Cross Border Smuggling in the 1940s and 1950s.

Rare things smuggled – 5-10-1940. Five tons of onions were seized by an R.U.C. Customs patrol at the Border near Clones. They were being unloaded from a lorry on the Monaghan side and carried across to a horse and cart on the other side.

A smuggling secret – 7-12-1940. At Derrylin Petty Sessions there were several successful prosecutions for possession of cigarettes which had come from Eire. The Customs Officer, Mr. Dickson, pointed out a secret of his trade by showing that in the words “W. D. & H. O. Wills” printed on every cigarette, the “&” had no tail above the downward stroke on the Northern Ireland cigarette, while a tail was visible on the Free State “&”. At the same court numerous cyclists were summonsed for offences. The fines imposed were:- not having a mask on the headlamp, 5s with 2s costs; no rear light 3s with 3s costs; not having more than one brake 2s with 2s costs; no bell 1s with 2s costs.

Smuggling eggs – 7-12-1940. The importation of eggs to the Six Counties was prohibited at the weekend. It had lately developed into a lucrative enterprise for 26 county poultry producers with eggs at 4d per dozen more north of the Border. About 6 to 8 dozen Ballyshannon producers regularly exported to Belleek. Pettigo poultry farmers are in a sorry plight as there is not a registered egg dealer within 18 miles on the Donegal side and they had previously sold all their eggs in Northern Ireland. Large seizures of eggs taken across the Border were made in Belleek and Pettigo since and the bringing of turkeys across the Border for sale is likely to be similarly prohibited.

Faithful friends in smuggling – 14-12-1940. Faithful dog at Belleek. A small farmer with his donkey and cart containing three pigs were apprehended at Belleek by Six Counties customs. The farmer was allowed to go home but the donkey and cart with pigs was detained in a yard in the village while the Customs investigated their suspicion that they were smuggled. The farmer’s dog which had accompanied them could not be persuaded either by coaxing or coercion to leave the donkey and cart and spent the night with them. Next day the pigs were forfeited but the donkey and cart released and the dog accompanied his inseparable companion home.

A smuggling battle – 6-4-1940. The scene of the “battle” between 90 flour smugglers and fourteen Guards and Customs men, was mountainous Moneygashel, near Blacklion, two or three miles from Cuilcagh Mountain and about a mile from the Shannon Pot, the source of Ireland’s largest river. The authorities were lying in wait near Moneygashel School awaiting a party of fourteen men who had crossed from Leitrim into Fermanagh to obtain flour which was about 8 shillings a sack cheaper in Northern Ireland. It was then stashed near the border and conveyed south by teams of donkeys across fields and bye-ways until the smugglers met the county road at Moneygashel.

On the night of the 27th the authorities lay in wait but never expected the huge convoy of over 100 donkeys and mules each carrying one or two hundredweights of flour and attended by about 90 men armed with sticks. When they were challenged the men were determined to break through and hand to hand combat began under a cloud covered moon with donkeys rushing too and fro braying, and men swearing and shouting. The apparent leader was on horseback and encouraged his men as he slashed at the fourteen engaged on behalf of the State. The narrow roadway hampered the attackers and eventually the authorities began to get the upper hand and at this juncture the attackers grabbed additional ammunition from the stone ditches and forced the authorities back. Still they held the roadway and in the morning when the smugglers had melted away seventy donkeys were gathered up and over two tons of flour apart from a huge amount spilled over the road and fields.

All of the Customs men took sick leave the following day as nobody was unscathed while Sergeant T. J. Rocks, who was in charge of the party was confined to his bed with a large gash to his head in which three stitches had been inserted. Many arrests have been made.

Big time smuggling – 11-11-1950. Big Belleek Seizure. On Sunday Sergt.  Cordher and Constables. Forde and Mc Alinden seized a Ford 8 car with 9,300 cigarettes, 15lbs of butter and other articles from John Johnston, New Lodge Road, Belfast. The goods were in the upholstery of the car. Released on bail of £300 and a surety for the same amount. Garrison police seized 3,000 cigarettes on the Kiltyclogher border.

Bare faced smuggling – 20-12-1958. Belleek man fined £100 on Customs charge at Ballyshannon – Detained pending payment of penalty. Patrick Greenan, Commons, Belleek, was fined £100 for importing 3cwt of wheaten flour to Eire. He and Andrew Duffy were seen wheeling two wheelbarrows containing goods down Belleek Street. They were observed by Constable Mc Kee of Belleek RUC who informed Seamus Hogan APO, Cloghore Customs Post. Charges against John James Greenan, Clyhore and J. J. Greenan and Sons, Ltd, Cloghore were dropped.

Smuggling fines were generally in the region of £100 and this was invariably out of the reach of the person caught and from around this area they would be sent to serve a prison sentence, generally of six months, to Belfast’s Crumlin Road. From Belleek the two local taxi men, Gilpin Irwin and Jimmy Greenan got the job alternately of running the guilty party to the Crumlin Road Jail in Belfast. On this occasion Jimmy had the run and the prisoner with two policemen as escorts set off for Belfast after the court in Belleek. Jimmy was a man fond of a drink and obviously the two police were also and they stopped first in Lack, then Omagh and Ballygawley and did not get to the prison until 9 where they found it closed for the night. The prisoner would have to be lodged in a barrack cell in Belfast and lodged in prison the next morning. This was done and Jimmy and the two policemen had a convivial night in Belfast. In the morning when they went to the barrack to collect their prisoner and take him to the prison they found he was gone. Someone had paid the £100 fine, he had been traced to his barrack cell, freed, given a train ticket to return to the loving bosom of his family and while they stood there looking at each other he was on his way home. As Jimmy and the two policemen rounded the corner of Belleek’s street there was their former prisoner waving at them – home before them. The two policemen received a severe caution and could have lost their jobs and Jimmy was not awarded another prisoner transfer from Belleek for over a year.

Along the Border in a short stretch between Pettigo and Scraghy there were seven country shops on the Southern side who all flourished during the time of smuggling. On shop called Haughey’s did a roaring trade in cigarettes and tobacco. It was believed that at the weekends it did a trade as good as a shop on O’Connell Street in Dublin. It was a one room shop that served only one customer at a time. Nobody wanted anyone else to know their business – how much of any item they were buying.

And finally another odd smuggling offence – 1-4-1939. Corsets. A fine of £100 with a strong recommendation to the Revenue Commissioners that it be greatly reduced was imposed on Miss Annie Jane Mills at Pettigo Court. She was charged with having being knowingly concerned in the evasion of payment of customs duty on corsets imported by her. She had been in the drapery business in the South and had come back to Pettigo to look after her aged mother and had an agency for a brand of corsets but got little sale for them as they were too expensive.

 

Advertisements

Enniskillen Urban Councillors V Troops in Fermanagh in WW2

The Holy Urban Councillors.

(Of Enniskillen – This poem in the Fermanagh Herald of 27-9-1941 describes the position of the Enniskillen Urban Councillors who were strict guardians of the Sabbath Day but were forced to yield to pressure to allow soldiers and airmen from the UK, USA, Canada, South Africa etc., access to the cinema on Sunday. Sunday golf in Enniskillen was also breached at this time. )

Oh we’re the holy Councillors of Enniskillen Town,

We fear the Lord, we keep the law, we stand for Church and Crown,

We love the Ten Commandments; to keep them is our boast,

But the one concerning Sabbath days is that we love the most.

On Sundays to all kinds of sport we offer stern denials,

All joy we shed, and go instead with long and solemn dials,

To keep the townsfolk holy too, we do our little best;

By banning entertainments on the Seventh Day of Rest.

But recently a horde of pagan soldiers who prefer

Sitting at moving pictures to kneeling down to prayer

Descended on our holy town with bayonets, guns and rifles

And swept aside out righteous laws, which they described as trifles.

And ruefully ‘neath force majeure, our statutes we forsook

Discarding the Commandment, and the teaching of the Book;

It doesn’t seem quite logical I fear we must agree,

But what in thunder could we do? No other choice had we.

To save our face in the fall from grace we made a solemn stricture

That only those in uniform on Sundays see a picture.

So gnash your teeth or thump your craws, it’s all the same to us,

We’ll make you all respect our laws no matter how you cuss,

And hearken, Sabbath breakers, when you come to your reward,

You’ll all be sniffing brimstone while we are walking with the Lord.

With halos round our holy heads, in stained-glass windows glorious

We’ll be remembered in our Church, the holy men victorious;

And thus like saints and martyrs will our memory go down

The holy, holy, holy men, of Enniskillen Town!

 

TIM – Transcribed J.B.C. 25-12-2006.

Fermanagh and the The Earl Grey Scheme. Exporting our Orphan Girls c1850.

The Earl Gray Scheme. Lisnaskea and Enniskillen Orphan Girl Emigrants and other Orphan Emigrant Girls with Fermanagh addresses.

The Great Famine in Ireland in the 1840s was a time of great change for the people of Ireland. The population of Ireland was reduced significantly during this time with many people making the voyage to Australia. Among those making the journey were approximately 4000 Irish female orphans under the Earl Grey Scheme. The immigration scheme was the brain-child of Earl Grey. He was the Secretary of State for the Colonies, and designed the program to meet an Australian demand for domestic servants and marriageable young women. It would also serve to reduce overcrowding in Irish workhouses. In the late 1840s many ships came to Australia bringing young girls travelling alone. Ships carrying orphan girls included the William Stewart in May 1848 with 51 aboard, followed by the Mahomed Shah in July 1848 with 12 orphan girls. The largest number of orphans arrived on the Pemberton on May 14th 1849 as part of the Earl Grey Scheme. 305 orphans disembarked from this ship after a voyage of 113 days having departed n 29 January 1849. The orphans arrived in Sydney, Adelaide, Hobart and Port Phillip and from these ports were spread across eastern Australia. Many suffered at the hands of their employers and husbands with beatings and violence. Others found their experience in Australia to be prosperous. Many married successful gold miners, landowners, farmers and shop keepers and led happy and fulfilling lives in Australia. The scheme was relatively short-lived and only lasted two years as many ‘anti’ groups saw Australia being flooded with Irish immigrants. These young women were condemned in local newspapers as being unskilled, untrained and useless, and a financial strain on Australia. The Earl Grey scheme, although the brain-child of the Irish Secretary of State for the Colonies was funded by the Australian people. In May 1850 the scheme was suspended. With the beginning of the gold rush, discussions surrounding assisted immigration passages were dropped as many migrants were now willing to pay for their own journey in the hope of making it big on the gold fields of Australia.

The Times reported – ‘The full-rigged ship Pemberton, Captain J.H. Richardson, arrived here from Liverpool on the 12th instant, for the purpose of embarking Irish girls for Sydney. They (the girls) were selected as follows:- From the Poor Law Union at Roscrea, 60; Nenagh, 40; Limerick, 50; Kilrush, 30; Lisnaskea, 20; Tipperary, 40; Mallow,20; South Dublin, 7; from the Dublin Royal Hibernian Military Asylum, 24; and from the Cork Foundling Hospital. 16; in all 307, under the charge of a head matron, 1 school mistress, and 4 sub-matrons. After they had been mustered and sent below, the crew, consisting of 63 persons, were inspected by Her Majesty’s Emigration officer, Lieutenant Carew, R.M., who in addition to some general advice, endeavoured in the most feeling manner to impress upon the minds of the men the propriety of treating the unfortunate orphans with every proper respect during the voyage….Thus in every way the bodily and physical wants of these expatriated girls have been cared for. The mental abilities of those from the unions have received little or no cultivation-scarcely any one can write, and very few can read. To aid them in this deficiency, and to provide suitable employment during the long and tedious voyage is the peculiar object of the benevolent institution denominated the Female Emigration Employment Society, which distributes its donations by the hands of the Rev. T. C. Childs, minister of St. Mary’s, Devonport, a gentleman who (with Mr. Allen) received the orphans on their leaving the main deck of the Pemberton, and was soon actively employed in giving them spiritual and moral advice, in kindly ranging them in classes, supplying them with books and appointing teachers and monitors to instruct them on the passage. The latter were selected mainly from the girls of the Dublin Asylum and the Cork Foundling Hospital, whose education, discipline, and general appearance, reflected credit on the conductors of those humane establishments.’

The Sydney Morning Herald reported the arrival of the Pemberton at Port Phillip, listing its cargo.

‘The Pemberton, ship, has on board, 11 married couples, 317 single women, 3 male children, and 1 female child, under 14 years old. The above emigrants are principally from the Unions. The Pemberton is a magnificent ship, and the largest that ever arrived in Port Phillip.’

To look after the children and procure employment for them, the Sydney Government formed the Port Phillip Orphan Immigration Committee and Board of Guardians. Charges of incapacity, dishonesty and immorality, however, were laid by the Argus newspaper. It reported that the City recruited harlots from the ranks of the immigrant girls, a charge strongly denied and refuted by the St. Patrick Society with strong connections to the rival newspaper, the Herald. ‘The girls, though rough enough in some respects,’ the Chronicles continue, ‘were honest, virtuous and teachable. After entering service many of them proved to be excellent household servants. There were at the time certain malcontents in Melbourne, chronic fault-finders and foremost among them….the Argus newspaper.’ The Chronicle details the reaction to the criticism of the Argus and continues, ‘But the most irrefutable vindication of the Irish orphan girls’ came ‘from the St. Patrick Society.’ At a special meeting attended by 700 visitors, E. Finn, vice-president of the Society delivered a stinging rebuke, which led to a resolution denouncing as gross and unfounded the charges of immorality and dishonesty that blackened the national character of Ireland.

Fermanagh Famine Orphan Girls.

Famine Orphan Girl Ships to Australia from Ireland – Ships to Melbourne, Victoria.

Ship Date of Departure [Plymouth] Date of Arrival
Lady Kennaway 11September 1848 6 December 1848
Pemberton 29 January 1849 14 May 1849
New Liverpool 25 April 1849 9 August 1849
Diadem 13 October 1849 10 January 1850
Derwent 9 November(?) 1849 25/26 February 1850
Eliza Caroline 31 December 1849 31 March 1850

Compiled initially from article by Trevor McClaughlin, ‘Barefoot and Pregnant? Female Orphans who emigrated from Irish Workhouses to Australia, 1848-1850’, in Familia: Ulster Genealogical Review, incorporating Ulster Genealogical & Historical Guild ‘Newsletter’, Vol.2, No.3, 1987, pp.31-36 and updated from shipping lists in New South Wales and South Australia. From http://www.familytreecircles.com/famine-orphan-girls-ships-to-australia-from-ireland-37811.html

Pemberton left 29th January 1849 arrived 14th May 1849.

Surname, First Name, Age, Native Place, Parents if known, Religion, CE (Church of England, really Church of Ireland but that is how they were recorded and RC for Roman Catholic.) Other information such as employment, marriage etc.

Armstrong. Susan. Age16. Lisneskin (Lisnaskea) Fermanagh. Parents: Not recorded. CE. Ship name: Pemberton. (Melbourne 1849). Other: Employed. M.r Grubb £12 for 6 months.

Armstrong. Isabella. Age15. Lisneskin (Lisnaskea) Fermanagh. Parents: Not recorded. CE. Ship name: Pemberton (Melbourne 1849). Other: Employed. Mr. Willis, Geelong £9 for 1 year.

Beaty/Beatie Ellen/Eleanor, 14 Lisneskie, (Lisnaskea), Fermanagh, RC Employed. John Haslett, farmer, Monee Ponds, £5, 3 years. Married, William Noble, Melbourne, 1850, at least 5 children by 1863, some in the Blackwood area. Ellen died of typhoid in Blackwood 30 Sept. 1863.

Beavis/Bearis, Mary Ann, 14 Fermanagh, CE. Employed. Sarah Kerr, upholsterer, Little Collins St., £6 for 2 years, apprentice.

Creggan/Creegan, Jane, 18, Fermanagh, CE. Employed by Richard O’Cock, Melbourne, £12 for 6 months. Married Richard Wilson, Melbourne, 3 June, 1850, at least 5 children, mostly born Doncaster area. Jane died Collingwood 1899.

Donnolly/Donelly, Jane, 16, Fermanagh, RC, Employed. Edward Bell, Richmond, £8 for 1 year. Married John Galley an ‘exile’ from Essex in St Peter’s in Melbourne 8 July 1850, 10 children. She died in Hawthorn 14 Sep. 1911, buried Kew.

Dunbar, Ellen, 18, Fermanagh, NA, CE, Employed by John Crow, Darebin Creek, £10 for 6 months. Married Henry Allison, a boot and shoemaker in Richmond, 21 Dec. 1852, 12 children, lived Taraville, died 30 April 1902.

Forster/Foster Eliza, 15, Fermanagh, NA CE. Employed by Mr Egerton, Ballarat, £10 for 1 year.

Kennedy, Ellen, 14/16, Fermanagh, John and Ann, RC, Hospital. Admitted to Melbourne Benevolent Asylum, 20 Jan 1853, condition, contracted limbs. Ellen died in the Asylum in 1881.

MacCourt/McCourt, Ellen, 18, Fermanagh, NA, RC, Employed by T.W. Langdon, Loddon River, £10 for 1 year.

MacDowal/McDowal, Catherine, 16, Fermanagh, NA, CE, Employed by John Tracey, farmer, Richmond, £9 for 3 months.

MacElroy/McElroy, Ellen, 14, Fermanagh, Hugh and Ann, CE, Employed by John Masham, Bourke St., Melbourne, £5 for 3 years, apprentice. Married William Surridge (an exile, born London) at the Minister’s residence, Independent Congregational Church, Melbourne, 25 Nov. 1852, c. 8 children, lived Bendigo and Creswick close to her sister (below). William died 1876 and Ellen at Creswick 11 Oct. 1923.

MacElroy/McElroy, Mary A., 16. Lisnaskea, Fermanagh. Parents: Hugh McElroy and Ann Clark. CE. Ship name: Pemberton (Melbourne 1849). Other: Employed by John Masham, Bourke St., £7 for 1 year. Married William Jordan (an exile, born Shropshire) St Peter’s, Melbourne, 31 August 1852, 13 children, 8 of whom died before reaching 21 years of age. William died 1895 and Mary Ann at the age of 90, 31st August, 1923.

MacGuire/McGuire, Catherine, 14, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed by Mr Tulloch, Portland, £8 for 2 years.

Mulligan, Rose, 15, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed T.W. Langdon, Loddon River, £6 for 2 years.

Noble, Ann, 17, Fermanagh, NA, C of E. Employed by T. H. Power, Melbourne, £10 for 1 year.

Nolan, Ann, 15, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed by William O’Connor, Woodstock, £12 for 1 year.

Willoughby, Ann, 14, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed by Mrs Janet Thompson, Brighton, £5 for 2 years.

None with a Fermanagh address on New Liverpool Arrived 9 August 1849 SRNSW 4/4816 Reel 2144.

 

Lady Kennaway Arrived 6 December 1848: Admitted to depot 13 December SRNSW 4/4816 Reel 2144 (with thanks to Ada Ackerley, Linda Paoloni and to Dr Pauline Rule) Surname First Name Age Native Place Parents Religion Other

Edwards, Anne, 16, Donegal, NA, RC, Inren, Donegal. Employed by James Elsey, Brunswick St., £8 for, 1 year. Born 7 July Drumfurie Parish, (Drumully?) Fermanagh, married Robert McWilliam at St Peter’s, Melbourne in 1854, 10 children.

Diadem arrived 10 January 1850. Arrived Depot 12 January 1850 SRNSW 4/4817. Reel 2145 (with thanks to Ada Ackerley, Linda Paoloni and to Dr Pauline Rule) Surname First Name Age Native Place Parents Religion Other.

Armstrong, Eliza, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE, Enniskillen. BG14/G/4 (3069) Union at large, entered 23 May 1849, left 3 Oct 1849. Employed by Charles Forrest, South Yarra, at £7 for 6 months.

Ball, Alice, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, C of E, PRONI BG14/G/4 (No. 48) (No.3708) Employed by John Brown, sailmaker, Richmond at £7 for 12 months., apprentice. Committed suicide after being made pregnant by her married master, Argus 26 April and 1 May 1850.

Ball, Jane, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, C of E, PRONI BG14/G/4 (no. 1458) (No. 3291) Dirty, able-bodied, entered workhouse 20 June 1848 and left 3 Oct 1849. Employed by Sarah Gough, Darebin at £6 for 6 months.

Betty, Margaret, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE. PRONI BG14/G/4 (2368) servant, Rossnagamper, entered workhouse 7 March 1848, left 3 Oct 1849. Employed by Mrs J T Chambers, Melbourne at £10 for 6 months.

Bing, Jane, 15, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE, (see Byng below). PRONI BG14/G/4 (4612) and BG14/G/5 (527). Employed by Mr Pippett, Russell St., at £7 for 12 months. apprentice. Married John Deslandes 5 April 1852 lived Melbourne, 10 children, died 3 August 1896.

Browne, Anne, 16, Fermanagh, NA, CE, Brown, Anna. (Tim(p)joo) (Tempo?). Employed by James Purvis, Chewton at £5 for 12 months.

Byng, Mary, 16, Fermanagh, George & Mary Ann Bing, CE, PRONI BG 14/G/4 (4611) child of George and Mary Ann Bing, sister of Jane (see Bing above), William, George and Cathy, Enniskillen, part of a large family group, entered the workhouse 28 Nov 1848, she left 3 Oct 1849. Native Place, Enniskillen. Employed by T. B. Foote, Table Top at £8 10shillings, 2 years, apprentice. Married Thomas Troubridge 29 July 1852 in Melbourne, husband a miner and bricklayer, 8 children. lived Inglewood, died 22 Sept. 1902.

Cahill, Catherine, 18, Trury, (Trory) Fermanagh, NA, RC, Native Place, Truro. Went to Mr Neave, St Kilda. Her sister, Elizabeth Neave, wife of Matthew Neave, died 13 March 1850. Catherine married Matthew, Melbourne, 1851, son born 5 April 1852, no further record.

Cambridge, Rebecca, 17, Ballyearag, (Ballyeareagh?) Fermanagh, NA, CE, PRONI BG14/G/5 (841) Ballyeareagh, entered workhouse 9 April 1849, left 3 Oct 1849. Employed by Mr George Moulds, baker, Collingwood at £8 for 6 months. Married Samuel J Harvey, 11 Oct 1854, 11 children, husband a gold digger, labourer and woodman, lived Morang, died 25 June 1905, buried Yan Yean. She left 10 acres of land and cottage in the township of Separation, valued £100, and 5 cows and furniture worth £40.

Cranston, Catherine, 15, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE. PRONI BG 14/G/4 (989) Cranston, Laragh, Rossawilla, (Rosahilly) entered workhouse 4 June 1847, left 3 Oct 1849.  Employed by Misses Kavanagh, Flinders Lane at £6 for 18 months. apprentice. Married Henry Firth Smith, Melbourne, 17 March 1852, husband later a miner in Ballarat, 8 children by 1868, no further record.

Crane, Mary, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, C of E. PRONI BG/14/G/4 (71) 13 year old, orphan, entered 4 July 1847, left workhouse 2 Oct 1849. Employed by William Armstrong, Melbourne at £6 for 12 months. apprentice.

Cunningham, Jane, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE. PRONI BG14/G/4 (156) 20 years old. Enniskillen Mulhylogane(?), (Mullylogan) entered workhouse 4 July 1847 left 3 Oct 1849. Employed.Henry Ginn Esq, Colonial Architect, Richmond, £13, 3 months

Dempsey, Anne, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, Margaret, CE. PRONI BG 14/G/5 (727) Demcy. Able-bodied, Union at large, with mother Margaret from King’s County, entered workhouse 20 March 1849, left 3 Oct 1849. Demsey, Ann. Employed. James Andrews, farmer, Brighton, £7, 6 months. Married Eugene Abel at St Andrews, Brighton, in 1852. Several children born in the Dandenong area by 1871.

Elliott, Jane, 16, Temple, (Tempo), Fermanagh, NA, CE, Employed. Charles Marshall, Little Bourke St., £10 for 6 months.

Ferguson, Mary, 17, Fermanagh, NA, CE. Town of Fermanagh. Employed. Augustus Farley, Collingwood, £8 for 6 months
Fitzsimmons, Helen, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, Grace (father dead), CE. PRONI BG 14/G/5 (254) entered workhouse with sister below 26 Jan 1849, left 2 Oct 1849. Employed. Edwin Leadbeatter, Collingwood, £10 for 6 months.
Fitzsimmons, Mary, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, Grace (father dead,) CE. PRONI BG14/G/4 (462) (255) Carne, Blacknett, entered workhouse with mother, Grace, widow, brother Robert and sisters Ellen and Roseanne, able bodied, entered 28 Jan 1849, left 3 Oct 1849. Employed. James Robe, Collins St., £7 for 12 months. apprentice.

Gradon/Grady/Graydon, Anne, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, Mary & James (father dead), CE. PRONI BG 14/G/5 (2155) Florence Court, Curraghglass, father James died in workhouse 2 May 1848, mother Mary and two brothers, James and Alexander, also in workhouse. Grady. Graydon. Employed. George Carnaby, Swanston St., £8 for 3 months. Married John Barker, farmer, 6 August 1852, lived Melbourne, 6 children, died 20 Dec. 1869, four years after her husband.

Hetherington, Isabella, 17, Little Brun, (Letterbreen?), Fermanagh, NA, CE.Little Breen (?) Employed. Mrs Roycroft, Moonee Ponds, £9 for 1 year.

Hillard, Jane, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, Richard & Margaret, CE. PRONI BG14/G/4 (986) Mallaghmean, Ballyeareagh, daughter of Margaret and Richard (202), older sister of Margaret Ann, deserted, entered workhouse 18 Jan 1848, left 3 Oct 1849. Employed. George Hirston(?), Russell St., £8 for 12 months
Hoines/Hains, Biddy, 19, Klunish, (Clones?), Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/5 (2263) 18year old, Laragh, entered workhouse 7 August 1849, left 3 Oct 1849. Hains. Hines. Employed. McClean(?), Richmond, £10 for 6 months

Little, Anne, 18, Fermanagh, NA, CE. PRONI BG14/G/5 (2215) 16 year old, Union at large, entered workhouse 31 July 1849, left 3 Oct 1849. Employed. John Sullivan, Richmond, £10 for 9 months.

Little, Jane, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, Mary, RC. PRONI BG14/G/5 (3000) 13 year old, Union at large, entered workhouse with mother Mary 54 year old widow and William 14 year old on 16 May 1848. She left 3 Oct 1849. Employed. Richard Tracey, Port Office, £6 for 12 months. apprentice.

Love, Margaret, 16, Churchill, Fermanagh, Mary, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (325 1) Union at large, sister of Sarah (see below) and Thomas, daughter of Mary who was disabled from dropsy. Employed. John Buckland, Geelong, £8 for 12 months. apprentice. Married William Hargrave in Geelong 1 July 1857, husband a blacksmith and miner, 12 children, lived Geelong, Ballarat. Admitted Maryborough Hospital 27 Feb 1877, died 30 April 1877.

Love, Sarah, 15, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/5 (2238) servant out of place, Union at large (see above) brother Thomas entered workhouse 3 August 1849, left 3 Oct 1849. Employed. John O’Loughlin, Point Henry, £7 for 1 year. apprentice. Married James Barry, Geelong, 2 June 1851.

McAlhoney, Mary, 15, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. John Purdy, Moonee Ponds, £7, 1 year., apprentice. Tikibeau informs us that she married ‘Richard Wrench in 1852 then went off with James Kennedy, no marriage found, 7 children born in Victoria and NSW. She then married John McLeish in 1881 at Orange NSW. Mary died 1900 in Narromine NSW.’

McCabe, Jane, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE. Employed. James Purvis, Chewton, £10 for 6 months.
McCann, Mary Anne, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/5 18 years old, Union at large, town, lived with her aunt the past eight months, entered workhouse 7 August 1848, out 3 Oct 1849. She was one of five sisters who came to Australia. Employed. Patrick Murphy, Little Lonsdale St., £8, 6 months. Married Patrick McLoughlin 4 Sept 1851 a gold miner of Kangaroo Gully, Bendigo, 9 children, died of pneumonia and exhaustion 1 March 1887.

McCann, Catherine, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/5 (1803) Ballyeareagh, deserted, entered workhouse 12 June 1849, out 3 Oct 1849. She was in the workhouse with sisters Susan 13 years., Margaret 10, Hannah, 8 and Ellen 6. Employed. Michael Cochran, 5 Elizabeth St., £5 for 1 year, apprentice. Sister of Mary Ann above. Her other sister Susan came to Australia by the Ocean Monarch in 1855. Catherine married Thomas Kelly, 1854, at least 7 children in the Maryborough and Majorca area.

McGee, Jane, 18, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. E McKenna, Russell St., £10 for 3 months.

Maguire, Margaret, 15, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Bernard McKeiver, Melbourne, £9 for 6 months.

McKenna/McCanna, Sarah, 19, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE. PRONI BG/G/5 McCanna (1347) 20 year old labourer entered 8 May 1849, left 3 Oct 1849. Employed. K F Clarke, Melbourne, £10 for 6 months.
McKenna, Anne, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA. CE. Employed. P Watson storekeeper off Bourke St., £7 for 1 year, apprentice.
McKinlay, Anne, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE. Employed. Mrs Wilson, Geelong, £7 for 6 months.

McLoughlin, Margaret, 17, Kinnaly, (Kinawley), Fermanagh, NA, RC. McLaughlin. Manus. Kinaly. Employed. Mrs Woods, Russell St., £7 for 6 months.

McSawley/McSorley, Mary, 15, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. McSorley. Employed. David O’Leary, La Trobe St., £7 for 1 year, apprentice.
McSorley, Catherine, 17, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (1739) 18 year old Enniskillen Town entered workhouse 23 November 1847, out 30 March 1848; BG14/G/5 (2221) 17 year old Ballycassidy, entered workhouse 31 July 1849, left 3 Oct 1849. Trorey, Fermanagh. Employed. Thomas Maunt, Russell St., £7 for 3 months. Married Henry William Field, Melbourne, 1851, 2 children by 1855, no further information.

Martin, Anne, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Andrew Ryan, Little Lonsdale St., £8 for 6 months.19 Jan.; received from hospital 24 March; 12 May gone to Mr Power, Melbourne.

Murphy, Anne, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Anthony Divin, South Geelong, £7 for 2 years, apprentice.
Murphy, Rose, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, Bessy, (father dead), RC. PRONI BG14/G/5 (475) Rose Ann 20 year old entered with mother Bessy 50 year old widow and Thomas 12 year old, Union at large, in 16 March 1849, out 3 Oct 1849. Employed. Mr Bilby, Dandenong, £10 for 3 months. She married John Tow (b. England) after he had served his time in Van Diemen’s Land, in Melbourne in 1851, 6 children. She died in Bendigo in 1889.
Murphy, Catherine, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (4936) Union at large, entered workhouse 19 Dec 1848, left 3 Oct 1849. Employed. James Liddy, Bourke St., £10 for 6 months.

Riley, Bridget, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (1120) 18 year old single Letterbreen, Leamore, entered workhouse 24 August 1847, left 3 Oct 1849. Ryley. Employed. Jeremiah Rigby, Little Lonsdale St., £8 for 6 months.
Riley, Rose, 18, Bough, (Boho?) Fermanagh, NA, RC. Ryley. Brough, Fermanagh. Employed. Timothy Ahern, grocer, Lonsdale St., £8, 6 months. Married James King, Melbourne, 1851, may have died in 1868.
Riley, Mary Anne, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (1816) 12 year old orphan Stonefield, entered workhouse 14 Dec 1847, left 3 Oct 1849. Ryley. Employed. Frederick Fitzgerald, Russell St., £8 apprentice.

Riley, Catherine, 18, White Hill, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (1486) 16 year old orphan clean and healthy, Ballycassidy, Laragh, entered workhouse 12 Oct 1847, left 3 Oct 1849. Ryley. Employed. Daniel Leahy, La Trobe St., £9, 6 months. Married Thomas Brown a policeman later a miner, Melbourne, 5 May 1852, 10 children, lived Taradale, buried Malmsbury, 9 April 1912.
Riley, Jane, 15, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE. Ryley. 17. Employed. John Humphries, Collins St., £8 for 6 months..

Ross, Margaret, 15, Roscarne, Fermanagh, NA, CE. Rosscairn. Employed. James Richardson, Lonsdale St., £6 for 1 year. apprentice. Married Vandemonian Bernard John Reynolds (b. 1817 Co. Cavan, per Emerald Isle 1843, d. Dec 1877) 28 April 1851, in Wesleyan Church, Melbourne, 8 children. Margaret became destitute when her husband went to gaol in 1869. Her youngest children went into Industrial School and some of the older ones to gaol. One son, Barny Reynolds, was later secretary to John Wren.

Smith, Margaret, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. John Brown, Heidelberg, £10 for 6 months.

Stirrup, Eliza, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE. PRONI BG14/G/5 (2237) servant out of work entered workhouse 31 July 1849, left 3 Oct. 1849. Employed. James Purves, Chewton, £10 for 6 months. Married George Stone, several children born in the Kilmore area, also lived in the Wangaratta and Alexander areas.
Sturdy, Margaret, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE. PRONI BG14/G/4 (2320) servant Ballycassidy, Tullany, entered workhouse 3 March 1848, left 3 Oct 1849. Strudy. Employed. William Cranston, tanner, King St., cancelled by Dr Patterson.

Wherry, Catherine, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, CE. PRONI BG14/G/4 (1557) Ballycassidy, Tullyany, entered the workhouse 24 Oct 1847, left 3 Oct 1849. Employed. Jane Boys, Collins St., £8 for 3 months. Married John White in Chadbro, South Australia 4 May 1851, several children born in Victoria. She died in Victoria in 1878.
Wherry, Jane, 18, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (Enniskillen Indoor Register) (1343) 18 year old bastard, Rahalton, Keelaghan, entered workhouse 28 Sept 1847 left 15 Dec 1847. BG14/G/5 (2267) Union at large entered 7 August 1849 left 3 Oct 1849. Employed. Mrs Tulloch, Portland, £14. Married James King, Portland, 1853, no further information.

DERWENT. Arrived 25 February 1850. SRNSW 4/4817 Reel 2145 (with thanks to Ada Ackerley, Linda Paoloni and to Dr Pauline Rule) Surname First Name Age Native Place Parents Religion Other. There were a further 24 orphan girls from the Lisnaskea Workhouse on board this ship and a large number from Enniskillen Workhouse.

 

Armstrong, Bessy, 16, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, CE. Lisanaskea. Employed. J G Reed, draper, Little Collins St., £9 for 16 months.
Armstrong, Sarah, 15, Rooky, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Charles Dawson, Collingwood, £6 for 12 months, apprentice.

Blair, Jane, 16, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, CE, Lisanaskea. Must be gone–is gone–.

Brian, Bessy, 15, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Lisanaskea. Employed. Joseph Walters, Bourke St. East, £8 for 6 months, apprentice.
Brian/Breen, Biddy, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI. Enniskillen BG14/G/4 (124), Breen, deserted, Enniskillen, Levaghy, entered workhouse 4 July 1847, out 26 Oct 1849. Employed. John Figless (?), Bourke St., £7 for 1 year, apprentice.

Burns, Margaret, 16, Blacklim, (Blacklion?) Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Daniel Fox, Queen St., £10, 3 months. Married Joseph Henry Collins, Williamstown, c 9 children, husband a master mariner. She died 3 Jan 1908.

Campbell, Ellen, 16, Temple, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Ambrose Draper, Brighton, £7 for 6 months.

Cassidy, Mary, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (2517) stated by Surgeon Nixon to be in distress, (3445) returned after being discharged and having no place to go, (3778) recommended by Wm. Henderson, relieving officer, Enniskillen Commons, entered workhouse 6 Sept 1849, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. Charles Chessell, South Yarra, £8 for 6 months.

Cliffordy/Clifferty, Ellen, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG 14/G/4 (896) Clifferty Manor of Carrick, Killen. BG14/G/5 Union at large, entered workhouse 13 Feb. 1849, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. Richard Forrest, Ryrie St., Geelong, £10 for 6 months.

Connelly/Connolly, Letitia, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (2065) orphan, Ballyreagh, Salry, entered workhouse 2 Feb 1848 left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. L Tweedy, Lonsdale St., £7 for 12 months. 18 March. Returned to depot 29 April. Reassigned Mrs McClelland, Collins St., £5 for 3 months. 3 July “still not returned”. Connolly. Married Wm. Hayes, Brighton, 4 May 1856, 5 children, husband a storekeeper, lived Dunolly. She died 13 May 1899. His estate valued at £7,487 in 1890; he was an astute businessman who had become wealthy on the dividends from the Goldsborough Mining Company.
Criggan/Creegan(?) Mary, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (230) Laragh, Belview, (4000) entered workhouse along with widow Nancy Creegan 17 Oct 1848, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. Walter Furlong, Darebin Creek, £10, 6 months.
Criggan, Isabella, 15, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Francis Nodin, Collingwood, £8 for 12 months, apprentice.

Drum, Ann, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, James & Ann Hazeldean, RC. PRONI BG 14/G/5 (1750) orphan, not disabled, in a starving condition, Holywell, Corrateskeen, entered workhouse 30 Nov 1847, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. Mr McDermott, River Plenty, £8 for 6 months. Daughter of James Drum, soldier, and Ann Hazeldean. Married Thomas Haley, widower with 3 children, 15 Sept. 1852, Melbourne. The couple had 7 children, lived Plenty Creek, selected land at Broken Creek before Thomas’ death in 1868. In Dec. 1877 Annie became publican at the Mount Ada Hotel, renewing her licence in December 1881. She eventually moved to Benalla where she kept a boarding house. She died 17 July 1900 and is buried beside her husband in Devenish Cemetery.

Early, Mary, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh Patt & ?, CE. PRONI BG14/G/5 (1419) deserted, in fever, entered workhouse along with brother Patt 15 years, Carn, Drumna, 12 Oct 1847, left 10 July 1848, (3462) returned 18 July left 9 Oct 1848, (4162) returned, this time her father Patt, a widower, also enters the workhouse, 7 Nov. 1848. She left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. Mr Bond, King River, settler, £10 for 12 months.

Farmer, Biddy, 18, Kenoily, (Kinawley), Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Luke Chambers, Melbourne, £10 for 3 months.

Farmer, Ann, 17, Kenoily, (Kinawley), Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (4560) Mary Farmer Kinawly, Clundawel,entered workhouse with Cathy Farmer, 54 years, widow 28 Nov. 1848. She left 26 Oc1849. Employed. Michael Dunn, farmer, Dandenong, £8 for 6 months.

Farmer, Mary, 16, Kenoily, (Kinawley), Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. H. H. Nash, Stephen St., £7 for 1 year. apprentice.

Flaherty, Catherine, 17, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Native Place, Lisnaskea. “Returned”. Employed. Catherine Duffy, Waurn(?) River, £10 for 1 year.

Graham, Eliza, 16, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, CE, Lisanaskea. Employed. Henry Daw, Melbourne, £8, 6months.

Gillon, Mary, 16, Maccon, (Macken?), Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Mr Riddles, Great Bourke St., £8 for 3 months.

Greenfield, Eliza, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG 14/G/4 clean and healthy, Enniskillen town, entered workhouse 12 Oct 1847 left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. Mr Robert Whitehead, Spring Creek, South Yarra, £8 for 12 months, apprentice.

Hoines/Hoins, Jane, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG/14/G/4 (913) Hoins. Enniskillen town, entered workhouse 4 July 1847, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. Patrick Nowlan, Bourke St., £9 for 3 months.

Hagin/Hogan, Margaret, 15/16, Brookborough, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Robert Absolom, Lonsdale St., £8 for 6 months.

Howell, Sarah, 14, Lesanaskea, (Lisnaskea), Fermanagh, NA, RC. Native Place, Lisanaskea. Employed. Edger Garmroy, King St., £8 for 12 months, apprentice.

 Kelly, Bridget, 18, Tarry William, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Robert McNamara, Moonee Ponds, £10 for 6 months.

Keenan, Catherine, 16, Menay, (Monea?), Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. Mrs Hobson, Yarra River, £6 for 6 months.

Lee, Anne, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG 14/G/5 (1865) Killinagh, Cerrohoose, entered workhouse 18 June 1849, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. John Martin, Merri Creek, £7 for 6 months.

McClosky/McCluskey, Mary, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (609) deserted, Killinaghe, Legeeland, entered workhouse 4 July 1847, left 26 Oct 1849. McCluskey. Screen. Employed. Mrs Cassony (?), Great Bourke St., £7 for 12 months.

McAnnally, Ann, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, James & Mary, RC. PRONI BG 14/G/4 (1081) deserted and in a starving condition, entered workhouse with her mother Mary, John 16, Cathy 14, Mary 11, Rose 7 and James18 months, from Ballycassidy, Monolea; (Monalla) (1858) all came in again, younger brother James dies 27 Dec 1847; (2918) by this time their father James has joined them in the workhouse 9 May 1848. Ann left 26 Oct 1849. Ballycassidy, Enniskillen. Employed by Henry Gasden, Steven St., £10 for 6months.

McBryan, Biddy, 16, Ahalogher, Fermanagh, NA, RC, Employed. John Lynch, Collins St., £8 for 12 months.

McCabe, Mary Ann, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/5 (41) servant, out of place, Union at large, entered workhouse 2 January 1849, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. John Treacy, Richmond, £10 for 6 months.

McCann, Susan, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/5 (4343) Letterbreen, Screen, entered workhouse 14 November 1848, left 26 Oct 1849. Died in Hospital 15 April 1850.

McKeon, Margaret, 17/16, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Native Place, Lisanaskea (Lisnaskea). Employeard. Mary Robertson, Swanston St., £8, 3 months.

McKeon, Mary Ann, 16, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Native Place, Lisanaskea (Lisnaskea). Employed. Adam Dumass, Great Collins St., £8, 6 months.

McHugh, Mary, 18, Killinagh, Cavan, NA, RC. Employed. Mr Croxsier(?), Lonsdale St., £8, 6 months.

McKelville/McKelvy, Catherine, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (1999) McKelvy. Castlecoole, Garvary, entered workhouse 18 January 1848, left 4 Dept. 1848, along with sister Mary (4071) Castlecoole, Cavancarragh, entered again 24 Oct 1848, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. Mr Clarke, Bacchus Marsh, £7, 12 months., apprentice.

McGuire, Catherine, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (819) orphan, Union at Large, entered 4 July 1847, left 26 Oct 1849 (see two Cathy McGuires below). Employed. Charles Horrett/Horress(?), Collingwood, £8, 6 months..

McGuire, Catherine, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG 14/G/4 (2497), orphan, Letterbreen, Collermer, entered with sister Bessy 7 years and brother James 2 years 22 March 1848, left 26 Oct 1849. Servant to Dr Rowe Kilmore, £9, 1 year. 10 children to first husband, 4 to second, lived Kilmore, Sandhurst (Bendigo) and died Deniliquin, 1894.

McGuire, Helen, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed Mr (?) Bygrave, Little Lonsdale St., £8 for 3 months.

McGuire, Jane, 15, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Native Place, Lisanaskea (Lisnaskea). Employed. Frederick Sweeting, Five Mile Creek, £10 for 1 year, apprentice.

McGuire, Catherine, 14/15, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC, Employed. John McDonald, Little Lonsdale St., £6, apprentice.

McGourn/Magoveran/McGowan, Bessy, 15, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/5 (921) Magoveran, Union at Large, Armanant, entered workhouse 15 April 1849 left 26 Oct 1849. McGowan. Employed. MG Smith, shoemaker, Little Lonsdale St., £7 for 12 months.

McGee, Catherine, 18, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/5 (723) Florencecourt, Mulvanigh, entered workhouse 20 March 1849, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. John Wippel, Shortlands, near Heidelberg, £11 for 3 months.

McEgan, Rose, 19, Fermanagh, NA, RC, Employed. Thomas Reed, Bourke St., £11 for 3 months.

McDonnell/McDonald, Mary, 18, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (4742) McDonald. Tempo, Ratosan, entered workhouse 5 Dec 1848, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. S Nelson, South Yarra, £7 for 6 months.

Wynn(e), Rose, 20, Killinagh, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Native Place, Killinagh. Employed by Peter Casskern, Lake Colac £9 for 12 months.

Wynn(e), Mary, 16, Killinagh, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Native Place, Killinagh. Employed. James Toohey, Brighton, £6 for 6 months.

Young, Ann, 16, Drumlock, Fermanagh, NA, CE. Employed. Robert Kerry, Bacchus Marsh, £8 for 6 months.

Wray, Elizabeth, 16, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, CE. Native Place, Lisnaskea. Employed. Mary Richardson, widow, Collins St., £8 for 6 months.

Wray, Mary Ann, 14, Fermanagh, NA, CE, Native Place, Lisnaskea. Employed. G. Giffin, Immigration Office, £6 for 12 months.

Wilson, Biddy, 16, Ballycassidy, Fermanagh, NA, RC, PRONI BG 14/G/4 (2220) Union at Large, entered 17 Feb. 1848, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed by John Sullivan, Melbourne at £8 for 1 year.

Tummany/Tummaney, Bridget, 19, Howell, (Ed. Holywell), Native Place, Fermanagh, NA, RC, c/o Mt Gambier, Portland.

Tiernay, Jane, 18, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Native Place, Lisnaskea, Employed by John McCarty, Little Collins St., £14 for 12 months.

Tierney, Mary, 18, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Native Place, Lisnaskea, Employed by J W Bell, Melbourne, £14 for 12 months.

Robinson, Mary, 15, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, RC, Native Place, Lisanaskea. Employed by Robert Farrell, Little Collins St., £8 for 3 months.

Rooney, Ann, 17, Kenawley, Fermanagh, NA, RC, Native Place, Kenanly, (Kinawley). Employed by Patrick Egan, Lonsdale St., £6, 12 months.

O’Brien, Ann, 16, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC, PRONI BG14/G/4 (2398) Labourer, able-bodied, Castlecoole, Galway, entered workhouse 14 March 1848, left 4 April 1848, (2610) Union at large, entered again 6 April 1848, left 26 Oct 1849. Gone with Matron.

Noble, Margaret, 19, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, CE, Native Place, Lisanaskea. Employed. Dr Patterson, Melbourne, £9, 16 months. Married Edmund Fox in Melbourne, 1850, 3 children by 1856. Edmund died in 1857, Margaret at Nhill in 1899.

Murray, Bridget, 16, Ahalogher, Fermanagh, NA, RC, Native Place, Newry, Down. Employed by Peter Gay, Great Collins St., £8, 12 months as apprentice.

Murphy, Ellen, 15, Newry, Down, NA, RC, Native Place, Letterbrun, (Letterbreen?) Fermanagh. Employed by Michael Londrigan, returned for reassignment, Portland, £12 for 12 months as apprentice.

Murphy, Ellen, 17, Kinnally, (Kinawley), Fermanagh, John & Ellen, RC, PRONI BG14/G/4 (4964) entered workhouse with John and Ellen, mother and father, also sister Anne, Kinawley, Derryholaght, 26 Dec 1848, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed by Thomas Purnell, Elizabeth St., £10 for 6 months.

Murphy, Margaret, 17, Castelwol, (probably Castlecoole), Fermanagh, NA, RC, Native Place, Castelrool. Employed by Michael Ryan, Great Bourke St., £8 for 6 months.

Murphy, Margaret, 16, Letterbrun, (Letterbreen), Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed by Patrick McIlray, (McElroy?), Merri Creek, £7 for 12 months, apprentice.

Melanophy/Malamphy, Rose, 17, Blacklane, (Blacklion?) Fermanagh NA RC PRONI BG14/G/5 (180) Malamphy, Florencecourt, Gortane, entered workhouse 16 Jan 1849, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. Mary King, Little Bourke St., £6 for 3months..

Melanophy, Mary, 16, Killenagh, Cavan, NA, RC, Employed. C. Daly, Geelong, £8.

Melanophy/Malanophy, Anne, 15, Fermanagh, NA, RC, PRONI BG14/G/4 (448) Malanophy. Florencecourt, Glenawley, entered workhouse 4 July 1848, left 26 Oct 1849. Employed. Mrs Harvey, off King St., £6/10/- for 12 months.

McMahon, Catherine, 18, Fermanagh, NA, RC, Employed. Miss O’Farrell, Collins St., cancelled.

McMahon, Jane, 15, Lesanaskea, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Native Place, Lisanaskea (Lisnaskea). Employed. John Powell, Collins St., £8, 12 months.

McManus, Ann, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG14/G/4 (4911) Labourer, Letterbreen, entered workhouse 11 Dec. 1848, left 26 Oct. 1849. Achanagh. Employed. Mrs Charles Tynon, Collins St., £8.

McManus, Margaret, 17, Enniskillen, Fermanagh, NA, RC. PRONI BG 14/G/4 (4060) Rahalton, Derrygonnelly. Entered workhouse 24 Oct 1848, left 26 Oct 1849. Agricultural servant, Richmond, £8, 6 months.

McManus, Mary, 15, Fermanagh, NA, RC. Employed. B Punch,

Bourke St., £7, 1 year, apprentice.

Total 141. RC, 95. CE 42.

Information from “Barefoot & Pregnant? Irish Famine orphans in Australia” by Dr Trevor McClaughlin who subsequently put them on to http://www.irishfaminememorial.org It allows for more information to be added as it comes available. Local names suggested by J.B.C.

See “The Great Silence – The Famine in Fermanagh 1845-1850 by John B. Cunningham.

 Using contemporary sources he tells of life in Fermanagh during those terrible years when over 40,000 Fermanagh people died of hunger, disease or emigrated from the county. The 216 page book is lavishly illustrated and contains the population details of every Fermanagh Townland (c2500) and the fate of Orphan Girls from the Workhouses of Enniskillen, Lisnaskea and Ballyshannon. There are numerous items from Fermanagh and Ballyshannon/Donegal newspapers. Paupers dying on the streets of Enniskillen contrast with the glittering balls held in the great houses – life went on in the midst of terrible suffering. The book costs £15 plus £7 P&P and is available from Fermanagh County Museum and Fermanagh Tourist Office or from the author via email adam4eves@aol.com or by phone from 02868658327. The author explains the title of his ground-breaking book as follows:

Any individual looking out over his Fermanagh townland in 1850 would have experienced the Great Silence – the Great Physical Silence which followed the Great Hunger. It was a dismal scene to survey empty cottages and untilled fields. Many of the familiar faces – often a hundred or more, men, women and children in some townlands, lay dead, often uncoffined, in hurried graves. Their children’s playful laughter stilled forever; the adults’ music and conversation gone forever. Those lucky to have got away to the corners of the world will never return. In little over a period of five years famine, disease and emigration swept away over 40,000 Fermanagh people; (more than two-thirds of today’s county population). In these pages we hear the voices of the people of the time tell of life and how it was in the words of the time in a local Fermanagh newspaper.
There is a second Great Silence – that of the guilty and greedy, the profiteering merchants, farmers, landlords, shippers, the uncaring, the vilifying English press and the murderous indifference of Government. Not many of these want to talk about the famine or recognise its terrible legacy. Some who profited from the misfortunes of those around them during those years have good reason for wanting it forgotten.
And there is a third Great Silence born of a condition of the mind known as non-rational guilt. Victims burdened with non-rational guilt have not earned this guilt through their own wrongdoing but feel the guilt of survivors – why not me too when others I knew perished. Paradoxically, while victims have been observed to cling to their non-rational guilt, perpetrators often disavow their guilt though the use of a variety of strategies including projection, rationalization, and denial. They may also promulgate the idea that the abuse is but a fantasy in the mind of the victim. That failing, they will attempt to justify the abuse on the basis that it is deserved by the victim.
Sir Charles Trevelyan believed that the Famine was an Act of God directed on Ireland and the Highlands of Scotland but then too many clergymen vacuously declared that the famine was a divine punishment for the sins of the people. So God had it in for us!! Can our great silence be non- rational guilt? Our individual ancestors made it through those terrible times through survival instinct, good luck or good judgement and survived while thousands perished around them – or else we would not be here.

The Enniskillen 100 Motorcycle Race.

The Enniskillen 100 Motorcycle Race. This race took place in Fermanagh from c1928 to 1954. It is hoped to revive the concept of the race as a family event on August 25th 2012 in the confines of St. Angelo Airfield, Enniskillen. Its most impressive winner has to be K. P. Farlow of Maguiresbridge in 1936.

July 2nd 1936. MOTOR CYCLING. ENNISKILLEN ‘ 100.’ Rider With Artificial Leg Wins.

Riding a 348 Velocette, K. P. Farlow, Maguiresbridge, on 24th ult., won the 100 miles road race held under the auspices of the Enniskillen and District Motor Club over the Mossfield-Sydare-Ballinamallard circuit. His average speed for the race was 59.49 miles per hour. Farlow’s win—a, popular one—was all the more remarkable because of the fact that it was his first race, and that he wears an artificial leg, having lost a leg some years ago in an accident. N. Todd, Dublin (490 Norton) was second with an average speed of 69.89 m.p.h., and Stanley Jeffers, Enniskillen, (349 Rudge) was third, his speed being 64.78 m.p.h.

Other placings were:—4, J. E. Little, Belfast (348 Velocette), 69.90 m.p.h. ; 5, E. Pepper, Belfast (490 Norton), 62.53 m.p.h. ; 6, J. Younge, Enniskillen (499 Rudge), 68.21 m.p.h.; 7, J. J. O’Neill, Dublin (348 Velocette), 67.80 m.p.h. ; 8, R. T. Hill,. Belfast (348 Levis), 57.54 m.p.h. ; 9, J. J. Brown, Belfast (249 O.K. Supreme), 56.56 m.p.h. ; 10, W. J. L. Mavitty, Enniskillen (249 B.S.A.) 49.74 m.p.h.; 11, A. J. M‘Coy, Dublin (249 Rudge), 55.36 m.p.h.

Todd completed the fastest lap at a speed of 71.89 m.p.h., but failed to beat the record of 75 m.p.h., set up last year by H. Taggart.

The class prizes were won as follows: — 500 c.c. (Residents’ Cap), won by Todd,, who also won the prize for the fastest lap. 350 c.c. (Enniskillen Motor Traders’ Cup) won by Little, who had also the fastest lap. 250 c.c. (Derby Cafe Cup), won by Brown. Fastest lap, McCoy.

Club prizes (confined to members of the Enniskillen Club of at least one year’s standing) were won as follows:—Ballinamallard Cup, Younge. Club Cup, Mavitty. President’s Cup, for best performance by a local rider, Jeffers.

The prize for the most meritorious performance was won by F. H. Stock, Belfast (490 Norton).

In the evening the prizes were distributed by Mr. Murphy, Dublin. Mr. Johnston, M.C.U., presided, and expressed the hope that the enthusiasm for the race would not wane. Mr. Murphy congratulated the Enniskillen Club on the very excellent measure of local support which the race had received, and also on being the promoters of the most richly endowed motor cycle race in Ireland.

Mr. A. M. Ovens and Mr. R. Nawn, secretary of the Enniskillen Club, also spoke, and thanks were returned to the competitors from a distance, Mr. J. E. Collum, H.M.L. (the President of the Club), and all who had helped make the race a success.

 

July 4th 1935. THE ENNISKILLEN ‘100’ – DUBLIN RIDERS VICTORY.

For the second successive year J. J. O’Neill, of Dublin, won the Enniskillen 100 miles motor cycle race over the Mossfield circuit. There were 23 starters and 12 finished- H. Taggart, of Belfast, created a new lap record for the course, attaining a speed of 74.75 m.p.h.,

He gave an amazing performance and was leading by nine seconds, and in second place in the last lap from O’Neill when his frame broke in front of the engine. Taggart finished second with his engine trailing the ground. Jackson, who had been leading until the last lap, crashed.

W. A. Murtagh, of Belfast, a non-starter, fractured an arm while riding to the race

Results:—

J. O’Neill (348 Velocette), 71.77. 2, H. Taggart, Belfast (490 Norton) m.p.h. ; 3 M. McSorley, Omagh (249 Rudge) 66.27 m.p.h.

 

May 30th 1935. THE SPEED MANIA. LORD Newton, in the House of Lords on Thursday, voiced an opinion which is becoming stronger, that the present mania for speed should be discountenanced. The London penny papers have large headings to articles describing how A, B or C has managed to cover a mile or 100 miles in less time than another person, and whether it be in the air or on Florida beach or in the water there seems to be a perfect craze for urging people to incur the loss of their own lives and perhaps of others in a mania that as Lord Newton observed, “seemed incredibly foolish.” When Sir Malcolm Campbell had a fine imposed on him for excessive speed the Minister of Transport, Hore Belisha, at a public banquet, presented Sir Malcolm with the amount of the fine imposed on the delinquent; paying great deference to what is called a speed king. There are ovations accorded to racing motorists, and Lord Newton said he would prefer to reserve rewards for people who had a clean licence and who had not done any harm to anyone during the course of 10 or 20 years.

A new highway code was under consideration in the House, and suggestions were made regarding motor cyclists and the danger which resulted from carrying parcels on handlebars of cycles. Let us hope that these observations in the House of Lords will have some affect.

 

July 5th, 1934. MOTOR CYCLE RACE. The Enniskillen Motor Cycle Club yesterday had 28 entries, including some from the Free State. The race is composed of 16 laps of a circuit of miles, making the distance exactly 100 miles. The course is fairly flat triangular in plan, and resting on Ballinamallard, Sydare and Mossfield. The surface is excellent, and the only hazard is a small curvet just before the finishing line over which the competitors perform acrobatics in proportion to their speed. The record lap speed is two years old, having been put up by F, J. Drummond, 490 Norton, in 1932, at a speed of over 72 miles an hour.

 

July 5th, 1934. THE TALKIES. The picture, King Kong, coming to Enniskillen on Monday night next is an amazing feat of photography. We have seen nothing like it in Enniskillen heretofore. It is truly ‘wonder picture.’

 

July 5th, 1934. OBSCURING LOUGH ERNE. Whoever is responsible for the cutting of the hedge along the Northern side of the Lough Erne shore road, should see that next year this hedge is cut early in the season. We have received a number of complaints from visitors who have motored from Belleek to Enniskillen along this beautiful road by the foot of Magho mountain to get a view, of Lough Erne, and all they can see for a good portion of the way is a hedge. This hedge can be cut down to three feet at most, and give an uninterrupted view of lake. We try to praise Fermanagh and its beauty spots, and at the same time blot the loveliest of them all out from view.