Should have been entered for FEARmanagh or at least the Olympics.

Should have been entered for FEARmanagh or at least the Olympics.
14-9-1946. EXCITING MAN HUNT. SCENES IN FERMANAGH. TWO TINKERS CAPTURED. A four-day man bunt, in which 100 police were engaged on both sides of the border, was started on Wednesday in Co. Sligo by news of the arrival in the vicinity of two tinkers, Patrick Joseph Cauley and Martin Ward, who had been over a fortnight at liberty following their escape from Victoria Barracks on the night of the 20th August.
The hunt lasted nearly four days and brought the fugitives and the police through three counties before the two men were captured by the Fermanagh R.U.C., under Head-Constable Gregg, on Benmore mountain, between Letterbreen and Belcoo, on Saturday as darkness was falling.
Cauley and Ward, who are natives of Roscommon, are aged twenty-one and eighteen years respectively. They are both married. At a special court at Rosslea on 20th August they were charged. before Mr. Crawford J.P., with having broken and entered the house of a man named Lynch, of Mullans, Rosslea, on the night of the 10th, 11th August, and taken nearly £40 and, on the same night, broken and entered the shop of Hugh McMahon, of Dernawilt, Rosslea, and stolen £3 in cash and a number of articles, including a pair of boots, cake and some cigarettes. Both accused were returned for trial and on that evening they were conveyed to Victoria Barracks, Derry, prior to being lodged in Derry Jail.
In the early hours of the following morning they escaped from their cell through a ventilator, and, despite intensive police efforts to effect their capture, got across the border to Donegal within twenty-four hours. It is thought they got across somewhere near Bridgend.
Knowing every inch of all the North-Western counties from their travels around as tinkers, they were able to keep to the mountains, only coming into the valleys after dusk each day to call at various houses and get meals. They told many stories, posing as escaped smugglers and deserters from the British Army. Thus, although their descriptions had been circulated and a close police look-out was kept for them, they avoided pursuit for more than a fortnight, until they had made their way to County Sligo.
SWAM A LAKE. On Tuesday of last week (it was reported to the Guards) two shops had been broken and entered in the Ballintrillick area of County Sligo, one owned by Mrs. Gallagher and the other the Co-Operative Stores. Money and articles, had been stolen.
Cauley and Ward were suspected, and detectives and Gardaí commenced a manhunt in the mountains between Grange and Ballintrillick. The two men narrowly escaped through the net—one by swimming a lake—and the chase continued through Kinlough and Glenade in County Leitrim, with forty Gardaí and detectives operating under Inspector P. J. MacNamee (a native of Cavan).
NARROW ESCAPE. On Thursday evening Gardaí Mulvey and Woods almost had their men, seeing them jump out of a bunch of whins forty yards away on Kilroosk mountain, about ten miles from the border. Exceptionally fast runners, the two fugitives made good their escape as dusk was falling. But the Gardaí were hot on their trail and the net was closing. On Friday morning, the hunt was intensified. The men’s route was traced by a house at which they had called in Brackberybog on the Manorhamilton-Garrison road, eight or nine miles from the border. The chase brought the Gardaí to a house much far¬ther-on, in Aghavanny, near the border village of Kiltyclogher.
OVER THE BORDER. By noon, the Gardaí had moved in and there was no escape except across the border. An hour or two later, Inspector MacNamee and Sergt. Feighan, of the detective force, Sligo, who had charge of the detective party, learned that the two men had made their way into Co. Fermanagh.
R.U.C. men under Head-Const. Gregg, Enniskillen (a native of Clontivern, Newtownbutler, who had been transferred to his native Fermanagh only two months ago) took up the chase, all available men being mobilised to the number of twenty, from Belcoo, Letterbreen, Enniskillen, Garrison and Derrygonnelly.
THE NET CLONES. When darkness fell that evening, the fugitives had been trailed to the area between Belcoo and Letterbreen, roughly a distance of ten miles from the place at which it is thought they crossed the bor¬der. Men were stationed at key. points and mobile patrols operated during the night. It was discovered next morning that Cauley and Ward had slept at a haystack beside an unoccupied house at Moneyargan between Letterbreen and Belcoo.
On Saturday morning, at 4 o’clock, forty constables from all over the county from Kesh to Newtownbutler were mobilised under Head-Constable Gregg, with Head-Constable McHale, Enniskillen, second in command, and a comb-out was started of thousands of acres in the wild mountain country lying from Belcoo and Letterbreen towards Boho and Cashel. Kinawley and Florencecourt also were thoroughly searched.
Civilians gave great assistance, twenty co-operating in the actual search. At four in the afternoon, after twelve hours combing, a trace of the two men was again found, this suggesting they had made for Benmore mountain, three miles away from their resting place of the pre¬vious night. Twenty more constables were called in to assist, and about five-thirty a cordon had been drawn behind the Benmore mountain area with one in front. The ends of both lines went forward t» meet each other, and thus a net was formed. This gradually closed and over three hours later, in the gathering dusk, about 8.50 p.m., the fugitives were discovered, hiding in clumps of whins.
They made a dramatic dash to elude capture, but rushed from one party only, to run right into the arms of another as the net was tightly drawn, leaving no loop¬hole of escape. The men offered no resistance and were brought to Enniskillen barracks after a manhunt by Fermanagh police lasting thirty hours.
“In all my experience, I have never met with such co-operation from the civilian population” said Head-Constable Gregg, in a tribute to the active assistance rendered by the people of the neighbourhood in the capture of the two men.
COURT CHARGE AT DERRY. The two young men who escaped from a cell in Victoria Police Barracks, Derry, on August 21st, and were re-captured at Letterbreen, County Fermanagh, on Saturday night, appeared at Derry Petty Sessions on Monday, charged with breaking prison while on remand in custody. The men, Patrick Cauley, aged 19, and Martin Ward, aged 20, both of no fixed abode, had been remanded in custody to Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on breaking and entering charges.
Giving evidence of arrest, Head-Constable Carson said after being cautioned in Enniskillen Barrack, Cranley said: “We just broke out,” and Ward said: “That’s right.”
Both (men were remanded in custody until September 23.
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1942 – Lord Erne, Eamon Anderson.

FERMANAGH FOLKLORE. By EAMON ANDERSON. THE TERRIBLE FAMINE DAYS. In the hurry of writing last week there were a couple of sentences towards the end in which I did not choose my words carefully and they might give readers the false impression that the British Government of that day, being pressed by Parnell and his party, actually voted money to relieve the terrible distress and famine in Ireland in 1879 and later. No such thing did they do during any of the terrible famines of the last century, not one penny at that time did they give gratis. The money that came in ’79 and ’80 to supply what was known as “Parnell’s meal’ and ‘Parnell’s bread’ to the starving multitudes in Ireland was raised by subscriptions, principally from the Irish race in America. There is no doubt of course that many charitable people in England, especially of the Quaker persuasion, did subscribe money during famine years, but their Government gave us nothing, only coercion and plenty of it The landlords ignored the distress, they wanted their rents whether the land earned them or not. The Government ignored the distress and sent out their police and military to enable the landlords to collect their pound of flesh off the walking skeletons in the bogs and mountains to protect, the process-servers and the “bone-grippers” and the crow-bar brigade, and the grabbers and emergency men and the agents and bailiffs and all others of that unholy alliance. In ‘Black ’47’, when the people of Ireland were dying in the ditches in tens of thousands, —when the coffin ships were crossing the Atlantic crammed with starving human beings, dying of famine and fever and being thrown overboard to feed the sharks, the London “Times,” chief organ of the Tory party in England, gloated over the extermination of the Irish race in these words; “The Celts are going— with avengeance. Soon a Catholic Celt will be as rare in Ireland as a Red Indian on the shores of Manhattan.” But strange to say, this stiff-necked Irish race (survived it all—and the Catholic Celt is very much alive to-day—in Ireland, and all over the world.

A DUCAL “JOKE.”  And here is what the Duke of Cambridge said during Black ’46 — ‘Ireland is not in so bad a state as has been represented. I understand that rotten potatoes, and even grass properly mixed, afford a very wholesome and nutritious food. We all know that Irishmen can live upon anything, and there is plenty of grass in the fields, even if the potato crop should fail.” This was in the early stage of the famine, before the real horrors began. O’Connell’s answer, to this outburst is well worth recording:— “There” said O’Connell, ,“is the son of a king—the brother, of a king—the uncle of a monarch—there is his description of Ireland for you. Perhaps he has been reading Spencer—who wrote at a time when Ireland was not put down by the strong arm of force or defeated, in battle; but when the plan was laid down to starve the Irish Nation (in 1602).; For three years every portion of the crop was trampled down by mounted soldiers; for 3 years the crops were destroyed and human creatures were found lying dead behind ditches with their mouths green, by eating sorrel and grass. The Duke, I suppose, wishes we should have such scenes again in Ireland. And is it possible that in presence of some of the most illustrious nobility, of England that a royal personage should be found to utter horrors of this description.”

AN OLD LORD ERNE,

Perhaps some people may say that this is not the time—in the midst of a great world, calamity—to go raking up the sins of the past – maybe so. As a Christian people we can forgive, subject of course, to repentance and full restitution of our National rights on the part of the aggressor. As Christians we are bound to forgive. But there is no reason why we should ever forget! Having said this much to clear the misunderstanding which might arise from the slight mistake in last week’s article, I will now continue our Fermanagh folklore. The Derrylin Shanachies tell many tales of the generosity of old Lord Erne—the Lord Erne who flourished during ’69 and ’79 and those times. Of course everyone will agree that a man  with a rent-roll of £80,0000 a year, drawn largely off lands which his ancestors got for nothing, the confiscated property of the Fermanagh chiefs and clansmen, everyone, I say, will agree that a man like that could well afford to be generous when the whim seized him. His estates stretched like a principality on both sides of the lough as far as the eye could see, and in addition he had vast estates in Mayo and elsewhere. His estate on the west side of Lough Erne included practically the whole parish of Knockninny. Most of the Irish landlords of that day—if a tenant showed any little sign of taste or prosperity, if he whitewashed his house, or had middling deceit clothes, would raise the lent on him at once. But Lord Erne, according to the Derrylin Shanachies, was of an entirely different opinion. He liked taste, he liked his tenants to have, at least, neatly patched clothes and a snug well-kept house and place. Once on a journey through his estates he came to a tenant’s place of which he did not at all approve. The man was ragged in his clothing; his house was badly in need of thatch and black for want of limewash. “What is your name,” asked his Lordship. “My name is Darling,” said the man. “On,” said Lord Erne, “you are the devil’s darling.” On another occasion, with his agent, he was .travelling part of his estate in the Slieve Rushen mountain area when he came to a house and farm tenanted by a widow with a family of small children. The house and place were kept neat and clean, and the children’s clothes were neatly patched. He said to his agent “I will venture to say that the rent of this place is paid up to date.” “No, unfortunately, there are five years arrears against it” said the agent. “Well, there must be something serious wrong, so,”-said Lord Erne. Yes, said the woman there is, ‘I have lost my husband and it takes all the money I can make to rear my family.” “Give this woman a. clear receipt up to date and do not ask her to pay any rent until she is able to do so,” said Lord Erne to his agent. “You are a great woman” he continued “and I am proud to have you for a tenant. – In spite of all your difficulties you are keeping your house and place in good styled and keeping your children, neat and clean.” Another tenant also owed several yearns rent as his cattle had died but as he was keeping his place and himself neat and decent, his Lordship commanded the agent to give him a clear receipt. At his castle of Crom, every year the used to give prizes for. home industries, for neatly patched clothes, for sewing, knitting and spinning, etc.          .

 

DERRYLIN MAN’S APPEAL. On the 1st November, 1869, an immense Tenant Right meeting was held in Cavan town, which was attended by great numbers of Fermanagh farmers and people generally. Even Enniskillen town though 32 miles away, sent a large contingent by jaunting cars and horse-drawn waggonettes. At that time bicycles and motor cans were not even dreamt of. A score of years had still to pass before such things were invented and another score of years passed before any of them were seen in Fermanagh. At any rate the Chairman at that meeting was Fr. Pat O’Reilly, the parish priest of Drumlane, in which parish is situated Belturbet town, near the Fermanagh border. In the course of his address the Reverend Chairman said that if all the landlords of Ireland were as good as Lord Erne there would have been no need to hold a meeting like that. Lord Erne, like all his class probably never read any papers, only such as came from the Tory Press. Certainly he would not read the speeches of those whom he would call “disloyal agitators,” so he was unaware of the- compliment paid him by the Rev. Chairman at the meeting. Some time later he found out that a number of his tenants in Derrylin district, had attended the meeting so he gave orders to have them evicted from their holdings without delay. There was a man named Doogan—a Derrylin man, and he was one of the best judges of a horse in Ireland and Lord Erne had always employed him to buy horses, and he had great influence with his Lordship. So the poor men who were  threatened with eviction—which was almost as bad as sentence of death in those days, asked Doogan to do his utmost with his Lordship to have their sentences revoked. Doogan went to Crom Castle and met his Lordship out on the lawn walking with the Countess. He absolutely refused to reconsider his decision and said that, the offending tenants must go out. Doogan then asked him if he had read the speeches at the meeting and he said “No, I would not read the speeches of agitators.” Doogan then handed .him a paper and asked him to read the Rev. Chairman’s speech. At first he refused to read it, but the Countess prevailed on him to do as the man asked him, so he sat down and read the speech. Then said Doogan, “Will you evict your tenants now for attending that meeting?” “No,’’ said. Lord Erne “I will not. That man speaks very fair.’’

ORANGE SHOOTING.

In some future article I will say a lot about that Tenant Right meeting of 73 years ago. Old Francis Cleary, of Kinawley, who died two years ago, aged 91, told me all about it. He with 100 other young men from this district walked to the meeting 22 miles and back that 1st November, 1869. He could repeat every speech almost word for word. Unfortunately, however, that day ended in tragedy. While the Fermanagh and West Cavan contingents were returning and passing through the village of Drumaloor, near Belturbet,, they were fired on by a party of misguided young Orangemen and a young man named. Morton shot dead. Morton was the servant of the Rev. Chairman, the P.P. of Belturbet, and was driving the priest’s car, and the bullets only missed Father O’Reilly by inches. A number of men were tried for the murder at Cavan Assizes the March following but were acquitted by an Orange jury. Apparently the accused exercised the right of challenging each jury man in turn, till they got twelve men of their own choosing to try them. A friend of mine possesses a newspaper of March, 1870 which gives an account of the trial covering two pages. The young men who fired the shots were sons of tenant farmers themselves, who were amongst the first to reap the benefits of the land agitation. And do we not in our own day in the North of Ireland see the same narrow-minded party bitterness, a party standing against the onward march of the nation although it would be to their own benefit, as well as ours, to have a free and united Ireland. Just one more story of Crom Castle and a former Earl of Erne. In the old days a parish priest of Newtownbutler, was transported for performing the ceremony of marriage between a Protestant and a Catholic. Some time later a great regatta was held at Crom Castle, the Prince of Wales—-who was on a visit there at the time being in attendance. The greatest event of the day was a boat race on Lough Erne between a chosen party of boatmen of Lord Erne’s tenants and a party of boatmen of a gentleman named Saunderson who lived between Crom and Belturbet. Saunderson’s boatmen were a family named Latimer, while Lord Erne’s boatmen were a couple of brothers named Goodwin who lived in Derryvore—that peninsula of Knockninny parish which stretches over the lough almost to Crom and a man called big Ned Martin of Killybrack, also in Derrylin district. In the presence of the Prince of Wales, Lord Erne promised the Goodwins and Martin any favour they would ask for if they would only win the boat race in his honour. That boat race became historic in the Knockninny and Newtown butler districts. After tremendous exertions, the Goodwins and Martin won the race against their wiry opponents. Lord Erne was overjoyed at the honour done to his house with the royal guest present, and he called his boatmen up to name their reward. “Now,” he said, “anything you ask, you shall have it even, to the best farms on my estate.” But the Goodwins and Martin answered as one man: ‘Our only request is that you will procure the release of Father Clarke of Newtownbutler.’’ “Oh ask me anything only that” said Lord Erne. But they still persisted till the Prince, who was listening asked what it was all about. The circumstances were explained to him how Fr. Clarke had been transported for marrying a Protestant and a Catholic. The Prince was shocked. “I did not know” he said that there was such, a law as that upon the Statute Book of England. I must get it removed at once.

So Father Clarke was released and sent home to his parishioners and the iniquitous law was removed from the English Statute Book. As far as I can find out this incident happened long after Catholic Emancipation as there are many people still alive who remember big Ned Martin of Kilnabrack.

A correspondent has written me recently requesting that I write the folklore of the great townland of Aughyoule on the slopes of Slieve Rushen, near Derrylin.. As soon as possible I am visiting that townland—which is the second largest in Ireland—to have a few chats with its Shanachies and I will record everything about it. I find that the folklore of Knockninny parish is almost inexhaustible. Up till lately I thought Kinawley could beat all Fermanagh for folklore, but now I find that Derrylin is

 

KILTYCLOCHER AND DISTRICT NEWS. Deep regret has been occasioned in, the district by the death of Mr. Patrick Burns, Straduffy, which occurred on Thursday last following a prolonged illness. The late Mr. Burns was a. well- known sportsman. The funeral, which took place to Kilmakerrill on Saturday, was large and representative. Rev. J. P. Brady, C.C., Kiltyclogher, officiated at the graveside. The chief mourners were— Mrs. M. E. Tyrkell, Dublin, and Miss Lizzie Burns (daughters), Messrs. John Burns, Garrison; Tom Burns, Cashel, and P. Burns (sons); Messrs. Thomas and Michael Burns (brothers).

Garrison Fair held on the 26th. ult., was large and prices for all classes of cattle (especially springers) showed an upward tendency.

A farm of 35 acres at Tullyderrin, Rossinver, was purchased for £195 by Mr. Thomas Sweeney, Garrison. Killasnett School, which was closed down some time ago owing to declining attendance has been sold for £80.

A little boy aged three years had a narrow escape from drowning in the Kiltyclogher River during the week. Deep pools in close proximity to the village are unprotected, and are a constant danger to small children playing along the riverside.

The death occurred recently at an advanced age of Mr. George Acheson, Whealt. Deceased, who was one of the most extensive farmers in the Garrison district, was brother in law of Mr. Mr. T. Allingham, Kilcoo.

An official of the Department of Supplies visited Kiltyclogher last week in connection with the flour shortage, but nothing has been done since to relieve the situation, which is worsening. On Friday and Saturday Kiltyclogher was without flour or loaves. Oatmeal is also extremely scarce, and several families have to depend entirely on potatoes

 

LISNASKEA FATAL ACCIDENT. An R.A.F. corporal was the victim of a fatal accident near Lisnaskea on Friday evening. Corporal Harold Leonard Nieman, a native of Peckham, England, fell from a lorry, sustaining a fracture of the skull from which he died on his way to hospital. The accident took place at Ballindarragh, and, the police being notified, Constable T. McKernan was immediately on the scene.

At the inquest in Fermanagh County Hospital on Saturday, conducted by Mr. G. Warren. Coroner, Head Constable Thornton, Enniskillen, represented the police authorities.

Sergeant H. A. Saberton said the previous night, at 7-30 he was travelling in the rere of a three-ton truck with deceased and two others. As the truck pulled up and crossed the crown, of the road, deceased, who was standing, fell backward to the roadway on his head, and the rere wheel passed over his shoulder. The truck, which had been pulled up gradually, was stopped within three or four yards.

Witness found deceased unconscious and bleeding from mouth, nose and ears. They removed him to the grass verge, and within ten minutes he was placed in a passing car and brought to hospital, but died just approaching Enniskillen.

Dr. T. J.’ O’Hagan, house surgeon, Co. Hospital, said deceased was dead on admission. There was an abrasion on the right cheek and one on the left side of the chin. There was considerable haemorrhage from the nose and right ear. Some brain tissue was mixed with the blood. Death was due to shock and haemorrhage following fracture of the base of the skull and laceration of the brain. Sister Monaghan saw deceased on admission and he was then dead.

Deceased’s squadron leader said deceased was aged 38 and married. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence, and Head Constable Thornton and the Coroner expressed sympathy with the relatives of the deceased and to the driver of the truck, whom, the Coroner said was not in any way to blame.

 

APRIL 11, 1942.

DE-CONTAMINATION OFFICER’S INSTRUCTION. MR. BEATTY REFUSES TO CO

When Enniskillen R.D.C., on Tuesday, was requested to send its Decontamination of Food Officer to a course of instruction in Belfast, Mr. J. Brown, Clerk, said Mr. John Beatty, ,J.P., a member of the Council, had been appointed to this post and he supposed it was Mr. Beatty’s duty to attend.

Mr. Beatty—I am not going. I am telling you straight. (Laughter).

Mr. E. Callaghan said no member of the Council had more time at his disposal for attending than Mr. Beatty.

Mr. Beatty said he refused to go.

The Clerk said that in that case he thought the best thing would be for Mr. Beatty to resign. (Laughter).

Mr. J. J. Coalter, J. P., said that supposing gas was used and food was contaminated, he felt the responsibility for any serious consequences arising out of Mr. Beatty’s inability to deal with the situation would rest upon Mr. Beatty. (Laughter)

Mr. Beatty—Don’t think you will frighten me—I am not that green. (Laughter). If there was any £ s d for it I wouldn’t be asked to go. (Laughter).

Chairman (Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P.)— Will you appoint anybody?

Earl of Belmore, D.L.:—No.

Mr, Burns asked if Enniskillen Urban Council had appointed a representative.

The Clerk said it had; so also had Irvinestown and Lisnaskea Rural Council. Mr. Callaghan—Where are the lectures? Clerk—In Belfast. /

Lord Belmore—Oh! hell. (Laughter).

The Council decided to get one of the Sanitary Sub-Officers to attend.

 

LORRY AND P.O. VAN COLLIDE. SEQUEL AT LISBELLAW COURT

Details of the collision between an army, vehicle driven by Private North and a G.P.O. van driven, by Wm. Norman Kerr, Lisnarick, Irvinestown, which occurred at Gola Cross on 11th February, were given at Lisbellaw Petty Sessions on Friday, when both drivers were before the. Court charged on the usual counts with careless driving. The evidence was that the military van was coming across the road at Gola, proceeding from Lisbellaw down the Belleisle road when it struck the G. P.O. van travelling from Lisnaskea to Enniskillen.

Evidence for the prosecution was given by Bernard McCaughey, a passenger in the G..P.O. van, and Const. Wilkinson. Kerr said he was practically stopped when the impact took place. He had slowed down approaching, the cross.

North admitted in evidence that he did not obey the “halt” sign on his road at the approach to the cross. The summons against Kerr was dismissed and North, who had a previous conviction, was fined 40/- and 2/- costs.

 

LABOURERS TO RECEIVE 1/- PER HOUR. URBAN COUNCIL DECISION

Enniskillen Urban. Council have decided to pay their labouring men at the rate of 1/- per hour, instead of on the present basis of £2 5s and £2 2s 6d weekly.

Senator Whaley presided at the Council meeting on Tuesday evening, when the Finance Committee reported that they had under consideration the following applications from employees of  the Council for increases in wages and make the following recommendations thereon:—

From 13 labourers— their applications being for an increase of the present rates of £ 2 5s per week for men on the permanent staff and £2 2s 6d for men casually employed. It was stated in their applications that the rate of wages payable to general labourers in the district is at present 1/0½ per hour. It was recommended that an increase of 2/6 per week be granted to both the permanent and casual labourers.

The Committee also recommended that an increase of 2/6 per week be granted to Andrew Bell, lorry driver, on his present rate of £2 12s 6d per week, and that the wages of William Hynes, mason, be increased from £3 15s to £4 per week.

Mr. P. Kelly said the wages of labourers employed by the E.B.N.I. and builders in the district was 1/1 per hour. Why should Urban Council labourers be paid only £2 5s or £2 2s 6d weekly when all other labourers in. the district were paid £2 12s. Could the Council do nothing better for its labourers than that?

Mr. Donnelly said he wrote to the Ministry of Labour on the matter, and read the reply to the Finance Committee. The reply stated that only builders’ labourers were paid 1/1 per hour.

Mr. T. Algeo said the Council were paying the best wages in the Six Counties with the exception of two or three others.

January 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

Pettigo News. Fermanagh Herald. 17th January 1942. The death has occurred after a short illness, at her residence, Tievemore, Pettigo, of Miss Elizabeth Reid. There was a large attendance at the funeral.

On Saturday R.U.C. from Tullyhommon, Pettigo, made a search of a number of farm houses in the Cloghore and Camplagh districts along the Lettercran border, and seized a quantity of flour and bread. They also seized a quantity of sugar in bags, which had been smuggled from Donegal.

Blacklion District news. 17th January 1942. The wedding took place at Killinagh Protestant Church of Sergeant Alfred Brady R. I. F. Dungannon, a native of Florencecourt, and Miss Elizabeth Sheridan, Gola, Blacklion. Mr. George Sheridan, cousin of the bride, was best man, Miss Annie Sheridan, sister of the bride, was bridesmaid. Rev. Mr. Coleman, B. A. performed the ceremony.

There was a 90% attendance at meetings of the L.D.F. at Blacklion, Glenfarne, Barran and Glangevlin Groups during the week. At a meeting of the Locality Security Force arrangements for extending night patrols were made.

During the week 160 men started to work under the minor relief scheme in the different parts of the area.

When returning from milking cows at Drumcow, Mrs Leonard, Belcoo, fell from a foot style and had her leg broken. She was removed to Enniskillen Hospital.

FINTONA. Butter jumps 1s 7d per lb.; pork 23 carcasses; young pigs 85s to 95s each, potatoes 6s to 7s 4d per cwt.

CASTLEDERG. Pork, 40 carcases; young pigs 65s to 80s each; chickens 4s 6d to 6s 6d, hens 3s 6d to 5s 6d, ducks 3s to3s 6d each; potatoes 7s to 8s per cwt retail.

24th January 1942. CAR ON CONCESSION ROADS. QUESTION OF LIGHTS NOT “ BLACKED-OUT ” A point affecting thousands of motorists who use the Clones-Gavan Concession Road, was raised at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions, before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., when Patrick McEntee, Clonfad, Newtownbutler, was summoned on three counts for not having the lights on his motor car properly blacked-out.

Mr. J. B. Murphy, solicitor, who appeared for defendant, said the case raised the point of black-out on the Concession- Road, on which defendant resided. The road was in and out of Monaghan and Fermanagh at points. Cars in Monaghan could use undimmed lights while the Six-County cars must be blacked-out. District Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, said defendant’s car was found in the Six Counties. Mr. Murphy — Any person using that road could be stopped in the Six Counties. Major Dickie—I am afraid they could. The real trouble is that Six-County “cars meeting headlights are helpless. Major Dickie said he thought it was a very proper case to be brought, to- see what would be done. Constable W. H. Walker—I brought it for that purpose. Mr. Murphy —‘What is Mr. McEntee to do in future? ‘ Major Dickie – That is the trouble with, all of us. I would suggest he should have a dipping headlight and drive with one headlamp dipped. I think if the defendant and all other Free State drivers used that form of light on the Concession Road there would be no objection by the police. Mr. Murphy asked to have the Probation of Offenders Act applied with costs, and said they in Monaghan would dip their lights. The Probation Act was applied.

24th January 1942. POPULAR ENNISKILLEN WEDDING. MAGUIRE — SMYTH. A pretty and popular wedding was solemnised in St. Michael’s, Church, Enniskillen, on Wednesday morning of last week, the contacting parties being Mr. Peter M. Maguire, the well-known Gael and secretary of Enniskillen Gaels G.A.A. club for the past 15 years and Miss Margaret (Gretta) Smyth, Wellington,, secretary of the Fermanagh County Camogie Board. The best man was Mr. James Donnelly, and the bride was attended by her sister, Miss Mary T. (‘Dot’) Smyth, P.E.T.

The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev. E. Rhatigan, C.C., Terenure, Dublin, cousin of the groom, assisted by Ven. Archdeacon Gannon, P.P., Enniskillen. The reception in the Railway Hotel, Enniskillen, was attended by a large number of relatives and friends of the happy couple. Father Rhatigan presided, and those present included Rev. Father Vincent, C. P., the Graan. The honeymoon is being spent in the South and West of Ireland.

24th January 1942. CALL FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION ON WIDER BASIS. Mr. J. J. Coalter, J.P., urged Fermanagh Regional Education Committee to appeal to the Government to place secondary education on the same basis as primary education so that all might be able to obtain the higher standard of education without extra cost. Mr. Coalter said the time had arisen when they should press upon the Government the absolute necessity of providing the same facilities for secondary as for primary education. Secondary education was not available to all pupils. It was lack of a proper secondary education that had caused the dearth of properly trained young men that were now wanted by the country in time of war. It was impossible for the ordinary man, after providing the necessities of life for children, such as food and clothing, to provide a proper secondary education.

24th January 1942. LEITRIM LADY’S DEATH IN WICKLOW. Mrs. Alice Clancy, proprietress, Grand Hotel, Wicklow, who died, was a native of Manorhamilton and was widow of Mr. Patrick Clancy, Kiltyclogher, Co. Leitrim. Formerly of the Bellevue Hotel, Dun Laoghaire, she took over the Grand Hotel, Wicklow, in 1918. She was sister of Sister Mary Therese, O.P., and Sister Mary Patrick, Holy Faith Order, both in South Africa, and mother of Mr. Joseph Clancy, who has been managing the Grand Hotel for some years; Rev. R. Clancy, C.C., Donabate, and of the late Rev. Berchmans Clancy, O Cist., Mount Melleray.

24th January 1942. DROVE WITHOUT LICENCE. John P. Brannigan, 6, Henry Street, Enniskillen, was fined 20s at Enniskillen Petty Sessions for driving a motor lorry without a licence.

January 10th 1942. RAILWAY LINE CLOSED. LAST RUN IN THE CLOGHER VALLEY. The close of the old year coincides with the passing of the Clogher Valley Railway, which has served the district for 65 years and was closed down on Wednesday of last week in accordance with an Order of the Ministry of Home Affairs. To mark the occasion members of the office and locomotive staffs with a number of local folk took a joy ride on the last train from Aughnacloy to Fivemiletown and back, the arrival home at Aughnacloy being signalled by the hooting of the engine whistle. Competition was keen as to who would have the honour of punching the last ticket issued and this distinction was credited to Dr. Gillespie of Tynan.

Some 70 employees are affected by the closing of the line, but most of them, will receive compensation on a varying scale. Although: no trains are now running the head office staff at Aughnacloy carry on as usual and will continue to do so for the present as a lot of clearing up work has to be attended to before the liquidator proceeds with the dispersal of the property.

The Ministry’s cattle grading centers at Aughnacloy, Clogher, and Fivemiletown will be carried on at the railway premises as usual, the Clogher Rural Council having made arrangements for the use of the railway weighbridges for the purpose.

It is interesting to note that the first ticket issued on the railway is retained by Mr. W. D. Graham, solicitor, Fivemiletown, having been purchased by his father, the late Mr. D. Graham, on the first run 56 years ago.

January 10th 1942. MANOR HAMILTON NEWS. Roses in Bloom. — Roses in bloom are to be seen in Mr. M. O’Donnell’s garden at Boleyhill.

L.D.F. District Command Dance. — The L.D.F. District Command Dance held on Sunday night was well patronised.

January 10th 1942. ROSLEA POTEEN CHARGE. BARREL OF WASH FOUND. JAIL SENTENCE. At Roslea Petty Sessions on Friday before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., Thomas Beagan, farmer, Tonnaghaboy, Roslea, was sentenced to two months’ imprisonment without hard labour when he pleaded guilty to having 20 gallons of wash in his possession, on Dec. 6th. A further charge of having a bottle in his possession containing a few drops of poteen was dismissed without prejudice. Defendant was not professionally represented. In reply to District-Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, Sergt. Ryder, R.U.C., Fivemiletown, stated that while accompanied by Sergt. C. E. Williams, Roslea, he assisted in searching the house of defendant. In the sitting-room he found two empty 141b. tins which had contained syrup. He then went to a hayshed and with the assistance of a graip he found a barrel in the hay which contained 20 gallons of ‘wash’. The wash had matured and was ready for running. Witness heard Beagan saying it was his wash. Defendant then informed the court he admitted having the wash.

Sergt. Williams deposed to finding a large bottle which smelled strongly of poteen. When questioned about the bottle defendant stated it had been left there by a girl called Lena Murphy. In fairness to defendant he would like to say he tested that statement and found there had been a bottle left there some days previously. When questioned about the wash defendant said it was his. When asked to account for the syrup defendant’s wife said it was used for making cakes. Later after the barrel was found defendant admitted the syrup was used for making the wash. Witness destroyed the wash and kept a sample. Defendant (told the court he admitted the wash but not the poteen. In reply to his Worship, the District Inspector said there were no previous convictions. In imposing the sentence stated Major Dickie said he would not impose hard Labour, although actually he believed it made no difference. Defendant was then removed in custody.

BLACKLION NEWS. In accordance with custom, groups of ‘Wren Boys’ travelled the district in the days prior to New Year’s Day.

The annual Xmas Tree was given in the Blacklion School by Mrs and the Rev. Mr Coleman on Wednesday night. A big number of children were entertained.

A dance in aid of funds for the new band was held in the MacNean Hall, Belcoo, on New Year’s Night. The spacious Hall was packed. The music was by the Sunny Melody Band.

A special meeting of the Group Staff of the Local Security Force was held in Blacklion on Friday night. Group Leader Wynn presided. Sergt Rock and D. S. O. Maguire, N. T. were in attendance. A letter from the Minister for Justice was read, thanking the group for their services for the past year. The question of the formation of a branch of the Red Cross was discussed and it was decided to assist in forming a branch as soon as possible. The appointment of Mr. John Jas. Grane as Section Leader was sanctioned. Mr Michael Foley was appointed Asst. Section Leader. An Intelligence Officer was also appointed.

PETTIGO NEWS. The poor in Pettigo village were provided with food, clothing and fuel by a number of charitable gentlemen and ladies in the vicinity during the Christmas season. The donors include: – Guard J. Treanor and Mrs Treanor, Mr. James Gallagher, Postmaster, Mr Michael Fullerton, Customs and Excise, Mr and Mrs Thos. Bradley, Sic-Co., Customs and Mrs Dora Wrenn, C.M.B.

On Tuesday night of last week Lettercran B. Group of the L. S. F. under Squad Leader T. Haughey assembled at the local hall and underwent instruction in squad drill.

On Thursday night of last week a very enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Parochial Hall, Agheyarron, (sic) the proceeds being in aid of Parochial Funds. The music was supplied by Messrs Eddie McHugh, Corgary, and Edward Lynch, Mullinabreen. Mr. James Neill McNally was M. C.

On Wednesday night of last week a dance was held in Letter Hall, Pettigo, the proceeds being in aid of charity. The music was provided by the Trio Dance Band. Mr. William H. Marshall, Skea, was M. C.