Should have been entered for FEARmanagh or at least the Olympics.

Should have been entered for FEARmanagh or at least the Olympics.
14-9-1946. EXCITING MAN HUNT. SCENES IN FERMANAGH. TWO TINKERS CAPTURED. A four-day man bunt, in which 100 police were engaged on both sides of the border, was started on Wednesday in Co. Sligo by news of the arrival in the vicinity of two tinkers, Patrick Joseph Cauley and Martin Ward, who had been over a fortnight at liberty following their escape from Victoria Barracks on the night of the 20th August.
The hunt lasted nearly four days and brought the fugitives and the police through three counties before the two men were captured by the Fermanagh R.U.C., under Head-Constable Gregg, on Benmore mountain, between Letterbreen and Belcoo, on Saturday as darkness was falling.
Cauley and Ward, who are natives of Roscommon, are aged twenty-one and eighteen years respectively. They are both married. At a special court at Rosslea on 20th August they were charged. before Mr. Crawford J.P., with having broken and entered the house of a man named Lynch, of Mullans, Rosslea, on the night of the 10th, 11th August, and taken nearly £40 and, on the same night, broken and entered the shop of Hugh McMahon, of Dernawilt, Rosslea, and stolen £3 in cash and a number of articles, including a pair of boots, cake and some cigarettes. Both accused were returned for trial and on that evening they were conveyed to Victoria Barracks, Derry, prior to being lodged in Derry Jail.
In the early hours of the following morning they escaped from their cell through a ventilator, and, despite intensive police efforts to effect their capture, got across the border to Donegal within twenty-four hours. It is thought they got across somewhere near Bridgend.
Knowing every inch of all the North-Western counties from their travels around as tinkers, they were able to keep to the mountains, only coming into the valleys after dusk each day to call at various houses and get meals. They told many stories, posing as escaped smugglers and deserters from the British Army. Thus, although their descriptions had been circulated and a close police look-out was kept for them, they avoided pursuit for more than a fortnight, until they had made their way to County Sligo.
SWAM A LAKE. On Tuesday of last week (it was reported to the Guards) two shops had been broken and entered in the Ballintrillick area of County Sligo, one owned by Mrs. Gallagher and the other the Co-Operative Stores. Money and articles, had been stolen.
Cauley and Ward were suspected, and detectives and Gardaí commenced a manhunt in the mountains between Grange and Ballintrillick. The two men narrowly escaped through the net—one by swimming a lake—and the chase continued through Kinlough and Glenade in County Leitrim, with forty Gardaí and detectives operating under Inspector P. J. MacNamee (a native of Cavan).
NARROW ESCAPE. On Thursday evening Gardaí Mulvey and Woods almost had their men, seeing them jump out of a bunch of whins forty yards away on Kilroosk mountain, about ten miles from the border. Exceptionally fast runners, the two fugitives made good their escape as dusk was falling. But the Gardaí were hot on their trail and the net was closing. On Friday morning, the hunt was intensified. The men’s route was traced by a house at which they had called in Brackberybog on the Manorhamilton-Garrison road, eight or nine miles from the border. The chase brought the Gardaí to a house much far¬ther-on, in Aghavanny, near the border village of Kiltyclogher.
OVER THE BORDER. By noon, the Gardaí had moved in and there was no escape except across the border. An hour or two later, Inspector MacNamee and Sergt. Feighan, of the detective force, Sligo, who had charge of the detective party, learned that the two men had made their way into Co. Fermanagh.
R.U.C. men under Head-Const. Gregg, Enniskillen (a native of Clontivern, Newtownbutler, who had been transferred to his native Fermanagh only two months ago) took up the chase, all available men being mobilised to the number of twenty, from Belcoo, Letterbreen, Enniskillen, Garrison and Derrygonnelly.
THE NET CLONES. When darkness fell that evening, the fugitives had been trailed to the area between Belcoo and Letterbreen, roughly a distance of ten miles from the place at which it is thought they crossed the bor¬der. Men were stationed at key. points and mobile patrols operated during the night. It was discovered next morning that Cauley and Ward had slept at a haystack beside an unoccupied house at Moneyargan between Letterbreen and Belcoo.
On Saturday morning, at 4 o’clock, forty constables from all over the county from Kesh to Newtownbutler were mobilised under Head-Constable Gregg, with Head-Constable McHale, Enniskillen, second in command, and a comb-out was started of thousands of acres in the wild mountain country lying from Belcoo and Letterbreen towards Boho and Cashel. Kinawley and Florencecourt also were thoroughly searched.
Civilians gave great assistance, twenty co-operating in the actual search. At four in the afternoon, after twelve hours combing, a trace of the two men was again found, this suggesting they had made for Benmore mountain, three miles away from their resting place of the pre¬vious night. Twenty more constables were called in to assist, and about five-thirty a cordon had been drawn behind the Benmore mountain area with one in front. The ends of both lines went forward t» meet each other, and thus a net was formed. This gradually closed and over three hours later, in the gathering dusk, about 8.50 p.m., the fugitives were discovered, hiding in clumps of whins.
They made a dramatic dash to elude capture, but rushed from one party only, to run right into the arms of another as the net was tightly drawn, leaving no loop¬hole of escape. The men offered no resistance and were brought to Enniskillen barracks after a manhunt by Fermanagh police lasting thirty hours.
“In all my experience, I have never met with such co-operation from the civilian population” said Head-Constable Gregg, in a tribute to the active assistance rendered by the people of the neighbourhood in the capture of the two men.
COURT CHARGE AT DERRY. The two young men who escaped from a cell in Victoria Police Barracks, Derry, on August 21st, and were re-captured at Letterbreen, County Fermanagh, on Saturday night, appeared at Derry Petty Sessions on Monday, charged with breaking prison while on remand in custody. The men, Patrick Cauley, aged 19, and Martin Ward, aged 20, both of no fixed abode, had been remanded in custody to Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on breaking and entering charges.
Giving evidence of arrest, Head-Constable Carson said after being cautioned in Enniskillen Barrack, Cranley said: “We just broke out,” and Ward said: “That’s right.”
Both (men were remanded in custody until September 23.
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Fermanagh Herald 1942.

24-10-1942. BAD ENNISKILLEN “BLACK-OUT” COURT CASES. “I had a letter from the A.R.P. authorities, saying the black-out in Enniskillen is no use, and we will have to take  sterner measures,” said Head Constable Poots at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, when a number .of householders were summoned for blackout offences. Major Dickie, R.M., inquired what the A.R.P. authorities exactly meant. Head Constable Poots said the A.R.P. authorities complained of lights from buildings, and particularly lights from the rear of buildings. The black-out at the rear of buildings was very bad. That had necessitated him putting extra men on duty at night to inspect the rear of premises to locate the lights. It was a very difficult job sometimes. The result of this tightening-up of the regulations would result in there being far more of these prosecutions for the next Court. In the cases before the Court the following decisions were announced: — Mary Heslin, The Brook, .Probation of Offenders Act; Mary McCaffrey, 2 Militia Barracks; 10/6 and costs; Margaret Dooris, 11 Eden St., 10/- and costs; Alfred Dickson, 6 Abbey St., 5/- and costs; Michael Byrne, Old Bonded Stores, 5/- and costs; George P. Haggins; 25 Strand St., 5/- and costs. Constables W. R. Allen and W. H. Walker were the complainants, and Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solicitor, represented two of the defendants.

24-10-1942. NO INTEREST. COMPLAINT AGAINST SCHOOL ATTENDANCE COMMITTEES. Mr. C. McKeown complained at Fermanagh Regional Education Committee on Friday that some school attendance committees were taking no interest in the attendance of the children at school. He asked when did the Roslea attendance committee meet? The secretary (Mr. Maguire); said he could not say. It was some time since he had a report. He knew of a number of cases in which sub-committees did not seem to take an interest in the school attendance in their districts. He had from time to time received reports that it had been practically impossible to obtain a quorum therefore there was no means of dealing with school attendance. Mr. McKeown said the Act was practically 50 years in existence, making attendance compulsory, yet they had districts in Fermanagh that were taking practically no interest in it. There should be some remedy. It was very discreditable in these days. Lord Belmore—We appoint these committees. We should put off those that do not attend.

24-10-1942. CHEAP MILK FOR ALL SCHOOL CHILDREN. MINISTRY’S CIRCULAR TO FERMANAGH COMMITTEE. A circular letter from the Ministry of Education informed Fermanagh Regional Committee on Friday that schools—primary, secondary, junior commercial, junior and technical—can obtain milk for children at the .rate of one-third of a pint per day, the child to bear half of the cost. Milk would .be supplied to the schools by any local supplier at Is per .gallon and the remainder of the cost would be paid for by the Ministry of Agriculture.

24-10-1942. BAZAAR GOODS SEIZED. SEQUEL AT LISNASKEA COURT. At Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Nellie McGovern, Derrynanny, was summoned for having, on 14th April, knowingly harboured 13 men’s shirts, 20 pairs of assorted ladies’ dress material, six pieces of artificial silk, five children’s frocks, one child’s blouse, one pair of silk stockings, and one lady’s nightdress, imported from the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted and Mr. Baldwin Murphy, solicitor, defended.

Sergt. Kirkpatrick told of the finding of the goods in a tin trunk at defendant’s house, which, he searched following information received. In a statement to him, defendant said she was President of the Women’s Committee in connection with the Catholic bazaar in Newtownbutler, and following the bazaar on 17th March, she brought the goods in question to her house as they had not been sold. These goods had been given as gifts to raise funds for the new church. Cross-examined, witness said that at first defendant told him she had no goods of the kind he was inquiring about in the house, but later said she had stuff belonging to the bazaar. She told him the committee meetings in Drumlone School had not been very well attended. Reginald Allen said the shirts were of Japanese manufacture, the importation of which had been, prohibited in the Six Counties since Japan’s entry into the war. Mrs. McGovern, in evidence, said she was President of the Catholic Bazaar Committee, and the goods in question had been gathered into the trunk at different times. Before the box came to her it had been in Drumlone School, where the committee meetings had not been well attended. His Honour said he was prepared to grant defendant a dismiss on the harbouring summons, but he must make the order for forfeiture.

24-10-1942. WALLPAPER AND WOOL. Edward Whelan and his wife, Mary Whelan, Lisnaskea, were summoned for knowingly, harbouring 13 rolls of wallpaper and 32 ozs. of wool imported from, the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. A. Herbert, solicitor, defended. Sergt. Kirkpatrick gave evidence of the seizure at defendants’ house, and said Mr. Whelan denied all responsibility. In all he found 121 ozs. of wool, but only seized 32 ozs. Mrs. Whelan said she got the wool from various drapers in Lisnaskea and Enniskillen. Mrs. Whelan said she brought the wallpaper in a suitcase from the Twenty-Six Counties about a year ago and was not examined by the Customs’ official on the train. It only cost 13/-. The wool, had been obtained in Six-County shops. His Worship said the Customs must prove the intent to evade payment of Customs duty as mentioned in the summons. Mr. Cooper said these prohibited goods had been bought in the Twenty-Six Counties and brought across the Border. His Worship – But if she was not aware they were dutiable? Mr. Cooper cited the case of a London cabby who was held liable for a man he had taken in his cab at London docks. His Worship said that since Mr. Cooper had introduced his cab he must convict as regards the wallpaper. He imposed a fine of £3 saying she might have been fined £100,

24-10-1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER COURT CASES. TURF-STEALING CHARGE. MOTORIST SAYS FINE “1S A BIT SEVERE.” At Newtownbutler Court, before Major Dickie, R.M., Thomas McCarney, labourer, Clonagun, Newtownbutler, was charged with the larceny of a quantity of turf, the property of Thomas Storey, Clontivern. Thos. Storey, in evidence, stated he had bog at Clonagun and discovered some of his turf being stolen. On the night of Sept. 27th he went to his bog and put a private mark on some of the turf which he had in clamps. On Sept. 28th he found some of the turf missing. He reported the matter to the police at Newtownbutler, and later accompanied Const. Ferguson to Carney’s house, where they found half a bag of turf in the kitchen. He picked out some of the turf (produced) which had his mark on them. Const. Ferguson corroborated. Defendant, in evidence, stated he was going to work and there was no turf in the house. If he had not taken the turf his wife and children would have no fire until he came back. District Inspector Smyth said there was an epidemic of turf-stealing in the district. This man had five horse loads stolen. Major Dickie—I will have to start sending people to prison, for these offences. He imposed a fine of 40/s and said if I there had been anything against defendant before he would have put on a much heavier penalty.

DRUNK IN CHARGE. John McCarroll, hackney owner, Lisnaskea, was charged with being drunk in charge of a motor car on October 1.1th. Defendant admitted the offence. Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, gave evidence, and Dr. James Dolan, Newtownbutler, stated he examined defendant, who was so far under the influence of drink as to be incapable of driving a car. Defendant told the Court he had been driving some soldiers and had some drink, but did not think he was incapable of driving. Major Dickie said there was a minimum penalty in these cases. He imposed a fine of £5, with £2 12s 6d, costs, and suspended defendant’s licence for 12 months. He fixed sureties in the event of an appeal. Defendant—I will appeal the case. Major Dickie—But you admit the offence. Defendant—I think that is a bit severe. Major Dickie—But that is the minimum penalty. Defendant—I don’t think I was incapable of driving. Major Dickie—No judge can impose a smaller penalty. If you appeal, I am afraid it would be a waste of time and money. Defendant said he was not in the habit of taking drink, and had driven all over the world. District Inspector Smyth, said it was much too dangerous to have people driving while under the influence of drink. Major Dickie said he would allow defendant to drive until his appeal was heard, but he did not know whether the appeal was wise or not.

24-10-1942. APPELLANT WAS DEAD. NEWTOWNBUTLER CASE UNUSUAL SITUATION. An unusual situation arose at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Wednesday when an appeal case was called in which Hugh Connolly, of Derrysteaton Island, appealed, against a £12 fine for harbouring 10 cwts. of sulphate of ammonia. Mr, V. G. Patterson, solicitor, who had represented Connolly at the Petty Sessions hearing, said the appellant was dead. He had been dead ten days at his island home before being found. Judge Ellison said perhaps the case could be adjourned. Mr. J. Cooper (for the respondent Customs authorities) —I don’t know how you can adjourn the case of a dead man. Judge—There must be some means of correcting an obvious error. Mr. Cooper—Nothing can happen – just strike out the appeal. Judge—If the fine is not paid he cannot be imprisoned which was the alternative. Could the £12 not be levied by distress on his property irrespective of his, death? Mr. Cooper -You cannot levy it on the goods of a dead man. We would not attempt to do it anyhow. Mr. Patterson—If they don’t do that and don’t attempt to follow Mr. Connolly, nothing further will happen. A constable of police from the locality said the dead man had no stock. A brother-in-law was looking after the farm, but nobody was living on it. Mr. Cooper said it would be different if Mr. Patterson said he was going to take out probate and continue the appeal, but he simply came and said he had no instructions. Mr. Patterson—The man was ten days dead before he was found. Judge—Could the Crown not claim it was a creditor? Mr. Patterson said he thought not in this case. The matter was adjourned.

24-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN MARKET, ENNISKILLEN, Tuesday—Pork, 45 carcases; potatoes, 4s 3d per cwt.; straw, 4s per cwt.; hens, 1s to Is 3d per lb.; chickens. Is 4d to Is 6d per lb.; rabbits, 7d to 8d per lb.

24-10-1942. DERRYLIN BURGLARY.“The monotony of their present service got on their nerves and they decided to desert with the intention of joining the Air Force from ‘Eire’ ” said Mr. E. Ferguson at Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday when he was defending two soldiers of the Royal Engineers, Gerard Fitzgerald and Leslie Fuller, who pleaded guilty to having on 11th August, 1942, broken and entered the dwelling house at Cloghan of Dr. S. J. McQuaid, M.O.H., Derrylin, and stolen two gent’s shirts, two pullovers, one gent’s sports jacket, one pair gent’s trousers, one gent’s lounge jacket and two pairs of gent’s socks, the property of Dr. McQuaid.

Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, said there were no convictions of any sort against Fitzgerald, Fuller was convicted on 21st August, 1935, for attempted housebreaking and larceny at Wealdstone Juvenile Court and put under a rule of bail. On 2nd July, 1936, at Middlesex Quarter Sessions he was sent to Borstal for three years. He was later convicted of being an Army deserter. Mr. Ferguson said both accused belonged to the Royal Engineers. Fitzgerald was 21 years of age in July last and before the war was an aircraft worker at Bristol. He joined the Army at 17, although, he was in a reserved service. Fuller was 23 years of age and had been in the Army since the outbreak of war. Although the pair had made repeated applications to get away from the Royal Engineers because of their peacetime occupations, one being an aircraft worker and the other a plumber, they had been refused. They applied to join the commandos but were refused. Wishing to join the Air Force from across the border, they needed civilian, clothes and this caused the offence. They went into the doctor’s house, found no one in and took these clothes. All the clothes had been returned and the only thing broken was one window. Since the offence, the men had been tea weeks in jail and as far as Fitzgerald was concerned he had expiated his crime and it would be a shame if he had to go to jail again. He asked that they should be allowed to go back to the Army where they would be of more use than in jail. Deputy Judge Ellison discharged Fitzgerald under the Probation Act. He bound over Fuller in £10 to keep the peace for two years. Both men were ordered to be detained pending the arrival of a military escort.

24-10-1942. £4 DECREE FOR ASSAULT. IRVINESTOWN MAN’S CLAIM. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, William John Swanson, of Drumbulcan, Irvinestown, sued James Farrell, of same place, for £5 damages for assault. The claim was not defended. Mr. A. Herbert (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented the plaintiff, who said that on 24th July last he was in the townland of Drumbulkin, and had his bicycle with him. He was at the foot of a hill and had dismounted from the machine to walk up the hill. Farrell came out of the house as witness passed and shouted. Witness looked round to see what defendant was talking about and Farrell struck him on the jaw and tumbled him on his back right over the bicycle. As a result, his jaw swelled and he was not able to take his food. Defendant was a forty-acre farmer with fairly good land. A decree for £4 was given with 2s 6d expenses,

24-10-1942. GOOD ATTENDANCE OF JURORS. When out of 102 petty jurors summoned for Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday, it transpired that only one was absent without explanation, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., said the attendance was very good indeed. “I have never heard a jury list before on which so many names were answered,” he added.

REDUCTION IN FINE. NEWTOWNBUTLER MAN’S APPEAL. Hugh P. Maguire, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, appealed at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday against two fines of £50 each imposed at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions in respect of (1) for failing to stop his car at the Border when called upon to do so, and (2) for exporting prohibited, goods. By consent, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., affirmed both convictions, but the fine for failing to stop the car was reduced to £40. Defendant applied for and was given six weeks in which to pay the £90.

24-10-1942. GLANGEVLIN VOCATIONAL SCHOOL. DECISION TO RE-OPEN IT. At the meeting of County Cavan Vocational Education Committee Mr. J. J. Gleeson presided. The Office of Public Works wrote that as Glangevlin School was not in use they were prepared to take it on lease from the committee for a period of ten years. Mr. McGovern proposed, that they reopen the school. Mr. P. Smith said it was a shame to have the school closed. The application was refused it was decided to take steps to have the school reopened.

24-10-1942. BORDER INCIDENT. BELFAST MAN FINED £100 AT CLONES. At Clones District Court before District Justice Lavery, Patrick McIlduff, whose address was given as English St. Belfast, and who was described as a bookmaker, was charged with on May 19, 1941, at Glasslough, Co. Monaghan, exporting prohibited goods consisting of wearing apparel and also rescuing the goods seized by a Customs official. Defendant was fined £100 on the charge of exporting and £1 on the charge of rescuing, and the fines were paid into court immediately. Evidence was given by Customs Officer Lynn of following a motor-car to the Tyrone border. When he arrived he saw defendant standing by the car along with the driver. He examined the car and found two parcels in it. A man came across the Border and seized one of the parcels and took it away with him across the Border. Defendant took up the other parcel and went across the Border with it. He had no doubt it was defendant who took one of the parcels away. Defendant said he knew nothing about the parcels in the car. He had some drink taken.

24-10-1942. CATTLE DEALER’S CLAIM. £12 DECREE AT ENNISKILLEN. In an undefended civil bill at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, John Elliott, 1 Victoria Terrace, Enniskillen,  cattle-dealer, sued Thomas Gallagher, Aghoo, Garrison, for £26, plaintiff alleging that defendant’s warranty in the sale of a heifer was contrary to the facts. Plaintiff said he paid £21 for the heifer on 12th August last, when, defendant said she had cleaned after calving. It transpired, however, he said, that she had not cleaned, and he had to pay £2 for medicine for her. She lost her milk and was now worth only £13. Defendant went to see the animal and promised to take her back. He did not do so, and when plaintiff saw him, again and mentioned the matter he told plaintiff to “make the best of it.” Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., gave plaintiff a decree for £13, plaintiff to retain the animal.

24-10-1942. FOUR MONTHS FOR ASSAULT. At Enniskillen Criminal Sessions Wm. Hynes, Nugent’s Entry, Enniskillen, was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment on a charge to which he pleaded guilty, of assaulting a girl of under thirteen years. He had been found not guilty of a serious charge against the child.

24-10-1942. PETTIGO NOTES. Mr. Patrick Chaucer, Customs officer at Pettigo Customs frontier post, is to be transferred to Clones. Mr. Chaucer since coming to the village has been a very popular young man. He is a keen athlete who took a prominent part in all the local games. He is being replaced in Pettigo by Mr. Denis Bradley.

On Sunday morning while on duty in the vicinity of Termon Creamery, near the Grouselodge border, Constables Mathers and Robinson, R.U.C., seized a quantity of tea, margarine and rice from a young man. The constables removed the goods to Tullyhommon R.U.C. station.

During the week, R.U.C. from Tullyhommon, Pettigo, were successful in tracing and .recovering, a heifer which had been missing from the farm, of Mr. Robt. Brandon, Glenvannon, near Pettigo.

On Sunday, Sergt. Bradley, R.U.C., when on patrol in the townland of Camplagh observed a man carrying a parcel and coming from the Donegal border. The man bolted leaving the parcel behind which contained woollen blankets.

31-10-1942. GIRL ESCAPES JAIL. £50 FINE SUBSTITUTED FOR PRISON SENTENCE. A pretty, well-dressed young woman, Elizabeth Hal, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, escaped a three months’ prison sentence by appealing to Newtownbutler  Quarter Sessions in Enniskillen on Wednesday. She had been sentenced at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions for dealing in prohibited goods, namely, four loaves, a carton of soap and 3½ lbs. flake meal. Mr. A. J. Belford (instructed by Mr. F. J. Patterson, solicitor) represented defendant. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown, Solicitor, for the Customs authorities, said the amount of goods involved was very small, their value being 3/-. On the 18th November, 1941, appellant was fined £3 for dealing in prohibited goods—18 loaves—and also £36 for exporting three tons of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. Cooper was proceeding to tell Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., of the ambushes carried out by, the police on three different days in April, 1942, when Mr. Belford interpolated and said his submission was that that evidence had been wrongly admitted by the magistrate in the Court below, no charge in respect of these allegations having been made. Mr. Cooper said the police had seen people, seventy-five in number, going to and. from the shop, bringing goods into the Free State. Judge – Illegally across the border? Mr. Cooper—Yes. Judge—Why didn’t you prosecute them?

Mr. Belford pointed out that the solicitor for appellant at the Petty Sessions objected to that evidence on the ground that no prosecution had been brought against those people. Mr. Cooper explained that the shop was on the very border and it was practically impossible to catch the offenders. In this particular case the policeman had to run after a woman; he grabbed the bag she was carrying but was unable to get a hold of her. The constable brought the goods back to appellant’s shop and she pleaded guilty. At the Petty Sessions he (Mr, Cooper.) was instructed to press for imprisonment, and his Worship said to her: “I have seen you before’ and sentenced her to three months. Mr. Belford said imprisonment in the case would be rather harsh as appellant was only twenty-five years old. Before the introduction of rationing, three- quarters of her customers were from over the border, and while he frankly admitted there might have been some irregularities, it was true to say she did not realise the enormity of the offences. She had been more or less out of business since her Ministry of Food licence had been withdrawn by the Lisnaskea Food Control Committee. She was now only allowed to sell some hardware and clothes, and she was contemplating giving up the business she had carried on for seven years. That being so, the police would be given no further trouble. Like many other border residents, she did not seem to realise the seriousness of smuggling and she had already been heavily punished by her livelihood being taken away. Mr. Cooper thought the licence was merely suspended pending his Honour’s decision. Mr. Belford said appellant would submit to a fairly substantial penalty in order to avoid the sentence, which would be likely to have unpleasant consequences for her in after life.

31-10-1942. YOUNG BOYS ON LARCENY CHARGES. ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions ion Friday three young boys pleaded guilty before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., to having on 26th July, 1942, broken and entered the shop of William H. Creighton, Church St., Enniskillen, and stolen chocolate and sweets to the value of £1 6s 6d. One of the above-mentioned boys and another boy pleaded guilty to breaking and entering the shop of Thomas Wilson, Garvary, between 11.55 p.m. on 13th Aug. and 3 a.m. on 14th August, and stealing two bicycle free wheels value 11s, pair pliers value Is 6d, 3½ doz. safety razor blades value 7s, two pocket torches value 3s, two fountain pens value 5s, one pair opera glasses value 15s and five bottles lemonade, value 3s 8d.

The boy twice charged, above also pleaded guilty to stealing a bicycle value £5, the property of Harold Cleary, on 20th July. Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented all accused. All the boys were very young and had respectable parents. None had. any previous convictions involving dishonesty. In two of the cases he mentioned that one boy had been earning £3 18s 0d weekly at public works at the age of 15. Another at the same age had been earning almost £5 weekly. This work stopped and the boys were running about with nothing to do. There was no proper control over the boys since the wages terminated until they had settled down again and got used to living with little or no money.

The Judge, sternly warning the boys of what would happen should they ever again be guilty of a similar offence, allowed them off on entering, or their parents’ entering into recognisances in £10 for their good behaviour. An order was made for the return of the stolen property, and £1 found in the possession of the boy who stole the bicycle was ordered to be handed to Cleary to compensate for a coat on the bicycle that was still missing. Mr. Creighton, said Mr. Cooper, was at the loss of the chocolate, which was buried and was rendered unfit. Asked whether he wanted compensation, by Mr. Herbert, who said the parents of the boy involved were very poor. Mr. Creighton said he did not. The Judge highly commended Mr. Creighton for his charitable attitude.

31-10-1942. ARTIFICIAL MANURE ON BORDER ISLAND. APPEAL AGAINST £12 FINE FAILS. At Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday, before Deputy Judge Ellison William Atwell, of Derrysteaton, appealed against a fine of £12 for the harbouring of a quantity of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. V. G. Patterson represented the appellant, and Mr. J. Cooper appeared for the respondent Customs Authorities. Constable Duffy said in an unoccupied house on Gallon Island belonging to defendant, while on boat patrol on Lough Erne, he found eight bags containing 16 cwt. of sulphate of ammonia. The house was approachable in summer time from the shore, but at this time of the year (February) could only be approached by boat. From the point of the island it was only 50 yards across Lough Erne to the 26 counties. In a statement defendant said he bought the ammonia in Newtownbutler for his own, use. It was the only ammonia he had bought that year. Witness discovered on enquiring at the shop where the purchase was made that the latter statement was untrue.

Cross-examined, witness said Mr. Anderson, manager of the Newtownbutler shop which supplied the stuff, said in a statement that on the 5th January defendant ordered a ton of sulphate of ammonia, took half of it that, day, and the remaining half the next day, and paid for it on the second day. Mr. Patterson—You got it in February, he got it in January; if he had wanted to get it across the Border there would have been no difficulty? –No difficulty. Even when taking it to his house he has to go along the shore of the Free State?—Yes. The Ministry actually urged people to get artificial manures early.—Yes.

Mr. Cooper—Atwell’s statement to you was that he had bought 16 cwt.?—Yes. It could be bought for about £12 a ton .here; what was the price in “Eire ?” —The price at the time was as much as £60. So it would be very profitable to get it across these few yards?—Yes. And 4 cwts. of this ammonia was missing?—Yes. George Dixon, Surveyor of Customs and Excise, stated on information from the police as to defendant’s probable requirements for his own cropping, he allowed 6 cwt. to the defendant, and had the remainder seized. Mr. Patterson—Did you know that he was treating for the purchase of another 40-acre farm?—No. And that he would require fertiliser for it?—No. Will you say you knew 6 cwt. was enough for his forty-acre farm, on Derrysteaton, and another 40-acre farm he was going to purchase?—I acted on information from the police. They did not know what he was going to crop?—They knew what he had cropped the previous year. Mf. Cooper—You don’t allocate fertiliser for a farm he has not bought? — No. Mr. Patterson said when he got his potato subsidy from the Government he received a notice stating that the Ministry had arranged for the importation of sufficient supplies of sulphate of ammonia to meet the needs of farmers, but it was most important that farmers should order immediately and where possible take delivery. “It is most important. Act now” stated the notice. Atwell followed that advice. He had 60 acres on Derrysteaton or heavy wet land, and required a quick acting fertilizer.

31-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN’S £200 PRIZE. When Enniskillen Urban Council met on Monday evening to allocate the prize money of £300 won in the recent waste paper salvage competition, a letter was read from Omagh Urban Council, congratulating the Council on winning a £200 prize. ‘The successful collection of waste paper,” stated the letter “requires great effort, organisation and co-operation of the townspeople, and your success shows that you had these three factors.” Mr. T. Algeo thought the County Hospital was the first consideration of the Council, as it catered for all creeds and classes, and he proposed that the Hospital get half of the prize money. Mr. P. Kelly seconded. Mr. T. Devine—I quite agree with Mr. Algeo that our County Hospital has our first claim, but there are a number of other institutions and organisations which 1 think have claims on you also. He proposed that the money be allocated as follows, County Hospital, £60; Enniskillen Nursing Society, £25: Enniskillen Council for Social. Service, £25; Soldiers’, Sailors’ and Airmen’s Association, £25; Inniskillings Comforts Fund, £25; £15 each to the Women’s Section, British Legion and the Earl Haig Fund; and £10 to the Ulster Gift Fund. Mr. W. H. Creighton seconded. Mr- W. J. Monaghan—Have the charities attached to the various churches received any consideration from you in these matters? Chairman, (Senator Whaley)—I don’t think they have been consulted in this matter at all

Mr. Monaghan said they were coming on to winter, and .he thought the various churches should get some little help for their funds, so that they could assist the poor people by either way of coal or other relief that they may be pleased to give to the people. “You have the outlook of a very severe winter; something should be done for these people,” he added. Mr. J. Donnelly (Borough Surveyor) said he had been consulted on the matter when it had been suggested that the St. Vincent De Paul Society should get £20, but this Society was in the most fortunate position that it had ever been in—that they had sufficient money at the present time. They were well able to carry on and meet the demands of the next couple of years or more. Mr. W. J. B. Lee said if they gave all the money to the County Hospital everybody would benefit, and he proposed that it all go to the County Hospital. Mr. Monaghan—It is a State-aided institution.  Mr. Devine—Speaking for the Church I represent, so far as I know they are not in need of any funds. Mr. Monaghan—That satisfies me. Mr. Algeo then altered his proposal and propose that the Hospital get £100 and he asked the Chairman to take a written vote “to see who was for the County Hospital or not.”

Mr. W. E. Johnston—I object to Mr. Algeo’s statement—“to see who is for the County Hospital or not.” Mr. Algeo—I demand a written vote on it. Mr. Johnston–You can have any vote on it you like. Mr. Devine said he would not like it to go out that this was a vote for and against the County Hospital. Mr. J. Logan thought that Mr. Devine’s motion should be passed unanimously. They had always the churches with them and they had always the poor with them, and likely to have them.

31-10-1942. MINOR HALL BOOKINGS DISCUSSED AT ENNISKILLEN URBAN COUNCIL. Enniskillen Urban Council discussed at length, at a special meeting on Monday evening an application from, the Six-County Council for Social Service for the use of the Minor Hall for .at least one night per week as a club for young people, and also for the taking over by them of a small plot of ground, the Council’s property, abutting on the road adjoining Mill Street and the Irvinestown Road us a juvenile recreation centre. The Chairman (Senator Whaley) asked had the Council a room to spare. Town Clerk (Mr. A. W. Ritchie) — For the next two or three months it is booked. Mr. T. Algeo—Haven’t you a resolution on the books that the Minor Hall is closed for three months? Chairman—After present bookings. The Town Clerk said if there was a fixed night each week it would be very difficult. The Minor Hall went usually with the main hall, when the latter was booked for dances.

Mr. Devine— They cannot surely book; up the hall for three months ahead. Mr. J. Logan proposing that Saturday night be granted to the Social Services in the Minor Hall, said all through the week the young people were engaged at their lessons, and it would be a shame to take them away from these to attend a club. The presence of the boys attending in the hall would help to purify the atmosphere. That would be a disappointment to some people. They would miss (the “hop.” The people would also miss the bottles of a Sunday morning. It would do the town a lot of good if they had the young boys in the ball on a Saturday night. There was very seldom a big function in the hall on a Saturday night; therefore, that night would not clash with any other people. He meant this arrangement to start from 1st January. Mr. Algeo seconded. Mr. Devine— We want it before January. Saturday night would not suit. The Town Clerk read a list of bookings of the Minor Hall for some weeks to come which, showed that the same three groups of people have the hall on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, respectively, of each week for some time in advance. Mr. Devine—Shilling “hops.” The Town Clerk said Saturday night was “Football.” Mr. McKeown— What football; there are several football clubs. Town Clerk—I cannot tell you the name of it. Mr. Devine—Corinthian Football Club. Everyone knows it. There is no secret about it. Town Clerk— It is difficult to get a night. Mr. Devine asked Mr. Logan, not to press his motion, because he did not think Saturday night would suit the Social Services. Mr. Logan—Saturday night is the best. The pictures have the main hall, so that there would only be the two parties here. It is all the same to me. Boys always strolled about the streets for an hour or two on that night, he said. Mr. Johnston—Country boys go home. Mr. Logan-The shops are closed earlier

7-11-1942. TRAGIC DEATH OF JAS. A. JONES, ROYAL HOTEL. POISONED BY GAS FUMES IN BEDROOM. Enniskillen got a profound shock on Tuesday with the news of the death that morning of Mr. James A. Jones, popular proprietor of the Royal Hotel, Enniskillen and one of the best-known auctioneers in the North-West. Only the previous evening Mr. Jones had been seen in the best of health and spirits, on his daily walk, and it was tragic to think that within little more than twelve hours he was dead. The tragic event was caused by an accident. A gas tap which had served a disused stove in Mr, Jones’ bedroom had been at some time or other inadvertently turned on. Mr. Jones was resting in bed after his morning cup of tea when the meter serving that pipe and tap was again turned on by the Gas Company’s fitter after having been off for some time. The fitter was unaware of the pipe leading to the bedroom. The turning on of the gas filled Mr. Jones’ room with gas. The window was closed and when the alarm was raised and the doctor arrived, he found Mr. Jones unconscious. He died after a short time. .

An Enniskillen man, Mr. Jones was a member of a popular and much-esteemed family. His brother Frank, a former Superintendent of the Garda Siochana, died less than two years ago in Dublin, where he was the proprietor of the Beresford Hotel. Another, sister, now deceased was a member of the Convent .of Mercy community Newry. The only surviving member of the family is Miss Josephine Jones, who lived at the Hotel with the deceased, gentleman. It was she who first raised the alarm. To her, in her sorrow, the sincere sympathy of the whole community goes out.

The late Mr. Jones, who was aged 59 years, started life as a clerk in the office of the late Mr. Robert W. Wilson, auctioneer, in the present premises of the Royal Hotel. . He became an auctioneer himself in Mr. Wilson’s employment, and on Mr. Wilson’s death succeeded him. He built up for himself one of the most extensive auctioneering practices in the North. He later became the proprietor of the Royal Hotel, and in both capacities he was as popular as he was-well-known. He entertained some of the leading personalities of Ireland in every sphere.

Mr. Jones was a good-living Catholic gentleman, who attended regularly to his religious duties. Although unmarried, he had a wonderful regard and love for children, a love for little ones shared by every member of his family. In life he had borne many crosses, several members of his family dying within a comparatively short time of one another, but he bore his sorrows bravely, even cheerfully, and was always in high spirits outwardly, whatever sorrows his inner soul might feel. He will be much missed by every creed and class in the town.

THE INQUEST. The sad circumstances of his death were investigated by Mr. G. E. Warren, Coroner, at an inquest in the Hotel on Tuesday. Head Constable Conlin represented the police; Mr. R. A. Herbert, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert), the next of kin, and Mr. Gerald Grant, BL., appeared for the Enniskillen Gas Company.

DOCTOR’S EVIDENCE. Dr. Philip Brady said in response to a telephone massage received at 11 a.m., he went to the Royal Hotel, where he arrived in a few minutes and smelled coal gas. He went, to a bedroom on the first floor and found a strong smell of coal gas in the bedroom. In the bed he found deceased in an unconscious condition but alive. He died a few minutes afterward. He was clad in pyjamas. Death was caused by asphyxia due to coal gas poisoning. Mr. Jones was a patient of witness’s and was suffering from myocarditis in a mild degree; otherwise he was in good health.

WAITER’S STORY. Wm. Brady, waiter, said that morning at 10-30 he was tidying up in the dining room when Miss Jones, sister of the deceased, told him to go up to deceased’s room because she had smelled gas escaping there. When he went into the room he found it full of gas and the gas pipe turned on. He turned off the tap and opened the window. The pipe from which the gas was escaping was not connected to the gas stove in the room and had not been for some time. The gas fire in the room was never used and the tap was on the portion of the pipe leading to the main. He saw deceased in the bed and asked him was he all right, but he made no answer. He felt deceased’s hands and face, and, as he appeared to witness to be unconscious, witness went for Dr. Brady. There was a fitter from the hotel working at the oven in the kitchen that morning. To Mr. Grant, witness said this pipe had been disconnected from the fire for some time, but he did not know who disconnected it.

Mr. Grant-How long had it been in that condition?—I don’t know. Had it ever been reported?—I don’t know, unless Mr. Jones did it. Witness said he did not know when he first noticed that it was cut. He was very seldom in Mr. Jones’s room, except to go occasionally for Mr. Jones’ coat. Mr. Herbert -Is it cut or disconnected? Head Constable—There seems to be six inches of pipe cut away altogether. Witness said, he had not seen the gas stove lit this ages. It was not lit last winter. Patrick Cunningham, boots, said between 9.45 and 10 a.m. that morning he was called by Miss Jones to the Hotel office; In this office were two gas metres, and he was asked by Miss Jones to turn on the gas. She opened the press where the meter was and, as witness knew nothing about them, he refused to turn on the gas. There was a gas man there and he got a wrench and went towards the meter. Witness did not know what he did. There was a gas radiator in the hall of the Hotel, and witness was seven months in the hotel and had never seen it lighted. He heard no conversation between Miss Jones and the fitter. Mr. Grant—Had you ever seen the stove lit in Mr. Jones’ bedroom?—I didn’t even know there was a stove in the bedroom.

IN USUAL GOOD SPIRITS. Michael Rooney, boots, said that about 9-15 a.m. that morning he went to Mr. Jones’ bedroom with his tea. Mr. Jones was in bed and seemed to be in good form. Witness gave him the tea and pulled down the black-out blind. The window was closed. Witness did not go near the gas fire in the room as he did not know it was working. It was usual for Mr. Jones to remain in bed in the morning and have his tea there. Witness never saw the gas fire in the room used. He was in the Hotel since August and never saw the radiator in the hall used. Head, Const. Conlin—Was there any smell of gas when you were in the room? —No. Mr. Jones seemed in his usual health, and spoke to him the same as usual. He made no complaint of any kind. To Mr. Herbert, witness said Mr. Jones took his tea. Coroner—You don’t know whether he got out of bed at all or not?—No, I don’t.

Henry Fox, employed as fitter by the Enniskillen Gas Company, said on this morning about 9 a.m. he was sent by Mr. Lusted, manager of the Gasworks, to the Royal Hotel to have a look at the gas radiator. He arrived at the Hotel at 8-50 a.m. and saw Miss Jones, who pointed out the gas radiator in the hall. She said in reply to witness that that was all in the place. Witness turned on the tap of the radiator, but no gas came. Miss Jones called the Boots to turn on the gas in this meter. As there were two meters in the office the boots was not sure what to do so witness turned on the main cock of the meter serving this radiator. The other meter served the cooking stoves in the kitchen and was fully turned on. Witness was not aware that this meter which he turned on served anything but the hall radiator, so he took the word of Miss Jones for this. He had since made a test of this meter which served the hall radiator and found it also, served the pipe which led to the gas stove in Mr. Jones’ room. He lit the gas in the hall radiator and Miss Jones told him to leave it on as it was cold. He was then brought to the kitchen to look at the cooker. He was not up in Mr. Jones’ bedroom on this visit. Head Constable—If the tap in the pipe in Mr. Jones’ room which was cut had been turned off, could any gas escape? — No, certainly not. It would have been perfectly safe. The pipe was not cut it was disconnected. To Mr. Herbert, witness said he asked Miss Jones were there any others in the place to be seen to, and she said that was all that was in the place. The gas in the hall radiator was still on when he left about twenty minutes past ten a.m.

SISTER’S EVIDENCE. Miss Josephine Jones, who, when the inquest was held at five o’clock, was still confined to bed from the results of the shock, gave her evidence in bed. She said her brother arranged with the Gas Company to attend to the gas in the morning. About ten minutes to ten a man from the Gas Company arrived. Before going to the radiator, the gas man asked her were there any other radiators and she said no. To make sure, she asked the waiter, and he also said ho. She did not remember about the stove in Mr, Jones’ room. It never entered her mind. She called Patrick Cunningham to turn on the meter in the office for the gas man, but he was not able, and the gas man did it himself. After the radiator had been fired, she brought the gas man down to the kitchen to look at the stove there. About 10-30 she smelt gas and went upstairs. She found on entering deceased’s room that it was full of gas. She noticed that her brother did not move as usual, felt his hand and found it cold. She then raised the alarm.

To Mr. Grant, witness said she could not definitely remember whether it was the radiator or gas fittings the gas man said when he asked her were there any others in the house. The tap which was turned on in her brother’s room was on the floor underneath the wash-hand basin, and it could easily have been turned on by someone brushing out the room, or hitting it with their foot when at the basin. Mr. Grant said on behalf of Mr. Lusted and the Gas Company, he extended very sincere sympathy in the terrible tragedy that had happened. The Head Constable and Coroner associated themselves with this expression, of sympathy, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL. B., also joined in the expression of sorrow at Mr. Jones’ tragic passing. He had been a personal friend of Mr. Jones and he was sure the relatives felt the blow very much. The Coroner returned a verdict of death from asphyxia caused by coal-gas poisoning, the result of an accident.

7-11-1942. MILITARY LORRY LIGHTS IN ENNISKILLEN. MAGISTRATE’S COMPLAINT. Complaints concerning glaring headlights of motor vehicles belonging to the military were voiced by Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. His Worship said that recently the whole street of Enniskillen was lit up by army vehicle headlights from end to end, and this was far worse than some of the cases which he had to deal with in Court. Those motor lights could certainly be seen for ten or twelve miles away from the air. He also spoke of the glare from torches. Sergt. John. Codd, R.U.C., said a special report had been made by the police on the subject of lights on army vehicles, but no reply had yet been received. His Worship pointed out that except a light could be seen from an altitude of six hundred feet he would not impose a fine.

One of the cases which fell within this category was brought against an air-raid warden in Enniskillen, and no penalty was inflicted. In another case Head Constable Conlon, prosecuting, said the defendant was aged ninety-three. She kept a boarding-house in Forthill Street and according to the constable she had forgotten to put up the black-out blind. His Worship said it was hard to put a penalty on a law-breaker when she reached the age of ninety three, but he had to do it. A. fine of 5/- and costs was ordered. Similar fines were imposed in a number of other summonses.

7-11-1942. PRISONERS ESCAPE FROM MOUNTJOY GAOL. The following statement was issued by the “Eire” Government Information Bureau on Tuesday; “Six prisoners serving sentences imposed by the Special Military Court escaped from Mountjoy Prison on the evening of November 1.”

 

 

1942. October. Fermanagh Herald.

17-10-1942.LICENSING PROSECUTION FAILS. IRVINESTOWN CASE. All five summonses issued in a licensing case heard at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday were dismissed by Major Dickie, R.M. The licensee Mrs. Elizabeth M. Shutt, was summoned on the usual five counts and her husband for aiding and abetting. Three men found on the premises were also defendants. D.I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL. B., defended. Constable Wright gave evidence that at 12.15 a.m. on 30th Sept. they heard noises in the kitchen of the licensed premises and at 12.20 were admitted by the licensee’s husband who said he invited the men in for a chat to await the return of the licensee who was at a dance. Two of the men had drink in front of them. Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness said the bar was closed and everything was in order. Constable Bradley corroborated. Giving evidence, the licensee’s husband said this wife was out at a dance and while awaiting her return, at one o’clock he invited three friends of his for a chat. The drink they had had been left out early in the .night for himself, and no money was paid for it. The bar had not even been opened to get it. After further evidence, the R.M. said he did not think there was any evidence and the explanation given was reasonable. He dismissed all the cases.

17-10-1942. TEN YEARS’ IMPRISONMENT. AMERICAN SOLDIERS’ SENTENCED. There was a dramatic conclusion to the General Court-Martial in Co. Down on Pte. Herbert G. Jacobs, aged 23, Kentucky, and Pte. Embra H. Farley, aged 27, of Arkansas, who were accused of the murder of Edward Clenaghan, of Soldierstown, Aghalee, who died in Lurgan hospital on September 23, shortly after being found with, head injuries, on the roadside near his mother’s public-house in Soldierstown, when at the end of the case for the prosecution, the defending officer stated that he would call no evidence for the defence. Following short statements by the officer for the prosecution and for the defence, the Court was closed. Within a few moments it reassembled to hear evidence of the character and military career of each of the accused, following which each of the accused was found guilty of manslaughter, and sentenced to 10 years’ imprisonment. The court consisted of four colonels and four lieutenant-colonels.

17-10-1942. CAVAN HALL BURNED. Killadoon Hall, situated in the Loughduff area of Mullahoran (County Cavan) Parish and erected by free labour in 1924, has been destroyed by fire. It was constructed of iron and timber with boarded floor seats and stage, and used as a meeting place by the local football club, L.D.F., Red Cross, etc.

17-10-1942.STORY OF ENNISKILLEN TRAGEDY BABY FOUND WITH THROAT CUT. MISSING MOTHER RESPONSIBLE WHILE INSANE. That five months old Claire Henderson died front shock and haemorrhage as the result of a wound inflicted on the throat with a carving knife by her mother while the latter was apparently, temporarily insane, was the verdict of a jury on Friday at the resumed inquest on the baby which had been found at 5.45 p.m. on the 24th Sept. lying dead on the settee in the sitting room of its parents temporary home 3, Erne View, Enniskillen, by its father Major Edward Henderson. Head-Constable Poots represented the police. Mr. B. L. Winslow appeared for Major Henderson and Mr. G. E. Warren, coroner, conducted the proceedings. Mr. W. F. Dewane was jury foreman.

FATHER S GHASTLY FIND. Major Henderson deposed that his wife and child resided with him at 3, Erne View Terrace, where they had rooms taken. On the 24th Sept. at 5.45 he returned from his office and went upstairs to the sitting room of their temporary home. He saw the baby lying on her back on the settee, with her throat cut and .a carving knife beside her on the settee. There was no one else in the room and he immediately went downstairs to the hallway and there saw Dr. McBrien and Miss Ellen Hands. He told them what he had seen, saying, as far as he could recollect ‘‘The baby’s throat is cut.”

Since the birth of the baby on 27th April last his wife had enjoyed good health. During a week or two prior to the tragedy, however, she appeared to be overstrung and suffered from sleeplessness. They had been on holidays at Bundoran from the 14th to the 21st Sept., and during that time his wife worried about the baby’s health. As a result of his wife’s condition and some remarks she made he called with Dr. McBrien on the morning of 24th September and asked him to visit his wife, who had said she thought herself and the baby were both ill. She also said she let witness down and would not go to heaven and that she was becoming mentally deranged. At 2 p.m. on the 24th Sept. he last saw his wife, when they were both coming out of the sitting room. Shortly before he left his wife went to procure a bottle for the baby. He had been at lunch between one and two o’clock and his wife appeared to be worrying unduly. He spent some time in cheering her up and comforting her. She appeared to cheer up while he was there. He had not since seen her and did not know where she was. The carving knife, which he identified (and which was produced bearing bloodstains) had been bought by him some time ago.

LAST TO SEE MRS. HENDERSON. Miss Rebecca Hands, who said she resided with her sifter at Erne View, deposed that the Henderson’s lived in rooms with them. Mrs. Henderson after the return from Bundoran complained that the baby was ill and looked worried. She complained several times that the baby was wasting away and had a cough. On the 24th Sept. she met Mrs Henderson on the stairs on her way to the sitting room. When out on a message later in the afternoon she met Mrs. Henderson in Belmore Street.

“I HAVE DISKED THINGS.’ Miss Eleanor Hands said she did not see Mrs. Henderson leaving the house. She described what took place when Major Henderson ran down the stairs. About: 4 p.m. witness was in Mrs. Henderson’s sitting room and saw Mrs. Henderson and the baby. Mrs. Henderson was sitting on the settee with the baby on her knee, and she seemed quite happy. She had not been too well and was a bit worried. Did she pass any remarks?—she said I have dished things. Witness did not know what she meant by the remark which was passed as witness was leaving the room and she attached no significance to it.

MAID’S STORY. Miss Joan Power, 9, New Row, Enniskillen, said she had been employed as a domestic servant by Mrs. Henderson between July 1942, and 24th Sept., 1942. On the latter date she left the Henderson house at 3.55 p.m. when she had her work finished, and went to her home. When she was going out Mrs. Henderson said her work was finished and told witness to come in at the usual time next morning. That was in the sitting room. Mrs. Henderson was sitting on a chair near the window and was feeding the baby. She appeared to be all right, and did not look worried. She complained to witness about her health shortly after she came back from Bundoran. She had not since seen Mrs. Henderson. The first she knew of the tragedy was at 8.45 the following morning.

DOCTOR’S EVIDENCE. Dr. M. E. McBrien said on the 24th Sept. Major Henderson called with him and asked him to visit his wife. He found the house occupied by Major Henderson about 5.45, that evening. The Major came down the stairs saying “She is gone and she has cut the baby’s throat.” Witness went upstairs to the sitting room and found the baby lying on her back on the settee. Her throat was cut across with the windpipe opened into and the principal vessels cut. The front of the child’s clothing was heavily stained with blood and a bloodstained curving knife was lying on the baby’s left side between the body, and the back of the settee. Life was extinct. Death was due to shock and haemorrhage resulting from the injuries described. Head-Constable Poots said a widespread search had been made for Mrs. Henderson since the tragedy but she had not been found. Sympathy with Major Henderson was expressed by Head-Constable Poots, the jury, foreman and the Coroner Mr. Winslow.

17-10-1942. CRIMELESS COUNTY LEITRIM. When Judge Sheehy was presented with white gloves at Carrick-on-Shannon he said he was glad to hear from Supt. McNamara that conditions in the county were very satisfactory.

17-10-1942. MOTHER S BODY FOUND IN LOUGH ERNE. SUICIDE VERDICT. The body of the dead child’s mother, Mrs. Mary Henderson (aged 26), was found in Lough Erne at the Weirs  Bridge, near Enniskillen, on Sunday afternoon, attired as she had been when last seen by Miss Rebecca Hands, in Belmore .Street, on 24th Sept. At an inquest held at the Workhouse, Enniskillen, on Monday morning by Mr. G. E. Warren, coroner, Capt. J. N. Hughes gave evidence of identification, and said deceased’s home address was Cheviot View, Ponteland, Newcastle-on-Tyne. Sergt. S. J. Sherrard said about 4.30 p.m. on Sunday an object was pointed out to him at the Weirs Bridge. On closer examination he found it to be the body of a woman fully clothed. He sent for assistance and had the body taken to the Workhouse mortuary. The body was found among the rushes near the bathing boxes at the swimming pond. Dr. M. E. McBrien said on examination he found the body in an advanced state of decomposition consistent with having been in the water about 17 days. There were no marks of violence and death was due to drowning. A verdict was returned of suicide by drowning while temporarily insane.

17-10-1942. OBITUARY MISS ANNIE McMANUS, ENNISKILLEN. Deep regret has been occasioned by the death of Annie McManus, Wellington Place, Enniskillen, which on Wednesday last following a short illness. Deceased gained the respect and esteem of everyone with whom she was acquainted. Of a quiet nature, she was deeply sincere in her friendships, and her unfailing good humour and kindness endeared her to a large circle of friends. During her illness she had the happiness of being frequently visited by the local clergy, and she made an edifying preparation for death. All along she retained her wonted cheerfulness, never uttering a word of complaint, .but patiently resigning herself to the Divine Will. The funeral took place on Friday following Requiem Mass in St. Michael’s Church, Enniskillen. Rev. C. O’Daly, C.C., who was celebrant, delivered a touching panegyric in the. course of which he referred to the deceased young lady as a model Catholic and one whose popularity in life was evidenced by the wide sympathy created by her demise. He expressed sympathy with, her relatives who had sustained a severe loss by her passing. The funeral cortege was large and paid eloquent testimony to the widespread regret caused by her death. Rev T. J. Meegan, C.C., officiated at the obsequies in the Catholic Cemetery, where the interment took place. The chief mourners were —Annie McManus (mother), Mary and Nellie (sisters), John and Patrick (brothers).

17-10-1942. HAD UNCUSTOMED CIGARETTES PENALTY AT DERRY COURT. A fine of £10 was imposed at Derry Petty Sessions on Charles McIntyre, 50 Creggan Road, who was prosecuted by the Customs authorities for aiding and abetting some person, unknown in the unlicensed sale of cigarettes. Constable Hinds said in a drawer in defendant’s room he found 1,450 American cigarettes, and the defendant, who was employed by the American technicians, said he bought the cigarettes from American sailors for his own use. No duty had been paid. Defendant, in reply to the R.M., said he was earning £5 13s a week, and had to pay 18s 4d a week income-tax. Captain Bell, R.M.—The more the Revenue is defrauded the more income-tax we will have to pay. Defendant—I was not defrauding the revenue. Captain Bell—Of course, you are. Captain Bell said he was determined to do his best to help the revenue and tobacconists, who had to make their living. A similar penalty was imposed on George Page, 7 Strand Road, who was summoned for being knowingly concerned in selling uncustomed goods, 3 3/16 lbs. cigarettes and 26 boxes of face powder. Police evidence was given that when defendant’s .premises were searched they found. 1,540 American cigarettes in a trunk marked “Eire’’ under a mattress. Defendant said he did not know who put the cigarettes in the trunk which was in a passage. The face powder was lying on a chest of drawers. There was no necessity to him to smuggle face powder when he could buy it in Derry at 6d a box.

17-10-1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER NEWS. During the absence of the family at church the dwelling house and shop of Mrs. E, Williamson, Clonagun, Newtownbutler, situated a few yards from the border, was broken into and raided. Following investigations by the R.U.C. in charge of Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, a man named John J. Connolly, Clonkeelan, Clones, was arrested. Later at a special court in Newtownbutler, before Mr. E. Reilly, J.P., Connolly was charged with breaking and entering the premises and stealing a gold watch and a quantity of cigarettes and tobacco. He was remanded on bail to Newtownbutler Petty Sessions. At the week-end Newtownbutler police in charge of Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, visited a house on the Cavan-Fermanagh border at Cleenagh and seized quantities of flour, candles, boots, horseshoes, thread, rice, loaves, and other articles suspected of being for export across the border. Constables H. Lowry and R. J. Freeman, Newtownbutler, seized a motor-car containing a quantity of rice at Summerhill. The car and contents were taken to Newtownbutler. On Sunday night, Sergt. Blevins, Newtownbutler, intercepted a motor-car coming from Co. Cavan direction at Parson’s Green and seized a quantity of whiskey from one of the occupants which was believed to have been imported.

17-10-1942. PETTIGO NOTES. A pretty wedding took place in St. Mary’s Parish Church, Pettigo, the contracting parties being Mr. William Baird, Dromore, eldest son of David and Mary Baird, Dromore, and Miss Teresa McGrath, youngest daughter of Michael and the late Mrs, M. McGrath, Belault, Pettigo. Miss Sadie McGrath, sister of the bride was bridesmaid, and Mr. John Baird, brother of the bridegroom, was bestman. The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by the Rev. P. McCormack, C.C., Pettigo.

On Friday night a very enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Hall, Lettercran, the proceeds of which were in aid of repairs to the church.

A sad burning-accident resulting in the death of Baby Marshall, the four-year-old daughter of James Marshall, Drumhorick, Pettigo, occurred on Monday. The child during her mother’s absence was in the vicinity of the fire when its frock became ignited; she ran on to the street to the mother who immediately extinguished the flames, but the child had received such severe burns as necessitated removal to hospital where she died a few hours later.

17-10-1942. BLACKLION DISTRICT NEWS. There was a full attendance of the committee at a meeting of the Red Cross branch in Blacklion on Thursday night. Mrs. Chas. Dolan presided. Mrs, Maguire, N.T., read correspondence and financial matters were arranged. A vote of sympathy was passed to. Miss Margt. McGovern, Loughan House, on the death of her father.

There was a large muster of the L.D.F. at Loughan on Sunday, when target practice took place. The highest three marks were recorded by Messrs. Fred Murray, Frank Maguire, Patk. Fitzpatrick, and Capt. Kelly. D.S.O. Magovern and Group Leader Farmer were in charge.

The Harvest Thanksgiving Service took place in Killinagh Protestant Church on Friday night. The special preacher was Rev. Canon Pratt.

D.S.O. Maguire, N.T., Sergt, Rock, and the local officers, were present at a meeting of the L.D.F. in Blacklion on Thursday night. Sergeant Rock read special communications and Group Leader of the L.D.F. was appointed to give lectures.

The wedding took place, with Nuptial Mass, at Drumshambo Church, of Francis, youngest son of the late John and Mrs. McGovern, Barran, Blacklion, and Margaret Teresa, third daughter of the late Mr. Peter Dolan and Mrs. Dolan, Crotty, Drumshambo. Rev. Father Cummins, C.C., performed the ceremony. Mr. Michael McGovern (brother of the groom) was best man, and Miss Dolan, (sister of the bride), was bridesmaid.

There was a large attendance at the funeral in Doobally of Mrs. Patk. McLoughlin, Tullinamoal. Rev. J. J. Murtagh, C.C., officiated in the church and at the graveside. .

17-10-1942. MANORHAMILTON NEWS. Forestry Officials—Mr. Curran who has been Forestry Inspector at Manorhamilton during the past two years has been transferred to Co, Cork, and is replaced by Mr. Madden who comes from Tipperary.

Teacher’s Appointment—Miss Dillon, assistant in the girls’ school, has been appointed assistant in Drumlease N.S., Dromahair. She possesses a lady-like charm, all her own and her departure from Manorhamilton is very much regretted.

Legion Of Mary—To mark the first anniversary of the formation of a branch of the Legion of Mary at Manorhamilton a very enjoyable function was held in the Technical School on Thursday evening (1st inst.). Tea was provided by the Legionaries and vocal, items were contributed, Bro. Ferdinand being the principal contributor. The guests at the evening were Rev. Fr. Brady, C.C.; Rev. Father McGrail, C.C.; Rev, Fr. Gilbride, and Bros. Ferdinand and Leonard. Rev. Fr. Brady congratulated the Legionaries on the good work they had performed during the year.

17-10-1942. SENIOR FOOTBALL FINAL. NEXT SUNDAYS GAME AT THE GAELIC PARK. At the Gaelic Park, Enniskillen on Sunday next Fermanagh’s two star teams— Lisnaskea Emmets and Newtownbutler St. Comgalls—clash once more in quest of county honours when they meet in the county final of the Fermanagh Senior Football Championship. So keen is the rivalry between these teams and so well are they .matched that this contest for premier honours should prove one of the best games seen in Fermanagh for a long time. The championship title has always been the most coveted in G.A. A. competitions and many memorable clashes have occurred in recent years between these teams for the blue riband of Fermanagh football.

Few teams can boast such an array of inter-county talent as the Emmets and St. Comgalls, for between them they comprise two-thirds of the Fermanagh county team. Lisnaskea have the services of such well-known players as T. Durnian, F. Johnston, A. Smith, F. O’Dowd, Duffy and Collins, whilst Newtownbutler have inter-county stars in E. McQuillan, B. Allen, M. McDermott and Murray. Two splendid additions to the .Newtown team lately have been the Smith brothers—M. Smith in particular being a, promising youth of inter-county status.

Only a month or so ago Lisnaskea triumphed over Newtown in the League final by a very narrow margin when the latter seemed favourites for the title. Newtown were short some of their regular team on that occasion however. The St. Comgalls’ victory over Clones-one of Monaghan’s best senior teams—in the Border League a fortnight ago greatly enhances their chances against the. Fermanagh Champions, but the Emmets have always proved they are a difficult combination to beat in championship struggles. Contests between Lisnaskea and Newtownbutler are invariably sparkling exhibitions of fast and clever football which have always attracted bumper crowds, and Sunday’s game should certainly draw a record crowd to the Gaelic Park. The throw-in will be at 4 p.m. and Rev. B. Mahon, Irvinestown, whose competency as a referee is widely recognised, will have charge of the game. Spectators are asked to note carefully that owing to the difficulty in stewarding the pitch at recent matches nobody except players and officials will be allowed inside the paling fences.

17-10-1942. ‘WIN BY STRATEGY BEST FOR ALL OF US” AN AMERICAN VIEW. “In the light of what you are doing in India, how do expect us to talk about principles and look our soldiers in the eye.”? This question is asked in an “Open Letter to the People of England” in the current issue of the magazine “Life.” The document demands one thing from Britain: “Quit fighting the war to hold the Empire together, and join with Russia and your allies to fight the war to win by whatever strategy is best for all of us. “After victory has been won, then the British .people can decide-what to do about .the Empire—for you may be sure we don’t want it. “But if you cling to the Empire at the expense of the United Nations’ victory you will lose the war … because you will lose us.” Briefly, there are two wars,’ the letter goes on “one we are actually. fighting and the other we must fight in order, to win. The war we are actually fighting is a war to save America. Nothing else. “Everyone here is prepared to fight this war to any extremes just as everybody in England will go to any extreme to save England. “But this kind of war of each trying to save himself is just the set-up for Hitler. If we are really going to overwhelm the Axis we must envision and fight for something bigger than either England or the United States. “We Americans are a strange people, maybe you think of us as rather practical. But you cannot understand us at all unless you realise what principles mean to us.” We fought you on principles in the first place. Once in our history we killed 600,000 of our own sons to establish the principle of freedom for the black man.” “Life ” suggests that the British may object that Americans have not defined these principles very well yet—“and that’s a fair objection.” “One reason we have not defined them is that we are not convinced yon would fight for them even if they were defined.” ‘’For instance, we realise that you have difficult problems in India, but we don’t see your “solution” to date provides any evidence of principles of any kind.’

17-10-1942. DISREGARD FOR TRUTH AMD HONESTY. PROTESTANT ARCHBISHOP PERTURBED. Speaking on Tuesday at the Joint Synod of Dublin, Kildare and Glendalough diocese, the Most Rev. Dr Barton, Protestant Archbishop of Dublin, referred to “the growing disregard for the sacredness of truth and honesty,’’ and said he had been, seriously perturbed of late by evidence of that disregard. Could a society be in a healthy state he asked in which a man would boast openly and without shame of how he had treated the Customs, or his neighbours, or in which there was graft and wire-pulling. He was convinced that a nation’s taxes could at once be reduced by 50 per cent, at the very least if its citizens could be trusted to tell the truth and to deal as conscientiously with Government departments as a man was expected to deal with his neighbours.

17-10-1942. NORTH LEITRIM FARMERS’ UNION. MEETING IN MANORHAMILTON. A special meeting of the above was held in McGloin’s Hall, Manorhamilton, on Oct. 7th. Mr. James Kerrigan, president, who presided, said that the appointment of a new Agricultural Commission which was composed almost entirely of professors boded ill for the poor farmers of Connaught. Such a Commission to be effective should be composed of practical farmers, and the Congested Districts should have representation as well as the plains of Boyle. Mr. Kerrigan said that North Leitrim was in a serious position owing to the bad harvest and the destruction of hay and crops by flooding and the drainage scheme which was turned down twelve, years ago should be revived. Mr. John McGarraghy, said that .much damage had been done in Mullies by flooding of the Bonet, and several farmers had lost large quantities of hay. Referring to the increased rates Mr. McGarraghy said the new County Council would be expected to work hard for a reduction in the rates.

Mr. P. J. O’Rourke, secretary, said that after working for four years in trying to establish a. Farmers’ Union  in North Leitrim, and after encountering many difficulties and disappointments he was glad to be able to state that his work and teaching had not been in vain because farmers all over the area were beginning to take a lively interest in the Union. Old prejudices, went on the speaker, are dying fast, and the workers on the land have come to realise the importance of their task in producing the food supply of the Nation. They have also learned after long years of disillusionment that the promise of politicians are made to be broken. I don’t mean to say that all politicians are selfish or dishonest, but I am not overstepping the mark when I say that men who are highly educated and claim to be intensely  patriotic have time and again made promises which they must have known could not possibly be fulfilled. I have it from usually well informed sources that a General Election will take place inside of a few months, and farmers will need to be on the alert if they are not to be fooled all the time. Thousands upon thousands of pounds have been spent for the past few years in building new houses in the cities tod towns, and in providing water schemes for the smallest villages, but when the farmers of North Leitrim apply for a grant to have a corn mill erected no money can be spared to facilitate them. When farmers who have lands which do not require drainage petition the Minister fop Agriculture to give grants for reclamation plots on the old system their appeal is turned down. They must make drains no matter what about the potatoes. The matter boiled down to one important point—that the farmer was disregarded because he generally supported politicians who knew nothing about farming. The farmers were dictated to by officials who had only a theoretical knowledge of farming. The Labour Party were now coming forward asking the people to return them to power at the next Election and hinting that they had a brand new plan for putting the agricultural community on their feet. Judging by letters which had appeared in the daily papers recently from men who are prominent in the Labour movement, the Labour Party expects farmers to produce food below the cost of production. I believe a Labour Government would fix the price of milk going to creameries at about 4d per gallon.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT. The relatives and friends of the Late Monsignor Soden, Manorhamilton, wrote expressing gratitude for the Co. Council’s vote of sympathy, and hoped the note would be accepted in acknowledgment.

NO OBJECTION. A letter was received from the Department stating that the Minister in pursuance of the Local Authorities (Financial Provisions) Act, 1921, had consented to the Leitrim County Council borrowing by way of temporary overdraft for the purpose of providing temporarily for current expenses, a sum not exceeding £15,000.

PARISH COUNCIL’S VIEWS. Mr. J. P, Eames, Secretary, Ballaghameehan Parish Council, wrote that at a meeting of that body on the 13th Sept., the following resolution was proposed by Mr. Joe Fox and seconded by Mr. Jas. Connolly—“That the Parish Council view with alarm the increase in rates, and they consider the time has come to reduce the rates,. and give an opportunity to the ratepayers to pay.” The communication was noted.

17-10-1942. RUBBER SHORTAGE “MAY STOP ROAD TRANSPORT” Major Eastwood, Yorkshire Road Traffic Commissioner, told road transport operators at Halifax on Saturday that if the country continues to use rubber at the present rate road transport will be brought to a complete standstill. Passenger services would have to be cut to the bone, and all road services in Yorkshire might have to be stopped after 9 p.m.

17-10-1942. PERMITS FOR SIX COUNTIES. BRITISH GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCEMENT. DRASTIC. REGULATIONS. STATEMENTS IN WESTMINSTER AND STORMONT. An important announcement regarding the control of emigrants into Northern Ireland from “Eire” and the reinstatement in employment after the war of demobilised soldiers was made in the British House of Commons on Thursday by Mr. Herbert, Morrison, Home Secretary. Mr.. Morrison said: ‘During the past two years there has been a considerable influx into Northern Ireland of persons normally resident elsewhere, and this influx is continuing to a considerable extent. “It has been decided to take power by a Defence Regulation to institute a system of control over persons who come to Northern Ireland from ‘Eire,’ Great Britain, or elsewhere, and to require such persons to furnish particulars as to their address and occupation.” “Subject to exceptions for children and persons in the service of the Crown, all British subjects who were not ordinarily resident in Northern Ireland on January 1, 1940, will be required if they desire to take up. residence there or to continue to reside there for longer than six weeks to obtain permits which will be issued on my behalf by the Ministry of Home Affairs in Northern Ireland. Unless there are security objections in individual cases, permits will be granted for so long as their services, are needed to applicants who are already in occupations and to those who in future come into Northern Ireland to take up work. “They will also be granted to those who ought to be allowed to remain there on compassionate or other special grounds.

“Each permit will bear a photograph of the holder, and will in all cases be issued for a period of six mouths or for the duration of the employment specified in the permit, whichever is the less. “These will be renewable on the same conditions as govern their issue. “Permit-holders will be required to notify the authorities of any change of address. The immediate objective of the schema is to deal with war conditions, but it is also contemplated that the scheme will be of value on the termination of hostilities for the purpose of facilitating the reinstatement in employment of demobilised men from Northern Ireland who join the Forces as volunteers. “At such a time it will be right to give to the demobilised volunteers, preference in the labour market of Northern Ireland over these newcomers, and for this purpose to have power to terminate the permits granted to persons who are in employment.

“It is, accordingly contemplated, that the scheme will be kept in existence for a reasonable time after the war and if the Defence Regulations should expire before the demobilised men have had reasonable opportunity of being absorbed into employment, it will, in the view of the Government, be right that the necessary legislation should be introduced in the United Kingdom Parliament for a temporary prolongation of the system.” Sir Hugh O’Neill-Can you say whether these Regulations will give power to deport people who have come in since Jan., 1940, and in respect of whom it is not thought desirable to give permits? Mr. Morrison.—Yes, there is no obligation on the Northern Ireland Minister of Home Affairs, acting for me, to grant a permit, and it can be withdrawn at any time. I am assured that the Minister for Home Affairs in Northern Ireland will be reasonable in the exercise of this power.

STORMONT ANNOUNCEMENT. A statement on similar lines was made by the Prime Minister, Rt. Hon. J. M. Andrews, in Stormont on Thursday afternoon, and was received with cheers. Mr. J. W. Nixon asked if the Prime Minister would continue the good work by restraining his Cabinet colleagues and other members from going to ‘Eire,’ sometimes in doubtful company?” The Prime Minister—I would remind the House that that was a statement made by the Secretary of State in the British Parliament and as a matter of courtesy I have read it to this House. I have nothing further to add.

24-10-1942. LISNASKEA POTEEN CASE. 23 GALLONS WASH SEIZED. FARMER TO SERVE THREE MONTHS. A farmer, who lives on a small mountain holding and has a wife and seven children, was granted a month at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, in order to get in his crop before serving a three months’ hard labour sentence imposed in connection with a poteen case. The defendant was James Wallace, of Carrowmaculla, Lisnaskea, who was charged by District-Inspector Smyth with having in his possession on 7th October at Carrowmaculla, twenty-three gallons of wash.

Sergeant Kirkpatrick, R.U.C., gave evidence that at 6.10 p.m. on 7th inst., in company with other police, he went to the dwelling house of the defendant to search for illicit spirits. In a bedroom off the kitchen, witness found a barrel containing twenty-three gallons of wash, the barrel being heavily covered with bags. Defendant was not present and witness went to where, he was working a mile away. On being told what the police had found and being asked for an explanation defendant, witness alleged, replied “It is mine. I am only a poor man and I suppose it will put me out of the place.” Witness, then brought him to the house and pointed out the illicit spirits be had found. Witness subsequently destroyed all the wash except the sample taken for analysis.

To Mr. Winslow, witness stated he agreed defendant lived in a very small farm up in the mountains and had a wife and seven children. When Mr. Winslow asked his Worship (Major T. W. Dickie, R.M.) to deal as leniently with the defendant as possible, District-Inspector Smyth said defendant had .been convicted and sentenced to four months’ imprisonment at Lisnaskea, on 10th December. 1927, for having in his possession a still and illicit spirits. Mr. Winslow—This unfortunate man lives on a very poor mountain farm. He had made the poteen and as a result he was now before the Court. He was married and had a lot of small children. In addition he had not got his crop saved. District-Inspector Smyth—It is all right, but he is not quite so innocent as he is made out to be. Our information is that he is making quite a lot out of illicit, spirits at the present time and that some of our visitors to this country have found out his dwelling house and are regular attenders.

His Worship said that having been convicted before defendant must have known perfectly well the risk he was running. In the circumstances he ordered a sentence of three months’ hard labour. On the application of Mr. Winslow, District-Inspector Smyth said he would not execute the order for defendant’s arrest for a month so that he could get his crop saved. Later, Mr. Winslow enquired if his Worship would substitute a monetary penalty which would be paid by some friends. His Warship refused the request stating that in these cases his iron rule was jail and so far as he was concerned he would not depart from that rule even if the defendant was ready to pay a £500 fine. It was the only way to stop it. He was sorry he could not accede to the request.

24-10-1942. SESSIONS ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. Several appeals before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C.,  at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Tuesday resolved themselves into pleas for leniency and a reduction of the penalty. £60 FINE SUBSTITUTED. Mark Prunty, Drumany, Lisnaskea, appealed against sentence of three mouths’ imprisonment for harbouring 6cwt. of white flour for the purpose of unlawfully exporting it. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, said after the conviction the defendant pleaded guilty. He stated that he knew the flour was there, and he had nothing to do with it and that he would not tell who put it there. Judge—He pleaded guilty, and that is an end of it as far as I am concerned. Mr. Cooper—Since then it came to my knowledge through another source—in fact, a party called on me and informed me that they were the real smugglers, and asked me if I would get a penalty of £60 put on this man. They said they would pay the money. I believe the money is in Court. I told Mr. Murphy was prepared to do that. Mr. J. Murphy (for appellant)—I had to advise my client that, there was no case to come before the Court. He was charged with harbouring and admitted he saw the flour put in an outhouse and raised no objection. The Judge withdrew the order for imprisonment and. substituted a penalty of £60. A man immediately walked forward and paid the amount of the fine in notes.

24-10-1942. PRISON SENTENCE TO STAND. Philip Swift, Lisnashillinda, Newtownbutler, for whom Mr. Black appeared, appealed against sentence of four months’ imprisonment without hard labour for harbouring 14cwts. of sulphate of ammonia and 12 stones of flour for the purpose of exporting it. Mr. J. Cooper said that after keeping Swift under observation and seeing three military tracks moving in certain directions Sergeant Green went to Swift’s house and in a byre found two lots in which were the sulphate of ammonia and flour. Soldiers pointed this out as the stuff they had brought there. They were promised £2 for their work. Both soldiers were reduced in rank. It was a bad day for them. The R.M. gave Swift- 6 months’ imprisonment. Mr. Black appealed to him and he reduced it to five months, and he appealed again, and it was reduced to four months.

Mr. Black—There is a further appeal to-day. I advised my client to plead guilty, and I appeal on this boy’s behalf for the substitution of a monetary penalty in lieu of imprisonment. He is 25 years of age, was married about year ago and has one little baby. He lives with his mother and looks after the farm. His mother has 25 acres under tillage, and this boy is responsible for the saving and harvesting of the crops. There will be nobody to work unless he is made available. This is the first time he has been charged with any offence of this nature. Mr. Cooper—He has been fined for making illicit spirits. Mr. Black said the young man was in delicate health, and he handed in a certificate from Dr. Dolan showing that for two years he had been treating him for gastritis and complications. The co-defendant (another man charged in connection with the same offence) had only been fined.

1942 Fermanagh Herald – Local News.

21st February 1942. OBITUARY. MRS. THOMPSON, IRVINESTOWN. Amongst her numerous friends in Fermanagh and Tyrone the news of the death- of Mrs. Mary Thompson, Main Street, Irvinestown, has caused deep regret. Deceased was widow of Mr. Wm. Thompson, who predeceased her 23 years ago. Typical of genuine Irish womanhood—a good wife and mother and a kind and helpful neighbour—her admirable traits of character won for herself the highest esteem amongst all classes of the community. The sad end came on Tuesday, the 10th inst., after a short illness, during which she had the best medical attendance and tender nursing. Mrs. Thompson was deeply devout in the practice of her religious obligations and gave a shining example in this respect. During her illness she was frequently visited by the Rev. J. Trainor, P.P., and Rev. B. Lappin, C.C., and in her last moments Father Trainor was at her bedside. Fortified by the consoling rites of the Church, her death was a holy and a happy one. May her soul rest in peace.

There was a large and representative attendance at the funeral on Thursday the 12th inst., those present including the professional and commercial classes of a wide area. Requiem Mass was celebrated in the Sacred Heart Church, Irvinestown, by the Rev. B. Lappin, after which Father Trainor, P.P. in the course of a touching panegyric, referred to the exemplary Christian qualities, of the deceased. Her whole life, he said, was in accord with Divine precept; for very many years she was a daily Communicant, and as well as attending daily Mass, paid visits to the Blessed Sacrament in the Church every evening. She was foremost in every local work connected with religious associations, and was a devout member of the Sacred Heart Sodality for years. By her death, the parish had lost a member of the Catholic flock which by word and deed had given an edifying example to all. On behalf of priests and people he sympathised with the members of deceased’s family, and exhorted the faithful of the parish to be mindful of her in their prayers.

Father Trainor, assisted by Father Lappin, officiated at the graveside.

The chief mourners were William and James (sons), Mrs. G. Thompson, Dromore (daughter-in-law}Joseph and James Eves, Edemey (brothers) ; Mrs. McElrone, Clonelly; Mrs. McCartney, Philadelphia (sisters); James McElrone, Clonelly (brother-in-law.); Mrs. O’Kane, Pettigo; Mrs. Jas. Eves, Irvinestown; Mrs. Jos. Eves, Edemey; Mrs. Patrick Thompson, Portstewart (sisters-in-law). Clergy present, were:—Very Rev. J. Trainor, P.P.; Rev. John Eves, Ederney; Rev. B. Lappin, C.C., Whitehill; Rev. H. O’Hanlon, C.C., Newtownbutler, Rev. E. Flanagan, C.C., Ederney; Rev. C. McCormack, C.C., Pettigo.

21st February 1942. PETTIGO NEWS. A popular wedding took place in St. Patrick’s Church, Aghyaran, the contracting parties being Mr. Bernard McGrath, Carn, Pettigo, and Miss Nan McHugh, Cloghore. Mr, W. M. McKenna, Slavin, a cousin of the bride, was best man, and Miss Maggie McHugh, Magheramena, Belleek, also a cousin of the bride, was bridesmaid. The ceremony with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev. C. Byrne, P.P.

The death took place at her residence “Gortnaree” Pettigo of Miss Isabella Brandon. Deceased was one of the most respected ladies in the district

A very successful whist drive was held in Pettigo Courthouse, on Sunday night week which was organised by Pettigo branch of the Legion of Mary. The prize winners were:—Mrs. J. P. Griffin. Pettigo, 1: Mrs. P. J. Toomey, Pettigo, 2; Miss Maisie Britton, ‘Fincashel’ 3; Mrs. B. Breslin, Pettigo, 4; Gents prize, Mr. Charles Friel, Customs officer. After distributing of the prizes, Rev. P. McCormack, C.C., spiritual director, thanked all who attended.

The marriage took place in St. Brigid’s (sic) St. Joseph’s) Church, Belleek, of Mr. Michael Monaghan, Tamar, Pettigo, and Miss Annie Donnelly, Belalt, Pettigo. Mr. Peter Monaghan, brother of the bridegroom, was best man, and Miss Lizzie Monaghan, sister of the bridegroom, was bridesmaid. The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev. Father MacCloskey, C.C., Belleek.

Pettigo customs officials recently seized a quantity of butter, sugar and other articles from persons who were attempting to export them to the six-counties.

 

The death took place in Donegal Hospital, after a lingering illness, of Mr, Hugh McGee. Deceased who was only 25 years of age, leaves a sorrowing father and brothers.

A very-enjoyable dance was held in Letter Hall on Wednesday night of last week. The proceeds wore in aid of the local Band. The music was supplied by the Kentucky Trio Dance Band. Mr. Wm. H. Marshall, Skea, was M.C.

 

A pretty wedding took place in St. Mary’s Parish Church., Pettigo, the contracting parties being Mr. Frank Monaghan. Brookhill, Pettigo, and Miss Evylin McGrath, Carntressy, Pettigo. Mr. Michael. McGrath, brother of the bride, was best man, and Miss Tessie McGrath was bridesmaid. The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev P. McCormick, C.C., Pettigo.

21st February 1942. KINLOUGH MAN’S EXPERIENCE. A DAY IN BUNDORAN. At Ballyshannon District Court, Brian McGowan, Kinlough, was charged with being drunk on 27th December and with unlawfully damaging a car. Supt. T. Noonan, prosecuted and Mr. E. P. Condon defended.

Evidence was given that a man from Tullaghan left his motor van on the street in Bundoran. As he was not capable of driving the van that night, the Sergeant took away the ignition key and the man stayed in Bundoran. The van was left on the street all night. On that day Brian McGowan came into Bundoran with a load of potatoes in a donkey cart. He sold the potatoes, and some hours later converted the donkey and cart into cash. He got “gloriously’’ drunk and fell asleep somewhere in the vicinity of the East End. Some boys playing a prank took off his boots and put him in the van. When McGowan awoke he thought he was imprisoned in the van, and not knowing anything of the mechanism of a car—never being in a car in his life—he did not know how to get out. He lifted the starting handle ‘ of the car and smashed the windows. Then he found he could open the van at the back and succeeded in getting out that way. He could not find one of his boots and went home in his bare feet. The defendant, it was stated, paid £2 19s 6d compensation to the owner of the car. Justice O‘Hanrahan remarking that the defendant had paid dearly for his day applied the Probation, Act.

 

21st February 1942. BLACKLION DISTRICT NEWS. The death has occurred in England of Miss Kathleen Murray, formerly of Roo, Blacklion.

There was an equipment inspection on Wednesday and Thursday, nights at meetings of the local Security Force in Barran and Blacklion.

Mrs. Chas. Dolan presided at a meeting of the local Red Cross Branch in Blacklion on Friday evening. Arrangements were in progress for first-aid lectures.

The death of Miss Rose Quinn, which took place at her residence, Dernaseer, Blacklion, at an advanced age, has caused deep regret. Deceased belonged to an old and esteemed family. . The funeral was largely attended. Rev. Francis Shiels officiated in the church and at the graveside.

New concrete streets are replacing the old pavements in Blacklion. The work is a relief scheme in charge of the County Council.

 

21st February 1942. MR. DE VALERA IN CAVAN. PROFITEERING CONDEMNED. Speaking at a Fianna Fail Convention in Cavan on Sunday, Mr. de Valera said —The Fianna Fail Organisation being responsible for the election of the present Government had a special duty to be in the forefront of every national endeavour —in building up the defence forces, and in the production of food and fuel. He recalled that it had been founded as a national organisation, and said he thought it would be admitted that their main political objective had been achieved as far as the 26 Counties were concerned.

“We are a completely sovereign State, but, unfortunately, a portion of our country has been cut off, and until it is reunited to the rest no Nationalist can say that the national objective has been achieved. I think the whole nation is united in that, because the other major party and the Labour Party also agreed.’’ There were those who said that this, that and the other thing would happen when war came, but nothing took place which would not have happened to a completely sovereign State.

In making an appeal for good citizenship in the matter of reporting profiteering to the authorities, Mr. de Valera said he knew that people did not like to report their neighbours, but they must make up their minds to report profiteering. If your neighbour is a decent fellow you should act decently by him, but if your neighbour is profiteering on the community he is not a decent fellow and he does not deserve decent treatment.

One of the things we want most is the assistance of each individual in the community. We can’t have a policeman in every house or an inspector on every doorstep. Already there are far more inspectors than we would like to have. If we want to diminish the number of police or inspectors the quickest and best way is for each individual citizen to be an inspector for the community.

We should see that if there are people who are not decent in the neighbourhood they will not get away with making wealth at the expense of the poor, for that is what it often is.

“NO LEADER BUT DE VALERA.” Rev. T. Maguire, P. P., Newtownbutler, Co. Fermanagh, said, that they across the Border placed their full trust and confidence in the Government in Dublin for their deliverance. They had no leader but Mr. de Valera. The resolutions passed included one asking the Government to use all necessary compulsion short of conscription to ensure that all available young men would be brought into the Defence Forces.

21st February 1942. EXPORTING CHARGE. TWO LEITRIM MEN FINED AT BELLEEK. At Belleek Petty Sessions before Major Dickie, R. M., Bernard Brady and Francis Ferguson, both of Townalick, Rossinver, Co. Leitrim, were charged on remand with being knowingly concerned in the illegal, exportation of 90 21b. loaves, 1 cwt carbide, 61bs. cocoa and l lb. tea at Garrison on January 3 and were each fined £10 and £2 2s costs.

 

21st February 1942. £40 FINE TO REMAIN. NEWTOWNBUTLER MAN S APPEAL. COAL INTENDED FOR EXPORT. A farmer whose house is said to be situated on the very border, appealed at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions against a fine of £40 imposed on him at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions for having, as alleged, harboured 16½ tons of coal which was intended for export to the 26-Counties. In addition to the fine the Resident Magistrate had ordered the confiscation of the coal.

The appellant was William Coffey, Clonmacken, Newtownbutler, and he was represented by Mr. J. B. Murphy, solicitor. After a re-hearing of the evidence (already published in this newspaper) Deputy Judge Ellison, K. C., said that taking appellant’s circumstances into consideration (it had been stated his farm was 26 acres in extent) and the close proximity of his place to the border, he was constrained to take the view that appellant had the coal for an improper purpose. Accordingly he (the Judge), affirmed (the lower court ruling.

Mr. Murphy asked his Honour to consider the amount of the penalty. The forfeiture of the coal was in itself a loss of £64 and this with the £40 fine made the total penalty £104. Did his Honour not consider that justice could be met by the imposition of a smaller penalty. When the fine was imposed, said Mr. Murphy, he R.M. had in his mind decided that the penalty must be such as would deter other people from attempting to export coal. The loss of 16½ tons of coal alone would be a tremendous and sufficient deterrent in a case of the sort, he submitted. He suggested that, a £104 penalty on a 20-acre farmer was really too large in a case of the sort even though, the R.M. wanted, and very properly so, to make an example of him. The loss of 16½ tons of coal to appellant was appalling.

Mr .J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, who represented the Customs Authorities, “very strongly” opposed the application for a reduced fine. He suggested that the coal never at any time belonged to appellant but to a Clones resident. People who did this sort of thing took the risk with their eyes open. At the present time, he understood tea was being sold for 16s a pound in Eire and coal was a very high price there too. His Honour had another case in which the appellant had been fined £40. People who got away with fines were prepared to carry on the racket owing to the high profits realised. It was nothing to some of them to lose now and again.

Mr. Murphy said he was able to inform Mr. Cooper that if he went through the town of Clones he would not find a single ton of British coal. In the other case referred to the appellant had a farm of nearly one hundred acres, he did not lose the coal, and he was fined £20. He (Mr. Murphy) thought it no harm, to tell his Honour that in Co. Tyrone, the Judge was rather more lenient and he (the solicitor) thought all the penalties should of a certain sameness.

Mr. Cooper—He could have been fined £500 under -the Act.

His Honour said he could not think that a 26-acre farmer was doing this transaction on his own. It seemed as if he was a catspaw for somebody else and he (the Judge) supposed that somebody else would pay for it. Consequently he could not see his way to grant the reduction asked for.

 

28th February 1942. AMERICAN TOOLS STOLEN. TWO TYRONE MEN RECEIVE JAIL SENTENCE. Magistrate’s Strong Comments at Kesh.

Kesh Courthouse on Tuesday resembled a hardware shop, when a large number of tools were exhibited in a larceny case. The defendants were James E. Maguire, Fivemiletown, and Michael McGinn, Ballynagowan, Clogher, charged with, the larceny of tools from a camp where they were employed on work of national importance. Mr. Smith, for the defendants, entered a plea of guilty. District Inspector Walshe referred in strong terms to the extensive larceny of tools at the camp. The tools had been brought from overseas for use on work of national importance. Sailors’ lives had been risked in bringing them over—and in some cases lives had been lost. He referred to the difficulty of getting replacements, and said that defendants had been employed at good wages and took advantage of their position to steal the tools given them to work with. It amounted to sabotage. Mr. Smith said that as he had entered a plea of guilty he thought it was unnecessary for the District Inspector to go into details,. He said Maguire was a married man with two, children aged 10 and 8½ years. He made a strong appeal for leniency in these cases.

Major Dickie, R. M. said he had been issuing stern warnings in these cases and he had his mind made up. It was .shocking treatment for these people coming to help them. His Worship sentenced each defendant to three months’ imprisonment and to one of the camp officers commented: “I am sorry to apologise for the conduct of my fellow-countrymen.”

 

28th February 1942. PETTIGO NOTES.  The death took .place in Enniskillen Hospital on Friday of Mrs. J. McClelland, Glenagarn, Pettigo. Deceased who was in the prime of life, leaves a husband and four children. The funeral to Tubrid cemetery was one of the largest ever seen in the district. The chief mourners were J. McClelland (husband); John, Edward, James and Robert McClelland (sons). The Rev. J. G. Sandford (rector),  officiated  at the graveside.

On Monday night an enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Hall, Lettercran proceeds being, in aid of repairs. The music was supplied by Mr. Wm. Baird and Mr. James McGrath, Mr. B. Cunningham being M.C.

Pettigo monthly fair on Friday was one of the briskest held in the village for three years. Prices for good quality animals were enticing. Springing cows and heifers, £20 10s 0d to £35 each; three year old heifers £19 to £21 each; two year olds, £14 to £15 10s 0d; small calves from £4 to £7 10s 0d; young pigs 35/- each.

28th February 1942. NOVELTY FOR FERMANAGH. As will be seen in our advertisement columns a silage mowing film is to be shown in Brookeborough Courthouse on Tuesday night of next week. This film has been made in the Six Counties and includes County Fermanagh farmers making silage. This should be interesting to all farmers as in addition to being the first appearance of this film in the county, silage making is the all-important operation on the farm, in a county with abundance of grass, wet climate and where, milk provides the largest proportion of the farmer’s income, .

 

BLACKLION DISTRICT NEWS. At a bull show for premiums at Brockagh, only two animals were exhibited.

There was a large attendance at a concert on Sunday night under the auspices of the Blacklion G.F.C. A report will appear in our next issue.

Most of the officers and committee were present at a Red Cross branch meeting in Blacklion on Friday evening. A number of members were enrolled.

Despite the difficulty of procuring building material, two new houses have been erected in the district, one for Mr. John McGinley, Belcoo, and the other for Mr. J. Armstrong, Blacklion.

During, the week Messrs. O’Connor and O’Keeffe attended at four centres in the district and distributed tons of seed oats and potatoes to farmers. The prices are 14/- per cwt. for oats, and 4/- per cwt. for potatoes.

There is at present a great demand for horses in the district. Some prices paid by buyers range from £30 to £45, and one animal, the property of Mr. J. McGovern, Loughan, was purchased at £66.

There was a large supply of cattle at Blacklion fair on Monday. Prices were in excess of the quotations of the previous fair, and many sales were effected.

The death of Mr. Patk, McGoldrick, merchant, which took place at his residence, Bealbally, Glangevlin, has caused deep regret over a wide area. Deceased, a prosperous young business man, was very popular in the district. He was a son of the late Mr. Patk. McGoldrick, who was a member of the old District Council and a member of the old Enniskillen Board of Guardians for many years. Deep sympathy is extended to deceased’s young wife, family, brother and sisters, The funeral to St. Patrick’s, Glangevlin, on Wednesday, was the largest seen in the district for many years. Rev. J. McCabe, P.P., who celebrated Requiem Mass, officiated at the graveside.

 

28th February 1942. ROOSTER FOR THE AIR FORCE. IRVINESTOWN MAN IN KESH CASE. Thomas Curley, Irvinestown, was charged at Kesh Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., that being a collector of eggs he obtained eggs from a person other than a producer registered with him for that purpose. He was also charged with obtaining the eggs at a price other than that permitted.

District Inspector Walshe, said that defendant was a licensed collector of eggs and had done wrong to purchase eggs from persons residing in the 26-Counties.

Defendant said that he had obtained the eggs for members of .the King’s forces who were going to England to see their wives.

His Worship — You must not do it.

Defendant—I would not have done it had I known it was any offence. I had them for the troops. 1 came to a very big loss at the same time.

The District Inspector said that defendant had 112 eggs, 8 lbs creamery butter, 11 lbs sugar, 55 hens, three geese, one duck, one rooster, and lost the whole lot.

Defendant said he thought he was doing a good turn purchasing the eggs at a cheaper rate than in the Six Counties.

His Worship—What would an air force man be wanting with a rooster? (laughter).

A fine of 20s was imposed on each summons.

 

DANCING CLASS IN COLLEGIATE SCHOOL. At the January meeting of the County Fermanagh Regional Education Committee Mr. C. McKeown complained of the admission of unauthorised persons to a dancing class held in the Enniskillen Collegiate School. By way of explanation the following letter was received from the Headmistress (Mrs. M. C. Smith M.A.) at the Committee’s monthly meeting on Friday. “In reply to your letter Miss Dobbin did carry on a dancing class at the School under the following circumstances. She was running a class for adults, chiefly former pupils of the School in the Minor Town Hall, but it was so much occupied that she found herself without a room and so asked me if she could carry on here. I have absolute confidence in Miss Dobbin and know that she would not abuse the privilege. It is naturally, important that her classes should pay as travelling from Dublin is expensive. It is to our School’s interest that they should pay otherwise we should lose Miss Dobbin’s services. The class, which was never advertised is not now functioning nor has it done so this term. The class was attended during last term by one or two people from Portora and one or two officers who came for a few lessons. I hope no objection can be taken to this under present circumstances. Miss Catt (proprietor) made herself responsible for the lighting and I have not sent in the bill for this and I shall have to find out the cost.” The explanation was accepted.

 

1942 Fermanagh Herald.

.JANUARY 14, 1942. LARCENY CHARGE AT CASTLEDERG. ‘BOUGHT CYCLE FROM FERMANAGH MAN” Before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., at Castlederg Court, two youths, James Hegarty and William John Hegarty, Cormacoll, Drumquin, brothers, pleaded not guilty to the larceny of a cycle, value £4. They were not professionally represented. Thomas Lynch gave evidence that on Sunday, 7th Sept. he left his bicycle outside Castlederg Chapel and when he came out it was gone. On 28th Sept. he observed a cycle outside a house in Scraghey and on examination. identified it as his although the handle grips and oil bath had been removed. James Hegarty claimed the cycle and said he had bought it from his brother William John. Witness reported the matter to the police. Sergt. Blackstock said James Hegarty came to the barracks and said he bought the cycle from his brother for £2.15s.  William John said he bought the bicycle from a Fermanagh man for £3. He described the Fermanagh man but the police could not trace him. Mr. Long at this stage dismissed the case against James. William John Hegarty gave evidence that he met the Fermanagh man on the road and he offered to sell the cycle, but witness had no money at the time, and they arranged to meet at Castlederg later on. He did so and paid 30s and got possession of the cycle; he met him later by appointment and paid a further £2, getting 7s 6d as a lucks penny on condition that witness would give back the oil bath and witness agreed. The Fermanagh man appeared to have plenty of money. Cross-examined by the District-Inspector, witness said the Fermanagh man would turn his back to people who were passing them when they were negotiating the sale. He had not seen the man since he bought the cycle. Mr. Long said there was a doubt in the case and he would dismiss it, but he made an order that the cycle be returned to Thomas Lynch.

JANUARY 14, 1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER FIRE. BUSINESS PREMISES SERIOUSLY DAMAGED. Serious damage was caused by a fire which broke out during the blackout hours in the grocery and drapery premises of Mr. John J. O’Donnell, Main Street, Newtownbutler. The outbreak occurred on Saturday morning. The alarm was given by the proprietor, Mr. O’Donnell, who was awakened by the crackling of burning timber. He ran to his sister’s bedroom and carried her through the flames to the Main Street. R.U.C. and military assisted civilians to fight the outbreak but by the time they arrived the fire had a strong hold and the flames were extending to the adjoining shop. Water was carried by civilians from the two town pumps in buckets, tubs and creamery cans. When it was seen that it was impossible to try and confine it. Mr. Joseph McNamee and his four sons climbed to the roof of an adjoining shop and broke down the roof, portion of which fell on Mr. McNamee, who was rescued by his son, Marcus. The Enniskillen fire brigade was  summoned but when it arrived on the scene the local residents had the fire under control. Mr. O’Donnell’s premises included a private house as well as a large store, all of which were burned to the ground.

JANUARY 14, 1942. G.N.R. OFFICIAL DEAD. NATIVE OF MAGUIRESBRIDGE. The death has taken place at a Belfast nursing home of Mr. W. A. F. Graham, aged 46, deputy traffic manager of the Great Northern Railway Co. He was a native of Maguiresbridge, Co. Fermanagh, and was educated at Enniskillen Model School, and entered the railway service 29 years ago. He is survived by his wife and. one child.

January 7th 1942. A FERMANAGH DONKEY. AMUSING COURT EVIDENCE. An unusual claim in respect of alleged breach of warranty in the sale of a donkey came before Deputy Judge Ellison, K. C at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions in Enniskillen. Plaintiff was John Cassidy, of Cullintagh, and he claimed £4 10s damages for the alleged breach from Morton. Greaves, of Knockdooris, Derrylin, who sold him the animal for £2 10s on the 16th September, 1941.Mr. Cooper, solicitor for plaintiff, said the case was an unusual one. The animal was warranted sound and able to pull a 15 cwts. load. The animal was big but not too well looking. On being brought home the animal’s condition became worse and it died. Plaintiff in evidence said defendant asked him to buy the ass in the fair of Ballyconnell, but he did not like to buy it as it was imported. However, the deal was made and the animal was left for him at Blake’s of Derrylin. Defendant said the animal could draw 15 cwts anywhere, and was the best ass in County Fermanagh. (Laughter). He also told plaintiff that when trotting along the road the feet of the ass made a noise like a pony (laughter), and that it had mowed with a pony. The beast was brought home by plaintiff  but it died on 15th October. On the way home it was dragging its feet. Mr. Cooper – It looked like a lady doing one of these new dances. (Laughter). Plaintiff added that the ass had lumps on its backbone, and was, “jinked.” It also walked sideways. (Laughter). Mr. Ferguson (for defendant) —What did you think you were buying, a horse or a donkey?—-A donkey. I am not that far gone yet that I would not know a donkey. (Laughter). Did you ever see a donkey ploughing? –No, but he told me this one ploughed. Don’t you deal in donkeys?—No, but when I get an order I buy one. Didn’t you inspect this donkey? —No, I did not. I was in a hurry for the bus. (Laughter) Didn’t you run it up and down the fair green in Ballyconnell?—No, I took his word for it. You would think it was a thousand-pound horse he was selling. I could not keep him from warranting it. (Laughter). He told me it was the best in the world and was worth £20. This was .a stallion donkey ?—Yes. Did you find it on its back in a drain? —No. Have you got a girl in your house?— She’s not a girl3 she’s a woman. (Laughter) I will not differ with you about the age, but you have a. girl?—I have a housekeeper, if you want to know my business. (Laughter). I don’t want to know your business any more than necessary, but did it take you, the girl and your nephew to pull it out of the drain? There is not a word about it. Fred Hart, M.R.C.V.S. said he examined the carcass of the animal on 15th October and found that it had suffered ailments of the liver, heart and spine. The animal was about 10 years of age and the ailment of the spine was of five or six months standing. To Mr., Ferguson witness said the spinal trouble would be apparent to any one buying the animal. Mr. Cooper–What did it die of?— Witness— it was dead when I saw it. Laughter.). Apparently it lay down as a result of this spinal trouble and ‘konked out.’ (Laughter). To the Judge witness said his opinion was that the animal could not have pulled a load of 15 cwts.

In the witness box, defendant said he had the donkey in his possession for nine months, and the bargain was made with plaintiff in Ballyconnell fair in September. Plaintiff ‘vetted’ the animal in the fair and defendant told him it could pull a good load. No warranty was given, and the bargain was made by a man called Fitch. The first complaint he got about the animal was in the form of a note given to him in Derrylin fair in October, the note demanding defendant to take it back. Cross-examined by Mr. Cooper, defendant said the animal brought a load of 14 or 15 cwts. For him at times. There was no talk of mowing. Mr. Cooper I notice this ass was smuggled twice as a matter of fact. (Laughter). Defendant. Yes. Mr. Cooper. Well we are not going to say anything about that. (Laughter). You bought another ass? Yes. What age was it? It was a wee foal. Mr. Cooper. To plaintiff – What age was it? Plaintiff. It was an oul ass. (Laughter). What did he pay for him? – 18 shillings. Mr. Cooper. What do you intend to sell him for? Defendant – I don’t intend to sell him. (To the Judge)—-I didn’t notice anything wrong in the way the ass walked to Ballyconnell fair. Foster Greaves, son of the defendant, said the ass in question was a strong one, and had always been kept in the house or tied when let out while in defendants possession.

Thomas Fitch gave evidence of the making of the bargain and said plaintiff had been inspecting the donkey all morning. Mr. McEntee of Clones, “the biggest horse-dealer in the world” (Laughter)—was giving £20 for him not so long ago. Witness did not see anything wrong with the donkey when it was running up and down. It was represented that it could draw a load of 15 cwt., but no warranty was given. Mr. Ferguson questioned witness as to whether the offer of £20 was of recent date or not. Witness—Not so long ago, it was wartime. Mr. Cooper — During this war? I think it was the last one. (Laughter). But we have been told it was ten years old? —bout ten or twelve years. How could it have lived in the last war? I suppose it was the last. (Laughter). .It must have been this war?—No. You said it was not so long ago?—Mr. McEntee could have been here if he had been summoned. If it was not so long ago  when was it. I could not tell; I have not a good memory. Was it a year ago? It was more than a year. Was it more than two years?—It may be four or five. The man who owned him said he did not want him any more for the children. Mr. McEntee wanted him as a sire. It was represented he could pull 15 cwts.?— He could run like mad. He could leap over me or Cassidy either. (Laughter). His Honour held there was a breach, of warranty and allowed a decree for £3 with 15/- costs and expenses.

BALLYGAWLEY—Country butter Is 3d to Is 6d per lb.; potatoes 8d – to l0d per stone; fowl; chickens; 5s to 6s, hens 3s to 3s 6d, ducks 3s 9d to 4s 3d—each; slip pigs 75s to-85s, suckers 50 to- 60s— .each.

February 14th 1942. PETTICO COURT CASES. At Pettigo District Court on Tuesday of last week, before Mr. Justice O’Hanrahan, Guard Gallivan summoned Gerald McMenamin, Minchifin for using an unlighted cycle. Fined 5s.

Supt. Noonan charged Michael McGee, Carntressy, with cutting and carrying away eighteen young trees from a cut away plantation at Carntressy on the lands of William Monaghan. Guard James Ryan proved tracing the trees to McGee’s residence. Mr. Monaghan, the owner, refused to prosecute and pleaded for leniency for defendant. A fine of 10s was imposed.

Guard, Gallivan summoned Adam Eves, Gortnessy, for using an unlighted cycle. Fined 6s.

Guard Treanor summoned J. Fitzpatrick, tractor driver, for driving without licence and no rear light. The Justice fined defendant 10s.

February 14th 1942. BROOKEBORO’ COURT CASES. At Brookeboro’ Petty Sessions, before Major Dickie, R.M., Thos. Clarke, Little Mount, was charged with slaughtering a pig without a licence on 2nd January. D.I. Smith prosecuted, and Mr. Stewart, the Ministry’s Inspector gave evidence of visiting Clark’s house, and Clarke admitted having slaughtered the pig, and at that time there were only l0 lbs. of pork left in the house. Clarke pleaded that he killed the animal in November last, as he had a large number of men working, and wanted the pork to feed them.

His Worship, remarking that it was the worst case he had known, fined defendant 40/-.

CYCLISTS’ DIFFICULTIES. His Worship, when dealing with, a number of cases where cyclists, charged with no rear lights, gave the excuse that they could not get batteries, and he would like to make it known that cyclists should have a clear patch of white paint as a background to a reflector when they could not get batteries.

 

February 14th 1942. FERMANAGH CLAIM FAILS. ACTION AGAINST BELCOO TEACHER. BOY WHO LOST EYE. A denial that he had dictated a story to the pupils as to what they should say when asked about an accident was made by the principal teacher, the defendant in an action for damages, the hearing of which was resumed in the Belfast King’s Bench Division on Wednesday of last week before the Lord Chief Justice. Mr. James Ferguson, P.E.T., of Belcoo, was alleged to have been negligent by not exercising proper supervision over the pupils on March, 25, 1959, when one of the boys, Patrick Anthony Leonard, aged 13 years, of Creenahoe, Belcoo, lost his right eve. The plaintiff’s case was that while playing on the road during the luncheon interval he was struck by a stone and he sought damages against the master for negligence. Mr: C. L. Sheil (instructed by Messrs. Cooper and Cooper) was for plaintiff, Mr. J. D. Chambers, K.C., and Mr. J. Agnew (instructed by Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented the defendant. The defendant said it was customary for the boys to play on the road on which they had played in his predecessor’s time. Answering his Lordship, the witness agreed that he had no personal knowledge of that. Mr. Ferguson added that he had instructed the boys not to play on the road on Blacklion or Belcoo fair days and the days, immediately following. He had warned the children not to go on the road on the day of the accident as the previous day was Blacklion fair day. He said he was quite unaware that there were pupils playing on the road. In order to get a clear story of what happened he had asked the boys to write a letter stating what had occurred, but there was nothing in the nature of dictation.

In reply to Mr. Sheil, the defendant agreed that the road was the best, playground they had, as there was an open sewer in the yard. There had been a dancing class in the school during the lunch hour. Mr; Sheil commented that a girl pupil who had not been on the road had written in her exercise, book— “No one knows whether it was a ball or a stone that hit him,”

“Did that child imagine that story,” asked Counsel, to which the defendant replied that the girl heard the inquiry going on, and could think for herself and form her own conclusions. It was a description of what the girl had heard from other children. That pupil was only writing an essay. The witness mentioned that he had never seen children in Belcoo School throwing stones.         He agreed with Mr. Sheil that the Ministry of Education were apprehensive about children playing on the road, and that in a circular he had produced it was shown that between January and December, 1939, some 569 accidents to children at school had happened in Northern Ireland, and of that number 575 were due to the presence of the children on roads. He reiterated that he had taken all the care possible. Mrs. Annie McCabe, the first assistant in the school, and a number of pupils also gave evidence. The lord Chief Justice held that the supervision exercised was not unreasonable, saying that the accident was caused by a fellow-pupil who was acting playfully. Having detailed his findings as to fact, his Lordship entered judgment for the defendant, with costs.

February 14th 1942. £15 FINE AFFIRMED. KESH FARMER’S FAILURE TO PLOUGH

John. Spence, Bannaghbeg, Clonelly, Kesh, appealed to Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Friday against a fine of £15 and costs imposed on him at Kesh Betty Sessions for having, as alleged, failed to obey a direction of the Ministry of Agriculture to plough five acres. Mr. Aiden Herbert, solicitor, represented the appellant and Mr. J. Cooper was for the Ministry.

Opening the case Mr. Cooper said it was a somewhat peculiar case. The farm in question was almost twenty-five acres in extent. Appellant was visited by a couple of inspectors from the Ministry to whom he spoke of the difficulty of getting tractors to do the ploughing. To another inspector he said the land was not fit for ploughing. That official took him over the lands and, using a spade, pointed out to him that the soil was suitable for cultivation. He should have ploughed five acres but only cultivated a plot for potatoes and at the Petty Sessions a fine of £15 was imposed. At that Court appellant denied ownership of the farm and told the R.M. it was the property of his sister who lived in Co. Donegal for whom he acted as manager. Under the regulations, an occupier meant a person rated or liable to be rated to the poor rate in respect of the holding or who would be so rated or liable to be rated for the provisions of the Local Government (Rating and Finance) Act (N.I.), 1929, that was the Derating Act and included in relation to any holding, the occupier of which was absent from Northern Ireland, any agent or other person entrusted with the management of the land on his behalf. On appellant’s own statement that he managed the farm for his sister and that he was the herd he was convicted. Since then he (Mr. Cooper] had made a search and found that appellant was the person actually rated for the land (certificate produced). Mr. Herbert intimated that the defence was that the land was not arable.

Samuel Jordan, Ministry’s Inspector, said fifteen acres of the farm were arable. When defendant said the land was not arable witness got a spade, and showed him in the field he said was most suitable that there were four or five inches of soil.

Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness agreed that generally Clonelly was not an ideal district for tillage. He did not test the area he said was arable as there was no question raised by appellant at the time. Furrows in the fields showed that cultivation had been carried out previously.

  1. S. Flack, area officer, swore he visited the farm on 7th March and 26th May. Appellant complained of the difficulty of getting tractors to do work. There were about fifteen acres arable. He agreed that in general Fermanagh farmers were not very fond of ploughing. Appellant had taken out a crop of flax in 1940. In the witness box appellant swore that he was reared on this farm, owned by his sister, and never at any time had there been more than six or seven acres cultivated. In 1940 he got Samuel Mills to work the tractor plough on his land but owing to the rocky nature of the field he was unable to do the work. The soil was only two to four inches deep whereas one needed seven inches of soil to do successful work with the tractor. Appellant also got a man with horses and plough but his ploughman was no more successful than Mills. Mr. Cooper—I suggest you are what is known as a lazy farmer?

Appellant—I have had to work hard all my life.

Samuel Mills gave evidence of his unsuccessful effort to work the tractor plough on appellant’s land. On an adjoining farm he broke eight socks in the ploughing of three acres.

To Mr. Cooper—I believe with a different type of tractor yon could plough this land.

James Allen said he started to plough with a chill plough and gave it up as there was a danger of getting killed. He refused to do any more work on the farm. His Honour affirmed the lower court conviction and fine.

FEBRUARY 14, 1942. £120 REWARD FOR DOMESTIC SERVANT. SEVERE BURNS SUSTAINED. A domestic servant who received severe burns while working at eggs in the kitchen of her employer’s house; her clothing catching fire. and causing severe burns to face, right arm, shoulder and body, appeared before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions last week in connection with the recording of an agreement whereby the applicant .had agreed to accept £50 compensation, together with the sum of £10 costs, and £3 11s 0d medical expenses.

The applicant was Margaret Muldoon, Drumcullion, Dernacrieve, Co. Cavan, and the respondent Patrick Rooney, Sessiagh East, Inishmore, Lisbellaw. The matter had been referred to his Honour to see if the compensation was adequate or not. Mr. J; P. Black (for applicant) told his Honour that applicant was employed by respondent as domestic servant, and on the 10th March, 1941, at her employer’s residence she received serious burns.

Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B. (for respondent)—Not arising out of her work, according, to my instructions.

Proceeding, Mr. Black said that applicant was detained in Fermanagh County Hospital for a period of about, 4 weeks, and subsequently the agreement was arrived at as set out in the opening paragraph. Applicant gave evidence in the witness box. She said that respondent was in comfortable circumstances. Applicant had been living with a married sister since the accident had occurred, and had no means in the world at all.

Mr. Herbert—I am afraid it is more than a question of means. The doctor, he added, said that the only limitation she had was limitation of her arm on account of skin grafting. Her beauty might be injured, but beauty was not the subject of the Workmen’s Compensation Act.

Mr. Horace T. Fleming, surgeon in Fermanagh County Hospital, described the extent of applicant’s burns when she was admitted to hospital. He had again examined her that day and she was totally incapacitated for work.

In reply to Mr. Herbert, witness said that he did not think applicant could do the ordinary work of a house servant.

Mr. Herbert made an offer of £75 in settlement.        . .

Mr. Black said that applicant had agreed to accept £100. He thought she was meeting respondent very fairly in accepting £100.

His Honour—I am not inclined to sanction a settlement of £75.

His Honour made an award of £120, with £10 costs and £3 3s 0d medical expenses.

 

February 14th 1942. EVIDENCE AT INQUEST. The tragic death of a Kinawley school boy was investigated by Mr. James Mulligan, coroner; and a jury, at an inquest on 6th inst., on William John Thompson (7), Derryvran, Thompson’s Bridge, Kinawley, who was killed instantaneously the previous day by a motor lorry.

Head-Constable Thornton represented the police authorities, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B. (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) the driver of the lorry. James Molloy, a conductor on the bus, said the boy was travelling from Stragowna School to his home and got off at Thompson’s Bridge Post Office. Witness was helping other children off the bus; he heard the lorry go past and after a few momenta looked up to see that the accident had occurred. Bernard McGovern, Gortgesh, said he was standing on the roadside and saw the boy go forward from the bus and cross the load end collide with the lorry. He had seen the lorry pass the bus and it swerved as it met the boy, who, however, hit against the left front off side and fell, the wheel going over him. Dr. S. McQuaid, Derrylin, said the boy suffered from multiple injuries to the head and neck. Sergt. Devine gave evidence of measurements.

The lorry driver, Patrick Corrigan, Clonatrig, said he was driving from Derrylin—in the same direction as the bus was headed and the boy was walking— and saw the bus by the roadside at the Post Office. He was driving slowly and passed the bus. He saw no traffic on the road. When he had the engine of the lorry past the front of the bus he suddenly saw the boy a few feet in front of him, crossing the road. He applied his brakes and tried to avoid the boy, but after he got the front of the lorry past him he heard a noise and knew the boy was hit. He stopped and got out and found the rear wheel had passed over the boy’s head. There was four or five tons of sand on the lorry. A verdict was returned that death was caused by injuries received when the boy was knocked down and crushed by the lorry, loaded with sand, and that the accident was unavoidable. The funeral to the Protestant Cemetery, Derrylin, on Saturday, was very large and representative of all creeds and classes.

February 14th 1942. EDERNEY FARMER’S APPEAL CATTLE SEIZURE ECHO.

The seizure of seven cattle belonging to a young Ederney farmer and dealer, and the subsequent forfeiture of five of the animals, had a sequel at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Thursday, when David Jones, Crimlin, Ederney, from whom the animals were seized, appealed against their forfeiture of the five animals. Mr. G. Murnaghan appeared for the appellant and Mr. J. Cooper for the respondent authorities. Head Constable Conlin, Kesh, said the cattle were seized on 1st Sept. last on suspicion of being smuggled. Jones’ statement was that two black polly heifers were bought from John Kane, Kilgarry, and three from William Lunny, same place, on 35th June, 1940. Subsequently, Lunny and Kane stated the cattle were sold a year previously. Mr. Murnaghan said the whole thing was the result of a slip in regard to the date of the sale on the part of Lunny, who said 1939 instead of 1940. Kane, when questioned, said he could not remember the date but it was the same date as Lunny’s sale.

Five, witnesses having given evidence for the appellants, and Head-Constable Conlin (recalled) and Mr. J. McMenamy, veterinary surgeon, of the Ministry of Agriculture, for the respondents, Deputy Judge Ellison, G.C., dismissed the appeal.

January 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

Pettigo News. Fermanagh Herald. 17th January 1942. The death has occurred after a short illness, at her residence, Tievemore, Pettigo, of Miss Elizabeth Reid. There was a large attendance at the funeral.

On Saturday R.U.C. from Tullyhommon, Pettigo, made a search of a number of farm houses in the Cloghore and Camplagh districts along the Lettercran border, and seized a quantity of flour and bread. They also seized a quantity of sugar in bags, which had been smuggled from Donegal.

Blacklion District news. 17th January 1942. The wedding took place at Killinagh Protestant Church of Sergeant Alfred Brady R. I. F. Dungannon, a native of Florencecourt, and Miss Elizabeth Sheridan, Gola, Blacklion. Mr. George Sheridan, cousin of the bride, was best man, Miss Annie Sheridan, sister of the bride, was bridesmaid. Rev. Mr. Coleman, B. A. performed the ceremony.

There was a 90% attendance at meetings of the L.D.F. at Blacklion, Glenfarne, Barran and Glangevlin Groups during the week. At a meeting of the Locality Security Force arrangements for extending night patrols were made.

During the week 160 men started to work under the minor relief scheme in the different parts of the area.

When returning from milking cows at Drumcow, Mrs Leonard, Belcoo, fell from a foot style and had her leg broken. She was removed to Enniskillen Hospital.

FINTONA. Butter jumps 1s 7d per lb.; pork 23 carcasses; young pigs 85s to 95s each, potatoes 6s to 7s 4d per cwt.

CASTLEDERG. Pork, 40 carcases; young pigs 65s to 80s each; chickens 4s 6d to 6s 6d, hens 3s 6d to 5s 6d, ducks 3s to3s 6d each; potatoes 7s to 8s per cwt retail.

24th January 1942. CAR ON CONCESSION ROADS. QUESTION OF LIGHTS NOT “ BLACKED-OUT ” A point affecting thousands of motorists who use the Clones-Gavan Concession Road, was raised at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions, before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., when Patrick McEntee, Clonfad, Newtownbutler, was summoned on three counts for not having the lights on his motor car properly blacked-out.

Mr. J. B. Murphy, solicitor, who appeared for defendant, said the case raised the point of black-out on the Concession- Road, on which defendant resided. The road was in and out of Monaghan and Fermanagh at points. Cars in Monaghan could use undimmed lights while the Six-County cars must be blacked-out. District Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, said defendant’s car was found in the Six Counties. Mr. Murphy — Any person using that road could be stopped in the Six Counties. Major Dickie—I am afraid they could. The real trouble is that Six-County “cars meeting headlights are helpless. Major Dickie said he thought it was a very proper case to be brought, to- see what would be done. Constable W. H. Walker—I brought it for that purpose. Mr. Murphy —‘What is Mr. McEntee to do in future? ‘ Major Dickie – That is the trouble with, all of us. I would suggest he should have a dipping headlight and drive with one headlamp dipped. I think if the defendant and all other Free State drivers used that form of light on the Concession Road there would be no objection by the police. Mr. Murphy asked to have the Probation of Offenders Act applied with costs, and said they in Monaghan would dip their lights. The Probation Act was applied.

24th January 1942. POPULAR ENNISKILLEN WEDDING. MAGUIRE — SMYTH. A pretty and popular wedding was solemnised in St. Michael’s, Church, Enniskillen, on Wednesday morning of last week, the contacting parties being Mr. Peter M. Maguire, the well-known Gael and secretary of Enniskillen Gaels G.A.A. club for the past 15 years and Miss Margaret (Gretta) Smyth, Wellington,, secretary of the Fermanagh County Camogie Board. The best man was Mr. James Donnelly, and the bride was attended by her sister, Miss Mary T. (‘Dot’) Smyth, P.E.T.

The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev. E. Rhatigan, C.C., Terenure, Dublin, cousin of the groom, assisted by Ven. Archdeacon Gannon, P.P., Enniskillen. The reception in the Railway Hotel, Enniskillen, was attended by a large number of relatives and friends of the happy couple. Father Rhatigan presided, and those present included Rev. Father Vincent, C. P., the Graan. The honeymoon is being spent in the South and West of Ireland.

24th January 1942. CALL FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION ON WIDER BASIS. Mr. J. J. Coalter, J.P., urged Fermanagh Regional Education Committee to appeal to the Government to place secondary education on the same basis as primary education so that all might be able to obtain the higher standard of education without extra cost. Mr. Coalter said the time had arisen when they should press upon the Government the absolute necessity of providing the same facilities for secondary as for primary education. Secondary education was not available to all pupils. It was lack of a proper secondary education that had caused the dearth of properly trained young men that were now wanted by the country in time of war. It was impossible for the ordinary man, after providing the necessities of life for children, such as food and clothing, to provide a proper secondary education.

24th January 1942. LEITRIM LADY’S DEATH IN WICKLOW. Mrs. Alice Clancy, proprietress, Grand Hotel, Wicklow, who died, was a native of Manorhamilton and was widow of Mr. Patrick Clancy, Kiltyclogher, Co. Leitrim. Formerly of the Bellevue Hotel, Dun Laoghaire, she took over the Grand Hotel, Wicklow, in 1918. She was sister of Sister Mary Therese, O.P., and Sister Mary Patrick, Holy Faith Order, both in South Africa, and mother of Mr. Joseph Clancy, who has been managing the Grand Hotel for some years; Rev. R. Clancy, C.C., Donabate, and of the late Rev. Berchmans Clancy, O Cist., Mount Melleray.

24th January 1942. DROVE WITHOUT LICENCE. John P. Brannigan, 6, Henry Street, Enniskillen, was fined 20s at Enniskillen Petty Sessions for driving a motor lorry without a licence.

January 10th 1942. RAILWAY LINE CLOSED. LAST RUN IN THE CLOGHER VALLEY. The close of the old year coincides with the passing of the Clogher Valley Railway, which has served the district for 65 years and was closed down on Wednesday of last week in accordance with an Order of the Ministry of Home Affairs. To mark the occasion members of the office and locomotive staffs with a number of local folk took a joy ride on the last train from Aughnacloy to Fivemiletown and back, the arrival home at Aughnacloy being signalled by the hooting of the engine whistle. Competition was keen as to who would have the honour of punching the last ticket issued and this distinction was credited to Dr. Gillespie of Tynan.

Some 70 employees are affected by the closing of the line, but most of them, will receive compensation on a varying scale. Although: no trains are now running the head office staff at Aughnacloy carry on as usual and will continue to do so for the present as a lot of clearing up work has to be attended to before the liquidator proceeds with the dispersal of the property.

The Ministry’s cattle grading centers at Aughnacloy, Clogher, and Fivemiletown will be carried on at the railway premises as usual, the Clogher Rural Council having made arrangements for the use of the railway weighbridges for the purpose.

It is interesting to note that the first ticket issued on the railway is retained by Mr. W. D. Graham, solicitor, Fivemiletown, having been purchased by his father, the late Mr. D. Graham, on the first run 56 years ago.

January 10th 1942. MANOR HAMILTON NEWS. Roses in Bloom. — Roses in bloom are to be seen in Mr. M. O’Donnell’s garden at Boleyhill.

L.D.F. District Command Dance. — The L.D.F. District Command Dance held on Sunday night was well patronised.

January 10th 1942. ROSLEA POTEEN CHARGE. BARREL OF WASH FOUND. JAIL SENTENCE. At Roslea Petty Sessions on Friday before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., Thomas Beagan, farmer, Tonnaghaboy, Roslea, was sentenced to two months’ imprisonment without hard labour when he pleaded guilty to having 20 gallons of wash in his possession, on Dec. 6th. A further charge of having a bottle in his possession containing a few drops of poteen was dismissed without prejudice. Defendant was not professionally represented. In reply to District-Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, Sergt. Ryder, R.U.C., Fivemiletown, stated that while accompanied by Sergt. C. E. Williams, Roslea, he assisted in searching the house of defendant. In the sitting-room he found two empty 141b. tins which had contained syrup. He then went to a hayshed and with the assistance of a graip he found a barrel in the hay which contained 20 gallons of ‘wash’. The wash had matured and was ready for running. Witness heard Beagan saying it was his wash. Defendant then informed the court he admitted having the wash.

Sergt. Williams deposed to finding a large bottle which smelled strongly of poteen. When questioned about the bottle defendant stated it had been left there by a girl called Lena Murphy. In fairness to defendant he would like to say he tested that statement and found there had been a bottle left there some days previously. When questioned about the wash defendant said it was his. When asked to account for the syrup defendant’s wife said it was used for making cakes. Later after the barrel was found defendant admitted the syrup was used for making the wash. Witness destroyed the wash and kept a sample. Defendant (told the court he admitted the wash but not the poteen. In reply to his Worship, the District Inspector said there were no previous convictions. In imposing the sentence stated Major Dickie said he would not impose hard Labour, although actually he believed it made no difference. Defendant was then removed in custody.

BLACKLION NEWS. In accordance with custom, groups of ‘Wren Boys’ travelled the district in the days prior to New Year’s Day.

The annual Xmas Tree was given in the Blacklion School by Mrs and the Rev. Mr Coleman on Wednesday night. A big number of children were entertained.

A dance in aid of funds for the new band was held in the MacNean Hall, Belcoo, on New Year’s Night. The spacious Hall was packed. The music was by the Sunny Melody Band.

A special meeting of the Group Staff of the Local Security Force was held in Blacklion on Friday night. Group Leader Wynn presided. Sergt Rock and D. S. O. Maguire, N. T. were in attendance. A letter from the Minister for Justice was read, thanking the group for their services for the past year. The question of the formation of a branch of the Red Cross was discussed and it was decided to assist in forming a branch as soon as possible. The appointment of Mr. John Jas. Grane as Section Leader was sanctioned. Mr Michael Foley was appointed Asst. Section Leader. An Intelligence Officer was also appointed.

PETTIGO NEWS. The poor in Pettigo village were provided with food, clothing and fuel by a number of charitable gentlemen and ladies in the vicinity during the Christmas season. The donors include: – Guard J. Treanor and Mrs Treanor, Mr. James Gallagher, Postmaster, Mr Michael Fullerton, Customs and Excise, Mr and Mrs Thos. Bradley, Sic-Co., Customs and Mrs Dora Wrenn, C.M.B.

On Tuesday night of last week Lettercran B. Group of the L. S. F. under Squad Leader T. Haughey assembled at the local hall and underwent instruction in squad drill.

On Thursday night of last week a very enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Parochial Hall, Agheyarron, (sic) the proceeds being in aid of Parochial Funds. The music was supplied by Messrs Eddie McHugh, Corgary, and Edward Lynch, Mullinabreen. Mr. James Neill McNally was M. C.

On Wednesday night of last week a dance was held in Letter Hall, Pettigo, the proceeds being in aid of charity. The music was provided by the Trio Dance Band. Mr. William H. Marshall, Skea, was M. C.

1953 July to December.

25-7-53 Ederney Parochial Sports. Teams from Pettigo, Dromore, Ederney and Trillick took part with Pettigo and Dromore reaching the finals by defeating respectively, Trilliok and Ederney. The final was not played owing to the rain and Pettigo won the tournament on a toss.

25-7-53 Weeping mothers and sweethearts crowded the GNR terminus at Great Victoria Street as more than 100 young men and women left by train for Cobh on their way to Canada. This was the 4th Emigrant Special to leave Belfast in the last six months and contained many families and Queen’s University graduates. The front of the train was decorated with the head of a giant Elk’s head. They will join the Cunard liner, “Georgic” at Cobh. Already on board from Southampton are 36 members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police who have been attending the Coronation ceremonies.

15-8-53 At Belleek Court, Francis Devanney of Forkhill Park, Irvinestown was fined £3 with costs and bound him to keep the peace for twelve months on his own bail of £5 plus one surety of £5 for striking James Burns, Brollagh, Belleek on 30th June. Devanney, who has a family of 10, came out of a pub convenient to the Cementation Works yard and struck Burns in the face for being unwilling to go on strike. The R.M. said he would have sent Devanney to jail only that he had a large family. Devanney has a long list of previous convictions for similar offences.

22-8-53 After the unveiling ceremony in Pettigo on Saturday members of “C” Company, headed by their pipe band paraded to what was formerly the RIC barracks in Pettigo. (Currently in 2002, the Priest’s House) and observed 2 minutes silence in memory of the late Commandant P. Breen, who was in charge of taking the barracks in 1921. Afterwards the band played, “The Minstrel Boy,” which was Comdt. Breen’s favourite tune. (Unveiling of Pettigo 1922 memorial.)

22-8-53   Donkey owner fined at Belleek. Susan Johnston, Commons, Belleek was summonsed for allowing her donkey to wander on the road. Seamus O’Connor, a driver employed by the Cementation Company said that the donkey wandered out in front of him. He did the donkey little harm but the front of his car was smashed in. The defendant said that the donkey must have jumped over the ditch and that on the evening in question all the animals were being annoyed by flies. She was fined 7/6 with 18/- costs.

22-8-53 Enniskillen child drowned. Inquest on Lough Erne fatality. Gerald Divine, Darling St., Enniskillen, aged 6 years drowned on the afternoon of the 8th while playing at the Round “O,” Enniskillen.

22-8-53 Enniskillen Convent’s great achievement. Every one of the 28 pupils entered for the Senior Certificate Examination passed.

22-8-53  Northern Patriots remembered in Impressive Ceremony. War of Independence Recalled at the Unveiling of Pettigo Memorial. The names on the Memorial are Patrick Flood (Pettigo), William Kearney and Bernard Mc Canny (Drumquin) and William Deasley, (Dromore, Co., Tyrone). The commemorative Mass was said by Rev. A. Slowey, C. C., Belleek and an FCA Guard of Honour, under Lieutenant L. Emerson, Ballyshannon, rendered Compliments at the Consecration. Minister of Defence, General Sean Mc Keown attended. Mr. Oscar Traynor made the oration at the unveiling of the statue commemorating the invasion of Pettigo on June 4th, 1922.

29-8-53   Irish-Ireland Activities in Devenish. Children’s classes attended by almost 60 children of the Parish up to the age of 14 years. The classes have been enthusiastically attended and supported by the children on three nights weekly, and lessons have been given in Irish Prayers, conversational Irish, Irish singing, dancing and history. There have been lessons in etiquette and a football team of juveniles chosen from the boys has been established and has proved a match for the best in three counties. The season closed on the 15th of August with a Ceilidh in St. Mary’s Hall. Among the prize winners were: – Best mannered child, Mary Flanagan, Corramore. Irish Prayers, Eileen Burns, Cashel. Exercise Books, J. J. Carty, Knockaraven. Accordion 1. J. J. Carty, Knockaraven; 2. Gerald Feely, Knockaraven.

29-8-53 Lord Bishop’s Regulations – Dances must end at Midnight. The Lord Bishop of Clogher, Most Rev. Eugene O’Callaghan, D. D. has issued regulations governing the organisation and attendance of Catholics of the Diocese at dances which continue until after midnight. The regulations are to come into force on September 1st. All Cross-roads, open air and dancing decks are to close before lighting-up time, All Parochial Halls and halls controlled by Catholics are to close not later than 10 o’clock midnight – old time. In addition I forbid Catholics of this Diocese to attend any public dance which is to continue to a late hour. These regulations bind in conscience i.e. under pain of sin from 1st September. Priests are to exert vigilance to see that the Diocesan Law for the conclusion of all public dances is strictly observed.

5-9-53 Newtownbutler are new County Champions after beating Irvinestown in a grueling final by 0-6 to 0-4. The game was played in Gaelic Park, Enniskillen through terrific downpours but the large crowd cheered on while sheltering under trees. Billy Charlton was at the centre of an almost impregnable full back line for Irvinestown. Kevin McCann (Belleek) was a scrupulously fair referee whose handling of the game was beyond criticism.

12-9-53 Garrison Man Unconscious for Seven Days. William George Acheson of Gorteen, Garrison, was unconscious for 7 days and in hospital for a month after cycling into the side of a shooting-brake. As he had suffered a lot through his own negligence he was only fined 5 shillings.

19-9-53 A fine of 15 shillings plus costs was imposed on John Murphy, Stranlongford at Irvinestown Court on Friday for being drunk in charge of a bicycle twice. His wife appeared in his stead and said he was ill and asked for a month to pay the fine.

19-9-53  Ederney drew with Irvinestown 3-3 to 1-9 although the league points were of little interest to either in this local derby. In the juvenile match before Irvinestown easily defeated a much lighter Ederney team. Most promising for Ederney were Manus and Martin Maguire, Sean and Joe Rolston, Joe Turner, Tony Maguire and Tony McGrath. In goals for Ederney Seamus Milligan made several fine saves including two penalties.

19-9-53 On Tuesday morning after 11 o’clock Mass in St. Mary’s Church, Pettigo, His Lordship, Most Rev. Dr. O’Callaghan, Lord Bishop of Clogher, blessed and opened St. Mary’s new national school at Pettigo. At the blessing ceremony a guard of honour was provided by the school children under their teachers Master B. Egan, B.A., N.T., Mrs T. Bradley, N.T. and Miss Mc Fadden, N.T. The minister of Education was represented by Mr. Joseph Brennan, T.D. who in a short address said Pettigo people should be proud of their beautiful new school, which had been such a necessity for the past 30 years. The building, he said, was a credit to the contractor, Mr. Geo. Irwin, Donegal, and his staff of tradesmen and workers. Thanks was expressed to the Rev. priests, Very Rev. P. Dempsey P.P., Rev. Jas. F. Brennan, C.C. and Rev. A. Slowey, C.C. for their unfailing efforts and constant attention until the beautiful building was completed. To Fr. Jas. F. Brennan alone the parish are deeply indebted for all his work for both the welfare of his parishioners and for the churches and schools in both Pettigo and Lettercran, and it is hoped that he will remain many long years in the parish so as to reap the reward of his zeal. His Lordship also blessed the twelve new houses erected in the village under the housing scheme. The choir with Miss Dora Mc Neill at the organ rendered sacred music during the Mass.

19-9-53 Pettigo Girl’s Licence Suspended at Belleek. Kathleen Monaghan, Ballymacavanney, Lough Derg, was fined £2-2-6 with costs and disqualified from driving for a year in N. Ireland, for driving without due care, and without a licence, insurance and tail lights. She admitted all offences. Constable Bell who stopped her said she came into the town from the Ballyshannon direction on the wrong side of the white line and swerved up the Main Street. She said she was learning to drive.

26-9-53 Omagh, St. Enda’s win Irvinestown Tourney Final by defeating Lisnaskea by 5-8 to 2-7. The fifteen wristlet watches were presented to the Omagh players afterwards by Rev. J. Mc Kenna, P.P., Irvinestown. Omagh opened the scoring with two goals. The 13 a-side format suited Omagh.

3-10-53 All the residents allotted new houses in Pettigo have taken up their residence during the weekend and are delighted with such splendid houses with every modern convenience.

3-10-53 Armagh gallant in defeat as they fail in the All Ireland final to Kerry by 0-13 to 1-6. Armagh missed a penalty and squandered chances to win. The official attendance of 85,155 and receipts of £10,904-9-1 constitute a record and an additional 7,000 got into the ground without paying.

3-10-53 During Monday’s floods Mr. P. Halpin, Customs Officer, Pettigo, performed a plucky act when he rescued four sheep from the Termon River as they were being swept away. He waded waist deep into the fast flowing river to rescue them.

3-10-53  Marian Year Proclaimed. The Pope has proclaimed 1954 as Marian Year in celebration of the centenary of  the definition of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception by Pope Pius X1 on December 8th 1854. The Pope ordered the World’s 400 million Catholics to concentrate on Our Lady’s intercession for three objects:- The Unity of the Church, The Peace of the World and The Church of Silence – 60 million Catholics behind the Iron Curtain.

3-10-53 Mr. Cahir Healy, M.P., again unanimously chosen at the Nationalist Convention to run as an anti-partition candidate in South Fermanagh. It was decided not to run in Enniskillen or Lisnaskea (where the Prime minister held) as these areas had been gerrymandered to return two Unionist candidates although Fermanagh had a Nationalist majority.

10-10-53 Cost of Dying Rising Too. Enniskillen Rural District Council is losing £300 to £400 per year in running Brendrum Cemetery. Increases are to be made in the burial and grave charges.

10-10-53 Fermanagh give grand display in losing to Derry by 9 points to 6 points. Following a draw with Tyrone it seems that a corner has been turned in Fermanagh’s fortunes since they were last a team to be feared in 1935. “P. Rooney was sound enough … Matt Regan, a supposedly volatile footballer, was as sound as a bell, brilliant in placing, deadly in tackling and as clean a player as was on a clean field. More performances like this and Matt will have beaten the best of his past  …. Gonigle was a good plodding midfielder, with a flash of brilliance in him quite often … J. P. McCann seemed a grand player playing with the foot brake partly on.

10-10-53 Mrs Brigid Maguire, relict of Mr. Peter Maguire, died at her home at Knockaraven, Devenish on Tuesday 15th September.

10-10-53 On Sunday evening Pettigo village was en fete with bonfires and cheering crowds when the residents learned that their Junior team were victors in the County Final against the Doe team at Ballybofey.

10-10-53 On Wednesday of last week torrential rain fell in the district for twenty-four hours continuously causing the most devastating floods ever remembered in the district. In Cortness (Gortanessy?)district a bridge connecting the farm of J. Fletcher, with the leading Pettigo to Castlederg road was swept away, nothing being left on the iron girders. The village street was flooded to a depth of two feet from the Diamond to the railway station. Pedestrians had to wade to the railway station in their bare feet. Ricks of hay and corn were swept away and in the mountain district sheep were swept away. Roads were also torn. The Pettigo to Castlederg road was under water for three miles at Lettercran.

17-10-53 Ceilidhe Mhor in St. Joseph’s Hall, Cashel, on Sunday 18th, October. Music by McCusker Bros. Ceilidhe band (first visit to Cashel. Dancing 8 o’clock, Admission 3s-6d.

17-10-53 Dance in Mc Cabe’s Hall, Belleek, Friday 23rd October with music by Derrylin Starlight Band. Admission 4 shillings.

17-10-53 On Friday night Pettigo GFC held a victory ceilidh in St. Mary’s Hall, Pettigo, to celebrate victory over St. Michael’s (Doe) at Ballybofey the previous Sunday in the junior County Final. The cup was carried in procession through the village by the team headed by the captain. The hall was packed by patrons from both north and south of the Border. The dance which was from 8 to 12 concluded with the National Anthem.

17-10-53 Tully’s High St. Enniskillen – Special Coat Display – Lady’s Gabardine Coat in popular new colours for 6 ½ guineas.

31-10-53 At Kesh court, Pettigo man, Thomas Reilly of Mill St. was fined 40s and had his licence suspended for 12 months for driving a car without insurance and 10s for driving without a licence. William Elliott of Killsmollen was fined 8s for carrying two passengers on a goods vehicle without a licence, Grace Elliott, Tulnagin, Ederney and Patrick Meehan, Largy, Lack who were both fined 2s-6d. Hugh McGrath, Ednaveigh was fined 8s for allowing three heifers to wander on the road. For allowing four animals to wander on the road William R. Johnston, Lack was fined 6s. John A. Harron, Gubbaroe, was fined 5s for throwing fireworks in Kesh. Thomas Mc Clelland, Feddans, Kesh was fined 20s for using a goods vehicle without a licence and Edward Maguire, Main St. Ederney was fined 3s for having no reflective mirror on a motor vehicle, and 5s, for having no horn.

31-10-53 Ballinamallard Couple’s claim against Kesh man. Charles Leonard and his wife Kathleen of Coolgarron, Ballinamallard sued Malcolm Turner of Tievaveeney, Kesh for £50 and breach of contract. They alleged that the defendant had invited them to live with him and that he would transfer his lands to Kathleen. They took up residence and put in two acres of potatoes and one of corn but the plaintiff refused to complete the contract or allow them to take away the crops. The defendant claimed that they had ordered £25 of groceries from Blakley McCartney of Kesh in his name and used them solely for themselves and family. The Judge granted £10 to the plaintiffs and allowed the defendant to keep the crops.

31-10-53 Enniskillen Fishery Board member disqualified for six months and fined £7 and costs after a fishery prosecution in Derrygonnelly. He was Mr John Maguire, Boa Island, a fisherman and his partner Edward Cassidy who was fined £4 and costs. Evidence was given that they had failed to stop their boat when challenged by the police launch, were fishing with worms with long lines and had undersized eels in their possession.

31-10-53  Fermanaghman to share in the residue of a ten million pound estate. One of two brothers who will share in the residue of the estate of the Duke of Westminster, Britain’s richest landowner, after many legacies and annuities to members of the family, friends and servants is Lieutenant Colonel Robert George Grosvenor, Ely Lodge, Enniskillen. The Duke died last July aged 74. He came to Fermanagh in 1951 when he bought the Ely Estate from Mr. Cathcart. He and his brother are cousins of the late Duke.

31-10-53  Old Character Passes. An old man of the roads, Bob Davitt, died in Ballyshannon. He was almost 80 years old and had been known to generations of families in the North-West as a gentle, kindly, old man who moved from place to place with his familiar, “bundle on his shoulder.” Youngsters delighted in letting imagination work on the mysteries of the great bag, which was opened occasionally to show the small articles that Bob would sell. He had great dignity and would only condescend to take a meal at some houses, and indeed to call only in some. He slept in haysheds or at the foot of haystacks; he was loved by children of several generations. By his passing a link has been broken of Ireland’s “men of the road.” He had a considerable sum of money when he died.

31-10-53  The sudden death took place at Killybeg, Belleek, of Mrs Jane Keown, wife of Mr. Patrick Keown. She had been in indifferent health for some time past.

7-11-53 A decree of £3 was awarded against Thomas Duffy, Commons, Belleek, for trespass by his cattle on lands at Rathmore, Belleek. The action was taken by John Mc Elroy, Auctioneer, Belleek who had the setting of the land. He claimed that the land was worth £20 per annum but Duffy would only offer £12 which was refused.

7-11-53 Inquest on Ballyshannon woman adjourned. Mrs Agnes White (49), widow of James White, one of the leading merchants of the district in his time was found dead in the attic of her home on Tuesday of last week. She was suffering from heart trouble for a number of years and was inclined to excessive worry. She was found lying in the attic with a rug under her head as a pillow. He found a cup and a small glass beside the body. Guard Flynn gave evidence of finding traces of vomiting and two partly dissolved capsules of a purplish colour. Dr. Patrick Daly gave his opinion that the capsules could not have caused her death.

7-11-53 Mr. S. McGinley is appointed secretary of Pettigo GAA Club. (John McGinley, Customs Officer and father of Sean McGinley, noted Irish actor.)

7-11-53 Storm over Fermanagh – Torrential rain all over the county during Sunday caused the most serious and extensive flooding in years. The Belleek to Letter Road was impassable at Rosscreenagh, where water poured down from the hills and covered the entire valley.

7-11-53 The case was dismissed against Joseph McDermott, Corry, Belleek, for riding his bicycle without due care and attention. He had been badly injured when struck by a lorry while cycling from his farm at Brollagh. He had spent 15 days in the Shiel Hospital, Ballyshannon, with severe head and arm injuries. A similar case against the lorry driver was adjourned.

14-11-53 The death has occurred of Rev. W. Babbington Steele, Castletown, Monea, retired minister of the Episcopalian Church of Ireland. He was born in 1865 and was the son of Rev. William Steele, headmaster of Portora from 1857 to 1891.He was the brother of  the convert, Rev. John Haughton Steele, born 1850, who had been minister at Deryvore, Co., Fermanagh, incumbent of Trinity Church, Crom, Newtownbutler for 27 years, before becoming a priest in 1912. Fr. Steele died on March 17th, 1920 and is interred in the grounds of Cavan Cathedral.

14-11-53 The death of Mr. James Cleary, Donegal House, Bundoran. He was a native of Lissan, Garvery, Enniskillen and had spent his early years in America returning in 1925 to set up a successful business in Bundoran. He had been on his way to Benediction on Monday evening when he died.

21-11-53 A fire broke out in the roof of Letterkeen School, Kesh, on Wednesday 11th. The 40 children were removed by their teacher Miss Mary I. Stephenson. Two sections of Enniskillen Fire brigade arrived within a half an hour, making the 18 mile journey in record time. They were able to put out the fire before any serious damage was done.

21-11-53  Opening Announcement – Radio and Television Service of Thomas P. Gannon, 37 East Bridge Street, Enniskillen opposite the GPO. Leading makes of radio and television stocked, batteries, valves and all radio components, sheet music and gramophone records, complete repair service, batteries charged.

21-11-53 Two men drowned in shocking Belleek tragedy. Both were employees of the Cementation Company. The dead men are Jack Lawler, Athy, Co., Kildare and Jack Mc Grath, Lisnarick. Edwards, J. Maguire of Boa Island was rescued. Mc Grath’s body has not yet been discovered despite search parties of up to 50 people searching the banks of the river. Mr. Maguire gave a graphic description of what happened to members of the Press.

28-11-53  Border fireworks. Guard James Dowd summonsed James McInern (18) of Bannaghbeg, Clonelly, Co., Fermanagh for exploding squibs in Main St. Pettigo and then running into the North out of the jurisdiction. McInern was caught but another youth escaped. The case was adjourned as McInern’s sister had rung in to say he was ill and unable to attend. Daniel McGrory was fined 10/- each for being lying down drunk on the road and having no light on his bicycle.

5-12-53 The minor Football Championship between Lisnaskea and Garrison was a very one sided affair with Lisnaskea having an easy win Garrison conceding two very soft goals at the beginning.

12-12-53 Ending of the Marian Year in a three day ceremony. Overflowing crowds at all Masses. “The cry for a new Redemption, a Redemption coming through Mary, has been answered.” Said at a ceremony at the Graan.

19-12-53 The longest ever Ballyshannon inquest lasting 3½ hours was resumed on the 9th on Mrs Agnes Fyffe White, proprietoress of the well-known business bearing her name, at the Mall, Ballyshannon, whose body was found in the attic of her home on 28th of October.

26-12-53  Inquest into Belleek tragedy. Accidental drowning verdicts were returned on John Lawlor (39) Athy, County Kildare and John McGrath, Rossgweer, Lisnarick, employees on the Erne Scheme at Belleek who lost their lives on the 16th November, when their boat was swept away after their engine had failed. The inquest on Lawlor was held in Belleek Courthouse and a jury of which Christopher Ross was foreman. John Maguire, Boa Island, the boatman gave evidence. The engine died out and they missed the first safety rope because the boat passed over it. They caught hold of the second but it sagged leaving them under the water. He let go and was swept through the open sluice gates. Below Belleek Bridge and the eel weir he caught up with the overturned boat and it took him to the bank where he clung to a tree until rescued. Like Lawlor he was wearing a life jacket but Lawlor’s head struck the sluice-gates and he was drowned. McGrath had no life jacket and his body was not found for days after. As his body was found on the Eire side of the Border an inquest was conducted in Ballyshannon. Frank McCauley found McGrath’s body having searched each day for it.