1942 Fermanagh.

2-5-1942 ENNISKILLEN GROCER’S SUCCESSFUL APPEAL. Ernest Colvin, grocer, High St., Enniskillen, appealed at Enniskillen Quarter. Sessions on Thursday against a penalty of £50 imposed at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on a charge of knowingly harbouring seven sacks of coffee beans with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereon. Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, said that after Colvin had been convicted they succeeded in arresting a man from the Free State named Keenan, .for whom, this coffee was, and he was fined £50. When the case same on against Keenan they had interviewed Mr. Colvin and his assistant, and got them to come and give evidence against Keenan. In view of this fact the Customs Authorities would agree to this penalty, being reduced to £25. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, D. L. (for Colvin) agreed to this course, and accordingly his Honour affirmed the conviction, but reduced the penalty to £25.

2-5-1942 WHISKEY SEIZURE BY FLORENCECOURT POLICE. Sergeant Ryan and Constable Redpath, Florencecourt, on Saturday evening stopped a car at Drumcarn, Belnaleck, Co. Fermanagh, and on searching it found 6 five naggin bottles of whiskey, four similar bottles of wine and two large bottles of gin, as well as a dozen egg cups, a quantity of tobacco and cigarettes, a showerproof coat and quantity of sweepstake tickets, all of which were seized, together with the car. The driver was taken into custody,, and on. Sunday afternoon was allowed out on £20 bail to appear at next Enniskillen Petty Sessions. Major Dickie, R.M., attended at the Barracks, on Sunday afternoon, and the car driver was ,present with his solicitor, but no court was held, the reason being that the magistrate could not discharge any judicial function on a Sunday, though he can sit as a magistrate. The case could only have been .proceeded with had the man sufficient money to pay any fine which, if he had been convicted, might have been imposed. Had the case been heard and a fine inflicted, the order would have been unenforceable, as the Court was held on Sunday.

2-5-1942 FIRE AT CASTLECOOLE. BUILDINGS DESTROYED. An outbreak of fire occurred on Saturday afternoon in outhouses at Castlecoole, Enniskillen, the residence of the Earl of Belmore. The Enniskillen Town Brigade and the Auxiliary Fire Service, both under Mr. James Donnelly, town surveyor, receiving notification at ten minutes to one, were on the spot before one clock a quick turn-out which probably saved extensive buildings because the fire had gained a firm hold on the solid buildings and was burning fiercely. The efforts of the Brigades were chiefly directed towards confining the outbreak. Until. 2.30 p. m, the battle with the flames continued, ending only when about forty yards of the buildings had been destroyed roof and floors being burned out. The A.F.S. Brigade was under the immediate command of Mr. Freddy Bleakley with Mr. J. Lusted, A.F.S. chief in attendance.

2-5-1942 PARTY VOTE ECHO. FARTAGH COTTAGE TENANCY. An echo of a recent Enniskillen Rural Council party vote on a cottage tenancy was heard at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions, on Friday, when the Council was granted a decree for possession of a cottage at Fartagh, against Miss Mary Millar. Miss Millar’s father was the tenant until his death a few months ago. Miss Millar applied for the cottage, but it was granted to a Unionist by a party vote of the Rural Council. Miss Millar is a Catholic.

2-5-1942 SEIZED BICYCLE AT BELLEEK BARRIER. JUDGE RECOMMENDS RETURN ON PAYMENT OF DUTY. Are bicycles liable to purchase tax? Although, according to Mr, George Dixon, Surveyor of customs and Excise for County Fermanagh the tax is collected throughout Great Britain and the Six Counties on bicycles, Mr. R. A. Herbert, L.B. (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert, Enniskillen contended during the course of an appeal at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Monday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., that the wording of the Section of the Act governing the matter makes bicycles not liable.

The appeal was one brought by Terence McGowan, of Ross, Tullyrossmearn, Co. Fermanagh, against an order of Major Dickie, R. M., forfeiting a bicycle under the Customs Acts. When cross-examining Mr. Dixon, the Customs Surveyor, Mr. Herbert referred the witness to the Finance Act No. 2, 1940, which created the Purchase-Tax, and stated that the schedule set out goods that were chargeable with purchase-tax. In the first column (that setting out goods charged at the basic rate of one third were the words: Road Vehicles and Cycles (whether mechanically propelled or not) being vehicles and cycles constructed or adapted solely or mainly for the carriage of passengers.” Mr. Dixon said that was the Section, which gave authority to charge purchase tax on bicycles. Mr. Herbert — Who would be the passenger on a bicycle?—He is his own. passenger. It is being definitely charged and paid all over the United Kingdom. It is time it was questioned. Mr. Herbert said a passenger was already interpreted in law. This boy cycling on this bicycle could not be said to be a passenger. Judge Ellison said he did not think the language in the Section was very neat for the purpose.

Mr. Herbert — It is very far from neat. He further argued that a machine constructed for one person to ride did not make the machine one “constructed for the carriage of passengers.” His Honour held against Mr. Herbert who raised the paint because one of the taxes the appellant was stated to have failed to pay was his purchase tax. Giving evidence for the respondent,  Customs Officer George Forrest, Belleek, stated McGowan was cycling past the barrier there, not stopping, when witness called on him to stop, seeing that he was riding a new bicycle. McGowan in answer to witness’s questions said he belonged to Kiltyclogher, but produced a national registration, card with his address at Ross, Tullyrossmearn. He asked him to account for the fact that he had stated he was from Leitrim, while he was from Ross, and McGowan said he lived at both places off and on, and that he had been, living in the Six Counties for ten years. He said he had borrowed the bicycle from his brother in Kiltyclogher as his own had been stolen. He then offered to pay whatever was necessary. Witness seized the bicycle and an order for forfeiture was granted at the Petty Sessions. “There has not been one single instance,” said witness, “of where a bicycle has been smuggled and has been confirmed as having been smuggled into the Six Counties where the bicycle has not been stated to have been a borrowed bicycle although the bicycle has actually been new at the moment. In cross-examination by Mr. Herbert, witness said cyclists should stop, and go into the Customs hut if necessary.

Do you stop all cyclists? —I do if I am on the road. We all pass these huts and see what occurs?—Sometimes it is after five o’clock (when the Customs hut closes). George Dixon, Customs Surveyor at Enniskillen, stated a Customs duty of 30 per cent, ad valorem was chargeable on Eire-built machines unless satisfactory evidence was produced (a certificate of origin from the manufacturer) that the machine was Empire-made and that the cost of materials and labour involved reached a certain percentage. Mr. Herbert—Could it have been of anything but Empire origin in these days? –Witness stated he admitted the present circumstances, but still the certificate was necessary. Mr, Herbert—Playing with the law like a child, isn’t it?—No, it isn’t. Would you swear this is a foreign article?— I cannot swear it, but it is for the importer to displace the prima facie charge by providing evidence. Were these things drawn to the attention of’ the importer? —It is the importer’s duty, if he wishes to claim preference, to make a declaration that he claims preference.

Don’t you think it would only be fair before putting Customs duty into force that the attention of the importer should be drawn to the provisions? —Undoubtedly, if the citizen had come into the hut and stated he had imported it. Mr. Herbert—A sort of Please, sir, can I pass? Mr, Herbert said McGowan came from Kiltyclogher but had been staying with friends in Ross for some years off and on. This was the smallest thing he had ever come across in the Customs line The same sort of point was raised before where a solicitor in Donegal drove his, car up to the barrier and the Customs seized it as having been imported, but the car was subsequently returned. This boy came along a proper route at a proper time and his bicycle was seized. He had gone a hundred yards or two into Six- County territory. It was straining the law very far to say a certificate of origin was required. Why didn’t they tell him to go back? When he found out the position the boy offered to pay. Mr. Cooper said this was not the only case brought up at the same place. The snuggling of bicycles into the Six Counties was a wholesale business. Mr. Herbert—There is no evidence of that.

Judge Ellison said he should be inclined to confirm the order and say he thought this boy should be let off if he paid what he should pay. Mr. Cooper—-We will forward it to the Customs, and they will obey your Honour’s recommendation. Mr. Herbert said Major Dickie had stated that if the brother had appeared to say the bicycle belonged to him he would have given it back. Unfortunately the brother could not appear as he was engaged in munitions work in England. His Honour—I think Major Dickie’s view of that was the right one.

25-4-1942. BELNALECK YOUTH’S LAPSE. A Belnaleck youth’s lapse led to his appearance at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on .Monday, before Major Dickie, R.M., charged with, larceny. The defendant was John Patrick Boyle, Toneyteague, and the articles concerned were a coat value £4, a silver watch value £4, a gold watch valued about £5, and the sum of 5/-. District Inspector Peacocke, who prosecuted, said that the silver watch, coat, and the sum of 5/- had been recovered. Constable Ewart gave evidence of a statement made by defendant, and, in reply to Mr. P. J. Flanagan, LL.B. (defending), said that defendant made a clean breast of the whole thing. Mr. Flanagan said that this had come as a complete surprise to defendant’s parents and everybody else, as heretofore defendant had borne an unblemished character. “He says he simply did not know what came over him,” said Mr. Flanagan, who added that defendant was prepared to make restitution for the gold watch that had not been recovered. His Worship bound over defendant for two years in his own bail of £10 and one surety of £10. He also ordered him to pay within three months the sum of £5 to Mrs. Cathcart, Belnaleck, the owner of the gold watch, and 31/6 costs of the prosecution.

25-4-1942. £2 FINES FOR BAD LORRY BRAKES. ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. At Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday Thomas Coogan, Gortnacallon, Newtownbutler, was summoned, as owner, for permitting a motor lorry to be used with inefficient brakes.  James P. Connolly, Cloniston, Clones, was summoned as driver. Sergt. Sherrard said as a result of an accident he examined the motor lorry owned by Coogan and driven by Connolly. At 20 miles per hour Connolly was unable to stop the vehicle with the band brake before travelling 25 yards. The vehicle travelled a similar distance before being stopped by the footbrake. Constable Wilson, inspector of vehicles, said both brakes were defective on all wheels except the offside front. That was not due to the effects of the accident. Connolly did not appear. Coogan, in evidence, said the driver had full charge of the vehicle, and witness did not know that the brakes were defective. They had been adjusted a fortnight before. District-Inspector Peacocke—Can you say why Connolly is not here to-day?—I cannot; he was to be here. A fine of 40s was imposed on each summons. Sergt. Codd said both defendants were from the Twenty-Six Counties, and had temporary Six-County addresses.

25-4-1942. FRUITLESS SEARCH. TWO HOUR INCIDENT AT BELLEEK. A party of about thirty-six young men from the Enniskillen, district attended the great ceilidhe in O’Carroll’s Palais de Danse, Bundoran on Wednesday night of last week, to which parties came from the Six Counties. When the Enniskillen bus reached Belleek, just across the Border, in the Six Counties, on the return journey at about 4 a.m. they were met by a party of Enniskillen police under Head-Constable Thornton. The bus driver was ordered to proceed to the barracks. On arrival there, the dance patrons were taken into the barracks in groups of two and three at a time and were closely searched. Every particle of paper and article in the possession of each was taken out, placed on a table and examined thoroughly. The men had to take off their coats and these were gone through; several of the youths were made take off their boots and socks, which were minutely scrutinised. Three rooms at the barracks were engaged by the police party for the purpose and while the search proceeded three constables did duty with the young men in the bus whose turn had to come. In all the search took almost two hours and the bus did not .reach Enniskillen until after 8 a.m. An American who was on the bus, was not interfered with. The bus conveying the party from Belleek to the ceilidhe was also searched.

25-4-1942. A. O. H. DEVENISH DIVISION. The quarterly meeting, of the above Division was held in the A.O.H. Hall, Brollagh, on Sunday, 12th inst., the President occupying the chair. A vote of sympathy was passed to the relatives of the late Terence Keown, Larrigan, also to the relatives of the late James Reilly, Corrakeel. The motion was passed in silence.

 

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October 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

10-10-1942. SIX-COUNTY DAIRY INDUSTRY. FARMERS’ RESENT MINISTRY’S ACTION. CLOSING OF CREAMERIES. “CHANGES HAD CREATED INDIGNATION ”

The Ministry would get far better and more successful results by acknowledging the education which the farmer had gained by experience, and consult him and secure his co-operation in their new schemes before touching them, said Mr. J. Johnston, secretary of the U.A.O.S., at the annual meeting of Creamery shareholders. Mr. Thos. McCaughey referred to the changes the Ministry was making in the dairying industry, not only in closing such a large number of creameries, but in upsetting the existing transport arrangements for milk suppliers. Milk will now have to be transported by lorry whereas previously 70 to 80 per cent of all the milk in Northern, Ireland was delivered by horse and cart.

Several suppliers present said they had notice from the Ministry to leave their milk at collection points over two miles from their house and away from the creamery, although, their house was only three-quarters of a mile from the creamery. It was unanimously agreed to leave, their milk at the point where they had always left it. Mr. J. Johnston, secretary, U.A.O.S., said the changes that were now being introduced into the industry by the Ministry had created a wave of indignation from farmers throughout the country. Inexperienced officials with little local knowledge of the country had marked out on a map the collection points where suppliers were to leave their milk and they had just heard some of the results. The same thing had happened all over the country.

It had been stated that farmers approved of the scheme because there had not been any protest, but the farmer has learned that if he dared to protest his milk would not be paid for. In his opinion the new transport arrangements to be carried out under the Ministry’s control would require a very large increase in the amount of petrol used, and would ultimately cost a great deal more. The petrol increase was a matter for the Petroleum Board, but the increased cost would have to be paid by the farmer.

With regard to the closing down of 60 creameries in Northern Ireland at 1st October, Mr. Johnston said, it had always been the view of the practical dairyman that the earlier in the morning the milk could be collected at the farm, and the nearer to the depot or creamery at which the milk was to be treated, the better the quality of the milk to be delivered to the consumer. They were told the whole scheme was intended to process the milk at present going to the creameries to make it suitable for the liquid milk market. By closing two-thirds of the creameries the distance to the creameries retained for treatment was greatly extended. The larger quantity to be treated took much more time, and the new system meant that milk would be collected from some points up to 3 o’clock and later.

10-10-1942. NO LICENCE FOR DANCE HALL. “EXCUSE ME ” DANCES A MENACE. Objections were made to the renewal of the licence for dances at Jamestown Hall by Sergeant John McGrath, Drumana, at Carrick-on-Shannon; District Court when the adjourned application of

Mr. John Gaffney, one of the trustees, came before the fortnightly (District Court) for the renewal of the licence.  Last year they got 12 dances and the hours were from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m. and the rows did not start until 1-30 or 2 a.m., and accordingly this year they wished to curtail the hours to 1 o’clock. Continuing the applicant said that the committee, tried to settle the row and keep the opposing parties separated but the crowd was so big it was impossible to handle them. There were dances held in August and September and there were no rows at them. He asked for 12 dances 8 p.m. to l a.m.

Sergeant John McGrath, Drumana, said that unless the Guards were present the parties in attendance came to blows, the committee took no action to prevent disorderly scenes and law abiding citizens had to pay for admission while the disorderly crowd were sent out free tickets. Witness said that he saw the free tickets himself being sent out to the disorderly crowd. Sergeant Gallagher said arguments developed in the hall and caused people to crowd around the hall. He had warned the committee not to have “excuse me” dances, as they cause trouble, and there was not a dance, on the occasion of the row, but was an “excuse me.” Mr Keane said that on the evidence of the Sergeant he had no hesitation in refusing the application. Had the hall been governed by a proper committee he would grant the application.

17-10-1942. “BRAINWAVE” SCHEME RETURNS TO AID RED CROSS. It was reported at the meeting of County Fermanagh Committee of Agriculture on Saturday that the amount of money raised in the .Six Counties for the month of August on behalf of the Red Cross. Agricultural Fund in the scheme initiated by Fermanagh of 1d in the £ on cattle passing through the grading centre was £1,111 8s 11d and for the month of July the total raised from the milk deductions (also suggested by Fermanagh) was £188 18s 0d.

Mr. H. A. Porter said he had meant the scheme to include pigs. Major W. O. Nixon (chairman) said the scheme had been satisfactory so far, but if they took the percentage of people that really subscribed to the fund it was very disappointing. Mr. J. N. Carson—It is not brought to their notice. If it is brought to their notice they pay at once.The Chairman said it was printed on the cards. Fermanagh had the highest percentage of any county in the North. Although the fund was doing well, it could do better. Mr. J. E. Fawcett, J.P., thought if it were printed in red ink on the cards it would emphasise it better. Chairman—I think the scheme was a brain-wave of the people on this Committee who suggested it.

17-10-1942. BISHOP MAGEEAN BLESSES NEW CHURCH. The Catholics of the pariah of Aghagallon, three miles from Lurgan, went to Mass in their new £20,000 church for the: first time on Sunday. On Thursday last the Bishop of the Diocese, Most Rev. Dr. Mageean, had solemnly blessed .and dedicated the building, but on Sunday he formally opened the new edifice! It was a day of celebration in the parish, and everywhere there were manifestations of joy, practically every Catholic house in the district displaying Papal flags. The front of the new building was decorated with streamers of Papal colours. Right Rev. Mgr. Dean O’Hagan, P.P., V.G., celebrated High Mass, and Rev. A. Ryan, D.Ph., D.D., preached. Very Rev. J. Connelly, P.P., thanked the subscribers

17-10-1942. KINAWLEY ROAD NEEDS REPAIRS. At Enniskillen Rural Council meeting Mr. J. R. Crawford moved that the Council repair the old road in Drumbinnis and Corracrawford between Kinawley and Florencecourt. Ten or eleven ratepayers he said had their farms alongside this road which was in a very bad condition. Mr. W, Kelly said he had been informed that it was impossible to use this road. One man had two carts broken on it within two months. The county surveyor (Capt. Charlton) said the road was not in as bad a condition as stated. However, financial provision had been made for it in the estimates. After further discussion it was decided to leave the matter in the hands of the County Surveyor.

17-10-1942. “TYRANNY OPERATING AGAINST MINORITIES’’ BRITISH M.P.s AND STORMONT. Two M.P. in the British House of Commons on Tuesday said that tyranny was operating against minorities in the Six Counties and that there was ’disgraceful discrimination” against Catholics. Mr. McGovern (I.L.P.), when the Prorogation of Parliament Bill was considered in Committee, moved the rejection of a clause dealing with the duration of the Northern Ireland House of Commons, and, urging an election there, said there was overwhelming opposition to the Northern Government taking dictatorial powers over Belfast City Council. Unionists have told me that the Government should be purged of certain elements and undergo a drastic change. “Three or four hundred people are interned there—some without charge or trial for over five years—-and many believe that they are prisoners because of malicious and political intolerance. Tyranny is operating against minorities I there.’’

Mr. Stokes (Lab.) said: “There is disgraceful discrimination against Catholics in Northern Ireland. When six young men were charged with shooting a Belfast policeman, the Government refused to have a single Catholic on the jury. That Government is not fit to carry on.” The amendment was rejected by 220 votes to 6, and after ,a further amendment by Sir Richard Ackland (Ind.) to prolong Parliament for six months instead of 12 had been rejected, the Bill was read a third time.

17-10-1942. LADY SEARCHER AT BALLYSHANNON. Customs searches on the Belleek border have been intensified. Train and bus passengers are all searched—a practice hitherto unknown in that area. A lady searcher has been appointed in Ballyshannon and she was on duty for the first time last week at all the trains. On Saturday evening she carried out a search of all the lady passengers on the last bus leaving Ballyshannon. On both sides there is much greater Customs activity at all posts but the number of seizures from ordinary travellers are comparatively few.

17-10-1942. CLONES COUNCIL FINANCES.  At a special meeting of Clones Urban Council held on Friday night for the  purpose of considering the council’s finances it was unanimously decided to raise a loan of £2.000 by temporary borrowing by way of overdraft accommodation for the months of October-November to enable the payment of arrears of loans to the Commissioners of Public Works and to their treasurers.

17-10-1942.TO LET OR SELL. Farm OF 100 ACRES, good 2 story slated Dwelling-house (with hot and cold water) (Calor Gas}; splendid Office houses, all in good repair, about 1 mile from Irvinestown. The above place can be let for a number of years, with 70.acres if required.—F. SCALLON, Moynaghan, Irvinestown.

17-10-1942.70 PER CENT. OF OAT CROP HARVESTED. FERMANAGH FARMERS’ GOOD WORK. Despite severe harvesting conditions experienced this year, seventy per cent, of the 1942 oat crop has been cut and stacked in County Fermanagh, while ninety per cent. has already been cut stated Mr. W. T. McClintock, B. Agr., War Executive Officer, at a meeting of the County Fermanagh Agricultural Committee in Enniskillen on Saturday afternoon. He said the farmers had, in spite of adverse conditions, done a remarkable job and .their work had been heroic. One man had cut twelve acres of oats with hooks.

At the present time, he said, there were in operation in the county 150 tractors and ploughs, 72 disc harrows, 88 binders, 46 mobile threshing mills, and, in addition, hundreds of horses. Labour, which had been one of their chief problems in the past, would not now be such a problem owing to machinery which had been set up by the Government to direct men to the land and remain on it. Voluntary labour, which had been so successful in other counties, had not been a success in Fermanagh, and in this respect there would remain, a stain on the county which, it was hoped, would be wiped out by an improvement in the matter next year.

The new Tillage Order had been issued, and .farmers had been asked for an increased effort. Subsidy would be paid on four crops in the coming season, i.e., wheat, rye, potatoes and flax. Mr. John Graham complained of the price allowed for potatoes, contending that after the £10 per acre subsidy and the £3 15s 0d per ton fixed price were added together the return did not compare favourably with that received by the “Eire” farmers.

Mr. F. Doherty thought that the reason was to be found in that the price was the same as that fixed, for the English crop. Mr. Graham said farmers in Northern Ireland were not getting a fair deal in this respect. He added that in “Eire’’ the price given for potatoes was £8 per ton. They were not worth digging at the price now fixed in Northern Ireland. Mr. J. O. Rhynehart, of the Ministry of Agriculture, who was pressed for an explanation as to the discrepancy in prices stated he was not in a position to state what the prices were in another part of the country, but pointed out that in ‘Eire’ the scarcity of manures would possibly result in a poorer crop, so that in the end the return per acre in Northern Ireland might be higher. Mr. Graham – I think that is not an answer. Mr. Doherty said that in country places potatoes were not worth moving at £3 15a per ton.

Mr. A. Wilson—Better do away with the potato crop. Mr. McClintock objected to the question as to the price paid in “Eire” stating they were not concerned with it. Mr. J. N. Carson, J.P.—Indeed we are concerned with it. Mr Graham (to the Secretary) — Yes, so, I am not going to let you away with that. We are concerned if a better price is paid across the Border in the Free State. Mr. Graham then spoke of the number of fat cows, which were going across into “Eire,’’ where a better price was being paid than at home. Major W. G. Nixon, D.L., chairman, said he was sure Mr. Rhynehart would bring their views on these two questions before the price fixing authorities.

Mr. J. E. J. Fawcett, J.P., voiced the appreciation of the farming community at the efforts of Mr. McClintock and his staff in promoting the tillage drive in the county. It had been a difficult period but the farmers had come through fairly well on the whole, and the position was much more satisfactory than anyone could have imagined earlier in the season. Mr. J. R. Hamilton, J.P., stated Mr. McClintock did a wonderful job of work, and the farmers had scored a wonderful achievement. Supporting, Mr. Graham said he was still of the opinion, that the Ministry had given the farmers an unfair deal as regards the potato crop. He requested Mr. Rhynehart to convey to the Ministry the Committee’s expression of thanks to their officials. Mr. Rhynehart said he would be delighted to do so. In reply, Mr. McClintock said the farmers of Fermanagh had responded promptly to the appeal for more tillage, and it was only in a very odd instance that the officials encountered any difficulty.

17-10-1942. MINUTES AMENDMENTS. WAR BONUS FOR RELIEVING OFFICER. Mr. James Murphy objected to the signing of the minutes of Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday on the ground that they stated that an increase in war bonus be granted to Mr. P. MacManus, reliving officer, to bring the grant under this heading up to 5s a week. Mr. Murphy said his proposal on the last Board day was to increase Mr. MacManus’s war bonus by 5s a week which would bring the grant up to 6s 6d a week.  Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., chairman, stated he had the entry in his book which corresponded to what Mr, Murphy now said. Mr. J. Brown, cleric, said he understood Mr. MacManus was being treated in the same way as Mr. Fee, another relieving officer had been dealt with—i.e., an increase of 3s per week, half payable by the Board and half by the Rural Council.

Mr. Murphy said that what really happened was Mr. Beatty proposed 10s a week, and he seconded. Mr. Thornton proposed. 3s and that was why he (Mr. Murphy) had proposed 5s a week. Mr. J. Beatty, J.P.—I understood the 5s proposal was passed. Mr; James Burns said his recollection of what happened was that the bonus be made up to 5s a week as the Clerk had stated in the minutes. Mr. C- McKeown—Didn’t the Ministry sanction 10s a week for a nurse? Didn’t the ferryman get 10s? I do not see why the Ministry should object to it. Clerk—It is not a question of that at all—it is a case of the minutes being correct. That now makes the bonus a total of 6s 6d per week? Mr. Murphy—Yes. Mr. Beatty—I would like to know why he was only allowed 6s 6d. Clerk—That was the Board’s decision. Mr. Beatty — That was nothing to allow any man. Mr. McKeown—It would buy matches. The minutes were amended as Mr. Murphy suggested.

17-10-1942. GAVE CAR ON LOAN—LICENCE SUSPENDED FOR YEAR. Fines of 40s and costs with suspension of licence for twelve months were imposed on Patrick McGovern Grayport, Belcoo, user of the vehicle, and John McGale, Tattysallagh, Clanabogan, Omagh, owner, when at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday is was proved that McGovern was found using the car which was covered with owner driven insurance only. Constable McKimm was the police witness. McGale said McGovern asked him for the loan of the car and witness acceded to the request. Mr, R. A. Herbert, LL.B., for McGovern, said the latter had walked into a trap. Major Dickie, R.M. (to McGale)—What right have you to give your car and petrol to anyone to drive round the country? He told me he would put the petrol in to do the job. I was always allowed petrol to go to my work.

£10 FINE ON IRVINESTOWN MAN. FALSE REPRESENTATION CHARGE. At Irvinestown Petty Sessions, on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., James Keys, of Glenall, Irvinestown, was charged with having on 22nd December, 1941, for the purpose of obtaining a supplementary pension for himself under the Unemployment Assistance Act, made a false representation that, during the seven days up to and including the 18th Dec., 1941, he had not earned more than 5s, whereas during this period he was employed by Messrs. Courtney, Ltd., I, Shipquay Place, Derry, at an average daily wage of 6/11d. The case had been brought at the last Irvinestown, Court but was dismissed without prejudice. Alan McCullagh, an official of the Assistance Board, gave evidence that he received an application from defendant for a supplemental pension on 31st Dec., 1940. He stated that he was in receipt of 10s old age pension and had stock of about one dozen hens. Later defendant wrote to him asking him if he could do something about placing him in employment and witness referred him to the Ministry of Labour.

William Henry Howe, another official, said that on the 26th May he told defendant that information had come into the possession of the Board that he had been employed with Messrs. Courtney and witness gave defendant the dates. Defendant made the following statement: “I was never employed by Messrs. Courtney and have done no work since ceasing to be employed by Mr. Hermon of Necarne Castle, Irvinestown. I am not living on a holding and get no privileges from the owner of the house where I now live. My son Irvine does no work of any kind.’’ Witness identified defendant’s signature on a document produced. John Charles Burkey, of the firm of Messrs. Courtney, said defendant was employed as a labourer by his firm from the 2nd December 1941, till 20th December, 1942. For the week ending 18th Dec., 1941, defendant was paid £2 7s 6d. The week prior to that, he was paid £2 9s 7d and the week before that £1 7s 4d. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, M.P. (defending)’ —Did you pay the defendant?—I paid a “J. Keys.” When Desmond Mahon was called as a witness and did not appear, Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, who prosecuted, said he would ask for a warrant for his arrest if necessary.

Mr. Ferguson submitted that he was entitled to a direction on the grounds that the prosecution had not identified defendant as the man, but his Worship ruled against him on this point. Defendant swore that he got a supplementary pension first about the end of 1940 and drew it from then until the 31st October, 1941, when his book was taken away and kept till 18th December. During that time he had to go and look for some work. He worked for a week and left on the 11th December. Before he went into employment he actually wrote to the authorities and told them he was going to apply for a job. After he had worked for almost three weeks he had to give up. From December, 1941 he had been in receipt of a supplementary pension. He was not working for the week ending 18th December and did not earn more than 5s during that week. There were any amount of Keys in that country besides defendant. Mr. Cooper—You don’t mind telling a little falsehood now and again, do you? No, never to my knowing. Defendant added that he signed his name that he never worked with Messrs. Courtney while he was getting the pension. Mr. Ferguson said he did not see any particularly hidden fraud in the case. Defendant had written to the Labour Exchange and called three times. His Worship said that during the week for which defendant had been prosecuted he thought it had been proved beyond any reasonable doubt that he had actually earned the sum of £2 7s 6d. He imposed a fine of £10 and £2 2s costs, and allowed defendant-two months to pay.

17-10-1942.CARDINAL MacRORY AND THE WAR. PLEA FOR NEGOTIATED PEACE. ADDRESS AT MAYNOOTH. His Eminence Cardinal MacRory, speaking at the annual distribution of prizes in Maynooth College on Tuesday, pleaded for a negotiated peace. He said: – On various occasions I have expressed my hope for a negotiated peace, because I believed that only in this way is there any hope of peace with justice. I am convinced of that more than ever, seeing that cruel feelings are arising on both sides and prisoners are being put in chains. “If the war is fought to a finish,’’ said his Eminence, “there may possibly be a stalemate owing to utter exhaustion on both sides, but if either side win there will be a peace, not of justice, but of vengeance which will but sow the seeds sf future wars.” The Cardinal, continuing, said:—”I am not so foolish as to imagine that anything I can say will have any effect. However, I feel it a duty to say something.

17-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN BOARD AND QUESTION OF REPAIRS. When an account from a local garage proprietor for repairs to the ambulance came before Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday for payment, Mr. J. Brown, Clerk, said Mr. J. Cathcart, the ambulance driver, was not prepared to certify some of the items. Mr. Cathcart said some of the items were not in his book in which he kept a record of all repairs to the ambulance. The explanation was this: On 15th, January last Mr. Barton’s man was employed to bring a patient into the Hospital in this ambulance, he (Mr. Cathcart) being out at the time in the other ambulance. An accident happened to the ambulance in charge of Mr. Barton’s (the garage proprietor) driver. On one occasion since it would not start. He thought himself these repairs were made necessary by the accident. The ambulance never had been in order since. It would not charge until it was driven at 35 miles per hour—a speed too high for a vehicle of the kind, it should start charging at at least 20 m.p.h. The repairs were, therefore, in his opinion chargeable to the insurance company. He had some of the items of the account in his book.

Mr, Murphy—Do you keep an account as well as Mr. Barton? Mr. Cathcart—Everything I get is kept in my book. Mr. Murphy—Mr. Barton’s account does not correspond with yours? Mr. Cathcart — No sir. Mr. Murphy—Very well, I would not pay him. Mr. Beatty-Was it sent back to Mr. Barton? Mr. Cathcart—No; it is here for payment. Mr. Beatty—Can’t you send it back? Mr. Cathcart—No; it is a matter for the Board. Mr. Kelly—Mr. Brown will ask Mr. Barton, about it and get the thing squared up. Mr. Murphy—Did the insurance company pay for the accident? . Clerk—We have not got any bill for it anyway.

Mr. Murphy—The ambulance should be put right and the insurance company should be informed accordingly. Mr. Beatty—Mr. Barton’s attention should have been drawn to it. Mr. Murphy—That ambulance is giving far too much trouble here and there is something wrong somewhere. There has always been trouble with it since it came here. Mr. Beatty—When you found it not right, why didn’t you draw his attention to it? Mr. Cathcart—I am tired drawing his attention to it. The Chairman, (Hon. C. L. Corry) was proceeding to the next business when Mr. Murphy said: We are here as representatives of the ratepayers; the ratepayers’ money is being paid away and we are entitled to know what it is being paid for. I am not at all satisfied. Write to the insurance company and tell them the ambulance is not giving satisfaction. Mr. Beatty — Draw Mr. Barton’s attention to it. Chairman — The Clerk is going to do that. Mr. Murphy—The insurance company is the body.

17-10-1942.ILLEGAL USE OF COUPONS. STATEMENTS IN BELLEEK CASES. CHARGES AGAINST MERCHANTS. Eight summonses alleging the illegal use of coupons were heard by Major Dickie, R.M., at Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday. John Stephens, draper, Main Street, Belleek, and who also has a business in Ballyshannon, was summoned (1) for having, at Belleek between 7th and 16th March, 1942, without the authority of a licence granted by the Board of Trade and for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods, made use of rationed documents or coupons other than those issued to him or those surrendered to him; (2) had in, his possession, with intent to obtain goods, rationed documents or coupons issued to another person; and (3) using for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods, rationed documents, or coupons which did not bear the name, address and National Registration number of the person or persons to whom they were issued. Michael McGrath, Main, Street, Belleek, was charged with aiding and abetting in the commission of these offences. Thomas Daly, grocer, Main St., Belleek, was charged with transferring rationed documents or coupons, and Michael McGrath was summoned for aiding and abetting. Mr. R. A. Herbert, LLb., defended.

Mr. J. P. Getty, solicitor for the Board of Trade, who brought the prosecutions, said his instructions were that Daly had quite a number of customers who left their ration books with him. His Worship would remember that certain ration books which were issued in the first instance with regard to food had 26 margarine coupons in them. Those coupons were not valid and were not used. At the 1st June, 1941, when clothing was rationed for the first time, these: margarine coupons were then to be used for the purpose of acquiring clothing. Their case was that Daly, having got all these margarine coupons from his customers he transferred them to Stephens or McGrath (who managed Stephens’ shop in Belleek), or both. If he did so it was an offence.

He (Mr. Getty) was going to call a number of witnesses to prove that they left these margarine coupons with Daly and gave him no instructions or authority to transfer them to Stephens or anybody else and they did not use them themselves. A quantity of these coupons was sent to Stephens’ wholesaler in Belfast, Messrs. Moffitt and Co., whose agent would tell the Court that 500 coupons were delivered by Stephens to him in return for goods to be supplied. Having got those coupons, the practice was for Messrs. Moffitt to send them to the Post Office and they in turn sent them to the Board of Trade, When they got to the Board of Trade these margarine coupons were found in the bundle, and this started the inquiries. Miss Rosalie Aiken, chief assistant in the Food Office, Irvinestown, gave evidence that ration books containing margarine coupons were issued to a number of people, whom she named.

Sadie Agnes Keown said that Daly was her grocer, and she received .ration books for herself, and three daughters which she gave to her grocer. She did not use the margarine coupons, but her husband used some and bought clothes in Stephens’ using the margarine coupons for the purpose. William Dolan said he never purchased clothing with the margarine coupons and did not authorise his grocer to hand them on. Ernest W. Hall, area manager, of the Board of Trade, Belfast, said the coupons came to him from the Post Office and included margarine coupons. Statements made to Sergt. J. D. Cochrane by Stephens, McGrath and Daly having been read,

McGrath gave evidence and said he could not say when the coupons came into his establishment. He was not given the particulars of the coupons before the prosecution came on, and consequently he was unable to make any inquiries. Sadie Keown’s, husband left in margarine coupons in exchange for clothes, and whatever he handed in would be sent to Moffitt. Dolan’s father and also Daly bought clothes from him. He had some difficulty in getting any regulations and ultimately got part of the regulations from a traveller. He had written five times previously to the Board of Trade and never got an answer from them. So far as he could, he carried out all these relevant regulations. John James Dolan said he did the buying for all of his family, and used his son’s coupons too.

His Worship dismissed the charge against Daly and also the charge against McGrath for aiding and abetting him. Regarding the other case, he said he found it fully proved. He fined Stephens 20/- and 10/- costs on each of the charges of making use of rationed documents other than those issued to him and using  them for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods. McGrath was fined £10 and £3 3s 0d costs for aiding and abetting in the commission of the first offence, and 120/- and three guineas costs for aiding, and abetting in the second offence. The other summonses against Stephens and McGrath were dismissed without prejudice.

17-10-1942. £5 FINE AT BELLEEK. HAD FIVE STONES OF TWENTY SIX COUNTY SUGAR. £5 FINE AT BELLEEK. James Johnston, Aghamuldoney, County Fermanagh, was charged at Belleek Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., with having on 28th May knowingly harboured five stones of sugar imported from the 26-Counties into the Six Counties with intent to evade the payment of Customs duty thereon. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, told the court that in the defendant’s house the police found five stones of sugar, which was of 26-County origin. Mr. P. T. Flanagan, LL.B., who pleaded guilty, in mitigation of the sentence said that if it were possible for defendant to pay duty on the sugar he would very willingly have done so. In certain seasons of the year defendant had special work to do on his farm. He could not get any labour in the Six Counties, and had to get a man from the Free State, This man had no ration card and during the time his application was in for one, by arrangement between him and the defendant they brought over this sugar, for which they paid 5/3d a stone in the Free State, whereas it was obtainable in the .Six Counties for 3/6d per stone. It was really a matter of trying to get over a personal inconvenience. Saying that he did not think it was a bad case, his Worship imposed a fine of £5.

£15 FINE FOR SMUGGLING SPIRITS. John Farry, Monendogue, was charged of knowingly harbouring ten bottles of Irish whiskey, one bottle of Sherry, and one bottle of port wine imported from the 26 Counties into the Six-Counties! Mr. R. A. Herbert, L.L.B., (defending) said that defendant lived with his father and brother on a small farm on the mountain side. His father was an invalid, over 80 years of age; and they were constantly afraid of him dropping off when they would not have any stimulants to give him. Defendant said he hold the police it was for his brother in Belfast. That was not true. None of the local people would sell him (defendant) a bottle of whiskey. Some of the whiskey had been in the house since Christmas- He collected it from time to time and brought it over with him. Mr. Cooper-—-Were you going over the Border on different days and bringing it back—accumulating it?—-No. His Worship—There’s no proof he was dealing in it on a very large scale. I think £15 would meet it.

LORRY DRIVER FINED AT IRVINESTOWN. “The lorry came round Flack’s corner 40 at m.p.h. without slackening speed.” “My lorry is governed down to 25 m.p.h.” These two conflicting statements of evidence, the first one by a constable and the second by the driver of the lorry were given at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday when District Inspector P. Walshe summoned Charles McQuaid, of Drogan, for driving a motor lorry in Irvinestown on 7th Sept. without due care and attention and without reasonable consideration for other users of the highway. Constable McKimm proved the summons and was corroborated by Constable Bradley, neither of whom heard a horn sounded. Defendant said he sounded the horn and only accelerated when he got round the corner. His lorry was governed down to 25 m.p.h. Major Dickie, R.M., said the two constable were definite that defendant came round without due care and he imposed a fine of 10s and costs.

TWICE TORPEDOED MERCHANT NAVY MAN FINED £5. A wireless operator in the Merchant Navy, who, according to his solicitor, had been twice torpedoed and had also been in a tussle with the ‘Deutschland’ appeared at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., on a charge of being concerned in a fraudulent attempt at evasion of payment of Customs’ duty on two bottles of spirits, at Kesh, on 28th July, imported from “Eire” into Northern Ireland.

Defendant was Vincent Mahon, of Mill St., Irvinestown, and Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, said a Customs officer found defendant sitting reading a book in a third class carriage of the train. He asked defendant if he had any articles to declare and he did not reply. He then asked defendant, what he had in his pockets: and defendant produced. two camera films and said that was all he had got.

The Customs officer, proceeded Mr, Cooper, was very suspicious of defendant as this pockets seemed bulky and ordered him to stand up till he searched him, and found a bottle of whiskey in each of his trousers pockets. When asked why he did not declare the spirits defendant told the officer to “go to hell you and the spirits;” When asked to furnish proof he admitted he had not paid any duty and absolutely decline to recognise the Customs authorities in any way.  His Worship—In what way? Mr. Cooper-He said he did not recognise them. His Worship — A very unfortunate position, with two bottles of whiskey in his pockets.

Mr. E. C. Ferguson, LL.B., M.P., defending, said they admitted having the two bottles of whiskey. The circumstances were these Defendant was a wireless operator employed by the Marconi Company with the Merchant Navy. Since the outbreak of war he had been torpedoed twice and on one occasion had been in a tussle with the ‘Deutschland.’ As a result of these sea activities he had been invalided home at the end of July by the Company. He (Mr. Ferguson) was instructed by defendant that he had wanted these two bottles of whiskey to send to a friend of his. Defendant was a decent fellow who was now fit and ready to return to duty and was awaiting a call to his ship. Mr. Cooper said if defendant .had adopted a different attitude he would have been fined there and then. The duty on the spirits was £l 15s 5d. Mr. Ferguson said in the circumstances perhaps it was excusable. “I am asked,” he said, “to apologise for anything, that he did wrong. His Worship said defendant knew quite well he should not have done this. However, in view of his record he imposed a fine of £5.

SUNDAY CARTING DISAPPROVED. A meeting, under the auspices of the Six-Co. Farmers’ Union was held in the Townhall, Enniskillen on Saturday afternoon, when representatives from all over County Fermanagh attended. Addresses on the policy of the Union were given by Mr. H. Jamison, General Secretary ; Mr, J. H. Barbour, Organiser; Mr. Hughes. Farmers’ Union Insurance Company, and Rev. R. J. M‘Ilmoyle, Dervock. Resolutions were passed, viewing with apprehension the milk marketing scheme so far as payments were concerned and a unanimous expression of opinion was voiced against the carting of milk on Sundays. The main purpose of the meeting was the formation of new branches and progress in this direction was made.

FELLOW INTERNEE’S TRIBUTE TO CAHIR HEALY, M.P. By Frederick Bowman, Internee, Brixton Prison, London and 5, Bradley Place, Eastbank St., Southport; Lancashire, England.

TILL IRELAND UNITE IN PEACE

The years, untried, in prison passed,

Have made impressions sure to last,

Many are grim, but, I’ve a few

For which my gratitude are due.

One patriot I’m proud I’ve met

While tangled in the prison net,

Is CAHIR HEALY—always kind,

Whose noble heart and cultured mind

Inspires respect and strengthen all

Whose courage might incline to fall.

His fine example—smiles of cheer

Make prison walls less gloomy here

His shrewd remarks and sound advice:

Confer a boon beyond all price

On those whose prison .life he shades,

Smoothing their madness, easing cares.

His land and loved ones far away,

Are in his gentle thoughts all day.

But helping others makes him try

To keep suppressing any sigh.

A man of wit and worth and charm.

Sincere and steadfast, firm and calm;

To death for Ireland he would go—

This man whom I’m so proud to know.

Peace for the world is what I claim

And Healy’s object is the same.

His work for Ireland will not cease.

Till Ireland can unite in peace.

SIX-COUNTY VACANT SEATS. STORMONT REJECTS LABOUR MOTION. A motion by Mr. H. Midgley (Labour, Willowfield) at Stormont on Tuesday which asked that writs for vacant Parliamentary seats be issued not later than three months from date of vacancy was defeated by 24 votes to one. The  motion was described by the Minister of Agriculture as the most reactionary that had ever been brought.

 

September 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

19-9-1942. 72 PACKS OF FLOUR. CUSTOMS CAPTURE AT NEWTOWNBUTLER. An Unusual Case. R.M, HOLDS GOODS LIABLE TO FORFEITURE. A most unusual Customs ease was heard at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major T. W. Dickie, R..M., when William P, Lucas, 15 Fade St., Dublin, and Matthew D. Rooney, 44 Temple Bar, Dublin, were charged in connection with 4 tons 4 cwts. 3 qrs. and 14 lbs. of flour, being goods of which, the export was prohibited, and which were found in the possession of the G.N.R, at Newtownbutler on April 14th, 1942 and in respect of which an order for forfeiture was sought. Mr. James Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted; Mr. J. Hanna, solicitor, appeared for the two defendants; Mr. M. E. Knight, solicitor, held a watching brief on behalf, of the G.N.R

Mr. Cooper said it was rather all unusual type of case. On April 3rd there arrived at Newtownbutler station 4 tons 4 cwts. 3 qrs. 14 lbs of white flour. This flour had been consigned by the Co. Derry Railway from ‘‘Eire” and was consigned to Dublin. The bags of flour were examined by Mr. Chapman, Officer of Customs. One bag was marked Belfast, another Australia, while the others were differently marked and appeared to have been taken out of the original, bags. The flour was put in a sealed waggon. Proceeding, Mr. Cooper said the Customs authorities, required the station master at Newtownbutler to furnish proof under Sec, 3 of the Customs Defence Act, 1939, as amended by the new regulation. Following the demand of proof from the stationmaster, word was received from the railway companies that this flour had been originally handed in at Stranorlar and that it was consigned from Stranorlar by a man named McFadden. The railway company also stated that Mr. McFadden had never sent any other flour by that route and appeared to be a small country shopkeeper who lived at Breena, about 20 miles from Letterkenny. The freight in sending it from Strabane to Stranorlar would be £1 16s per ton and to send it by Ballyshannon would he £2 Is per ton.

It was re-consigned from Ballyshannon by a man named J. McDonald. Nobody knew who McDonald was. The Customs authorities directed the flour to be seized. It was seized, and notice of the seizure was served on Rooney Bros., Dublin. Mr. Fitzpatrick, solicitor, gave formal .notice that Mr. Lucas claimed ownership, and also wrote on behalf of Rooney, who claimed two tons of the flour. The railway company then informed them part of this flour was first sent from Buncrana to Letterkenny by a man called W. Porter. A man named Bradley then came in and made a claim against the railway company for £228 for loss in respect of the flour. This flour was unobtainable at the time in the Free State and they suggested it was smuggled through the Customs somewhere about Strabane, because it would have to be unloaded and put on the train to have it sent down to Ballyshannon. In any case, it had no business to be exported from Northern Ireland at all.

19-9-1942. IRVINESTOWN PETTY SESSIONS. CYCLE LARCENY CHARGE. BICYCLE THEFT PRISON FOR SOLDIER. At Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., District-Inspector Walshe charged Private Kerrigan, Pioneer Corps, formerly of Boho, Co. Fermanagh with the larceny of a bicycle value £10, the property of Curry Beatty, Ballinamallard. Henry Armstrong, Coolisk, was charged with receiving the bicycle. Kerrigan stated that he was returning to England from leave, when he bought the bicycle from a man named O’Donnell, of Sligo, for £1 15s. He then sold the bicycle to Armstrong for £2 10s. A sentence of six months’ imprisonment was ordered. For Armstrong it was said that he was under the influence of drink when he bought the bicycle and the case was dismissed on the merits.

19-9-1942. £120 IN FINES CALEDON MAN MULCTED. At Dungannon Petty Sessions, Thomas A. Clark, Ballagh, Caledon, was prosecuted for dealing in the following prohibited goods—85 loaves of wheat flour bread, five -0-st. bags wheat flour 420 lb. candles, 446 packets and 14 lb. of soap flakes and soap powders, 3¾ cwt. soap, 24 lb. custard powder, one quarter and 2½ lb. cocoa, and 1 qr. 22 lb. coffee. On a second count he was prosecuted for having the following uncustomed goods—large iron kettle, one aluminium teapot, one enamel teapot, two enamel dishes, one enamel saucepan, and 38 dozen eggs. Mr. Long, R.M., said the Clarke family seemed to be engaged in the wholesale distribution of these prohibited articles Owing to defendant’s age and ill-health he would not send him to prison. In the first case he would be fined £115 12s 3d. For harbouring the uncustomed goods he was fined £5.

19-9-1942. REFUSED TO GIVE NAMES TO B SPECIALS. Five Men Before Trillick Court. At Trillick Petty Sessions on Monday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Francis Donnelly, Derrymacanna; Francis Woods, Moorfield, Trillick; John P. McGrade, Shanmullagh; Philip McGrade, Tallymacanna; and Frank McColgan, Stralongford were charged with disorderly conduct and refusing to give their names to members of a “B” patrol. S. D. Commandant Beattie, gave evidence that early on Monday morning, Aug.,

19-9-1942. £30 FINE ON IRVINESTOWN MOTORIST FAILURE TO TAX CAR. Daniel McCrossan, Main Street, Irvinestown, appeared at the local Petty Sessions last Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., to answer a summons brought against him for using a motor vehicle on the public road on 7th April last without a licence. The summons was brought by Fermanagh County Council per Herbert J. D. Moffitt, taxation officer.

Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, said that Constable Cander found defendant’s car on the public street on 7th April, 1942 without being licensed. The matter came before the County Council, and they decided to allow defendant off with a mitigated penalty of £1. Mr. Moffitt wrote to defendant on the 6th May informing him that proceedings would be stayed if he paid £1. No answer was received, and Mr. Moffitt again wrote, but no answer was received from defendant. Constable Cander gave evidence of finding a public service vehicle, the property of defendant, on the street on 7th April. It was not licensed. Defendant said “It was just an overlook at the time.” John Moffitt, who is employed in the taxation office, said the car was licensed at the present time. The annual duty was £10 a year. He sent a notice to defendant that the County Council had considered the matter, and that if he paid £1 proceedings would not be taken—if he took out a licence. There was no reply. Witness sent a further note on 7th July. Mr. Cooper—In this case the penalty is £20, or three times the amount of duty payable, whichever is the greater. The County Council I understand, have power to review it when it goes back to them. The greater penalty is £30. Defendant said that the car was out of order at the time, and he was looking for parts for it. His Worship — Why did you not answer the letter? I did not think the offence was very serious. Defendant added that if he did not tax the car he would get no petrol. His Worship imposed a penalty of £30, and £1 ls 9d costs, with a stay till next Court. Mr. Cooper — We want to get the penalty your Worship, to show these people they must pay attention to these things.

19-9-1942. TO STAND FOR STORMONT SEAT MR. EAMONN DONNELLY, Ex-T.D. Mr. Eamonn Donnelly, secretary of the Green Cross Fund, and formerly T.D. for Leix-Offaly, is to be a candidate for the Northern Ireland Parliamentary by-election for the. Falls Division, Belfast. He was also M.P. for South, Armagh from 1925 to 1929. Mr. Donnelly told a Press man that he had been asked by a number of representative men to stand for the Division in the interests of unity. His chief aims would be to try to bring together all sections of the minority. “I know,” he said, “there are many who will support the candidature of one espousing the principles that I would like to see established. We have been wandering more or less in a morass for the last, number of years, at sixes and sevens, with no definite guidance as to the ultimate realisation of the objective, that everyone cherishes dearly, namely, the unification of our country.

“I have always held, and still hold, that it is possible to re-unite our country by constitutional means. I believe the Irish people as a whole, given an opportunity, will stand for the bringing together again of the old Constituent Assembly, the first Dail under the aegis of which the advances were made which Southern Ireland today enjoys, but which do not apply to us.” “I assured the delegation,” he said, “ that my aim, if elected, would be to concentrate on the release of political internees. “There can be no peace while internment without trial exists. It is contrary to every principle of justice and citizenship, and certainly contrary to what the Allied. Powers profess to be fighting for. I have never compromised and never will on the unity of Ireland. I believe the unity of the country is more necessary to-day than ever, more particularly as its defence as a unit in the present world conflict should be the first consideration of every Irishman. I have no doubt as to the result in West Belfast. It often gave a lead before to Ireland, and God knows we want leadership now more than ever.”

19-9-1942. CHARM ING DERRY WEDDING. OMAGH POSTAL OFFICIAL WED. HYNES —YANNARELLI. A charming wedding took place on Thursday morning in St. Eugene’s Cathedral, Derry, with Nuptial Mass and Papal Blessing, when two well-known Derry and Tyrone families were united. The contracting parties were Mr. Patrick Hynes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hynes, of Campsie, Omagh, Co. Tyrone, and Miss Isabella Yannarelli, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Yannarelli, Strand Road, Derry City. Both bride and bridegroom, are well known and highly esteemed, the bridegroom being a very popular member of the clerical staff of Omagh Post Office, while the bride is prominent in local social circles. The ceremony was performed by Rev. T. Devine, C.C.. Castlefin, Donegal.

19-9-1942. ASSAULT CASE. DEFENDANT FINED AND REMOVED FROM COURT. IRVINESTOWN STORY. Summonses against father and son were heard at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when Thomas McLaughlin, Coolback, brought a summons against James Hamilton Martin (father), Cabragh, for defendant’s neglect to pay for trespass of his cattle on complainant’s land at Doogary on 3rd inst.; and also a summons against Ernest Martin (son), Cabragh, for assault. Mr. A. Herbert appeared for complainant, who gave evidence that he had taken part of a farm, the other, part being taken by the senior defendant; Plaintiff alleged that on the 3rd inst. Martin senior put, seven head of cattle on to the land he (plaintiff) had taken. Later, when plaintiff met defendant and his four sons defendant asked him did he drive the cattle off, and plaintiff replied in the affirmative. Plaintiff then described what followed, and said that Ernest Martin struck him on the mouth, which bled.

Francis McMulkin, owner of the farm gave evidence as to the letting. When he had finished his evidence there ensued an argument between the senior defendant and witness.       Sergeant M, Kelly said that when plaintiff called with him on 3rd inst. there was blood trickling from the side of his mouth, and his lip was slightly swollen. Defendant said that plaintiff made all shapes to stick, him with a pitchfork. One of his sons caught, the pitchfork, and whatever injury plaintiff got was in the wrangling over the pitchfork.

This man, declared defendant, “is a bad man—a dangerous man. Would you not know the look of him? Ernest Martin denied striking plaintiff. Plaintiff and his brother were wrestling for the pitch fork on one side of the road, and witness was standing on the other side of the road. Kenneth Martin said plaintiff followed them with a pitch fork and attempted to stab his father with it. Witness caught the pitch fork, and during the tussle plaintiff got a crack on the face.His Worship—How many of you were there? — We were going to our work, and there were five of us. Henry Emery also gave evidence.

His Warship held that Martin, Sen., was guilty of trespass, and that his son was guilty of an unprovoked assault. He fined the son 40/- and 4/- costs, and made an order for the trespass by scale, with £2 2s 0d costs. Addressing Martin, Senr., his Worship said that from his behaviour in Court, if he had any more trouble with him he would bind him over in heavy sureties to keep the peace. Defendant—I will appeal the case. His Worship then directed the police to remove defendant from Court.

19-9-1942. ROSSINVER PARISH COUNCIL. FARMERS’ GRIEVANCE. THE TEA SUPPLY. A meeting of Rossinver Parish. Council was held in St. Aiden’s Hall on Sunday, Rev. Father McPhillips, P. P. (chairman) presiding. Other members present included: Messrs. Michael Sheerin, V.C., John Gilligan, P.C.; Joseph Fox, James Connolly, Sean Eames, N.T. (secretary), and Padraic J. O’Rourke.

DRAINAGE. A deputation appeared before the meeting on behalf of farmers residing in the townlands of Corraleskin, Gortnaderry, Gubmanus, Lattoon and Cornagowna, whose lands have been flooded by the Kilcoo River. Mr. Patrick Meehan, Latloon, who acted as spokesman said that many farmers along the border from Kiltyclogher to Garrison had suffered great losses in hay crops and pasture for the past two months. The damage done had been unprecedented. Nine floods, coming in quick succession had effected the complete ruin of a huge amount of hay and oats. The floods had been the worst in living memory. A lake in the Six Counties had been drained a few years ago, and the extra water from this area was now coming into the border river, making the flooding much worse than it used to be. Rev. P. McPhillips- The people have been trying for the past 50 years to get the border river drained, and the removal of a narrow bed of rock from the river bed near Garrison would solve the whole difficulty at a very small cost. A. few sticks of gelignite would; do the whole thing.

Mr. O’Rourke—Farmers on both sides of the border are affected, and our Government were prepared to have the river drained four years ago provided the Six-County Government would co-operate. The required co-operation was not forthcoming, and so the scheme fell through.

Mr. Denis Keaney (a member of the deputation) stated that as all the good grazing lands, lay along the river the cattle had failed in milking since they were put on the hard hills, and farmers had lost from £5 to £10 in their creamery Cheques for the two months, and the flooded hay was likely to kill the cattle during the winter.

The following resolution, proposed by Mr. P. J. O’Rourke, seconded by Mr. M. Sheerin, was passed unanimously (copies to be forwarded to the Minister for Local Government and local T.D.s): “That we, the members of Rossinver Parish Council, request the Minister for Local Government to take into, consideration the serious losses in hay crops and pasture suffered by farmers living along the border river, particularly in the townlands of Corraleskin, Gortnaderry, Lattoon, Gubmanus and Cornagowna, and to grant them a rebate in the rates, for the coming year. Wo also consider it very necessary that immediate action be taken by the Government to have the rock at Cornagowna, which is the prime cause of the whole flooding, removed.” Mr. Sheerin—We want the T.D.s to back us up in this matter.

19-9-1942. BELLEEK SESSIONS. At Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday, Before Major Dickie, R.M., Eric Carson, Knocknashangan, Garrison, was fined 10s for failing to produce his identity card when asked to do so by an authorised person. Michael O’Shea, Drumanillar, Belleek, was summoned for leading two horses on the public highway during the hours of darkness without having a light in front of the animals. The case was dismissed.

19-9-1942. WAR DEPARTMENT PETROL. Thomas Gallagher, Aghoo, Garrison, was charged with having in his possession on 23rd July a quantity of petrol—5 gallons— the property of the War Department. (N.I.), which, he bought or received from a soldier or person, acting on his behalf. He was also charged with not being a servant of the Government acting in the course of his duty as such, or a person acting in accordance with the authority of a Government Department had in his possession a quantity of Government petroleum spirit contrary to the Emergency Powers Order. Constable McMullin, examined by D.I. Walshe who prosecuted, said that on 23rd July he stopped Gallagher, and subsequently went to inspect defendant’s garage, and found the petrol in a tins there. In a statement Gallagher said he got two gallons of petrol from a soldier on the road a few weeks previously. Sergt. Bailey gave evidence of testing the petrol, which he found reacted to the test for Army petrol and Cpl. Geelan said he dispatched a sample of the petrol to the public analyst at Belfast. D.I. Walshe said that owing to the enormous expense entailed they had not brought the analyst from Belfast, but had obtained his certificate. Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solr., Enniskillen, pleading guilty on behalf of his client, said that this was the type of offence any person, being human, would fall into. The defendant had acted with extrema foolishness, and he asked the Resident Magistrate to deal leniently with the matter. The R.M. said he could not treat the matter lightly, and imposed a fine of £93 on the second summons, the penalty to rule both charges. He allowed two months to pay.

CASE DISMISSED, George Connor, Aghoo, Garrison, was also charged with having army petrol in his possession. D.I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr, P. J. Flanagan defended.

19-9-1942. SIX COUNTY POTATO PRICES. MORE MONEY FOR GROWERS. (Ed. “Ware Potatoes” is a term mostly used within the potato industry. Sometimes, it is used in a generic sense for any potatoes destined for human consumption in potato form, as opposed to seed potatoes or potatoes that are primarily valued for the amount of starch that can be extracted from them for industrial processing.)

Growers’ prices for ware and seed potatoes of the 1942 crop as from 1st October have now been announced. The districts will be District 1—Counties Antrim., Down, Armagh (Newry No. 2 Rural District only), Tyrone (Strabane Rural District only) and Londonderry, and District 3—-Counties Fermanagh, Tyrone (except Strabane Rural District), Londonderry and Armagh (except Newry No. 2 Rural District).

In District I. the price of ware potatoes during October will be 90/- per ton tor the varieties Golden Wonder, King Edward, Red King and Gladstone; 75/- per ton for Kerr’s Pink, Redskin, Up-to-Date, Dunbar Standard, Arran Peak, Arran Victory and any other variety grown on red soil, and 70/- per ton for any other variety not grown on red soil. In District II. the price will be 5/- per ton less in each case. These are fixed prices for delivery f.o.r. grower’s railway station, or on buyer’s lorry at the farm.

Growers’ prices per ton for Class I. certified seed will be until further notice: Arran Crest, Catriona, Di Vernon, Doon Early, Immune Ash leaf, May Queen, Ninetyfold, Witchhill,  Ulster Chieftain, 205/-; Arran Pilot, Ballydoon, Duke of York. Ulster Monarch, Arran Scout, Sharpe’s Express, 155/-; Doon Pearl, Dunbar, Robar, Eclipse, Dargill Early, Suttin’s Abundance, Arran Signet, 140/ -; Ally, Alness, Arran Comrade, Arran Peak, Ben Lomond, British Queen, Dunbar Standard. Edzell Blue, Gladstone, Golden Wonder, King Edward VII, Red King, Beauty of Hebron, Herald, Bintze, (Muizen) – 120/-: Arran Banner, Arran Cairn, Arran Chief, Arran Consul, Arran Victory, Bishop, Champion, Doon Star, Dunbar Archer, Dunbar Cavalier, Field Marshall, Great Scot, Irish Queen, Kerr’s Pink, King George V., Majestic, President, Redskin, Rhoderick Dhu, Royal Kidney {Queen Mary), Tinwald Perfection. Up-to-Date, Baron, Arran Luxury, 110/-.

The price for Northern Ireland Report Certificate Seed will be 20/- per ton less in each case. A top riddle of and a bottom riddle of 1¼ will apply to all varieties of seed of the above classifications.

CONSUMER TO PAY LESS. A reduction in the maximum wholesale and retail prices for ware potatoes has been announced. To offset this reduction a subsidy will be paid to licensed “first buyers’ and in certain circumstances licensed grower-salesmen. The maximum wholesale price in District I. from 24th to 50th September will be 4/- per cwt. for Grade A and 3/6 per cwt. for Grade B. In District II the price will be 3d per cwt. less in each case. From 28th September to 3rd October the maximum retail price in both districts, will be 5d per half-stone for Grade A and 4½d per half-stone for Grade B.

19-9-1942. Department and Monaghan Appointment. At a meeting of the Co., Monaghan Vocational Education Committee, a letter was read from the Department intimating that the Ministry was not prepared to approve of the appointment of Miss M. Duffy, as commercial teacher in Monaghan Technical School. By 14 votes to 4, a resolution was carried requesting the Minister to sanction the appointment temporarily pending Miss Duffy securing certificate for instruction in typewriting.

19-9-1942. NOTICE TO FARMERS.  We wish to inform our customers and the general public that we have received a large consignment of Men’s, Women’s and Boys’ Kip Nailed Boots for the winter season. These are exceptionally good, reliable Boots, and up to pre-war standard. We would advise the early purchase of same, as we may not be able to repeat the superior quality of these lines. FLANAGAN’S, Enniskillen.

19-9-1942. DESERTED FROM TWO ARMIES. A stranger stopped by a policeman in Enniskillen was found to be a deserter from the Irish Army. It later transpired that the man had deserted from the British Army. The man, Michael D’Arcy, of the A.M.P.C., was charged with being a deserter at a special court before Mr. W. F. Dewane, J.P., and was ordered to be handed over to the military authorities.

19-9-1942. LISNASKEA ASSAULT CASE. When Mary Jane Melanophy, of Lisnaskea, summoned Margaret Burns, Erne Terrace. Lisnaskea, for assault, at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, plaintiff alleged that defendant threw two stones at her, one of them striking her on the ankle. Defendant, said she threw a stone at plaintiff, but she did not believe it hit her. She threw the stone in self-defence when plaintiff raised a broom over her head. Major Dickie, R.M., said he did not believe there was anything to choose between them from what he heard in Court. He imposed on Mrs. Burns a nominal penalty of 2/6, with £1 Is 0d costs, and advised the parties to try to live in peace.

26-9-1942. CONSTABLE SUMMONED AT LETTERBREEN. RECKLESS DRIVING CHARGE DISMISSED. Constable James Mulqueeny, formerly of Kinawley, Co. Fermanagh, and now of Bessbrook, Co. Armagh, appeared at Letterbreen Petty Sessions on 16th inst., before Major Dickie. R.M., on the usual three counts; the reckless driving of a motor car on 2nd May last at the cross roads at Florencecourt Creamery. Mr. P J. Flanagan, LL.B., defended. Two constables who had been with defendant in the car on the occasion gave evidence that on the way out from Enniskillen defendant mentioned about the steering of the car being stiff. About 50 yards from the creamery cross they passed another car. Defendant was driving on the left-hand side of the road at a speed of from 25-30 miles per hour, and in the words of one of the witnesses “all of a sudden the car just gave a ‘double’ on the road and struck the far ditch.” Keith Farlow, aged 13 who witnessed the accident, said he saw the car come round the cross and skid on the gravel. The car had been travelling at a medium speed.

Sergeants Ryan and Henderson also gave evidence, the latter, who is inspector of public service vehicles, describing the condition of the car following the accident, and said the right front wheel was buckled and the tyre burst. Defendant said that at the time of the accident was stationed at Kinawley, and was the driver of the Customs car.. The car in which he had the accident was his own, and his brother had been using it in the city. When it came back he noticed there was something wrong with the steering. Describing the accident, defendant said the steering seemed to lock. He put pressure on it, but could not get it straightened again. The steering did not answer at all, and he struck the bank. His Worship-—There are so many, theories one could advance of how this accident happened. I don’t know which to accept. I don’t think it is a case in which I ought to convict. He dismissed the case.

19-9-1942. WRONGFUL USE OF PETROL. LISNASKEA CASE. The first case of its kind in the district was heard at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when Imelda Evelyn Beggan, of Tattycam, Newtownbutler, was charged, with having used motor fuel on 3rd August at Kilygullion for a purpose other than that specified. Constable Kelly gave evidence of stopping a Ford motor car driven by defendant on 3rd August, and in reply to questions she said she was getting three gallons of petrol per month for going to Mass on Sundays, and bringing eggs to Lisnaskea market every Saturday and that she had been leaving her sister to the 5.30 p.m. train for Belfast. Mr. J. B. Murphy, defending, said that defendant lived six miles from a railway station and in one of the forms she stated that there was no public transport. He suggested that defendant was entitled to use the car to bring her sister, who worked, in a Government office, to the railway station in order to get back to work. His Worship—She is given this for certain purposes in strict law. He added that one thing that was wrong was the statement that there was no public transport.

Mr. Murphy—It is three miles away. He said that it was the first case of its kind, and he would ask his Worship to apply the Probation of Offenders Act. When applying for a renewal of the three gallons defendant could mention this journey. District Inspector Smyth said it was the first case in the district. They were going to delve into this business very carefully, and the prosecution had been brought to air activity in the matter. His Worship—I understand that if a person is convicted for improper use of petrol automatically the petroleum officer: will not give them any further supplies. District Inspector—They refer it to the police first and ask their opinion. Dealing with defendant under the Probation of Offenders Act on payment of costs of Court, his Worship said that did not mean that the next person would get the benefit of the Probation Act.

26-9-1942. FALSE REPRESENTATIONS CHARGE AT KESH. Thomas Duncan, Water Lane, Letterkeen, was charged at Kesh Petty Sessions an Tuesday with having on the 1st Jan., 1942, at Kesh, for the purpose of obtaining for himself a supplementary pension under the Unemployment Assistance Act, knowingly made a false representation that during the seven days up to and including, 1st January he had not earned more than 5s, whereas, during this period he was employed by Messrs. H. and J. Martin, Ltd., 163, Ormeau Road, Belfast, and in the week ended 31st December, 1941, earned 76/3d,: this sum being paid to him on 3rd Jan., 1942. There was a second charge against defendant of making a false representation, for the same purpose, for the week ending 8th January, the amount he was alleged to have earned  being 67/9d. Alan McCullagh, an official of the Assistance Board, gave evidence of receiving defendant’s application on 16th October last. Major Dickie, R.M. “(to defendant) — Have you any explanation to give? Defendant—I have not indeed. I know nothing about it. His Worship-—You knew enough to draw £3 16s.

James Weir, another official, gave evidence of filling up the application for defendant on 14th Oct. He read over the application to defendant and explained it to him and witnessed defendant’s mark. Another official, William Henry, Howe, told of interviewing defendant on 4th. Feb., and following caution, defendant said he had done “only an odd hour’s work inside, the last three years.” He denied having been fully employed. John L. Duffy, of the firm of Messrs. Martin, said that for the four weeks from 16th Dec.—10th January, defendant was paid 15s 6d, 75s, 76/3, and 67/9. Miss Mildred Thompson, postmistress, Kesh, said when defendant brought these paying, orders to her, she read them over to defendant and explained them to him. Sergt. Horgan said defendant was a labouring man of good character. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown solicitor, prosecuting—These cases are giving a lot of trouble. These men are drawing large sums of money and are getting this money at the same time. His Worship—I am afraid it is not a case in which there could be any possibility of a mistake. He would not send defendant to jail but imposed on the first charge a fine of £5 and 40s costs, and on the second charge 40s and 20s costs. In default, in the first case two months’ imprisonment and in the second case one month, to run consecutively. Addressing defendant, his Worship said —“That is a fairly substantial penalty, but I am afraid you deserve it.”

19-9-1942. ANTRIM MAN KILLED. TWO U.S. SOLDIERS IN CUSTODY. Soldierstown, Aghalee, South Antrim, has been the scene of a horrible crime which has resulted in the death of Edward Clenaghan, aged 46, who was found lying unconscious on the roadside about midnight on Monday and who died on Tuesday in Lurgan District Hospital. Two American soldiers; 20-year-old Embra H. Farley, from Arkansas, and 26-year-old Herbert Jacobs, from Kentucky, are being held by the U.S. military police in connection with the affair. At an inquest a verdict was returned that Clenaghan died from injuries caused by some person or persons. The dead man was an A.R.P. warden and was unmarried. He lived with his mother at Soldierstown and helped her to manage a public-house, he was a kinsman of the famous artist, Sir John Lavery under whom, he studied art for a time, and was a cousin of the late, Rt. Rev. Mgr. Canon Clenaghan, P.P., V.G., St. Malachy’s Church, Belfast, and of Rev, George Clenaghan, P. P., Armoy.

At the inquest, Dr. James O’Connell, R.M.O., Lurgan Hospital, said that deceased was admitted at 1.50 on Tuesday morning. He was unconscious on admission, and remained so until his death, about 7 o’clock that morning. He had a lacerated wound over the left eye, a lacerated wound on the left side of the chin, and bruising on the right side of the head. The cause of death was cerebral laceration following a fracture of the skull. James Joseph Clenaghan, farmer, a brother of the dead man, said that on Monday evening he was in the bar of his mother’s licensed premises. There were a number of U.S. soldiers there, and he particularly noticed two of them, who seemed to be in or about all afternoon.

All the soldiers left except the two. The soldier in command seemed to be more or less scared of these two but he eventually got them out. All the others left and witness got the bar closed.  About 9.20 p.m., he heard the sound of breaking glass and went out to the hall door and found that a pane of glass in the bar window was broken. He heard footsteps running and overtook two American soldiers. He tried to reason with them, but they started using filthy language and waving two beer bottles and insisted on having more drink. Witness refused, advising them to go on up the road and they might get another drink elsewhere. They still kept walking about on the road some twenty yards or so from the house. He went back home, and his brother, Edward, said he would go up and see the commanding officer of the camp.: He left on his bicycle about 9.30 or 9.45 p.m. About 12.15 a.m. in consequence of a message, he went along the road towards Aghalee, and about a quarter of a mile from home found his brother lying on the grass on the left-hand side of the road going towards Aghalee. He seemed to be in terrible pain and was unconscious. Witness obtained a motorcar and accompanied him to Lurgan Hospital.

26-9-1942. FEEDING STUFFS RATIONING Laggards Should Lodge Ration Books At Once. Livestock owners and farmers have now had their ration books for the fifth period under the feeding stuffs rationing scheme in their possession for three weeks, but, strange to say, many have not yet lodged the books with their chosen suppliers. The Ministry of Agriculture has issued to those who have not done so a timely warning that feeding stuffs cannot be allocated to them until their, suppliers have received their buying permits, and, of course, no supplier can obtain a buying permit until he has forwarded his customers’ nomination forms to the Ministry. If, therefore, you do not receive feeding stuffs because of your failure to lodge your ration book, do not blame your supplier, or the Ministry. Blame yourself because you will be the only person worthy of blame.

26-9-1942. UNSCUTCHED FLAX. MINISTER AND THE 1941 CROP. The proportion of the 1941 flax crop as yet unscutched is 472 acres, and everything possible is being done to assist in having these crops processed. This was stated by Lord Glentoran (Minister of Agriculture) in reply to Mr. Brown (South Down) at Stormont on Tuesday. Lord Glentoran said a survey of scutch mills had shown that in two areas facilities for handling the crop were inadequate. He was satisfied there would be adequate facilities for 1942 crop, and steps were being taken to ensure that any increase in the 1943 crop would dealt with.

26-9-1942. BREAD PRICES INCREASED ON BOTH SIDES OF BORDER. Britain’s bread is to be dearer, but potatoes cheaper, under a new order, which also affects the Six Counties. From Sunday, the 4lb. loaf went up from 8d to 9d, with the 21b. loaf up by a halfpenny. Potato prices will from September 28 be reduced to an average of 1d a lb. The price charges are part of the campaign to reduce bread and increase potato consumption in Britain. The British Food Ministry has kept the price of bread almost stable since the outbreak of war by subsidies costing some £80 000 a year. Increased bread prices came into effect in the Twenty-Six Counties on and from Monday last.

26-9-1942. TEACHERS’ DEMAND FOR WAR BONUS. QUESTION AT STORMONT. At Stormont on Tuesday, the Minister of Finance told Mr. J. Beattie (Lab., Pottinger) that a demand for a war bonus of £1 a week for all teachers had been received by the Ministry of Education. He was informed that in Britain the Burnham Committee has recommended that war bonuses for teachers should be increased as from the 1st July, 1942, the new rates being £45 per annum for men and £36 per annum, for women on the lower scales of salary, and £35 and £28 for men and women respectively on higher scales. Certain matters were at present under investigation by the Ministry of Education with a view to the application of these rates of bonus to teachers’ salaries in Northern Ireland, and, of course, as the member was aware the policy of their Government had been to give to Northern Ireland teachers the same war bonuses— and no more—as had been granted to their colleagues in Britain.

26-9-1942. MISUSE OF PETROL LISNASKEA MAN’S OFFENCE. Charles Magee, hackney car owner, of Lisnaskea, was, at Caledon Petty Sessions on Monday, fined 10/- for using petrol in his car for purposes other than intended. It was stated by the police that defendant was intercepted on a recent Sunday driving his wife and family to Newry to see friends. Mr. J. J. Rea, solicitor (for defendant) admitted defendant used the car to drive his family to Newry to see his mother-in-law, who was ill, and his client did not know it was an offence to use the car in this way.

26-9-1942. TRACTOR WITHOUT LICENCE KE$H COURT FlNE. When William J. Hamilton, Kilmore, was prosecuted at Kesh Petty Sessions on Tuesday for permitting a young boy to drive a tractor without a policy of insurance, Sergeant Bradley stated that the boy gave his age as 13 years and had no licence to drive. Hamilton said that the young lad had been pressing him to learn to drive and he yielded to the boy’s request. Hamilton was fined £3 and costs and a case against the boy was withdrawn. No order was made as to suspension.

26-9-1942. UNPRODUCED IDENTITY CARD. When Dorothy Grimsley, Feddans, Kesh, was charged with failing to produce her identity card to a police constable in uniform, it was stated that defendant elected to produce the card at Kesh but had not done so within the prescribed period. Defendant said she was sorry about the whole thing. Major Dickie, R.M. – You have given everybody a lot of trouble. I am afraid you will have to pay for it. Fined 5s.

26-9-1942. GAELIC SPEAKING PRIESTS. As a result of a motion by Riobard A. Bramharm (An Ard Craobh), adopted by the Dublin Executive of the Gaelic League, the Annual Congress is to be called on to request his Eminence Cardinal MacRory to ensure that at least one Gaelic-speaking priest be appointed to each church in Ireland, to attend to the spiritual needs of Gaels..

26-9-1942. FISHERY CASE AT KESH. Hamilton Shaw, jun., Ardshankill, Boa Island, was charged before Major Dickie, R; M., at Kesh Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, with having had an otter in his possession at Mullans, Boa Island, on 1st June last. Mr. J. Hanna appeared, for Enniskillen Fishery Board, and Mr. Murnaghan defended. William Irvine, water bailiff, gave evidence that when on the shore of Mullans Bay he observed two men fishing on the side of Lusty Beg. Later the boat headed for the Boa Island shore where the men got out. Witness took cover and saw a man—whom he failed to identify—walking from the boat. The other man (defendant) walked out of the boat with something under his arm and hid it in a whin bush. Defendant walked back to the boat, picked up some sticks, and headed off. Witness approached him then and asked him where he had got the fish and he did not give any definite answer. Witness searched the whin bush and found an otter and a line of flies in a wet condition. He followed defendant and took the fish from him. Defendant denied having had the otter. His Worship said he was afraid there was not much doubt about it and imposed a fine of 20s and £2 10s costs, with an order for the forfeiture of the otter and line.

26-9-1942. DISTRESSING FIVEMILETOWN AFFAIR CHILD LOSES LEGS. A distressing accident occurred during harvesting operations on Wednesday evening of last week, when a child aged two years, daughter of Bernard McMahon, Breakley, Fivemiletown, had both legs severed.  It appears the child crept into the corn and became entangled in the reaper. The child was immediately removed to Fermanagh County Hospital, where its condition is still regarded as rather critical.

26-9-1942. INFANTILE PARALYSIS OUTBREAK. Nine deaths from infantile paralysis have been reported since July 1, the Dublin Department of Local Government announced on Tuesday. Apart from the five cases in Dublin city during the week ended September 19, there were 26 cases in the rest of the country for that week. Every possible precaution against the spread of the disease is being taken, the Department adds.

26-9-1942. TWO £10 FINES AT KESH. James Brimstone, Pruckliss, was fined £10 at Kesh Petty Sessions on Tuesday, for knowingly harbouring one head of cattle. A similar charge against John Brimstone, Bannagh, Kesh, was dismissed. Wm. John Mulholland, Derrylougher was fined £l0 for importing or bringing one head of cattle into the United Kingdom.

26-9-1942. £275 AMBULANCE PRESENTED TO A.R.P. SERVICE. The new £275 ambulance provided by Enniskillen subscriptions was presented to the County Fermanagh Civil Defence authorities, on Monday evening by Mr. W. Maxwell, organiser of the committee (consisting of Messrs. J. Ryan Taylor, J. Lusted and D. Devine), who collected the subscriptions. Mr. Maxwell said the committee was formed about 12 months ago, and aimed to collect £250. They exceeded the total by £100. The ambulance cost approximately £275, which left a balance that the committee had decided to keep for running expenses. After the war it was intended to present the ambulance to the Co. Hospital. The Civil Defence authorities would have the use of it for the duration of the war. He thanked all who had assisted in making the project a success. They had a lady driver and lady attendant for the .ambulance—Miss Scott and Mrs. Clarke; and he would like other ladies to join the Civil Defence organisation. Senator G. Whaley, chairman of. Enniskillen U.D.C., receiving the vehicle on behalf of the Civil Defence authorities, said he hoped the ambulance would never. be required in the district for war casualties. There was a very small attendance at the ceremony on the Jail Square. Those present included Capt. Shutt, county organiser of Civil Defence, and Major Henderson; Enniskillen’s A.R.P. chief. The ambulance has accommodation for four stancher cases and is extremely well fitted.      ‘

26-9-1940. FATALITY NEAR BELLEEK. OCTOGENARIAN’S FATAL INJURIES.A fatal motor cycling accident at Brollagh Hill, Belleek on Tuesday of last week was investigated by Mr. G. Warren, coroner and a jury at an inquest on Wednesday. The deceased was Andrew Roohan, aged 86 of Brollagh, who died eight hours knocked down by a motor-cycle at Brollagh Hill at three o’clock approximately. Andrew Roohan, son gave evidence of identification and of seeing his father lying injured on the side of the road. To Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solicitor, for Peter Francis McGovern, Garrison, who was riding the motor cycle. Witness said his father could hear when the voice was raised a little.

Dr. George Kelly, Belleek, stated that he examined deceased on the roadside after the accident. Witness described deceased’s many wounds and gave his opinion that death was due to haemorrhage following injuries together with senility. Witness had treated deceased in the last six months for deafness. Mrs. Teresa Keown, Tullymore, gave evidence that when walking along the road with her daughter and with a baby in her arms, deceased overtook. They walked up the hill and her daughter warned them that a motor-cycle coming behind. Deceased, who was on the outside, looked round partly to his right and the next thing she saw was deceased lying on the road ten yards ahead. The motor-cycle was ridden by McGovern and he had a passenger on behind. To Mr. Flanagan, witness said her opinion was that the motor cyclist had plenty of room to pass on the right without hitting deceased.

Corpl. Francis Hugh Green, R.A.F., who was in the vicinity, stated he heard the sound of brakes being applied. Constable George S. Acheson, R.U.C. deposed to finding deceased lying on the side of the road. The road at the point of impact was eighteen feet wide with an 18-inch grass verge on either side. The motor cyclist (McGovern) pointed a spot five and a half feet from the right-hand side of the road as the point of impact. Witness put in a statement alleged to have been made by McGovern, who stated a pillion passenger and he were coming from Belleek. At Brollagh he saw the man, woman and child on the road in front. As he was about to pass them deceased, he alleged rushed straight to his right. He pulled the machine to the right in an effort to avoid deceased, but the front wheel struck him and deceased and the two men on the machine fell. The reason he did not sound a warning of approach was because he had no bell or horn on the motor cycle. He had two years’ experience of motor cycling. Hr could not have pulled to the left as it would thereby have endangered the lives of the woman and child. McGovern told the jury he had nothing to add to the statement. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony and the Coroner, Head-Constable Briggs and the foreman of the jury expressed sympathy with the relatives of the deceased.

1942 Fermanagh Herald. Belleek Attack.

8-8-1942. SMUGGLER ESCAPES BY RIVER SWIM. LARGE LOAVES SEIZURE BY NEWTOWNBUTLER POLICE. A seven a.m. chase of smugglers on the Monaghan-Fermanagh border last week led to the capture by Sergt. Blevins and Constable Freeman, Newtownbutler, of a large quantity of loaves. Sergt. Blevins, newly transferred to Newtownbutler from Belleek, where his customs work had gained him a wide reputation, surprised two men on the banks of the River Finn, which at this point is the border between the two States. The men were conveying loaves to a ‘’cot,” which is a large unwieldy float for carrying cattle across lakes and rivers in Fermanagh. On the arrival of the police, the cot, drawn up at the Six-County side of the river, already held a large consignment of loaves. As the police rushed to the “cot’’ one man made off across fields in the direction of the border. The other man, divesting himself of his clothes, put his pants around his neck and plunged into the icy-cold water and swam the thirty yards of river to Twenty- Six County territory. Both men made good their escape. The police seized all the loaves and the “cot’ which was later conveyed to Enniskillen. They also found and seized the jacket, waistcoat, boots and other clothing, excepting the trousers of the swimmer.

8-8-1942. TYRES SEIZED AT ENNISKILLEN. Seeing a man dragging two large bags along a railway line at Enniskillen, Sergt. McNally and Constable Walker investigated and found in the bags several doz. bicycle tyres which they seized.

8-8-1942. CUSTOM ACTIVITIES INTENSIFIED. Customs officers along the entire stretch of the Border (on both sides) from Pettigo to Clones are redoubling their efforts to prevent smuggling and the quantity of goods finding their way across from either side must have fallen to such an extent as to be a very small proportion of the former quantities. Trains and buses are gone through almost “with a fine comb” and many cross-border time schedules have been completely upset by the customs delay for months past, but more particularly of late. The intensified efforts, while naturally showing fair returns in seizures, are not producing nearly the same proportion of captures as in former times, the reason probably being that those with an inclination to smuggling are being ‘‘headed off” by the knowledge of what awaits them on arrival at the Customs post. This, of course, refers to ordinary travellers, and does not affect the professional smugglers who presumably have other means of getting across their consignments of prohibited goods. But even these find the more intensive police watch on both sides distinctly more discouraging.

5-9-1942. GLENFARNE NEIGHBOURS’ DISPUTE. AN ASSAULT CASE. “ Jealousy Over Land ” CASE AT KILTYCLOGHER COURT. At Kiltyclogher District Court on Tuesday, before Mr., Flattery, District Justice, Patrick McDermott, a minor, through his father, Peter McDermott, Lougnross, summoned Peter Clancy, of the same place, for alleged assault.

Mr. Alfred McMorrow, B.A., L.L.B., appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. P. O’Flynn, solicitor, Manorhamilton, appeared for defendant. Patrick McDermott, in evidence, stated that a few evenings before the alleged assault had taken place, Mrs. Clancy was milking a cow on the road and the cow had .its head across a gate leading into his (plaintiffs) father’s field. There had been some words between defendant’s wife and himself on that occasion about trespass, and a few days later, when he (plaintiff), was riding down the road on a donkey, Peter Clancy had come down the road meeting him and had knocked him off the donkey with a blow of a spade shaft and had got on top of him, pounding him with his knees. He had to take through another man’s land to escape as he could, not pass Clancy’s house.

Mr. O’Flynn—-Were you not prosecuted some time ago in this Court for stealing Clancy’s fowl?

Witness—It was my brother took the fowl; I only accompanied him.

Mr. O’Flynn—You were along with your brother, and for that reason you have spite in for Clancy. Do you know anything of a well between Clancy’s land and the land of a man named Flynn?—There is water in a shough; it is not a well.

Mr. O’Flynn — Why did you put bushes around that well from which the Clancy’s get water ?—I did it to stop trespass of cattle.

Mr. O’Flynn—On the evening of this terrible assault was Clancy thatching? — He was not.

Mr. O’Flynn—I put it to you that Clancy was thatching, and when you came down the road he came down the ladder and asked you what filthy language you had used to his wife. – He was not thatching.

Did you call Clancy a grabber?—-No.

You didn’t go home to tell your father about this terrible assault? A slap was all you got.

Peter McDermott, father of plaintiff, in evidence, stated that he suffered a lot with Clancy, all owing to jealousy over a bit of land he got. Clancy’s cattle were always on his land.

Mr. McMorrow-—You were going to town on the day of the assault? — I was going to the town, and I went to Clancy’s house and asked for a drink of water. Clancy came round the house with a knife in his hand, and said to me “When I get up to that son of yours it won’t be good for him.”

Mr, .O’Flynn — You went to the house of your greatest enemy and you asked for water. Did you get milk? — I did.

Mr. O’Flynn — You got more than you asked for. Was Clancy thatching?—I don’t know.

Mr. O’Flynn — You say he had a knife in his hand? Of course that knife was for cutting the scallops. Did he complain about the language your son used to his wife, and did you tell him to correct your son every time he heard him because he uses language like that at home?—I don’t remember.

5-9-1942. Clones Call for Reprieve—At the meeting of Clones Urban Council on the motion of Mr. McCabe, seconded by Mr. O’Connor, it was decided to send the following telegram to  the Duke of Abercorn:—“The newly elected Urban District Council of Clones composed of all shades of religion and politics, begs your Grace to use your prerogative of mercy for the reprieve of the six young men under sentence of death. By doing so you will ensure goodwill and friendship amongst the people on both sides of the border.”

 

5-9-1942. BELFAST YOUTH EXECUTED. WILLIAMS BORE UP WELL TO THE END. EARLY MORNING SCENES. POUCE PRECAUTIONS IN VICINITY OF PRISON. Thomas Joseph Williams, aged 19 was executed at Belfast Prison on Wednesday morning at 8 o’clock, all efforts to secure his reprieve having failed. At 8.15 a.m. a notice intimating that the death sentence had been carried out in their presence was posted on the prison gate and signed Robert Henderson, Sheriff for Belfast, George Stewart, Justice of the Peace, Thomas Moore Stuart, Governor of the prison, and Rev. T. McAllister, Chaplain.

Young Williams bore up well to the end. He had been visited by relatives a short time prior to the execution and his spiritual comforts were attended to by priests in attendance. Precautions against a demonstration were taken by the police and crowds who gathered at various points at the approaches to the jail and knelt in prayer.

No people were allowed into Crumlin Road for a distance of about 200 yards in front of the prison. A police car patrolled the area around the prison and a strong cordon of police was also drawn around the district.      .

As eight o’clock was striking there was an opposition demonstration in Old Park Road when about 100 women and girls gathered and sung ‘’God Save the King” and British songs and engaged in cheering. They were forced into side streets by the police.

Williams, with five others was convicted and sentenced at the Assize Commission in August on the charge of causing the death of Constable Murphy, R.U.C., by shooting in April. An appeal to the Court of Criminal Appeal over a week ago was dismissed. A Nationwide appeal for the reprieve of the youths was without result in the case of Williams. On Sunday last Lord Abercorn’s statement announcing the reprieve of five of the youths was issued but it stated that the law must take its course in the case of Williams.

LORD ABERCORN’S STATEMENT. The statement issued at Stormont Castle said that the Six-County Governor had considered the cases of Thomas J. Williams, William J. Perry, Henry Cordner, John T. Oliver, Joseph Cahill and Patrick Simpson, ‘’prisoners lying under sentence of death in His Majesty’s Prison Belfast,” and decided that in the case of Williams the law must take its course, that the sentences in the cases of Perry, Cordner, Oliver and Cahill be commuted to penal servitude for life, and that Simpson’s sentence, be commuted to15 years’ penal servitude. The Governor’s decision was conveyed to the parents of the five reprieved men by Mr. D. F. Marrinan, their solicitor.

 

5-9-1942. …. and that such consecration as may be desired by the Church of England or the Catholic Church should be carried out on the individual grave. It was found that this principle met the wishes of the fighting Services better than the use of denominational plots and that it corresponded to a very deep conviction that the graves of men of very different faiths, who died, however, in a single cause, should be side by side. “If the local conditions make it necessary for a Separate Catholic plot to be formed, will you please arrange this through our District Inspector.’’ The Chairman—I suppose the Council would have no objection to that. Mr. William-Kelly—It is all the same, I think. The Council decided to grant Archdeacon Gannon’s request.

5-9-1942. £100 FOR ENNISKILLEN GRAVEYARD CARETAKER. The caretaker of Enniskillen new Cemetery—Mr. Jas. H. Kerr—applied to Enniskillen Rural Council for an increase of salary. The application, made last May, was adjourned till Tuesday, when the members had received the report of the Committee relative to the acquisition by the Catholic people of their hitherto unused plot. Mr. Kerr, who has £50 a year with free house, coal and light, plus £7 10s 0d a year war bonus, said he was afraid of the extension throwing so much additional work on him that, with the scarcity of  labour, he would find it difficult to cope with it. On the proposal of Mr. J. J. Bowler, seconded by Mr. A. Wilson, the Council unanimously agreed to increase Mr. Kerr’s salary to £100 a-year and to make him wholly responsible for the carrying out of all work at the Cemetery. -The Clerk pointed out that on many occasions the Registrar was not given sufficiently early notice of burials.

Old Graveyards—Caretakers’ Replies. Recently complaints were made as to the state of the old graveyards in Enniskillen rural area under the care of the Rural Council, and the Clerk was directed to write to the caretakers drawing their attention, to the complaints. Here are three replies received by the Council from caretakers :— From the caretaker of the old graveyard in Kinawley—‘‘I have mowed it twice this summer—the last time less than a month ago—and am now going to mow it a third time. It is quite possible that the person or persons who complained to you about the appearance of the graveyard, made a mistake about .the identity of .the plot. You can enquire off  some local person around the village about the  appearance of the old graveyard.’’ Devenish graveyard caretaker stated  that he never had failed to mow the graveyard, while the caretaker of. Pubble cemetery, Tempo, said: ‘‘I mow it once every year, and at the same time I remove the weeds, and trim the hedge.”

5-9-1942. GARVARY PENSIONER’S ESCAPE. An old-age pensioner named Mary McQuillan, of Shankhill, Garvary, had a remarkable escape when she was knocked down by a military lorry. Found lying in a pool of blood, she was rushed to hospital where it was found that her injuries were superficial. When knocked down she was going for a jug of milk, and on reaching hospital she was still clutching the jug.

5-9-1942. CAVAN FARMER FOR TRIAL. At Cavan District Court, before District Justice Lavery, Patrick Greene (24) farmer, Enniskeen, Kingscourt, was charged with maliciously burning a quantity of hay, value £100 the property of Patrick Tinnelly, Enniskeen, and maliciously burning a cart and harness and other property, value £50. Accused was returned for trial.

5-9-1942. Rossinver Convent.—The Franciscan Sisters of the Atonement of the Mother Lurana Mary Francis House, Rossinver, County Leitrim, have pleasure in announcing that permission has been given by the Holy See to make the Mother Lurana Mary Francis House a Temporary Novitiate for the duration of the war. The time of receptions will be announced later.

5-9-1942. £2 5s for Graveyard Caretaker.—At Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Mr. J. Murphy enquired if the salary of the caretaker of Cleenish Old Graveyard had been increased recently. The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) said originally the salary was 30/-. Then about two years ago the salaries of all graveyard caretakers were increased by 50 per cent.

5-9-1942. Catholic Burials — Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., presiding, instructed its engineer, Mr. James Donnelly, to prepare a specification for carrying out certain works at the New Cemetery, where the local Catholic community are utilizing their plot in future owing to lack of space at the Catholic Cemetery.

5-9-1942. NOTICE TO OUR CUSTOMERS. THE DERBY CAFÉ,ENNISKILLEN, WILL BE CLOSED ALL DAY THURSDAY,10TH SEPT. RE-OPENING FRIDAY MORNING.

5-9-1942. BUNDORAN LADY DIES IN COUNTY FERMANAGH. The death occurred of Mrs. F. Maguire, late of’ Ocean View, Bundoran. Since the death of her husband she had resided with her son and daughter-in-law at Lattoon, Belcoo, Co. Fermanagh. At the funeral last week the chief mourners were—James Hackett, Clogher (brother); Mrs. P. Carty (daughter); John and Freddie Maguire (sons); Peter Carty (son-in-law); Mrs. J. Maguire and Mrs. F. Maguire (daughters-in-law); Miss M. Maguire (sister-in-law); Nano, Packie and John Maguire, Jose, Jack, Frankie, Paddy, Peter and Michael Carty (grandchildren).

5-9-1942. AMERICAN SOLDIER SENTENCED. SEQUEL TO FATAL STABBING. Found guilty by secret ballot of the manslaughter of a member of the British Pioneer Corps, an American soldier, Pte. William Davis (23), of Texas, was sentenced to eight years’ imprisonment by a United States Army courtmartial in the Six Counties on Tuesday.He was also ordered to be dishonourably discharged from the American Army. Davis, who was found not guilty on the original charge of murdering the Pioneer Private, Owen McLoughlin, of Motherwell, will be sent back to America to serve the sentence in a penitentiary. McLaughlin was fatally stabbed on August 1st during a row at a dance in Randalstown Orange Hall.

5-9-1942. THREE TYRONE SISTERS ENTER RELIGIOUS LIFE. Miss Agnes Murray (Sister Mary Laurence) was finally professed, and her sister Winnie (Sister Bernard Therese) made her first profession at La Sainty Union Convent, Bath, on 15th August. Another sister Miss May Murray, H. Dip., has entered the Loreto order in Llandudno, North Wales. She was educated at St. Louis Convent, Carrickmacross, and University College. Dublin. Miss Winnie Murray was educated at Loreto Convent, Omagh, and the Convent High School, Southampton. They are daughters of Mr. .and Mrs. Patrick Murray, Rathfragan, Fintona.

5-9-1942. TO FIGHT TUBERCULOSIS IN BRITAIN. A number of sets of miniature radiography apparatus-the new weapon to combat tuberculosis—has been ordered and may be ready about the end of the year, Mr. Ernest Brown, British Minister of Health, disclosed on Monday opening a sanatorium at Nottingham. We have many difficult problems to solve in finding how the best use can be made of this new weapon, he said. Ideally everyone ought to undergo a regular examination and look upon it as a normal health measure. The fight against tuberculosis—that scourge happiness and destroyer of manpower has a definite, and by no means unimportant, place in the nation’s war effort.

5-9-1942. TRANSACTIONS IN BRANDY. TWO MEN FINED AT BELFAST.

CASE AGAINST ENNISKILLEN MAN. Fines totalling £125 or in default three months imprisonment were imposed by Major Dickie, R.M., in Belfast Summons Court on Desmond McGratty, Ormond Road, Dublin, in Customs prosecutions arising out of transactions in brandy. Samuel Moore, Down St., Enniskillen, was fined in sums aggregating £101 and ordered 12 months’ imprisonment without hard labour. Immediate warrants were issued against both defendants. The summons against McGratty was for being concerned in dealing in 59 bottles of brandy and a bottle of wine, with dealing wholesale in .spirits without a licence, and for causing to be harboured 446 bottles of brandy. Moore was summoned for dealing in 59 bottles of brandy, delivering spirits without a permit, dealing wholesale in spirits without a licence, and causing spirits to be harboured.

Fines of £10 were imposed on R. M. McLane and John Watters, publicans, Belfast, for failing to make an entry in their stock books and other cases against them were dismissed. The former was summoned for being concerned in dealing with 59 bottles of brandy and a bottle of wine, with receiving spirits without a permit and failing to make the necessary stock book entries, and the latter for being concerned in harbouring 446 bottles of brandy, for receiving spirits without a licence, and for failing to make the necessary stock book entries.

Mr. T. J. Campbell, K.C., M.P. (instructed by Messrs. J. Donnelly & Co.) for the defence, said if there was any offence at all it was a Customs offence, and he submitted that his clients were innocent even of the Customs charge. Mr. R. F. Sheldon (Crown Solicitor), for the Commissioners of Customs and Excise, gave notice of appeal in the Excise Cases against these two defendants.

5-9-1942. POLICE RAIDS IN BELFAST. 200 PERSONS DETAINED. Belfast police raided various districts in the city early this week and as a result 200 men have been detained. The raids began at five o’clock on Tuesday morning and the district covered include Falls Road, Ardoyne, North Queen Street, the Dock area, the Markets area, and portions of Ballymacarret and Short Strand. A very large force of police was engaged and the swoop was made simultaneously in each district. The majority of the suspects were taken from their beds, and the men, having been allowed to dress, were removed in cage cars and taken under strong escort to the cells at Chichester Street. There was intense police activity in the Falls Road area of Belfast all during Tuesday night and into the early hours of Wednesday morning.

A number of houses were raided. One man is known to have been detained. In Lisburn district there were also extensive police raids and a number of persons taken to the local barracks were questioned and afterwards released. There were many raids on Thursday night and early on Friday morning. After a night of patrol activity by armoured cars, police in tenders and on foot carried out concentrated raids at dawn. It is understood that the people detained are mostly youths, but a number of girls are also under detention.    In one case a father and his five sons were taken, leaving the mother the only remaining member of the family. . Police waited outside factories and mills and questioned young men as they left at lunch hour. Some on arriving home were detained.

In one street in the Falls, police with drawn revolvers followed a number of youths and later another chase developed when a young man jumped out the back door of a house when the police entered, and ran across the Bog Meadows. The men detained comprised dockers, factory, mill and munition workers and some A.R.P. wardens and fire watchers were taken to the barracks.

12-9-1942. BELLEEK BARRACKS ATTACKED. BOMBS FAILED TO EXPLODE, SHOTS FIRED. ENNISKILLEN HOUSE SEARCHES. At 4 o’clock on Friday morning the R.U.C. Barracks at Belleek, a short distance from the .Border, was attacked. A homemade time bomb or bombs placed near the building failed to explode. Shots were fired at the barracks and to these the police replied. The telephone wires to Enniskillen were cut but the police got a message through to Kesh from which a police party under Head-Constable  Conlin rushed to the assistance of their Belleek colleagues. After less than half an hour, however, the firing ceased and the only damage caused was a few windows broken in the barracks. About fifty shots in all were fired. Considerable police activity followed, several men in the Belleek district being questioned. Police from County Head-quarters at Enniskillen, under County Inspector Gorman for several hours investigated and received reports on the occurrence.

ENNISKILLEN SEARCHES. In Enniskillen district during Friday six houses were visited by a party of armed police and detectives. Nothing was found it is believed. One mart, Mr. Bertie Love, of Mill St., Enniskillen, was painting on the roof of a hut several miles from the town when he was taken into custody. He was later released. In the interval, he was lengthily and closely questioned by several police officers. His house was one of those searched. Other houses raided included that of Mr. Sean Nethercott, Paget Square, well known Fermanagh Nationalist, and Mr. W. J. Monaghan, U.D.C., P.L.G. Several hours were spent in each search.

OFFICIAL STATEMENT. On Friday night R.U.C. headquarters issued this statement:—“At 4 a.m. to-day Belleek barracks, Co. Fermanagh was attacked by fire and bombs. About fifty shots were fired. Police returned the fire. After calling on the police to surrender, the assailants disappeared.

RANDALSTOWN AFFAIR. The explosion at Randalstown barracks, caused by a bomb placed on the sill, blew in one window and the surrounding brickwork, cut the heavy steel bars over the window, badly damaged adjacent houses and broke windows for a hundred yards on either side of the barracks. One of the injured policemen, Sergeant McCammond was flung across the day room and through a door opposite the window. He had been doing clerical work at the time. Constable Bunting, the other injured man, who was standing in the centre of the room was blown against another door and knocked semi-conscious. The sergeant was found to have a fracture of the left arm and severe abrasions to the left leg when he was removed to the Royal Victoria Hospital, where he was stated last night to be comfortable. The constable was not .seriously hurt. The day room is only 9ft. by 12ft. The floor was littered with bricks and other debris, while the walls were pitted with holes.

12-9-1942. ROSLEA COURT BORDER MERCHANT FINED. At Rosslea Petty Sessions before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., John Maguire, merchant, Lackey, Roslea (near Clones), was charged on three counts with being in possession of the following goods with intent to evade export prohibition— 8 cwts. rice, 5 cwts. barley, 2½ cwts. S/R flour, 3 cwts. currants, 2 stones sultanas, 96 tins salmon and 42 lbs. soap powder. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted, and Mr, Herbert, solicitor defended. Martin Shaw McMullen, of McKay and Leetham, Belfast, deposed to selling the goods to defendant on September 23rd, 1941. He had never seen defendant before. Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness said there were no restrictions on the goods at that time.

Sergeant Moffatt deposed to visiting defendant’s premises, which were about 20 yards from the border, on Oct. 29th. Defendant had a very small stock and the goods which were seized were found in defendant’s dwelling-house. At that time witness could find no trace of baking soda or lentils which defendant had purchased in Belfast. In a statement defendant said half the goods were for a Mr. Somerville who owned a shop about 1½ miles away. Defendant refused to sign the statement.

Defendant, in evidence, stated he was an ex-serviceman and had served in the British army in France and in the East during the last war. He had been in business for himself since 1934 and was on friendly terms with Mr. Somerville, Clones with whom he had previously been employed. His purchases from January, 1941 to August, 1942, were £910. Witness had never any intention of smuggling these goods across the border. Convicting, defendant of being in possession of the goods for export, the R.M, imposed a fine of £60, with time to pay. He dismissed the other two charges. He ordered the forfeiture of 2 cwts. of barley and 2 cwts. of currants.

12-9-1942. MISCONDUCT AT WEEKLY DANCES. AMERICAN OFFICERS’ COMPLAINT.  A letter was read from the officer in charge of U.S.A. military police, regarding dances held in the Minor Townhall—particularly those held on Saturday nights, under the auspices of the football club. It stated: “The door keepers have no limit in admission; the result being that the atmosphere is appalling. There is no room to dance and when evilly disposed. There is no room to dance and when evilly disposed persons start a “brawl’ the hall is so crowded it is impossible to pick out the participants. We suggest that the number of persons admitted be limited to 150 at the outside. We are agreeable to place joint police patrols at the door, who will be responsible for seeing that the service men do not gain admittance after the correct number had been reached, and also our patrols will enter the hall if there is any disorder among the service personnel at the request of the door keeper or a member of the dance committee. We take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation to all classes in Enniskillen for the hospitality and cooperation we have invariably received.” In a subsequent letter it was stated: “We can no longer provide police patrols for duty at the above mentioned dances as we are not getting the cooperation of the organisers.’’

The Chairman (Mr. Johnston) said the difficulty was 200 to 300 people go to this dance and the place gets choked up. One dance last week had to be stopped on account of the conduct. There was only one thing they could do and it would be a drastic remedy—close the hall altogether to these dances. The Council made an order that the number of persons to be admitted to a dance in the Minor Hall be limited to 150.

12-9-1942. LEITRIM COUNCIL SYMPATHY. THE BALLINAMORE TRAGEDY. Mr. Mooney proposed a vote of sympathy with the relatives of the victims of the Ballinamore drowning tragedy. He happened to be in Ballinamore the previous Tuesday, and he witnessed a scene of sorrow there which he hoped never to see again. It was a consolation to know that the children who lost their lives were daily attenders at Mass and communicants. Therefore they were well prepared to meet their Creator, and their parents had the whole-hearted sympathy of the Council in their bereavement. Mr, P. J. Reynolds, in seconding said it was his intention as a member of the Council for Ballinamore area to propose a vote of sympathy as he thought according to procedure the agenda had to be finished first before taking up consideration of such a resolution. The parents had the wholehearted sympathy of the Leitrim County Council in the great loss which they had sustained. The Chairman said the sad occurrence had cast a gloom not alone over the Ballinamore area but it caused a painful shock throughout “Eire.” They sympathised deeply with the relatives of those children.

12-9-1942. DEARER 26-CO. BREAD. The price of the 41b. batch loaf is to be raised in the 26 Counties from ls to ls 1d, delivered, as from September 21. The price will be Is when sold at bakers’ shops. The price of flour (including wheaten meal) will be increased South of the Border from 52s 6d a sack of 280 lbs. to 60s free on rail at port mills, as from September 14th. The flour price increase is attributed to the new guaranteed price of 50s a barrel for Irish wheat,

12-9-1942. GLANGEVLIN TRAGEDY. MAN FOUND HANGED. A distressing tragedy was discovered in Glengevlin on Friday afternoon when Peter McGovern, Bealballie, Glangevlin was found dead, suspended from a rope, in his home. A niece of deceased, who had acted as housekeeper for him, had left on the previous evening to visit her sister’s house, some miles away. On her return on Friday afternoon she found the door bolted and. was unable to gain admittance. Securing assistance the door was forced .and the grim discovery made. THE INQUEST. At an inquest held on Saturday a verdict of suicide while of unsound mind was returned. It was stated that deceased had not been in good health since a recent illness. Sympathy was extended to his relatives. The funeral, which took place to Glangevlin, was largely attended.

12-9-1942. BALLYSHANNON COURT. JAIL SENTENCES FOR ASSAULT. At Ballyshannon District Court, before Mr. J. O’Hanrahan, D.J., Patrick and John Rooney, Single Street, Bundoran, were each sentenced to two months’ imprisonment with hard labour for assaulting Charles Gorman, who said he was cut in several places, Lieut. James Mahony, National Army, said one of the Rooneys held Gorman as the other beat him. Witness interfered and took the man away. John Rooney said Gorman started the row.

12-9-1942. KESH MAN GETS DECREE. A decree for £25 was given in a civil bill brought by Francis Maguire, Derrynieve, Kesh, against Lena Gallagher, Tourist House, Bundoran, for that amount due for. cash lent and advanced by plaintiff to defendant on the 20tk October, 1938.

12-9-1942. 60 DOZEN EGGS SEIZED. Imposing a penalty of £100 with a recommendation that it be reduced to £5 in a case in which James McGonigle, Corlea, was convicted of attempting to smuggle 60 dozen eggs across the Border, the Justice said he hoped it would serve as a warning to people on this side of the Border not to be catspaws for those outside the jurisdiction of the State. Garda McGarvey said when questioned McGonigle, who was carrying three boxes of eggs, in a donkey cart in the direction of Corlea, said he was conveying them for a day’s pay from a shop in Cashelard to a man who lived in the Belleek district. The eggs were seized.

12-9-1942. DRUMKEERAN DISTRICT COURT LICENCE APPLICATIONS. Mr. M, J. C. Keane, District Justice, presided at this Court on Wednesday. DANCE LICENCE. Mr. H. Murray, solicitor (Mr. C. L. Flynn), Carrick-on-Shannon, applied on behalf of Mrs. Celia Crowne, Drumkeeran, for an annual dance licence in respect of Crowne’s Hall, Drumkeeran.

Superintendent McNamara, Carrick-on-Shannon, said there was no objection to the licence and the Justice granted the application as asked by Mr. Murray— twenty dances in the year from 8 p.m. to 12 midnight. Mr. Thomas Dowd, Gluckawn, was granted a licence to hold a dance at Gluckawn National School, the guards having no objection.

ANNUAL LICENCES. The publicans in Drumkeeran and district had their annual applications listed for the renewal of their licence and as there was no objection the applications were granted, as also exemptions for early opening on fair mornings.

Mr. Patrick Dolan, .Drumkeeran, applied for the renewal of his spirit grocery wholesale and retail licence, and the Justice inquired if there was any proof of valuation with regard to the wholesale licence. Mr. Early, court clerk, said the applicant was within the limitation and had been granted a licence on a previous occasion. The renewal of the licence was accordingly granted.

12-9-1942. D.J. SUGGESTS TRANSPORT FACILITIES TO COURT. MINERS’ ABSENCE HOLDS UP CASE. Fifteen miners, summoned to give evidence at Ballyfarnon in a series of cases under the Holidays (Employees) Act, 1939, against Michael Leydon, managing director Arigna Collieries, Ltd., failed to appear, and Mr. Keane, D.J., adjourned the summonses for a month for their attendance. It was alleged that Mr. Leydon had failed to give workers annual leave and public holidays, and had failed to pay, assessor pay when they quitted his employment.

Mr. M. Lavin, Inspector of Mines and Factories, said Mr. Leydon had told him that he thought the Act did not apply to his mines. Mr. Leydon, after the issue of the summonses, sent a letter to the Department enclosing receipts from the persons concerned stating that they had got payment in respect of assessor pay, annual leave and holidays. Mr. C. E. Callan, defending, said the inspector had prevented Mr. Leydon increasing the men’s wages. The men could not be present at court owing to transport difficulties. Mr. Keane thought that some effort to transport them to court might he made.

12-9-1942. SMALL FINES PROTEST. CROWN SOLICITOR AND R.M. When at Tynan Petty Sessions on Saturday, Mr. Austin, R.M., fined Patk. Carbery, Balteagh, Middletown, £15 for having been concerned in carrying 35 bottles whisky, uncustomed goods, Mr, J. P. Best (Crown Solicitor) said it was no use the Commissioners getting small penalties like that.He again protested when Fras. Hughes, Lislanley, was fined £3 in respect of two cycle tyres.

If these penalties were to continue he suggested to the Commissioners that they make the minimum fine £100. Mr. Austin — If you want to fill the prisons well and good. Mr. Best—Small penalties encourage smuggling. Mr. Austin—I don’t believe in imprisonment unless it is absolutely necessary. Mr. Best — You don’t seem to think there is a war on.

SUING FOR £1,000 FINE. When Patrick Hamill, John St., Portadown, was charged in respect of 2 lbs. tea. Mr. Best said that under a new Order the authorities were suing for a. £1,000 fine. The R.M.—Very well, I will fine him £1,000. Then he goes to jail. Defendant—I’ll go to prison rather than pay £1,000. Mr. Best, (to the R.M.)—If you want to make yourself ridiculous you can impose the fine. A fine of £3 was imposed.

12-9-1942. BLACK-OUT WARNING. “I would like people clearly to understand that penalties will be very heavy in the coming winter if they don’t blackout, said Major Dickie, R.M:, at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. Addressing District Inspector Peacocke, his  Worship said: “At the same time, Mr. Peacock, I might suggest, that it would be well to draw, the attention of the military authorities to the practice of military cars and lorries not only passing through Enniskillen, but parking in Enniskillen, with unscreened headlights full on. I counted six of them at midnight with blazing headlights. . The whole town of Enniskillen must have been blazing with lights visible from the air for miles away,” he said. D. I. Peacocke—That matter has been given attention already. Of course you understand we must approach the authorities. In, the black-out cases before the Court, his Worship imposed fines of 5/- and costs in the majority and in one a fine of 20/- and costs was ordered.

COCOA SALE: £31 FINE. Thomas Coogan, merchant, Ballybay, was fined £20 and his brother, Patrick Coogan, £5 when summoned at Ballybay for charging 3/9 for a lb. of cocoa. They were also fined £2 each for selling the  cocoa to a non-customer For refusing to give a. receipt a further fine of £2 was imposed on Patrick Coogan.

12-9-1942. ROSLEA DROWNING TRAGEDY. FATHER’S STORY AT INQUEST. How a horrified father watched his son drown in a lake a short distance from the shore was described at an inquest held in Rosslea on Wednesday of last week into the circumstances of the death of a boy named Frank Morton (18) son of Constable Francis Morton, R.U.C., Rosslea, who: was drowned in Drumacritten Lake on the previous evening. The inquest was held by Mr. James Mulligan, Coroner, sitting without a jury. District Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, conducted the proceedings for the Crown. The death of young Morton, who was a general favourite with everyone, caused a pall of gloom in the district. A lad of fine physique, measuring six feet in height, the deceased was about to be accepted in the police force, and his untimely death has evoked widespread sympathy. A native of Co. Armagh, his father was transferred from Derrylin about five months ago, Deceased was his second eldest child, fond, of all kind of sport and a remarkably strong swimmer.

At the inquest, Constable Horton, who was obviously overcome with grief, stated that on the evening of the tragedy witness left his home about 6.30 to have a shot with his gun. His sons, Frank (dead) and George, asked him where he was going, and witness told them so that they would know where to get him. Later witness shot two wild ducks rising off  Drumacritten Lake. Witness tried to get his setter dog to go out for the ducks, but the dog would not go, as it had not seen the ducks on the water. Witness gave up trying to get the ducks and was going away when his two sons arrived. Frank said he would go in for the ducks, and started to take off his clothes. Deceased was a strong swimmer. His son entered the water, and when he was about halfway turned to come back, shouting for help. Witness ran up to a .field to get assistance, but when, he returned he could only see bubbles where his son had disappeared. A verdict of accidental death was returned and sympathy expressed with the bereaved family and relatives.

12-9-1942. SYMPATHY WITH POLICEMAN. When Constable Frank Morton, R.U.C., was giving evidence in a black-out case, Major Dickie said he would like to mention how much they all sympathised with Constable Morton on the occasion of his recent sad bereavement. They were all extremely sorry. Mr. Cooper also, associated himself with the expression of sympathy and Constable Morton, returned thanks. Constable Morton’s 18-year-old son had been drowned in a lake hear Roslea a couple, of days previously. Fines were imposed in a number of cases against householders for not having their premises effectively blacked-out, and Major Dickie said the .penalties would be much heavier this winter if there were any complaints from the R.A.F.

1942. They were ‘Peeps’ before they became Jeeps.

4-7-1942. U.S. SERGEANT KILLED. Sergeant Robert D. Gibson, of the U.S. Army, a native of Knoxville, Iowa, was killed on Sunday afternoon when a “peep’ in which he was travelling was in collision with a U.S. Army truck. Deceased, who aged thirty eight years, was married. (Ed. Originally, many soldiers did not call it a jeep at all. Jack Keenan, a World War II Third Armoured Division veteran, wrote that early Willys-Overlands were not called Jeeps. “We called ’em ‘Peeps.’” His contemporary sketches of the vehicles in Louisiana and desert manoeuvres were clearly labelled “Peeps.” )

At the inquest, Private Robert D. Goey gave evidence that he had been walking with some companions, and the ‘‘peep” in which deceased was riding, passed them about 20 yards before the accident. The deceased was sitting on the right-hand side in the front seatt. Immediately the “peep’ passed him witness saw a large truck approaching. He saw the two vehicles hit and at that time the “peep’’ was well on its’ own side and the truck was over on its wrong side by about four feet. After the ‘‘peep” was hit it swerved to its left and then back to the middle of the road, where the deceased was thrown out as the “peep” swerved back again to the left.

When the “peep” ‘ was meeting the truck the deceased had his head out to the right over the side of the “peep’’ speaking to witness and his companions, and witness saw the head thrown back and he believed, hit by the radiator grill of the track. If the deceased had not his head out witness did not believe he would have been hit. On the same side that the “peep” was travelling there were some girls at a gate and he saw the driver of the truck looking at them immediately before the accident. In witness’s opinion both vehicles were travelling between 25 and 30 m.p.h.

Private Fred T. Ruggien, who was travelling with deceased in the “peep,” said he was sitting in the back seat on the right side and the deceased was sitting immediately in front of him.  They were travelling close to the grass verge on the left hand side and the truck was travelling about the centre of the road. The two vehicles hit about three or four feet from the left side of the road. Immediately after the collision witness saw blood spouting from a hole beneath deceased’s left temple and he lurched over towards the driver. The “peep” then swerved over again to the right, and as it swerved back to the left deceased was thrown back. The driver of the truck pulled in to his right and stopped about 50-60 yards from the point of impact.

Corporal Merl B. Averill said he was in charge of the truck which was being driven by Pte. John H. McLaughlin. About 100 yards ahead he saw a “peep’’ travelling in the same direction. Witness was sitting in the cab beside the driver and had his head, turned to the right, watching some children on the roadside.

So far as he could judge the truck was travelling on the left centre of the road. He did not see the “peep” coming towards them until he looked out after hearing the crash. The driver of the truck was perfectly sober.

Captain Garrold Hungester, a medical officer of the U.S. Army, said that deceased was dead when he arrived at the scene of the accident. In his opinion the cause of death was multiple compound fracture of the skull with cerebral haemorrhage. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence.

FIXTURES FOR SUNDAY, 5th JULY. Senior Football League.

Lisnaskea v. Newtownbutler — S. O’Grady, Ballyconnell.

Teemore v. Kinawley —  P. Maguire, Derrylin, 5 p.m. (E.S.T.).

O’Connells v. Harps — P. Maguire, Derrylin, 7 p.m. (E.S.T.).

Junior League.

Irvinestown v. Ederney—Father Kirke, C.C., Trillick.

Enniskillen v. Tempo—P. Corrigan, Belnaleck, 4 p.m. (E.S.T.).

Aghadrumsee v. Roslea—H. Fitzpatrick, Newtownbutler.

All matches on grounds of first-named clubs, and at 5 p.m. (extended summer time) except otherwise stated.

LEAGUE TABLES.

Senior Football League.

  1.       W.       L.         D.        Pts.

Lisnaskea … …            6          6          0          0          12

Newtownbutler. 4       4          0          0          8

Kinawley         6          2          4          0          4

Harps .   5        1          4          0          2

O’Connells …. 3          1          2 .        0          2

Teemore … .    6          1          5          0          2

JUNIOR         LEAGUE.

Northern Division.

  1. W.       L.         D.        Pts.

Derrygonnelly . 6        6          0          0          12

Mulleek … … … 6        5          1          0          10

Devenish … … , 4        1          3          0          2

Cashel … …     4          0          4          0          0

Drumavanty    . 4        0          4          0          0

 

Central Division.

  1. w.        L.         D.        Pts.

Enniskillen 5   4          1          0          8

Edemey ..        4          3          1          0          6

Tempo ..  4      1          3          0          2

Irvinestown  5 1          4          0          2

 

Southern Division.

  1. w.        L.         D.        Pts.

Roslea …          2         2          0          0          4

Aghadrumsee … 3 1 2 0 2

Killyvannon … 3 12 0 2

4-7-1942. FERMANAGH MOUNTAIN FIRE CLAIM AT QUARTER SESSIONS. A Fermanagh mountain fire which it was alleged raged over an area 395 acres in extent had a sequel at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Tuesday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., when an application for malicious damage was heard. The applicants were Elisabeth. M. J. Beacom, Tullyvocady; Jas. Stewart, Derrin; Cap., J. G. Barton, The Waterfoot; Geo. Lowry, Portnablaghey; Wm. Lowry, do., and Rebecca Mills, Tullyvocady, and they claimed £500 alleging that some person or persons maliciously set fire to 395 acres of meadow and grazing land, 5 acres of crop land and crops, together with game cover and eggs, fences, trees, shrubs and seeds. All the lands are situate in the Pettigo-Belleek area in the parishes of Muckross and Templecarne.

Mr. E. C. Ferguson, LL B., M.P., represented applicants, and Mr. James Cooper, D.L., solicitor was for the Fermanagh County Council, defendants. Richard Crozier, surveyor, gave evidence that a total of 316 acres were completely burnt in what he described as “a good burning.” A week after the fires were first reported’ he visited the area and had to walk through red hot ashes. Freshly cut turf were singed. The greater part of the land affected was arable mountain grazing.

In reply to Mr. Cooper, witness said that at the time of the fire the cover was in a most inflammable condition. James Stewart, farmer and gamekeeper for Mr. Barton, gave evidence of seeing the three fires at 1 o’clock, a.m., on 4th May, half a mile and a quarter of a mile apart. Attempts by relatives and himself to extinguish the flames were of no avail. All the ditches on his land were levelled and he had his cattle tied in since. He had lost £50 by the fire on his grazing land, which was full of grouse.

Cross-examined, witness said he lived a mile off the road and few people went up his mountain. All the applicants were very popular in the locality. George Beacom, husband of .one of the applicants, Mrs. Beacom, stated he saw the three separate fires about 4 p.m. One of the fires was about two hundred yards from his house and another a quarter of a mile away. The latter never joined with the two which converged towards his house. Twenty acres of his wife’s holding were burned including, fences, an acre of potatoes damaged, and four acres of arable land. He did his best to put the fires out.

Cross-examined, witness agreed nobody could have any possible interest in burning the mountain. Nobody had anything against the applicants.          .

Wm. Lowry said that after eleven o’clock on 4th May he saw a fire spread over a considerable area a mile or a mile and a half away. Ten acres of grazing land on his farm, worth £30, were burned, also four or five hundred acres of mountain grazing, of which he had a grazing right. A rood of early potatoes, value £5, were burnt, in addition to a ridge of cabbage plants worth £2.

Captain John Barton said he had exercised his shooting rights over the townland in question. For the defence, Sergeant Kerr, R.U.C. gave evidence of investigating the fire and said he could find no trace of malice. Similar fires occurred in other parts of the district. All the applicants were popular in the locality. His Honour refused the application and allowed McCrea 5s witness’s expenses.

NOTED. 11-7-1942. £14 Sought for Heifer.—Notice of intention to apply to the County Court for £14 compensation for the loss of a heifer, which he alleged was maliciously killed on Pushin Island, was received by Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday on behalf of Wm. Lunny.

R.M.’s Advice.—When John McClean, Rafinton, an ex-policeman, and Wesley Johnston, Ramult, appeared at Brookeboro’ Court in cases of threatening language, Major Dickie, on the advice of the solicitors on both sides, advised the parties to go home and leave each other alone in future.

Cycle Thief Gets Six Months—Described by Sergt. McQuaid as “a criminal and dangerous liar,” Edward Keenan, no fixed abode, was, at Virginia (County Cavan) sentenced to six months’ imprisonment for having stolen a bicycle. It was stated he made a statement involving an innocent man.

Rainfall at Heath Lodge, Belleek.—The rainfall for June amounts to only 1.09 inches, being the lowest for that month for the past eighteen years. Rain fell on twelve days, on ten of which it amounted to .04 inches or over. The drought which prevailed since early February caused an exceptionally low rainfall for the first half of this year, namely 18.78 inches, which is approximately one-third of the annual average rainfall for the past twenty years.

Tractor Offences. —Samuel Ernest Dane, of Mullaghmeen, Ballinamallard, was fined 5/- and costs at Enniskillen Petty Sessions for driving a motor tractor with trailer attached, without having an identification mark on the rear of the trailer. Philip Diver, Drumcullion, Ballinamallard, was fined 5/- and costs for not having an identification mark on the front of a tractor and rear of a trailer.

Pulled out without signalling.—When Ernest Elliott, of Drumconlin. East, Letterbreen, was charged at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday with having driven a motor car without due care and attention on 4th June last, Sergeant McNally gave evidence that defendant pulled out from the kerb in Darling St., Enniskillen, without giving a hand-signal, and a lorry coming behind had to brake violently in order to avoid a collision. A fine of 10/- and costs was imposed.

Increase for Town Surveyor—At Enniskillen U.D.C. on Monday, the Finance Committee recommended that in view of the part that Mr. J. Donnelly, Borough Surveyor, pays all his clerical and incidental office expenses out of his own pocket, he be granted a war bonus of £50 as from 1st inst. Further, subject to sanction, that he be granted an honorarium of £25 in respect of his extra services during the recent protracted illness of the Town Clerk. The recommendation was passed unanimously.

SUNDAY CINEMA CHARGES. Notice of a resolution, which will permit the Regal Cinema to increase the charge for the balcony seats on Sunday, from 8d to 9d to meet the increased tax, was given at Enniskillen U.C. on Monday by Mr. W. Monaghan. The Sunday cinema is confined to soldiers, and the proposed increased charge would not affect the ordinary soldier using the body of the

May 1942.

DUTY OF PEDESTRIANS ON ROADS. INTERESTING POINT IN IRVINESTOWN PROSECUTION. Ought pedestrians obey the road code and walk on the right-hand side of the road, or follow the custom and walk on the left? This question was discussed at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on. Friday, when a motorist was summoned for driving without due care, etc., arising out of an accident in which the car, travelling in the black-out, knocked down a soldier. Major Dickie, R.M., said it was apparent that defendant did not see the soldiers until he was right on top of them. Everybody knew that soldiers were likely to be moving out of the town about that hour, and surely defendant should have driven in such a way that he would have stopped in time. He (the R.M.) recognised that army uniforms were difficult to see in the black-out. Mr. P. J. Flanagan, LL.B., solr., defending the car driver, said the same thing could be said of the soldier, who knew there was traffic on that road, and he should have kept in. His Worship pointed out that the law said pedestrians had a perfect right to be on the road, and there was no obligation on them to be struggling along on the grass verge. Mr. Flanagan said pedestrians had no right to be all over the road.

His Worship—I do not say for a minute they were all over the road. All the Crown witnesses agree the soldiers were not over the centre of the road. His Worship added that at the present time it was much safer on the right hand side of the road at night. Mr. Flanagan said he understood the Code specified that side for pedestrians, yet if it was used they would be deemed to be negligent.His Worship remarked that in the case of traffic approaching from the front the pedestrian would have to clear into the hedge, and people objected to that. The case in question was that in which Thomas McCrossan, Irvinestown, was summoned under the usual two counts for careless driving and for not having a. P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan was summoned for permitting the latter offence.

Gunner Kane gave evidence that when walking home from Irvines town on 21st March, at 11 p.m., he was on the outside of two other soldiers, with some soldiers in front and some behind. A car came up behind them, and knocked him down. He next found himself being attended by nurses in hospital. He was not seriously injured. Cross-examined, witness could not say why he did not hear the car before it struck him. They had been in Irvinestown for a night’s jollification. He did not remember sitting on a coat on the aide of the road and smoking a cigarette after the accident. Gunner Young said he saw the car go past with the last witness on the front of it between the mudguard and the bonnet. The car had no lights lit when it stopped. Gunner Haydon estimated the speed of the car at fifteen to twenty m.p.h. Gunner Wosley stated he saw Haydon pull the other two soldiers into the left as the car drew near.

Sergt. Kelly, R.U.C., gave evidence of finding the car without lights beyond the scene of the accident. The headlights were in order when switched on, and a side lamp had been broken off in the mishap. The road is 19 feet wide, at the spot where the accident happened. Thomas McCrossan swore he could not find his brother, who had contracted to bring three men out of the town, and he had to drive them, though not duty licensed for the. purpose. He was travelling on the centre of the road, and was just passing the soldiers when he heard the bump. When he stopped he switched off the lights. Later he found that the bulbs were blown. He had since taken out a P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan testified to his having arranged to drive three men home, but was unable to get out in time to do so. He did not authorise his brother to drive the car. His Worship said it was not a bad case but drivers ought to drive within the circle of their own lights. For driving without due care Thomas McCrossan-was fined 40/- and 6/- costs. The second summons concerning the licence was dealt with under the Probation of Offenders Act. The summons against Daniel McCrossan was dismissed on the merits.

16-5-1942. BICYCLE WHEEL THEFTS. A Kinawley Man’s Experience. Thefts of a particularly mean type, of which cyclists are the victims, are now, with the shortage of cycles and accessories, becoming prevalent. A young man who left his bicycle outside a hall while at a dance in the Arney district found his front wheel stolen when the dance was over. Another close by had the tyres and tubes of his bicycle stolen. But a Kinawley man’s experience was worst of all. He cycled across the Border to Swanlinbar and left his bicycle on the street while he visited a house. When he emerged after some time, both, wheels had been removed from, his machine and stolen. He had to walk back across the Border with the frame on his shoulder. R.U.C. men took him to the barracks on suspicion of smuggling the frame, but on telephoning the Swanlinbar Gardaí they confirmed the man’s story that his wheels had been stolen. He had to do the rest of the journey on foot, carrying the frame on his shoulder.

16-5-1942. IDENTITY CARDS. People without National Registration Identity Cards, or with Cards which are inaccurate, will find difficulty in Obtaining new Ration Books, when they are due for issue next month. Anyone who has lost his or her Identity Card, or whose Card is inaccurate, should call at once at the local National Registration Office, which is usually the Food Office, and have the matter rectified. Some local Food Offices (see advertisement pages), intend, opening sub-offices, it which the public will be able to obtain new Personal Ration Books and Clothing Cards on production of properly completed Identity Cards and Ration Books, with the Reference Leaves accurately completed.

16-5-1942. EXCESS FLOUR AND MEAL SUPPLIES. SELLING EGGS TO A NEIGHBOUR. CHARGES AT CASTLEDERG. Before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., at Castlederg Petty Sessions on Friday, Elizabeth Harkin, Garvetagh, was summoned for being in possession of an excess quantity of flour and oatmeal, Henry McAnea and Samuel Greer, both shopkeepers, Castlederg, were summoned for disposing of excess quantifies of flour and meal. Const. Wilson said he found two seven stone packs of flour and a ten-stone bag of meal in Harkin’s house on the 2nd March.. In. a statement she took full responsibility and said about six weeks ago she bought a bag of flour from McAnea and about two weeks later ordered another from him, as one bag had only lasted her six weeks. She also purchased the meal at McAnea’s about six weeks ago. – Witness interviewed McAnea, who said he only supplied Harkin with seven stones flour and ten stones meal. He had no hesitation in giving it as it was a long time since she had obtained any from him. Greer told witness that he supplied Harkin with seven stones flour on the 13th December. Witness seized eleven stones flour and 7½ stones meal. The R.M. said it was now permitted to buy any quantity of’ ‘points’ food legally acquired and a month’s supply of unrationed food. The R.M. applied the Probation of Offenders Act in all cases, and forfeited one sack of flour. The R.M. added that the prosecution was properly brought, and it was only the circumstances of the cases that caused him to deal leniently with them.

Robt. A. Scott, Drumclamph, was summoned for having an excess, quantity of flour, namely, 10 stones. Const. Irvine said on the 31st March he went to defendant’s place and was told by him that he received 3 or 4 bags of flour from his brother-in-law, Mr. Rosborough, Derry. Witness found five ten-stone bags. He seized three of them. There were five resident in the house and four full-time employees. In a statement he said while he was at Derry show, he called with his brother-in-law and told him, to send him some flour. He received eight bags of flax and five of flour. The supply would have lasted him two months. The R.M. applied the P.O. Act and forfeited two ten-stone bags.

John Love, Crewe, was summoned for selling eggs other than to a licensed collector. Jeannie Love, do., was summoned for selling eggs at a price other than at the maximum price, and for selling without a licence. James Donaghey, Faughan Bridge, Drumnahoe, Derry, was summoned for purchasing eggs otherwise than at the fixed price, for obtaining 1 lb. butter otherwise than according to the rationing regulations, and for having one lb. butter without authority. Annie O’Neill, Creeduff, was summoned for disposing of 1 lb. butter without authority.

PETROL SHORTAGE FOR AMBULANCES. SERIOUS COMPLAINT AT ENNISKILLEN. Difficulty in securing supplies of petrol for Enniskillen Union ambulances was referred to at the meeting of the Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry presiding. In a letter to the Board, Mr. John Cathcart, ambulance driver, said: “I beg to inform, you of the difficulties that exist in getting a. supply of petrol for the ambulances. When application, would be made for 140 units 80 would be supplied, and when application- for 80 was made 50 would be supplied. The number of coupons is insufficient to keep the ambulance service going, and on the 8th. inst. an inspector from the Petroleum Office called at the Workhouse and informed me it was illegal to obtain petrol without coupons from any trader. He also called with Messrs. Topping and Co. and told him he would hold him liable if he supplied petrol without coupons. I have eight gallons of petrol in stock, and when this amount is exhausted the ambulance will have to be refused for the want of petrol.”

The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) corroborated Mr. Cathcart’s remarks, and said he (the Clerk) told the Petroleum Board representative that ambulances were of more importance than any other vehicles on the road, and that the general public could not possibly be left without ambulances to convey the sick to hospital. He also told the official that they would get petrol for the ambulances whether by surrender of coupons or not. The official promised to explain the matter at his headquarters. Mr. A. Wilson—Did you not ask the Ministry?Mr. J. J. Coalter—Send that letter to the Ministry of Home Affairs and explain the difficulty.  Clerk — The petrol authorities must have got it into their heads we were using it ourselves. Mr. Coalter’s suggestion was unanimously approved of.

CONFIRMATION AT DEVENISH. St. Mary’s Church, Devenish, was thronged on Friday last when the Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, administered the Sacrament of Confirmation to upwards of 140 children and some adult converts. His Lordship was met at the church by Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, and proceeded through the sacred edifice with a procession of over twenty priests to the High Altar. Mass was celebrated by Rev. P. Monaghan, C.C. Addressing the children after Confirmation, his Lordship congratulated them on being enrolled as soldiers in the army of Christ. Until now they had few responsibilities, but from this hour onwards it would be their duty not only to defend the Kingdom of Christ, but to extend it, and to do this they would have to take an intelligent interest in all that pertains to their faith, and particularly in the liturgy and functions of the Church. It would be easy for them to remain faithful to their religion while they were at home in Catholic Ireland, but if some of them found their way to countries where the faith has grown cold and many people would sneer at their religion, there would be danger for them unless their lives were lived in accordance with the teaching of their faith. They had in the main the Ten Commandments of God to be the general outline of their lives, and they had an informed conscience to tell them what was right and what was wrong. They had a leader, Jesus Christ, and if they were to be enthusiastic about their faith they must always remember the beauty of their Leader, and be ready to sacrifice everything for Him.

During the month of May it is the wish of His Holiness the Pope that all children should pray for his intention, and peace is a necessary preliminary to the restoration of Christian virtue. After administering the Total Abstinence pledge to the children until they attain the age of twenty-one his Lordship said it used to be a mere formality in the past for girls to take the pledge, but times had changed, and there were grave temptations for young girls to take intoxicating drink, particularly in seaside towns during the holiday season. Sponsors were, Mr. Henry McGrath, Devenish; and Mrs. Dick, ex-P.E.T., Cornahilta. His Lordship was much impressed by the splendid new Parochial Hall at Devenish, which competent authorities say is one of the best of its kind in the North.

Confirmation in Cleenish and Derrygonnelly. Administering the Sacrament of Confirmation in St. Mary’s’ Church, Arney, to the children of the three districts of the Cleenish Parish (Arney, Mullaghdun and Belcoo) , Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, referred to the death of Dr. McKenna, late Bishop of Clogher, and expressed sympathy with the people of the diocese in their loss. The children confirmed numbered 130, and his Lordship, told them that the Sacrament strengthened their faith.

GREEN CROSS FUND. ENNISKILLEN I.N.F. CEILIDHE FOR GREEN CROSS. The Devenish (Enniskillen) Branch of the Irish National Foresters on Sunday held a most enjoyable and successful ceilidhe in the Foresters’ Hall, Enniskillen, in aid of the Green Cross Fund. (Ed. a fund to support the families of interned Republicans.)

A very large gathering of patrons assembled, drawn mainly from the surrounding districts, but also fairly representative of a much larger area, parties coming from Omagh, Clones and  other parts. To the excellent music of the Enniskillen St. Molaise Band, the dancers enjoyed a very large selection of Irish dances, these being participated in with the utmost pleasure. Never for a moment did the spirit of pleasure flag, and the dancers parted as they had kept happy dancing company, in the best of humour. Mr. Jim Sheridan, Lackaboy, was an efficient master of ceremonies, his dance announcements being made all in Irish. He was assisted by Mr. C. P. Drumm, secretary of Branch Devenish and organiser-in-chief of the ceilidhe. The proceedings concluded with the National Anthem, played by the band and sung by the large assembly, standing at attention.

OTHER SIMILAR FUNCTIONS. Largely contributing to the great improvement in the Ederney parish contribution to the Fund (already acknowledged) was a similar ceilidhe held in Ederney recently. It is to be hoped that other parishes will follow the Enniskillen and Ederney , examples and organise ceilidhthe or football matches in aid of the Fund apart from the ordinary parish collections.

IRVINESTOWN. The Irvinestown district collection of the Irvinestown Parish is complete, but the lodgement is being held over until the Coa and Whitehill areas have also had an opportunity to contribute to the parish total.

ARNEY. A meeting will be held on Sunday evening next, 17th inst., in the vicinity of St. Mary’s Church, Arney, after Devotions, to arrange for this year’s collection in that area. A large attendance is earnestly requested.

KNOCKNINNY. The parish collection is being taken up, and it is hoped that Teemore will also be organised shortly.

KILLESHER. The parish collection in Lower Killesher is well advanced. Nothing has as yet been done in Upper Killesher, but’ an effort is being made to organise that area.

KINAWLEY. The Kinawley collection is practically finished.

DEVENISH. Very Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, has forwarded to the County Secretary a cheque for £34 10s 0d, being the 1942 Devenish parish collection for the Fund. The total is an increase of about £5 on last year, and Devenish is to he heartily congratulated on its prompt and generous response to the appeal.

OTHER AREAS. Will other parishes or districts in which no effort has as yet been made please arrange to have the collection taken up as soon as possible. It is desired that the county’s total effort should be concluded within a reasonable time.

EDERNEY’S FINE EFFORT. Ederney Branch of the Green Cross Society has forwarded to Mr P. J. O’Hare, Co. Fermanagh secretary, the sum of £30 2s 8d, result of the 1942 collection in the parish. This amount exceeds by nearly £10 the 1941 total, and Ederney is to be congratulated on its prompt and successful effort. Ederney has been the first parish to complete the 1942 collection. Enniskillen is almost complete, but there are still a few books to come in.

23-5-1942. BELLEEK BREAD CASES. At Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Mrs. Margaret McMahon, Ballynadoghy Belleek, was charged with having, on 22nd November, 1941, without a licence granted by the Board of Trade acquired 16 2 lb. loaves, whereby the total quantity of bread in her possession or under her control, exceeded the normal quantity required by her. The following were similarly charged in  respect to the same date, Mrs. Margaret McCann, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Alice Greenan, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Annie McGroarty, Fassagh, for 6 2 lb. loaves; Miss Mary Somerville, Fassagh, 7 2 lb. loaves.

Patrick John McCart, Forthill, Irvinestown, was charged with having on November 22nd unlawfully disposed of a quantity of bread to the above mentioned defendants, knowing that by reason of such disposal the quantity of .bread which may be lawfully acquired by these persons would be exceeded. Head Constable Briggs, Belleek, said that on the 22nd. of November, he visited a number of houses in the Commons district. He went to McMahons and found 19 2lb. loaves in a cardboard box. When questioned Mrs. McMahon told him she was giving some of them to friends in the Free State and made a statement to that effect.

The statement was read by Sergeant Blevin. Continuing Head Constable Briggs said that in McCann’s he found six loaves in a coarse bag and four in a handbag hanging from the roof. There were also two other loaves in the house some homemade bread and 9 stone of flour. There were eight people living in the house. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin, Mrs. McCann said she got six of the loaves from Hughes bread van. Witness sized ten of the loaves. There were five children in McCann’s as well as the defendant and her husband. The bread van only came round twice a week—on Tuesdays and Saturdays. The house was about 250 yards from the village. Head Const. Brigg’s, continuing, said he went to Greenan’s and found 14 loaves there. There was also some homemade bread and 9 stones of flour. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin defendant said she got all the loaves except two from Hughes van.

Sergt. Blevin cross-examined said Mrs. Greenan made no statement concerning her brother-in-law wanting the bread for a dance he was having nor did she mention her sister in hospital. One of the children made some reference to McCabe later. Head Const. Briggs said that in connection with the affair he interviewed McCart, the driver of Hughes bread van, who said he only sold bread for the use of Northern people. He sold one doz.  to McMahons; ½ doz. to McCann’s; 1 doz. to Greenan’s, ½ doz. to Miss Somerville and 5 doz. to Mrs. McGroarty. McCart had one dozen loaves in the van when he was stopped in Garrison. Cross-examined by Mr. Flanagan witness said that when questioned McCart told everything. He had been selling bread in the district for some time.

Constable Green said that on Saturday, November 22, he visited McGroarty’s and saw 9 21b loaves on the table. There were two elderly, and two young people living in the house. Mrs. McGroarty said the loaves were for their own use. Cross-examined witness said the nearest shop was a quarter of a mile away. Mrs. McGroarty would get the same bread there on Monday and Tuesday as she would buy on Saturday. There was flour in the house. Constable Green said he asked Miss Somerville had she any bread in the house and she said she had only two loaves. In a large box he found seven loaves. There were three elderly people in the house. The house was 50 yards from the border. Cross-examined witness said Miss Somerville was an old infirm woman and her brother and the other occupant of the house was much the same.

THE DEFENCE Mr. Flanagan said that his client had been selling bread in the district for some time. He was changed with “knowing” or ‘that he ought reasonably expected to have known, that the amount disposed of was in excess of the quantity to which each person was entitled.” The defendant had no means of knowing how many people lived in each house. His job was to sell bread and like a good businessman he tried to increase his sales. His worship had mentioned, perhaps rightly, that when a poor man was summoned under the Food Order, there were people behind him, but in this case, the firm who employed McCart had nothing whatever to do with it. The defendant had been suspended for a while. He was a young married man with six children.

Capt. Ramage said that Mrs. McMahon had a brother living across the Border, to whom she gave some bread. There was no question of sale. Concerning McCanns there were five, children, two who were working, and the defendant and her husband. There was not an excessive quantity of bread, in the house to last that family from Saturday evening until Tuesday. In McGroartys 9 loaves for four people for three days was not excessive.. All the cases were border line ones.

Mrs. Greenan said she had a brother- in-law John McCabe. At that time her sister Miss Gallagher was in the hospital and, her brother went to see her on that day and the house was locked up. There were three men living in it. On Friday her brother told her to get the bread for him when he was away. Mrs. McCabe was also away seeing her sister and sent a message with witness’s daughter to get some bread as her husband (McCabe) was having a dance on Sunday night, and wanted the bread for the band. She bought six loaves for McCabe, four for her brother and four for herself. Cross-examined, witness said she told the Sergeant about McCabe. There were only seven and a half stones flower in the house. McCart was fined 15/- and 6/7 costs; Mrs. McMahon, 10/6, and Miss Somerville, 10/6. The summonses against the other defendants were dismissed.

HEATH FIRE Peter Maguire, Scribbagh, was fined 8s and 2s costs for displaying a heath fire in an open field. Constable McMullen, Garrison, was complainant.

CAVAN MAN FINED. FOUND WITH CYCLE TYRES AND TEA. CHARGE AT ENNISKILLEN. A young County Cavan man with an address at Lisnaskea—John Stephen J Brady, of Cootehill,—was at a Special court in Enniskillen on Thursday before Major Dickie, R.M., fined £6 4 0d (treble the value of the goods involved) for being on the previous day knowingly concerned in dealing in six cycle tyres and 3lbs, of tea with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereof. Mr. J. Cooper prosecuted, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) defended. Mr. Cooper said the defendant was met by Constable McKeown with a parcel in which the articles were found.

Constable McKeown said defendant went to Westville Terrace, Enniskillen, watched by witness, knocked at two doors, failing to gain admittance, and then went up the Hospital lane. Witness went up by the railway station and met Brady coming down. Asked what was in the parcel Brady said tyres. Witness put his hand in and found another parcel, which Sergt. Sherrard later at the barracks found to contain the tea. Brady had been working for some time in Fermanagh. A. Dickson, surveyor of Customs and Excise, said Brady made a statement to .him in which he said nothing he had was intended for export. Of the tyres two were intended for a man at Lisnaskea, two for a man at Enniskillen and two for himself. He had got them all in Irvinestown or vicinity, and there also, from a woman whose name he would not give, he had got the tea for his own use.

Mr. Herbert said defendant was married and had five children. He had been working in Fermanagh for some time and had been residing in Lisnaskea. At his work his way of subsistence was to take tea three times daily and this as well as the tea he got in Lisnaskea was more than the two-ounce ration would supply. Therefore he took the chance to get this extra tea for himself. In evidence, Brady bore out this, statement and also swore to the statements made to Mr. Dickson. When apprehended at Enniskillen he told Mr. Cooper he was coming from Irvinestown and going to Lisnaskea. He did not go in by train to Lisnaskea because he had a bus ticket. Constable McKeown, recalled, said at the time it was 9.5 p.m. and Brady was looking for lodgings in Enniskillen. Major Dickie — That rather upsets his story. The magistrate convicted and in addition to imposing the penalty ordered the goods to be forfeited.

23-5-1942. 14½-YEAR-OLD GIRL EARNING 35/ – WEEKLY AS CLERK. A fourteen-and-a-half years old girl is earning 35/- weekly as a clerical assistant in the office of the Clerk of Enniskillen Union. (Mr. J. Brown). Referring to the matter at the Board of Guardians’ meeting on Tuesday, Mr. W. A. Thornton, J. P., expressed this view: “If the wage was three times the amount there would be no question about it. It is too cheap, I think.”

The matter arose through a letter from the Ministry to the Board, in which it was stated that in the absence of full details of the qualifications possessed by Ethel Armstrong—(the child concerned) — and the other candidates for the position of assistant in the clerk’s office, they were not prepared to approve of the appointment to this position of a girl of such tender years and lack of experience, particularly at the comparatively high scale of remuneration proposed. The Ministry asked to be furnished with full particulars of the qualifications experience, etc., of the other candidates whom the Board considered eligible for appointment, and that the Board should forward at the same time the original applications of each. It was stated that the little girl was receiving 35/- weekly. Chairman (Hon. C. L. Corry) —What sort of work is she doing ? The Clerk — It is not very important, She is only 14½. Mr. D. Weir — Does she not do the work as well as an applicant of 20 years of age? Clerk — The Ministry say she is too young. Mr. Weir — It’s a good fault. Mr. Thornton then expressed the view j already quoted. It was decided to ask the Ministry to reconsider their decision and to allow the little girl to stay on.

1942 -Are you a passenger pedaling your own bike? Smuggling.

2-5-1942 ENNISKILLEN GROCER’S SUCCESSFUL APPEAL. Ernest Colvin, grocer, High St., Enniskillen, appealed at Enniskillen Quarter. Sessions on Thursday against a penalty of £50 imposed at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on a charge of knowingly harbouring seven sacks of coffee beans with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereon. Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, said that after Colvin had been convicted they succeeded in arresting a man from the Free State named Keenan, .for whom, this coffee was, and he was fined £50. When the case same on against Keenan they had interviewed Mr. Colvin and his assistant, and got them to come and give evidence against Keenan. In view of this fact the Customs Authorities would agree to this penalty, being reduced to £25. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, D. L. (for Colvin) agreed to this course, and accordingly his Honour affirmed the conviction, but reduced the penalty to £25.

2-5-1942 WHISKEY SEIZURE BY FLORENCECOURT POLICE. Sergeant Ryan and Constable Redpath, Florencecourt, on Saturday evening stopped a car at Drumcarn, Belnaleck, Co. Fermanagh, and on searching it found 6 five naggin bottles of whiskey, four similar bottles of wine and two large bottles of gin, as well as a dozen egg cups, a quantity of tobacco and cigarettes, a showerproof coat and quantity of sweepstake tickets, all of which were seized, together with the car. The driver was taken into custody,, and on. Sunday afternoon was allowed out on £20 bail to appear at next Enniskillen Petty Sessions. Major Dickie, R.M., attended at the Barracks, on Sunday afternoon, and the car driver was ,present with his solicitor, but no court was held, the reason being that the magistrate could not discharge any judicial function on a Sunday, though he can sit as a magistrate. The case could only have been .proceeded with had the man sufficient money to pay any fine which, if he had been convicted, might have been imposed. Had the case been heard and a fine inflicted, the order would have been unenforceable, as the Court was held on Sunday.

2-5-1942 FIRE AT CASTLECOOLE. BUILDINGS DESTROYED. An outbreak of fire occurred on Saturday afternoon in outhouses at Castlecoole, Enniskillen, the residence of the Earl of Belmore. The Enniskillen Town Brigade and the Auxiliary Fire Service, both under Mr. James Donnelly, town surveyor, receiving notification at ten minutes to one, were on the spot before one clock a quick turn-out which probably saved extensive buildings because the fire had gained a firm hold on the solid buildings and was burning fiercely. The efforts of the Brigades were chiefly directed towards confining the outbreak. Until. 2.30 p. m, the battle with the flames continued, ending only when about forty yards of the buildings had been destroyed roof and floors being burned out. The A.F.S. Brigade was under the immediate command of Mr. Freddy Bleakley with Mr. J. Lusted, A.F.S. chief in attendance.

2-5-1942 PARTY VOTE ECHO. FARTAGH COTTAGE TENANCY. An echo of a recent Enniskillen Rural Council party vote on a cottage tenancy was heard at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions, on Friday, when the Council was granted a decree for possession of a cottage at Fartagh, against Miss Mary Millar. Miss Millar’s father was the tenant until his death a few months ago. Miss Millar applied for the cottage, but it was granted to a Unionist by a party vote of the Rural Council. Miss Millar is a Catholic.

SEIZED BICYCLE AT BELLEEK BARRIER. JUDGE RECOMMENDS RETURN ON PAYMENT OF DUTY. Are bicycles liable to purchase tax? Although, according to Mr, George Dixon, Surveyor of customs and Excise for County Fermanagh the tax is collected throughout Great Britain and the Six Counties on bicycles, Mr. R. A. Herbert, L.B. (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert, Enniskillen contended during the course of an appeal at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Monday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., that the wording of the Section of the Act governing the matter makes bicycles not liable.

The appeal was one brought by Terence McGowan, of Ross, Tullyrossmearn, Co. Fermanagh, against an order of Major Dickie, R. M., forfeiting a bicycle under the Customs Acts. When cross-examining Mr. Dixon, the Customs Surveyor, Mr. Herbert referred the witness to the Finance Act No. 2, 1940, which created the Purchase-Tax, and stated that the schedule set out goods that were chargeable with purchase-tax. In the first column (that setting out goods charged at the basic rate of one third were the words: Road Vehicles and Cycles (whether mechanically propelled or not) being vehicles and cycles constructed or adapted solely or mainly for the carriage of passengers.” Mr. Dixon said that was the Section, which gave authority to charge purchase tax on bicycles.Mr. Herbert — Who would be the passenger on a bicycle?—He is his own. passenger. It is being definitely charged and paid all over the United Kingdom. It is time it was questioned.Mr. Herbert said a passenger was already interpreted in law. This boy cycling on this bicycle could not be said to be a passenger. Judge Ellison said he did not think the language in the Section was very neat for the purpose.

Mr. Herbert — It is very far from neat. He further argued that a machine constructed for one person to ride did not make the machine one “constructed for the carriage of passengers.” His Honour held against Mr. Herbert who raised the paint because one of the taxes the appellant was stated to have failed to pay was his purchase tax. Giving evidence for the respondent,  Customs Officer George Forrest, Belleek, stated McGowan was cycling past the barrier there, not stopping, when witness called on him to stop, seeing that he was riding a new bicycle. McGowan in answer to witness’s questions said he belonged to Kiltyclogher, but produced a national registration, card with his address at Ross, Tullyrossmearn. He asked him to account for the fact that he had stated he was from Leitrim, while he was from Ross, and McGowan said he lived at both places off and on, and that he had been, living in the Six Counties for ten years. He said he had borrowed the bicycle from his brother in Kiltyclogher as his own had been stolen. He then offered to pay whatever was necessary. Witness seized the bicycle and an order for forfeiture was granted at the Petty Sessions. “There has not been one single instance,” said witness, “of where a bicycle has been smuggled and has been confirmed as having been smuggled into the Six Counties where the bicycle has not been stated to have been a borrowed bicycle although the bicycle has actually been new at the moment. In cross-examination by Mr. Herbert, witness said cyclists should stop, and go into the Customs hut if necessary. Do you stop all cyclists? —I do if I am on the road. We all pass these huts and see what occurs?—Sometimes it is after five o’clock (when the Customs hut closes).

George Dixon, Customs Surveyor at Enniskillen, stated a Customs duty of 30 per cent, ad valorem was chargeable on Eire-built machines unless satisfactory evidence was produced (a certificate of origin from the manufacturer) that the machine was Empire-made and that the cost of materials and labour involved reached a certain percentage. Mr. Herbert—Could it have been of anything but Empire origin in these days? –Witness stated he admitted the present circumstances, but still the certificate was necessary. Mr. Herbert—Playing with the law like a child, isn’t it?—No, it isn’t. Would you swear this is a foreign article?— I cannot swear it, but it is for the importer to displace the prima facie charge by providing evidence. Were these things drawn to the attention of the importer? —It is the importer’s duty, if he wishes to claim preference, to make a declaration that he claims preference. Don’t you think it would only be fair before putting Customs duty into force that the attention of the importer should be drawn to the provisions? —Undoubtedly, if the citizen had come into the hut and stated he had imported it. Mr. Herbert—A sort of Please, sir, can 1 pass?

Mr, Herbert said McGowan came from Kiltyclogher but had been staying with friends in Ross for some years off and on. This was the smallest thing he had ever come across in the Customs line The same sort of point was raised before where a solicitor in Donegal drove his, car up to the barrier and the Customs seized it as having been imported, but the car was subsequently returned. This boy came along a proper route at a proper time and his bicycle was seized. He had gone a hundred yards or two into Six- County territory. It was straining the law very far to say a certificate of origin was required. Why didn’t they tell him to go back? When he found out the position the boy offered to pay. Mr. Cooper said this was not the only case brought up at the same place. The smuggling of bicycles into the Six Counties was a wholesale business. Mr. Herbert—There is no evidence of that. Judge Ellison said he should be inclined to confirm the order and say he thought this boy should be let off if he paid what he should pay. Mr. Cooper—-We will forward it to the Customs, and they will obey your Honour’s recommendation. Mr. Herbert said Major Dickie had stated that if the brother had appeared to say the bicycle belonged to him he would have given it back. Unfortunately the brother could not appear as he was engaged in munitions work in England. His Honour—I think Major Dickie’s view of that was the right one.

APPEAL AGAINST JAIL SENTENCE. SUCCEEDS AT ENNISKILLEN. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Thursday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., James E. Maguire, Cran, Fivemiletown appealed against sentence of three months’ imprisonment imposed at Kesh Petty Sessions in February, when he was charged with the larceny of tools from a camp where he had been employed on work of national importance. Mr. R. H. Herbert, LL.B. for appellant said appellant was a young tarried man, with two young children just school going age. He was a joiner and carpenter and had led an exemplary life.

Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, for the Crown, said that at the time of the prosecution irregularities had been going on in the camp—stealing of goods— and the sentence in this case was very fully justified. It was the least possible sentence the magistrate could put on. Since defendant had been convicted he had given certain information to the camp authorities which enabled them to trace very considerable quantities of other goods and put an end to a very big racket that had been going on. The camp superintendent had asked him (Mr. Cooper) to ask his Honour to deal with the appellant in the same way as another defendant had been dealt with—to fine him the sum of £15. He (Mr. Cooper) would consent to that if his Honour approved of it, but only because of the very valuable information which, appellant gave to the authorities. Sidney E. Sullivan, camp superintendent, told his Honour that appellant had helped him immensely as the result of information given. His Honour affirmed the conviction, but instead of the jail sentence imposed a fine of £15.

2-5-1942 “READ EXCEPTIONALLY WELL” Customs Officer Congratulated at Belleek. When nearly two foolscap pages of closely-written matter—a statement taken down by the witness—had been read in a loud, dear voice by Customs Officer George Forrest, Belleek, at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions, on Monday, Mr. J. B. Murphy, solicitor, congratulated Forrest, remarking: “It is the first, statement I ever heard read out which I was able to hear every syllable. He certainly read it exceptionally well.” Mr. Murphy had given Mr. Forrest a severe cross-examination, but said that, despite that, he must pay Mr. Forrest the above tribute.

 

9-5-1942. JOTTINGS. Accident.— Mr. Joseph Lendrum, Civil Bill Officer, Clones, sustained severe cuts to his face and hands when he was thrown from his bicycle while on official business in Newbliss district.

Nine Typhoid Cases in One Family—In her half yearly report to Enniskillen Rural Council, Dr. Henrietta Armstrong, medical officer, Tempo, stated on Tuesday that nine cases of typhoid had occurred in one family during the period.

Only a Third Tendered For—Although tenders had been invited for the maintenance of twenty-two roads only seven tenders were sent in, it was stated by Mr. J. Brown, clerk, at the quarterly meeting of the Enniskillen Rural District Council on Tuesday.

Train Derailed—Four wagons of the goods train from Clones were derailed at Enniskillen Railway Station on Friday evening, causing suspension of services on the particular line, from shortly after 12 till 11 p.m. Crane and other equipment had to be sent from Dundalk to restore waggons to the rails and clear the line.

Cycle Combination Strikes Bus.—Harry M. Burnside, an American technician, was fined 10/- at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday for having driven a motor cycle without due care and attention. District Inspector Peacocke stated that defendant pulled out of a line of traffic and struck a bus coming in the opposite direction.. The driver of the bus gave evidence that he tried to avoid a collision, but the sidecar of the motor cycle combination struck the bus.

£40 Sought for Mountain Burning— Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday received a preliminary notice of application for £40 compensation for the alleged malicious burning of heather mountain grazing and fences at Killyblunick Glebe, Kilskeery. The claim was forwarded by Messrs. Donnelly and O’Doherty, solrs., Omagh, on behalf of Francis Murphy. Mr. J. Brown, Clerk, thought this place was not in the Enniskillen rural area. Chairman, (Mr. J. J. Coalter, J.P.)— Part of’ the mountain may be. The matter was referred to the Council’s solicitor

9-5-1942. Tractors on Roads.—James Magowan, Innishway, Blaney, was .fined 5/- and 4s costs at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday for driving a motor tractor on the public highway without being licensed for the purpose. He was also fined 5/- and 2/- costs for not having the wheels fitted with smooth-soled tyres. Const. Wilson proved the offence. For a similar offence, John Cox, Ballylucas, was fined 5/-: and costs;. Major Dickie, B.M., expressed the hope that there would be no more of these cases, as the Co. Surveyors were complaining about these things.”

9-5-1942. COMING EVENTS

Tuesday, May 9—-Home Guard Dance, Townhall, .Enniskillen.

Sunday, May 10— Dance MacNean Hall, Belcoo.

Tuesday, May 12—Home Guard Dance, Townhall, Enniskillen.

Whit Monday, May 25—E.U.F.C. Dance Townhall, Enniskillen.

9-5-1942. NEW CEMETERY FOR CATHOLICS. The present Catholic Cemetery in Enniskillen being now almost entirely used, Ven. Archdeacon Gannon, P.P., V.G., announced at the Masses in St. Michael’s Church, on Sunday, that use will be made in future of the public cemetery at the Tempo road, near the town. In the Protestant part of this burying ground, there are hundreds of graves, but not more than a dozen interments have taken place in the portion reserved for Catholics.

9-5-1942. BROUGHT EGGS FROM CO., MONAGHAN. EMYVALE MAN FINED AT ROSLEA. At Roslea Court, before Major Dickie, R.M. John McCrudden, Golan, Emyvale, Co. Monaghan, was charged with illegally importing 60 doz. eggs from County Monaghan. Mr. Cooper said defendant was caught, bringing over 60 doz. eggs on a bicycle into the Six-County area. Mr. J. B. Murphy (for defendant) said his client was the son of a six-acre farmer in Co. Monaghan, and was cycling across with the eggs. He wanted to point out the sons of small farmers in “Eire” had nothing like the money they had in the Six Counties at the present time. Defendant was fined £5 11s, equal to the single value of the duty.

9-5-1942. EDERNEY P.P. INJURED. On Friday evening at Manoo, Cross between Kesh and Irvinestown, Co., Fermanagh, a collision took place       between a motor-car driven by Rev. P. McCarney, P.P., Ederney, and a military vehicle. Father McCarney, who was coming from Irvinestown direction, was seriously injured and his car completely wrecked. He was removed to Fermanagh County Hospital, Enniskillen.

9-5-1942. THROWN FROM CART. BELTURBET MAN’S TRAGIC DEATH. Dr. J. Stuart, coroner, held an enquiry in Cavan Surgical Hospital into the death of Jas. McManus (68) farmer and shop keeper, Drumgart, Belturbet at the institution as the result of falling from a cart. The evidence was that when drawing manure in a cart the pony bolted and the deceased was thrown out of the cart. Dr McInerney, house surgeon, stated that the man died from respiratory failure due to spinal injuries. A verdict in accordance with testimony was returned.

CIVIL DEFENSE EXERCISE IN ENNISKILLEN. The Wardens, Casualty and Rescue Services of the A.R.P. organisation in Enniskillen took part in an outdoor combined exercise on Tuesday night. Casualties and incidents were staged in various parts of the town and were expeditiously dealt with by the various services concerned. Work generally was well done, services quickly on the spot, and in general the leaders of parties and instructors have every reason to congratulate themselves on the degree of efficiency attained. More drill and more practices are needed to reach the required standard, but it is obvious from this practice that the groundwork has been well done.

The Report Centre exercised efficient control and showed that they had complete knowledge of the different business of co-ordination and control. The exercise showed very plainly the need for a really efficient messenger service. Telephonic communications for short distance calls during hostile air activity may be regarded as, if not impossible, at least much too slow. More messengers are required, especially those with bicycles. Special uniform and equipment are provided free to cyclist despatch riders. The umpires who supervised the practice were:—Casualty Services, Dr. W. A. Dickson; Wardens and Rescue Parties, Major J. A. Henderson, A.R.P.O.; Report Centre, Mr. J. W. Lusted; Transport, Mr. J. W. Maxwell; Director of Practice, Capt. W. R. Shutt, M.C., County Civil Defence Officer.

MAY 9, 1942. The Regal Cinema, Friday, May 8 and Saturday—

BING CROSBY, BOB HOPE DOROTHY LAMOUR.

THE ROAD TO ZANZIBAR

Monday, May 11 and Tuesday— VIRGINIA BRUCE, JOHN

BARRYMORE. THE INVISIBLE WOMAN

Also Dennis O’Keefe, Constance Moore in

I’M NOBODY’S SWEETHEART NOW

Wednesday, May 13 Thursday— MIRIAM HOPKINS CLAUDE RAINS

LADY WITH RED HAIR

Also William Lundigan, Eddie Foy, Jr, THE CASE OF THE BLACK PARROT.

9-5-1942. INSURANCE FOR SMUGGLERS. Comments on Fermanagh Solicitor’s Statement. Commenting on a statement made by Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor for Fermanagh, in a smuggling prosecution in Newtownbutler that in Co., Monaghan people could take out policies of insurance against capture whilst smuggling, a writer in the “ British Journal of Commerce,” the leading shipping paper, says: “ By inference, the Crown Solicitor appears to have considered these insurances to be reprehensible, but if they are, then such reprehensible practices are countenanced by the very law which, the Grown Solicitor was employing in his prosecution, the law of England, which, presumably, runs in Northern. Ireland save in so far as there is special legislation for that part of the United Kingdom..

“It was in 1779 that Lord Mansfield, to whom, we owe so much of our marine insurance law, held that it was not illegal to effect an insurance on a smuggling adventure into a foreign country. It was in the case of Planche v. Fletcher, and his very words were ‘At any rate this was no fraud in this country. One nation does not take any notice of the revenue, laws of another.’

“If, however, any would-be smuggler is thinking of effecting a policy, on a cargo of contraband, presuming he can obtain the necessary export licence, he should take care to inform his under-writers of the nature of the adventure, for while it may be legal to insure a smuggling venture, to fail to inform the insurers of its nature would, surely invalidate the policy by reason of concealment of material fact.”

9-5-1942. ENNISKILLEN VANDALISM CONDITION OF TOWN HALL. “For some reason there has been a determined attempt to wreck everything in the Town Hall and public lavatories,’’ said the Borough Surveyor (“Mr. T. Donnelly) at Enniskillen Urban Council on Monday. “There seems to be a systematic wave of destruction for the past, six or nine months,’ he added. These remarks arose out of a report upon a series of malicious damages to public conveniences and lavatories in the town; also electric light fittings and clothes racks in the Town Hall. “In all cases the damage appears to have been wilful, and carried out with the object only of destroying property. During the past months the entire water supply fittings to the urinals in the Town Hall lavatories have been broken away from their positions, and left lying on the floor, although they were properly secured to the walls, the chromium-plated stand to a wash-basin was smashed, and part of it taken away, etc.” Chairman (Senator Whaley)—This damage has not been done by children—it has been done by adults.

Mr. Devine said this was all due to lack of supervision. Mr. W: S. Johnston disagreed Damage would not be done while their caretaker was about, and he could not stand all day in the lavatories. Mr. Johnston then told how he and their Surveyor tried some of the fittings and could not budge them. “It would take a superman to pull off some of the fittings-it must have taken terrific strength,” he commented.

9-5-1942. WANT TURF PRICES FIXED. ENNISKILLEN COUNCIL REQUEST. Enniskillen Urban Council is to communicate with the Ministry of Commerce with a view to having the price of turf fixed. The matter was raised by Mr. W. Monaghan, at the Council meeting on Monday, when, he said fuel was a problem. In the interests of the poor, the Council, should take up with the authorities the question of regulating the supply and price of turf. He understood exorbitant prices were being given for stacks .of turf by people who were in a position to give high prices, and this might; react against the poor during: the coming winter. Some regulation of supply and price was made during the last war.         Mr. Devine said it was a very important matter. Turf prices should be controlled. The Chairman (Senator Whaley) said he believed it was during the coal strike that there was a collection in the district to supply turf to the poor of .the town at reduced prices. The Council agreed to write to the Ministry asking for the advice of the Ministry on the whole  position and to establish fixed prices for turf and regulate the supply.