Fermanagh 1951.

21-7-51. Cashel GFC Sports. Cashel defeated Enniskillen Gaels in a Junior League match. The old age pensioner’s race was won by Jas. Gallagher with Michael Kelly second.

21-7-51. Fermanagh beaten at the post Cavan 3-5 Fermanagh 1-9 in the Ulster Minor Football Final.

28-7-51 Belleek defeat Enniskillen Gaels 1-1 to 3 points in the County Minor Championship. Near the end Shea scored the winning goal for Belleek. Enniskillen have appealed. Malachy Mahon proved an efficient referee though some of his decisions were very open to criticism. “I was shocked to see both Casey and Gonigle revert to unsporting tactics. I saw at least four fouls committed by these Belleek stars yet they were not penalised. Whether or no the referee seen this or not is the big question. Because Casey and Gonigle are county stars is no reason why the referee should be lenient with them.

4-8-51 Fermanagh’s gallant bid for victory at Clones fails – Armagh are Ulster Minor Football Champions by a score of  1-8 to 1-3. Pat Casey, star of the team unable to play due to being confined to bed with a heavy cold. S. Gonigle, Belleek on the team.

4-8-51  Franciscan Monastery nears completion at Rossnowlagh.

25-8-51 Belleek to meet the winners of Roslea and Lisnaskea in Minor Football Championship. Garrison defeat Derrygonnelly 2-5 to 10 points in the final of the Junior Championship. The Garrison team was P. Nealon, M. McGee, Phil Keown, J. P. O’Brien, J. Dolan, P. Dolan, J. Mc Coll, ? Gallagher, P. Casey, M. J. O’Brien, P. Keown, D McGee, Peter Dolan (on for Keenan)

8-9-51 Pettigo GAA Sports at Mullingoad. Ederney Pipe Band was in attendance. Prize winners – Donkey Derby – Mr. P. Gallagher, Mulleek. Cycle race, 1. Jim Mc Caffrey, Ballymacavanney; 2. John Mc Andrews, Billary. Mountcharles football team won the 7 a side.

22-9-51. Fermanagh go down to Derry by 5-6 to 3-5 but give a good performance. Day excursion tickets to the All Ireland final in Croke Park Sunday 23rd September. Adults £1, children half price departing Belleek 5.59 am returning from Dublin at 6.45 pm.

13-10-51 Ederney defeat Derrylin in the final of the Fermanagh Junior championship by 3-2 to 1-4. Derrylin has done well to reach the final in their first year. Ederney and Kinawley will now play Senior football next year.

13-10-51 Fermanagh Senior Championship Final unfinished between Belleek and Lisnaskea. The match took place in Irvinestown under ideal conditions. Lisnaskea, already League Champions, fell behind by six points after a bright start by Belleek. Approaching half time Lisnaskea were back within two points of Belleek when blows were exchanged between two players who were ordered to the sideline by the referee Johnny Monaghan of Ederney. During the interval the crowd, as is usual, entered the playing pitch. Over-excited supporters of the rival teams became embroiled in arguments which unfortunately developed and the referee called the game off.

13-10-51  Future of Railway to Bundoran and Pettigo in doubt. The policy in Belfast at the moment seems to be to abandon the railways in favour of transport by road.

13-10-51 The dance of the season in Mc Cabe’s Hall, Belleek, on Thursday 18th October. Dancing 10-3. First engagement in Northern Ireland of, Al Allen and his Dublin orchestra (late Embassy Ballroom, Dublin), featuring Carlton McKenzie, coloured saxophonist and vocalist.

27-10-51 Mr. Joseph Mc Grath, Rogagh has died at a comparatively early age. The following marriages have taken place; Patrick Mc Manus Molleybreen, Belleek to Miss Kathleen Mc Manus, Moonendoogue, Garrison. Mr. Bernard Keown, Devenish and Miss Kathleen Feehily, Glen West. In Ballyshannon, Mr. Patrick J. Treacy, Knockaraven to Miss Sheila A. Mc Cauley, Newtown House, Lisahully.

3-11-51  Almost a thousand patrons were attracted to Irvinestown to the replay of the Fermanagh Senior Championship final between Belleek and Lisnaskea. It was difficult to control the greasy ball on a treacherous pitch. The game was played in a sporting spirit contrasting with some of the unfortunate scenes of the previous abandoned meeting; not one regrettable incident occurring. “Sonny” Gunn was Lisnaskea’s star and Sean Gonnigle likewise starred for Belleek. Final score 4 points each. Replay next Sunday in Irvinestown.

3-11-51 Funeral of Mrs Ellen Foy, Devenish Villa, Garrison who died in the Shiel Hospital after a short illness. She maintained a thriving guesthouse in Bundoran until a few years ago which she ran since her husband’s death 30 years previously.

3-11-51 Mr. T. J. Keenan of Gortnalee had his pony bolt when being loaded with turf in Cornahilta Bog. It galloped for a distance of three miles before being overtaken by men on bicycles.

3-11-51 Still going strong is Mr John Mc Garrigle who is almost 90 and the oldest man in the Garrison district. He was for many years a member of Belleek Creamery Committee. He takes a keen interest in political matters and hopes to see Partition ended.

10-11-51 In the Garrison area the deaths of Mr. Denis O’Brien, Dernamew and Mr. Andrew Breen, Leigheid, has occurred.

10-11-51 Lisnaskea defeated Belleek in the County Championship final by 1-6 to 1-3. Forty eight hours of rain had left the Irvinestown pitch waterlogged and the goals Belleek defended in the first half was flooded to a depth of 6 inches. Lisnaskea’s fouls were mostly holding and tripping designed to save a goal at the expense of a free while Belleek’s infringements were mainly pushing or back-charging especially in midfield or among the forwards. The Belleek team was only a point behind with five minutes to go and shot a large number of wides towards the end of the game.

24 11 51  Congratulations to Master J. J. Mc Dermott, Devenish on winning the Ulster Championship in dancing. He is a son of Mr. John Mc Dermott, merchant tailor and brother of Miss Jenny Mc Dermott, Irish dancing teacher. A talented young Devenish musician is Master James J. Carty whose accordion playing has an almost professional touch.

24 11 51 Miss Rose A Duffy of Aghoo, Cashelnadrea has gone to England to enter the Novitiate of the Sisters of Perpetual Adoration.

24 11 51 The Bannagh Players (Kesh) entertained a packed house in St. Mary’s Hall Garrison. Other items were supplied by local musicians. The proceeds were expected to pay off the last of the debt incurred in equipping the local band.

24 11 51 When spotted by a Garrison RUC patrol a young man abandoned his bicycle and a parcel containing 21 lbs of tobacco.

01 12 51 According to a newspaper correspondent Lisnaskea Emmetts Club was founded in 1905. In the first round of the Championship they defeated Donagh Sons of Erin and remained undefeated until the final against Teemore. They were leading 1-1 to nil when a dispute arose and the game was abandoned. Teemore won the replay by 2 points to 1. Lisnaskea did not win a Championship until 1928.

01 12 51 Monsignor Gannon PP, Enniskillen performed the opening ceremony for Cashel new hall. It has been built through the initiative of Rev. Eugene Canon Coyle PP. The hall has a capacity of 400 and was designed by Mr. O’Doherty, Ballintra and built by Messrs Timony and Duffy, Cashel. Mr. O’Doherty’s wife, Miss Costello of Lisnaskea, is a niece of the late Monsignor Tierney PP, Enniskillen. (Later to teach in Belleek National School.) In his speech Monsignor Gannon said that with a beautiful church with central heating and electric light, a comfortable school and a new hall Cashel had everything they could possibly want. He deplored the current emphasis on the use of halls almost exclusively for dancing. He cited Enniskillen as bringing in a cross Channel band which he was told cost as much as £200 plus the cost of a relief band as this band did not play the whole night. Mr. Cahir Healy M.P. said that it was hardly a secret that Canon Coyle had given his life savings towards the erection of the two halls in Devenish West Parish.

22 12 51. Education. In the Fermanagh Education Office there are 15 officials at pretty large salaries. No Catholic was appointed.

22 12 51.  The funeral of Mr. John Ward, Editor “Donegal Vindicator” who died in Dublin took place last week. He was a deeply religious man who visited the church twice each day and was a daily communicant.

 

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FERMANAGH HERALD. SAT., NOV. 9, JOTTINGS

  1. FERMANAGH HERALD. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, JOTTINGS

THE FATHER O’FLANAGAN FUND. THE hosts of admirers of the Rev. Father Michael O’Flanagan, not only in North Roscommon but throughout the whole, of Ireland, are anxious to inaugurate a Fund to mark in some small degree the feelings they entertain for his fearless work in Ireland’s Cause. With this object in View they respectfully solicit subscriptions, which will be duly acknowledged in the columns of the Press from time to time. Subscriptions can be sent to the Treasurers of the Fund in Crossna, namely Mr. Edward Doyle, Chairman of Boyle No. 1 .Council, Crossna (Co. Roscommon) and Mr. Patrick Kerins, Knockvicar, Boyle.

SHAUN MCDERMOTT’S. F. C. STOP-WATCH COMPETITION, 2 minutes to 10. At Arney Gaelic Hall, Sunday Evening, 3rd THE WINNER: MISS BONNIE WARD, CO. MONAGHAN.

ENNISKILLEN TECHNICAL SCHOOL, (TOWN HALL). IRISH FOR NATIONAL TEACHERS. THIS Class will reopen on SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, at 1.15 p.m. JOHN W. MANSFIELD, Principal.

DEATH. KELLY- October 30, 1918, at St. Vincent’s Hospital, Dublin, Anna Teresa, third daughter of William and Susan Kelly, The Hotel, Belcoo. Age, 22 years. R. I. P. At a rehearsal of the Blacklion Dramatic Club a resolution was passed in silence on the motion of Miss M. Maguire, seconded by Miss A. Dolan tendering the sincere sympathy of the members to Mr. and Mrs Kelly, Belcoo on the loss sustained by them in the death of their beloved daughter Miss Anna Kelly, and as a mark of respect to the memory of the deceased all the rehearsals for the week were adjourned.

John Small, C. C. Belturbet, for cutting the tyres of bicycles belonging to P. Callaghan, Knockaraven, Co., Fermanagh, and Jas McDonald, Milltown on the night of the East Cavan election result was traduced for £3 and £8 in the respective cases at the Cavan Quarter Sessions. Defendant, who did not appear, was with the Sinn Fein crowd said the plaintiff Callaghan.

Manorhamilton Electric Light Co. has increased the charge for light from 6d to 9d per unit.

At the meeting of workers in Enniskillen on Saturday week a resolution was passed urging shop assistants to join the National Union.

The licensed vintners of Enniskillen are taking steps to have the hours of closing in the afternoon altered, especially on fair and market days.

Mr. W, J. Brown, J.P., presided at a meeting of the Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday. The business was purely routine.

At the meeting of Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday, Mr. W. J. Brown, J.P., said that vaccination was a humbug and fraud.

The medical officer of Lisnaskea Guardians reported that six cases of influenza, three of them exhibiting serious pulmonary complications, were admitted to hospital daring the last week. (The ‘Spanish Flu’ which killed about 50 million people around the world at this time including populations in the Pacific Islands including my grandmother at the age of 28.)

The Earl of Belmore, Mr, J. Crosier, J.P., and Mr. J. P. Gillin, Fermanagh County Council, have been surcharged in £50 expended in connection with Fox’s Ferry, Upper Lough Erne. An appeal has been lodged against the surcharge.

Several new members have joined the Derrygonnelly branch of the National Amalgamated Union of Labour, and it is stated that labour candidates will go forward at the next local government elections.

In the course of his quarterly Report to the Fermanagh County Council, Mr. J. P. Burkitt, county surveyor, paid a tribute to the work of Mr. Finnegan, assistant county surveyor, who, he said, carried out his duties in an admirable manner.

A special meeting of the Enniskillen Urban Council will be held on Friday night to co-opt a member and to consider an application from the National Amalgamated Union of Labour asking for an increase for the employees who were members of the Union.

The “flu” is fairly prevalent in Enniskillen and district, but there are signs that the epidemic is abating. Several schools have been closed including Portora Royal School, where a number of the students contracted the disease.

At Enniskillen Quarter, Sessions C.E.R.A. Irvine, solicitor, sued W. J. Browne, J.P., auctioneer, Kinawley, to recover £17 for-costs incurred on defendant’s behalf. Mr. Irvine appeared in person and Mr. Clarke (Messrs. Clarke and Gordon) for the defendant. The case was dismissed,

MR, ARCHDALE, M, P. AND LABOURERS’ UNION. At the quarterly meeting of the Fermanagh Co. Council on Thursday, Mr. John McHugh (Pettigo) presiding, a letter was read from Mr. M. Donnelly, Derry, National Amalgamated Union of Labour, applying for an increase of wages on behalf of the members of the Union who were in the Council’s employment as surfacemen, attendants to steamrollers and other works in connection with road maintenance.

Mr. Archdale, M.P. — I think the National Amalgamated Union of Labour is going to destroy the labourers of this country. It will upset them and put them out of work. It is of no help to the labourers. Lord Belmore — What are their present wages?

The Co, Surveyor said that the drivers were paid £2 or 35s: the attendants, 24s; surfacemen from £l to 25s. He believed that none of the men should be paid any less than 22s 6d per week. Mr. Archdale —  None of them are paid less than that fixed by the Wages Board?

Co. Surveyor — I don’t think so. We have very few men who are constantly employed. The application was referred to the Roads and Quarries Committee.

ENNISKILLEN MILLING SOCIETY. The Committee of the Enniskillen Milling Society had under consideration at their last meeting, the question of erecting a new patent kiln in their new mill. It appears that a Belfast firm have arranged to make kilns of the new pattern known as “air drying which dries the grain before milling at the rate of about one ton per hour without any labour whatsoever, thereby saving the very expensive operation of turning the dried grain as it had to be done on the old kiln heads. It was decided to have this new invention established in their new mill.

DECEMBER 21, 1918. ENNISKILLEN WORKHOUSE ‘BURIALS.

DIGGING THE GRAVES. Assistant Clerk’s Report.

At the meeting of the Enniskillen, Guardians on Tuesday, Mr. Edmund Corrigan, vice-chairman, presiding, Mr. Joseph Ross, assistant clerk reported:—“Owing to the illness of the Master and Matron and the inmates who usually assist at burials, being laid up with influenza, I asked Mr. James Harvey to allow a couple of his men to open the, graves for two inmates in the Workhouse Cemetery on Friday last, who died three days previously, but these men were stopped at the work by Felix Cleary (who is at present under suspension), who went up to them. Two others (who are in the employment of Mr. Rutherford) were, got to bury one of the bodies, and the remains of the other man were buried in the new cemetery by Mr. Millar, who kindly undertook to nave a grave ready after a few hours’ notice. In connection with the above I paid a sum of 10s for having the work carried out, which I would ask the Board to refund me under the circumstances.”

Mr. Carson said it was very kind, of Mr. Ross, and it was a most blackguardly and disgraceful act of Cleary. Mr. W. Elliott (Greentown) said the Board must be in a powerful fix if they would tolerate such work. Mr. Ben Maguire suggested that they should consult their solicitor with the object of having proceedings taken. Mr. Cathcart said he had never thought before that the country around Enniskillen had gone to such a pitch.

The Chairman said there was no member of the Board or no man outside the Board who believed more than he did in the principle of a man being paid a living wage, but when it came to this — to try and leave corpses unburied — it was going too far for him. Mr. B. Maguire proposed that their solicitor be consulted with the view of having proceedings taken against Cleary. Mr. Cathcart thought the matter should be reported to the police authorities. Mr. Ross said a police sergeant was sent round with the coffin to the burial ground lest the men would be interfered with. No further action was taken in the matter.

15 March 1917.

15 March 1917.

STATEMENT BY RETURNED AMERICAN.  NEW YORK-MONDAY.

According to Havana messages, the members of Gerrard’s party declare that the people of Germany are not only starving but have reached that stage of stoicism in face of the inevitable that they care little whether victory or defeat awaits them if they can only get food. They say that the last straw that will break the camel’s back must come for the German people before another year is past and that once they come to learn that the harvest has failed and that the supply of men is short the people will realize the failure which has hitherto been so carefully hidden from them.

15 March 1917.

DEATH OF COUNT ZEPPELIN.  The special correspondent of the National Tidente at Berlin telegraphs—Count Zeppelin who died at noon on Thursday in his 79th year in a sanatorium at Charlottenburg, Berlin, had been staying until a few days ago at the Hotel Kaiserhof, Berlin, When he became ill with inflamation of the lungs he was taken to the sanatorium.

It was in 1892 that the Count first conceived the idea of a dirigible. The German Government treated his representation for a subsidy without sympathy and though the inventor succeeded in flying over take Constance in 1900 his second Zeppelin was shattered on its first landing. The King of Wurtenberg and afterwards the German War Office were ultimately induced to take an interest in the invention which turned out to be of use for scouting purposes at sea but a failure for raiding purposes. The Count’s aerial ships are a national mania with the Huns, despite the disaster that has so often overtaken them. A warrior as well as a scientist, Count Zeppelin took part in the American War of Secession, and saw service in the Franco-German War of 1870.

15 March 1917.

POLICE SERGEANT CHARGED WITH MURDER. CHILDREN’S TRAGIC DISCOVERY.

Sergeant Joseph H. Crawford, of the Royal Irish Constabulary, appeared in the dock at the Belfast Police Court on Friday charged with the alleged murder of his wife, Ellen Jane Crawford, at their residence, 107 Fortwilliam Parade, on 17th January last. The accused was formerly dock sergeant in the same court and, as he was assisted into the dock, where, for two and a half years, he had discharged his public duties, the presiding magistrate and the officer s of the court were visibly affected. Throughout the proceedings he sat with a handkerchief to his eyes, as if he could not trust himself to look upon the familiar faces of the officers and professional gentlemen in court. On the 17th January, when the three young children of Mr. and Mrs. Crawford returned home from a pantomime they found their father and mother lying on the floor of the kitchen with their throats cut and a bloodstained razor between the bodies. Mrs, Crawford was dead and the sergeant has since been, under treatment in hospital. District-Inspector Gerty was the only witness examined on Friday. He arrested the accused that morning and after giving him the usual caution he said, “I never done it. Is she dead? I was sitting in the kitchen when she put her arm round my neck and gave me a jag. ’ ’ The accused also spoke some other words, which he the (the District-Inspector) could not catch, as he broke down and was sobbing. The accused was remanded for a week, Mr. Graham, who defended, stating that owing to the condition of the accused he was unable yet to get instructions.“ “It is one of the saddest cases I have ever known,” he added.

15 March 1917.

THE NEWTOWNHAMILTON MURDER. ACCUSED GETS FIFTEEN YEARS. George Berry, a young man of humble rank, who was placed on trial for his life at Armagh Assizes, before Mr. Justice Ross and a common jury, charged with the murder of Charles Warnock, a pedlar, in Newtownhamilton, on 24th January last was found guilty of manslaughter, and sentenced to fifteen years imprisonment.

15 March 1917.

LORD CROMER’S COMMISSION; The Part Played by Mr Asquith, Mr, Churchill & Lord Kitchener. The eagerly-awaited report of Cromer’s Commission of Inquiry into the Dardanelles Expedition was published on Thursday. A voluminous document of nearly 60 closely-printed pages, it covers the origin and inception of the campaign and the events up to March 23 of 1915 to, when, the naval effort having failed, it was decided to postpone further operations until adequate forces could be assembled. It is clear that the men mainly responsible for the campaign were Mr. Asquith, Lord Kitchener, Mr. Churchill, and Lord Fisher.

Mr, Churchill, in the first place, and Kitchener, subsequently, urged the need and practicability of the forcing of the Dardanelles, while Lord Fisher and the other naval experts, when they were consulted first dissented, and afterwards gave half-hearted approval. The report confirms the impression that by mismanagement, misunderstanding, and delay, an opportunity of reaching Constantinople by sea was thrown away, and rendered inevitable the ultimate failure of the Gallipoli operations which followed the naval failure.

The main points brought out by the report are: — Attack on Dardanelles first mooted November, 1914, but no intention then of making a purely naval attack.

On January 2, 1915, the Russians, hard pressed in the Caucasus, appealed to London to make a demonstration against the Turks elsewhere.

On January 13, the Admiralty were instructed to “prepare” for a naval attack on the Dardanelles, but there was some doubt as to whether the War Council had on that date committed themselves to the expedition.

On January 28 the decision to do so was confirmed. Lord Fisher decided to resign, but yielded to persuasion by Lord Kitchener.

There was still no intention of using troops; except in minor operations, but on February 16 it was decided to mass a large army ready to assist once the Fleet had forced the passage. Three days later the first bombardment took place, with “fairly satisfactory results.’ On the following day, February 20, the decision to send troops from England was suspended principally owing to the anxiety of Lord Kitchener regarding the position in other theatres. Mr. Churchill strongly dissented from this decision, and “disclaimed all responsibility if disaster occurred in Turkey as a result of the insufficiency of troops.”

On March 10 Lord Kitchener sanctioned the departure of the troops held back on February 20. Eight days later the second bombardment took place. Heavy losses were sustained, but Admiral de Robeck, commanding, and officials at the Admiralty wished to persist.

As a result, however, of representations made by Admiral de Robeck and Sir Ian Hamilton, who had been sent out to command the troops, it was decided, on March 23, to await the arrival of adequate troops before renewing the attack. By the time the troops were ready the Turks were prepared to meet the attempt.

15 March 1917.

CAMPAIGN OF MURDER. THE CALIFORNIA SUNK. 43 PASSENGERS AND CREW MISSING. THE SECOND OFFICER’S STORY. The Anchor Line steamer California from New York, with passengers and mails, has been torpedoed and sunk. Survivors state that 90 of the crew and 13 passengers are missing, and it is feared they are drowned. Four persons were killed by the explosion, and about 20 were injured. The big vessel, it is stated, was attacked by two submarines.

When the rescuing vessels arrived sympathetic crowds gathered near the deep-water quay and Custom House and cheered the survivors as they descended or were carried down the gangway. Motor cars, ambulances, and other vehicles were in readiness to convey the victims of the latest German sea outrage to the hospitals and the hotels and a strong feeling of indignation was evinced when the wounded were being carried on stretchers to the Red Cross ambulances hard by.

Second-Officer McCallum, of the ill-fated liner, who was one of the survivors, was in his shirt sleeves and wearing water-soaked clothes, he having been in the water for some time before being rescued. Mr. McCallum stated that the California left New York on last Monday week for Glasgow with about 205 passengers and crew. The voyage was a comparatively fair one for a winter passage. The weather was clear, with a heavy swell but calm sea. At 9-10 am. on Wednesday the steamer was quite suddenly struck by a torpedo close by No. 4 hatch. The shock was absolutely terrific, and the vessel shook from end to end. He was standing on the poop at the tune, and was knocked down, and a huge column of water was blown upon the dock, deluging those in the immediate vicinity. The captain, who was on the bridge, ordered the crew to the boat stations, and then promptly directed the boats to be lowered away.

There was no panic, and the passengers behaved splendidly. The women were first got into the boats, and he added that the number of boats ready was in excess of the requirements. He did not see either the submarine or the torpedo which sent their ship to her doom. But some of the crew assert that there were two submarines, one on each side of the liner, and that escape for them was impossible.

One boat got swamped unfortunately, but he could not say what happened to those who were in it. The captain, with splendid coolness and deliberation, gave his orders from the bridge, and did not leave his post until the California foundered under him. A number of the officers stood by the sinking vessel, even after the boats had filled, and then they had to plunge overboard to save themselves being carried down by the suction of the huge hull. She went down stern foremost. He {Mr. McCallum) got in the boat which had been swamped, and was subsequently taken into a boat, which also picked up the captain.

No warning of any kind was given by the Germans, who must have known there were helpless women passengers on board. The California only remained afloat about seven minutes after being struck. He was confident it was not ten. They were in the boats scarcely an hour when assistance came in response to the wireless messages sent out. The crew and passengers lost everything they had. “And,” added Mr. McCallum, “as you must have observed when they landed, some of the crew had only pants and shirts on, and were without boots or hats.” He believed that of the 32 passengers on board 19 were saved, and about 13 are missing.

1951 to June. National & International.

 

The Northern and Southern governments agree on the running of the Great Northern Railway (9 January)
Ian Paisley co-founds the Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster (11 March)
On 23 March, Shannon Airport is the base for a rescue operation after a USAF C124 aircraft crashes into the sea – some wreckage is found 450 miles off the west coast, but all 53 people on board are lost
The Catholic hierarchy condemns the ‘Mother and Child’ scheme (4 April); Dr Noel Browne, Minister for Health, resigns; the scheme is abandoned on 6 April
A census (8 April) shows the population of the Republic to be 2,960,593; that of Northern Ireland on the same day is 1,370,921
The first demonstration of television in Ireland is held at the Spring Show in the RDS, Dublin (30 April)
The Arts Council is founded in the Republic (8 May)
Fianna Fáil regains power in a general election (30 May); Eamon de Valera becomes Taoiseach on 13 June
The Abbey Theatre, Dublin is destroyed by fire (18 July)
Ernest Walton of Trinity College Dublin is jointly awarded the Nobel prize for physics with Sir John Cockcroft
Liam and Josephine Miller found the Dolmen Press
T. J. Walsh establishes the Wexford Opera Festival
Samuel Beckett’s novels Molloy and Malone Dies, and Sam Hanna Bell’s novel December Bride, are published.

Births

Bertie Ahern (Fianna Fáil leader and Taoiseach) in Dublin
John Buckley (composer and teacher) in Co. Limerick
Dana (pseudonym of Rosemary Brown, singer) in Derry/Londonderry (30/8)
Peter Fallon (poet, founder of Gallery Press) in Osnabrück, Germany
Bill Graham (rock journalist and author) in Belfast (29/8)
Fred Johnston (poet and novelist) in Belfast
Paul McGuinness (manager of U2) near Hanover
Brian Maguire (painter) in Wicklow
Patrick Mason (theatre director)
John O’Keeffe (Kerry Gaelic footballer) (15/4)
Alan Shatter (Fine Gael politician) in Dublin (14/2)
Niall Stokes (founder and publisher of Hot Press magazine) in Dublin.

Deaths

Sir James Andrews
Daisy Bates
Joseph Warwick Bigger
Peter Cheyney
Joseph Chifley
Sir Ernest Clark
Louis D’Alton
Aodh de Blacam
George Gavan Duffy
Robert Flaherty
M. J. MacManus
Henry de Vere Stackpoole.

Local Events

13-1-1951. Death of Mr. Patrick Magee, Garrison, at an advanced age. Very Rev. Canon Coyle officiated.

27-1-1951. Sympathy is extended from the residents of his native Grouselodge to the brothers and relatives and to the clergy of the Diocese of Clogher on the death of the Very Rev. Denis Canon Mc Grath, P.P. of Bundoran last week. The late Canon Mc Grath was beloved by the people of Grouselodge in which townland he was born and reared.

3-2-1951. “You have often passed through a Woolworth store and marvelled how such a large staff can be maintained and goods sold so cheaply – or apparently so. In 1950 the firm set a new profit record of £5,355, 272.

3-2-1951. Much debate was occasioned at the County GAA Convention on the state of Gaelic Park and criticism of Enniskillen Gaels re state of Gaelic Games in the town and especially the Enniskillen pitch. Mr Jim Brady of Enniskillen excused the unplayable state of the pitch on account of a circus having been there for some time or perhaps because of the rising level of water from the adjoining Erne. Mr. Fee, County Secretary interjected, “It was because it was full of holes.” Mr. Fee welcomed the re-affiliation of Ederney and Kinawley to the association.

3-2-1951. Omagh man Mr. Maurice J. Hackett of Kevlin Road, Omagh, has bought six occupied dwelling houses at Prospect Terrace, Omagh for £80. The price represents the most astonishing bargain in house property. The former owner was Miss Louisa Crawford, Omagh.

3-2-1951. Enniskillen grocers request their customers to bring shopping baskets with them for general groceries, bread etc. and containers for potatoes owing to the increased cost of wrapping paper, paper bags and twine. Co-operation in this matter is urgently requested.

17-2-1951. The oldest inhabitant of Devenish has passed away in the person of James Mc Grath, 96, Rogagh, Cashelnadrea whose death occurred on Friday last. Also the death of Thomas Melaniphy, Frevagh, Devenish and of Mrs. M. Cassidy, wife of Mr. Michael Cassidy, Rossinuremore.

17-2-1951. Wedding bells for Tracey and Kelly at the Cathedral, Sligo. Miss Agnes Tracey, “Woodvale,” Kilcoo, Garrison to Gerald Kelly, Kiltimagh, County Mayo.

17-2-1951. Customs Fines at Belleek. Michael Ferguson, Drumbadreevagh, prosecuted for having in his possession a smuggled bicycle. He claimed he had got the bicycle from his brother-in law, Michael Gallagher, Rockfield, Ballyshannon to go to work on the Erne Scheme.

10-3-1951. An Ellen Donohue was fined £5 at Derrylin Court for concealment of 9 turkeys. She was suspected of having smuggled then by boat across a border river as tracks led from the river to the house of a friend.

10-3-1951. The death is announced of ex-senator John Mc Hugh of Pettigo at the venerable age of 92. He was chairman of Fermanagh Council from its inception in 1898 until it was dissolved by the Six County Government in 1922. He was one of two Nationalist M. Ps for County Fermanagh until the “gerrymander” of 1929 rearranged the boundaries to give two Unionist and one Nationalist M.P for a county which had a Nationalist majority.

10-3-1951. Lord Bishop of Clogher on the dangers of the Dance Craze. He wants amusements curtailed and the closing of all halls by midnight. He made a special appeal for prayer especially the Rosary.

17-3-1951.  Rabbits are not pests on Sunday. With an all-out war being waged on the rabbit pest it is, nevertheless, an offence in the Six Counties to kill rabbits on a Sunday. This was made very clear at Rathfriland Court when Patrick Travers, Lassize, was fined 10 shillings for the offence, and Kevin Travers, Lurgancahone, fined 20 shillings for using a net, “to kill rabbits on a Sunday.”

24-3-1951. Death of Master Ted Feely, Knockaraven, Garrison, aged 9. His coffin was carried on the shoulders of his classmates to his last resting place.

24-3-1951. Death of Mrs Maguire, ex-PT, Corgra House, Belleek. She retired last December after 44 years of service in Cornahilta School. Unfortunately she has passed away before the presentation organised for her by the local people. Two of her daughters are Sisters of Mercy.

31-3-1951. Tempo had an unexpected victory over Belleek in the Senior League by 2-5 to 1-4.

31-3-1951. The Ulster Farmer’s mart in Enniskillen celebrates its first birthday. Initially there were grave doubts in the minds of farmers as to whether the weekly sales would be a success but their fears proved unfounded. During the past 12 months 27,776 animals and total receipts for the period amounted to £672,147. The Farmers’ Mart Co. had helped put Fermanagh on the map as a centre for cattle sales.

7-4-1951. Fermanagh defeated in the Ulster Junior Championship by Donegal by 2-12 to 0-4.

14-4-1951. Death of Mr. John Flanagan, Glen West, Devenish. He had a long and trying illness.

14-4-1951. Derry defeat Fermanagh in the Dr. Mc Kenna Cup by 3-11 to 2-5. Playing for Fermanagh were M. McGurren, M. Regan, and J. Connors of Belleek.

14-4-1951.  E. F. Fairbairn, Ltd., Ireland’s best chicks. Accredited eggs only at Portadown, Enniskillen, Larne, Coleraine and Belfast. Pullets are dispatched in boxes bearing the name of the firm and marked, “Pullets.”

14-4-1951.  Ederney defeat Cashel 2-2 to 1-1. For Cashel best of a well-balanced defence was Timoney, Mc Garrigle and Ferguson. Of the forwards McGovern and Maguire were always dangerous and took careful watching. Despite the inclement conditions it was a good match. Ederney’s well merited win was mainly due to a very strong defence in which Kelly making his debut in goals made some really fine saves. F. Mc Hugh at centre back, the Lunny brothers and Durnian all played a major part. The forwards made good use of their scoring chances and had in B. Mc Hugh the outstanding player afield. Mc Carron also had a good game at right full forward. Scorers Ederney, Murphy (1-1), McKervey (1-0), Cassidy (0-1). Cashel, Maguire (1-0), McGovern (0-1).

14-4-1951. Opening Announcement. Funeral Undertaking. Messrs Magee and O’Connor, Mulleek, County Fermanagh wish to announce that they are in a position to supply, coffins, shrouds, wreathes etc. Modern Dodge motor hearse. Distance no object. Charges moderate. Phone Leggs No 1 or Ballyshannon 41 (Day or Night)

14-4-1951. YP Pools. Total Dividend for Saturday 7th April £8,112-12-6. There were two winners of the First Dividend with 23 goals each.

28-4-1951. Devenish defeated Enniskillen Gaels in Enniskillen by 5-1 to 3-4. The chief player responsible was Dan Magee, former stalwart of the Gaels team.

5-5-1951. Fermanagh Senior League Tie. Belleek defeat Irvinestown by 4-7 to 0-4 dispelling the fears that Gaelic football was on the decline in the area. A feature of the game was the sparkling display given by the homesters full forward P. Cox whose hat trick of three goals surely establishes a record among Fermanagh front line attackers.

5-5-1951. Tempo calling. Tempo calling, Tempo Calling. Old customers please bring in your ration books to be registered for meat. New customers invited Hugh Tunney, Tempo Established 1879.

19-5-1951. Irvinestown defeat Belleek by 1-4 to 6 points.

9-6-1951. The last County Board meeting was largely taken up with a debate about the result of the recent match between Belleek and Irvinestown. Irvinestown said that after the match the referee said that Irvinestown had won by a point while the official report sent in said that the match was a draw. The report has been sent back to the referee.

16-6-1951.In a challenge match Pettigo defeated Bannagh by 1-4 to 1-1. A fine match played in a splendid spirit was that between Pettigo and Bannagh, at Bannagh, on Sunday, refereed by Mr. Patrick Maye. The new Bannagh team formed as a result of the enthusiasm and organisational ability of Mr. Packy Calgy is serving up splendid football and promises to be heard of soon in prominent headlines. Scorers for Bannagh were Frank Armstrong (goal), and P. Mc Gibney (point), and for Pettigo P. Gallagher (4 points), and M. Reid (goal) Gallagher and Reid were outstanding for Pettigo and Nugent brothers, Keown brothers and Calgy for Bannagh.

23-6-1951. Fermanagh Minors best against Monaghan by 2-7 to 0-7. S. Gonigle, Belleek and P. Casey, Devenish played.

23-6-1951. Very Rev. Dr. P.J. McLaughlin, Professor of Experimental Physics at Maynooth is to be the next President of the college. He is a native of Ballyshannon.

30-6-1951. After an absence of some years, Seemuldoon, one time Fermanagh County Champions, made a reappearance on the field at Ederney on Wednesday evening winning by 3-3 to 1-2. By their superb display of good football despite the difficult playing conditions due to the wet evening, the young Seemuldoon team proved themselves no mean successors of the earlier players, and capable of giving a very necessary fillip to the game in NW Fermanagh if the difficulty attending the formation of a team drawn partly from an area partly in County Fermanagh and partly in County Tyrone could be overcome.

30-6-1951. Cashelnadrea, County Fermanagh is very much in the news, reason being that electric light has come to the district. Your correspondent had the pleasure of switching on the light in the spacious premises of Mr. John Mc Gowan, Cashel House, on June 29th. Mr Mc Gowan has got the first connection but in a short time the Catholic Church, the new hall and the school will be lit up, and after that the wants of the entire district will be attended to.

30-6-1951. Death of Lady Gallagher is announced. She was the widow of Sir James Gallagher a native of Aghavanny, Kiltyclogher who became a Dublin Alderman and later Lord Mayor of Dublin. He was knighted by King Edward V11. He was apprenticed to a tobacconist and ended owning several tobacconist shops.

30-6-1951. Speaking on Monday at the annual distribution of prizes at Maynooth, Most Rev. Dr. D’Alton, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All-Ireland explained why the Hierarchy intervened in the Mother and Child Scheme.

SAMUEL B. HORNE, BELLEEK. MEDAL OF HONOUR WINNER.

SAMUEL B. HORNE, BELLEEK. MEDAL OF HONOR WINNER.

Samuel Belton Horne. Born March 3, 1843, Belleek, County Fermanagh, Ireland.  Died September 18, 1928, Connecticut. Buried at Winsted, Connecticut. United States Army.  Rank Captain

Unit.  Connecticut 11th Connecticut Infantry Regiment. Battles/wars. American Civil War. The 11th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 11th Connecticut Infantry was organized at Hartford, Connecticut, beginning October 24, 1861, and mustered in for a three-year enlistment on November 14, 1861. The regiment lost a total of 325 men during service; 8 officers and 140 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, 1 officer and 176 enlisted men died of disease.

Awards  Medal of Honour.

Samuel Belton Horne (March 3, 1843 – September 18, 1928) was an American soldier who fought in the American Civil War. Horne received his country’s highest award for bravery during combat, the Medal of Honour. Horne’s medal was won for heroism at Fort Harrison, Virginia, on September 29, 1864. He was honoured with the award on November 19, 1897.

Fort Harrison was an important component of the Confederate defences of Richmond during the American Civil War. Named after Lieutenant William Harrison, a Confederate engineer, it was the largest in the series of fortifications that extended from New Market Road to the James River that also included Forts Hoke, Johnson, Gregg, and Gilmer. These earthworks were designed to protect the strategically important Chaffin’s Bluff on the James River. On September 29, 1864, 2,500 Union soldiers from Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler’s Army of the James overran Major Richard Cornelius Taylor’s 200-man Confederate garrison and captured the fort in the Battle of Chaffin’s Farm. Brig. Gen. Hiram Burnham, a native of Maine and a brigade commander in XVIII Corps, was killed in the assault, and the Union-held fort was renamed Fort Burnham in his honor.

Horne was born in Belleek in County Fermanagh, Ireland, and entered service in Winsted, Connecticut, where he was later buried.

Medal of Honor citation. “The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honour to Captain (Infantry) Samuel Belton Horne, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 29 September 1864, while serving with Company H, 11th Connecticut Infantry, in action at Fort Harrison, Virginia. While acting as an Aide and carrying an important message, Captain Horne was severely wounded and his horse killed but he delivered the order and rejoined his general.”

The Medal of Honor is the United States of America’s highest military honor, awarded for personal acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty. The medal is awarded by the President of the United States in the name of the U.S. Congress to U.S. military personnel only. There are three versions of the medal, one for the Army, one for the Navy, and one for the Air Force. Personnel of the Marine Corps and Coast Guard receive the Navy version.

The Medal of Honor was created as a Navy version in 1861 named the “Medal of Valor”, and an Army version of the medal named the “Medal of Honor” was established in 1862 to give recognition to men who distinguished themselves “conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity” in combat with an enemy of the United States. (Versions of the Medal of Honor. Army version on the left.)

Because the medal is presented “in the name of Congress,” it is often referred to as the “Congressional Medal of Honor”. However, the official name is the “Medal of Honor,” which began with the U.S. Army’s version. Within United States Code the medal is referred to as the “Medal of Honor”, and less frequently as “Congressional Medal of Honor”.

The Medal of Honor is usually presented by the President in a formal ceremony at the White House, intended to represent the gratitude of the American people, with posthumous presentations made to the primary next of kin. According to the Medal of Honor Historical Society of the United States, there have been 3,514 Medals of Honor awarded to the nation’s soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen since the decoration’s creation, with just less than half of them awarded for actions during the four years of the American Civil War.

In 1990, Congress designated March 25 annually as “National Medal of Honor Day”. Due to its prestige and status, the Medal of Honor is afforded special protection under U.S. law against any unauthorized adornment, sale, or manufacture, which includes any associated ribbon or badge.

First noted by Gary McCauley, Belleek who informed me of its existence.

From  https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_B._Horne