1843 News.

October 19th 1843. LOUGH ERNE NAVIGATION.—Yesterday the committee held a meeting in the Court-house which was attended by the Earl of Erne, Wm. Archdall, Folliott Barton, Esqrs, Rev. J. G. Porter, George Wood, John Collum, Roderick Grey, and John Halliday, Esqrs. Every remaining arrangement for carrying this great object into effect was finally settled. The purchase of the Weirs was completed, and this principal obstruction is, now to be removed forthwith. The removal of several obstructions was likewise decided upon, and they are to be proceeded with early next spring.

BUTTER IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY.—Yesterday the Earl of Erne, Folliott Barton, Wm. Archdall, James Lendrum, Esqrs., the Rev. J. G. Porter, Robert Archdall, Esq., and others held a meeting in the Grand Jury room which was attended by the Sessions Grand Jury and a number of respectable farmers. Lord Erne addressed the meeting at length, and read some valuable communications on the subject. Mr. Porter also addressed the, meeting, and much useful conversation ensued which is likely to prove of great importance to this county in this material branch of Irish, produce.

3D DRAGOON GUARDS. Captain Nugent’s Troop of this Regiment quartered in this garrison for the last few months, marched yesterday to join headquarters in Dundalk, from which place the Regt. is to proceed to Dublin, and will be relieved by the 5th, or Green Horse, a Troop of which is expected here on the 30th. The troop was played out of town yesterday by the fine band of the 53d,

EXPECTED FACTION FIGHT AT PETTIGO. From information which has reached the local magistrates of the Pettigo district, and forwarded to the military and police authorities here, for detachments to attend the fair there on to-morrow. This day a company of the 53d left this garrison for the purpose, and Captain Henderson and twenty of the Constabulary also, left, this town for Pettigo, and will be reinforced by parties of Police from. Donegal and other stations,

THE WEATHER—Monday night we had a fearful storm here; it blew most violently during the entire night. Some large trees were blown down in the neighbourhood, and hay and corn were knocked about in different places, but neither in the town nor country have any houses suffered. The weather has been fine since,

THE FINE ARTS.—In the collection of prints now on sale with Mr. Caddy, as agent for Mr. Thomas Boys, London, Printseller to the royal family, we were particularly gratified with the splendid style in which “The last moments of Charlies I.” ‘‘Trial of the Earl of Strafford,” and “Cromwell’s family interceding for the life of Charles the First” “Belton Abbey, &c’ are executed. Mr Boys’ Fine Art Distribution takes place in London on Wednesday, 25th October inst. By the prospectus we perceive the prizes vary from four to five hundred guineas, and each subscriber—independent of his chance of drawing a prize on payment of one guinea—receive from the agent a print value for the sum paid—which is selected by the subscriber from unrivaled collection now on view with the agent. We wish Mr. Boys every success in his interesting lottery. Indeed we have in doubt the nobility, gentry, clergy, etc. will justly appreciate this great Artist’s laudable undertaking.

DANCING,—In directing attention to Mt. Sullivan’s advertisement, we are justified in remarking that his patronage in this place has arisen solely from his merits, and that the advantages held out in his proposed evening class are such as are worthy of attention by those wishing instruction in the graceful art.

Saturday last, the Earl and Countess of Belmore, family and suite, arrived at Castlecoole from Cowes, Isle of Wight.

The Lord Lieutenant has appointed the Rev. J. G. Porter Commissioner of Education in the room of Lord Vesey Fitzgerald deceased.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE ERNE PACKET. Sir, beg leave to send you an extract from the last report for 1843, of the Dingle colony, in the county Kerry, which you may probably think worth inserting in your paper. They are valuable, as showing the influence of Gospel truth amongst our poor benighted fellow-countrymen, and at the present moment when there is so much to distract and dishearten, may prove peculiarly gratifying to many of your readers who probably have not have been aware of the satisfactory work now in progress in the above remote corner of our native land and who may be induced to aid it by  their contributions, which I am sure you would readily transmit to any of the following persona appointed to receive the same, namely—Mr. Robertson, 3, Grafton-street; Messrs. William Curry, jun., and Co , 9, Upper Sackville-street; or Messrs. La Touche and Co., Castle-street Dublin; the Treasurer, the Rev. Charles Gayer, Ventry, or the Secretary Miss Mahon, Booterstown, near Dublin. I am etc. A FRIEND OF IRELAND.

In the town of Dingle, which is situated in the most western part of Ireland, on a promontory extending forty miles into the Atlantic ocean, and in the district immediately around it, there have been 750 persons brought out of the Church of Rome by the preaching of the Gospel, within the last seven years. Three entirely new congregations have been formed of converts: two Churches have been erected and five school houses for the children and it is now found necessary to enlarge the Church at Dingle the third time, as in that town alone there are 250 converts added to the original Protestant congregation. In Ventry there are 200 converts, a Church and School-house have been erected, and ten houses are now being built for the protection of the converts. At Dunerlin there are 65 converts, a Church and School house have been erected. In Donequin and the adjacent Blasquett Islands there are 110 converts. At Donequin a commodious building is nearly completed, which will be used as a school-house during the week, and for the Church services on Sundays; a school-house, with a residence for a master, has also been built on the Blasquett Island.

In Kilmechedar parish, there are about 45 converts a school-house is now being erected there. In addition to these enumerated, there are about fifty converts scattered in different places who cannot be counted with any particular .congregation.

Besides those still living, nineteen converts have died since the commencement of the work, all of whom, without any exception, have remained steadfast in the faith, notwithstanding the violent and persevering efforts that in some cases have been used by their Roman Catholic relations to induce them at their dying hour to recant. Such testimonies have been most valuable, proving if anything were needed prove that their change was no tone of mere outward profession to secure for themselves any supposed earthly gain, while the full value of the testimony cannot be felt by those who are not acquainted with the assault of mingled warning and threat, and earnest entreaty which the dying convert has often to endure.

If .more were needed to confirm the reality of the work, the following extracts from the letters of the Bishop of Limerick, and the. Rev. Denis Browne the Rev. Charles Gayer, might be so:—In a letter, dated September 1, 1842, the Bishop of Limerick states—“ Nothing I consider has taken place in Ireland of so much importance to the furthering of true religion, and for the Interest of the Established Church, as the movement that has manifested itself in your parishes.

The Rev. Denis Browne writes September 1, 1842. I cannot tell you the interest which, my late visit to Dingle has produced in my mind in the progress of the work there. I was prepared to expect some little disappointment in visiting and personally inquiring into a work of which I had heard so much at a distance but so far from being disappointed, I have found in reality to exceed far my most sanguine and having visited every post in the district, and in minutely inquired into all the particular work that is going on in it, and having carefully examined some of the principal converts, I am satisfied that the work is of God.

Of the state and progress of the colony, Rev. C. Gayer writes in a letter, dated December 31 1842 “I have now to state that in addition to the houses mentioned in your last report, ten been completed in Dingle, and ten more are now of being built at Ventry, five of which, finished. In the Dingle colony there are one hundred and fifty individuals receiving shelter, among who are twelve widows. The numbers of children attending the Sunday school are one hundred and seventy-six. The adult Sunday class .has increased to one hundred and thirty. Since the operation of the Society have been enlarged three scripture readers and two schoolmasters have been supported by the colony.

SERIOUS LOSS OF PROPERTY BY FIRE,

Early on Sunday morning last, Adam Nixon, Esq., Graan, had his entire, range, of offices, including stables, barn, cow houses &c., entirely consumed, together with between 60 and 70 cocks of hay that were stored on the lofts; a quantity of farming and, jaunting-car harness, &etc., &etc., and the dwelling house and inside properly narrowly escaped falling a prey to the destructive element likewise. The disaster originated in the negligence of a farm servant, who in going to bed in a room over the stables placed the candle against the bed post and fell asleep. About three o’clock the family, of the house was alarmed, and on getting out found the whole range in flames; the alarm was extended in every direction; and messengers were dispatched to town for assistance. Captain Henderson and the police repaired to the place forthwith, and Col. Philips with the utmost promptitude sent out two officers and a company of the 53d. The country people, the military and police used every possible exertion to get the fire under but without effect. The pump on the premises was broken in a short time and water having then to be brought from a distance rendered the most strenuous exertions fruitless. The only object then was to cut off every, communication from the dwelling-house, which was happily effected. The furniture and property of the house were all carried out, and though strewn about the most trifling article was not lost. The military and police remained till the offices were burnt out, and all fears of the mischief extending further removed. All praise is due to these forces for their exertions, both officers and men, as also to the country people who left no labour unemployed. A young stable-boy lying in the room where the fire originated did not awake till surrounded by the flames, and in getting out was severely scorched; he had to be conveyed immediately to the Infirmary. Mr. Nixon’s loss cannot be much less than £200. It is melancholy to reflect that a corporate town like Enniskillen could not afford an Engine, which would on this one occasion have saved more than its own value.

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FERMANAGH HERALD. SAT., NOV. 9, JOTTINGS

  1. FERMANAGH HERALD. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, JOTTINGS

THE FATHER O’FLANAGAN FUND. THE hosts of admirers of the Rev. Father Michael O’Flanagan, not only in North Roscommon but throughout the whole, of Ireland, are anxious to inaugurate a Fund to mark in some small degree the feelings they entertain for his fearless work in Ireland’s Cause. With this object in View they respectfully solicit subscriptions, which will be duly acknowledged in the columns of the Press from time to time. Subscriptions can be sent to the Treasurers of the Fund in Crossna, namely Mr. Edward Doyle, Chairman of Boyle No. 1 .Council, Crossna (Co. Roscommon) and Mr. Patrick Kerins, Knockvicar, Boyle.

SHAUN MCDERMOTT’S. F. C. STOP-WATCH COMPETITION, 2 minutes to 10. At Arney Gaelic Hall, Sunday Evening, 3rd THE WINNER: MISS BONNIE WARD, CO. MONAGHAN.

ENNISKILLEN TECHNICAL SCHOOL, (TOWN HALL). IRISH FOR NATIONAL TEACHERS. THIS Class will reopen on SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, at 1.15 p.m. JOHN W. MANSFIELD, Principal.

DEATH. KELLY- October 30, 1918, at St. Vincent’s Hospital, Dublin, Anna Teresa, third daughter of William and Susan Kelly, The Hotel, Belcoo. Age, 22 years. R. I. P. At a rehearsal of the Blacklion Dramatic Club a resolution was passed in silence on the motion of Miss M. Maguire, seconded by Miss A. Dolan tendering the sincere sympathy of the members to Mr. and Mrs Kelly, Belcoo on the loss sustained by them in the death of their beloved daughter Miss Anna Kelly, and as a mark of respect to the memory of the deceased all the rehearsals for the week were adjourned.

John Small, C. C. Belturbet, for cutting the tyres of bicycles belonging to P. Callaghan, Knockaraven, Co., Fermanagh, and Jas McDonald, Milltown on the night of the East Cavan election result was traduced for £3 and £8 in the respective cases at the Cavan Quarter Sessions. Defendant, who did not appear, was with the Sinn Fein crowd said the plaintiff Callaghan.

Manorhamilton Electric Light Co. has increased the charge for light from 6d to 9d per unit.

At the meeting of workers in Enniskillen on Saturday week a resolution was passed urging shop assistants to join the National Union.

The licensed vintners of Enniskillen are taking steps to have the hours of closing in the afternoon altered, especially on fair and market days.

Mr. W, J. Brown, J.P., presided at a meeting of the Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday. The business was purely routine.

At the meeting of Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday, Mr. W. J. Brown, J.P., said that vaccination was a humbug and fraud.

The medical officer of Lisnaskea Guardians reported that six cases of influenza, three of them exhibiting serious pulmonary complications, were admitted to hospital daring the last week. (The ‘Spanish Flu’ which killed about 50 million people around the world at this time including populations in the Pacific Islands including my grandmother at the age of 28.)

The Earl of Belmore, Mr, J. Crosier, J.P., and Mr. J. P. Gillin, Fermanagh County Council, have been surcharged in £50 expended in connection with Fox’s Ferry, Upper Lough Erne. An appeal has been lodged against the surcharge.

Several new members have joined the Derrygonnelly branch of the National Amalgamated Union of Labour, and it is stated that labour candidates will go forward at the next local government elections.

In the course of his quarterly Report to the Fermanagh County Council, Mr. J. P. Burkitt, county surveyor, paid a tribute to the work of Mr. Finnegan, assistant county surveyor, who, he said, carried out his duties in an admirable manner.

A special meeting of the Enniskillen Urban Council will be held on Friday night to co-opt a member and to consider an application from the National Amalgamated Union of Labour asking for an increase for the employees who were members of the Union.

The “flu” is fairly prevalent in Enniskillen and district, but there are signs that the epidemic is abating. Several schools have been closed including Portora Royal School, where a number of the students contracted the disease.

At Enniskillen Quarter, Sessions C.E.R.A. Irvine, solicitor, sued W. J. Browne, J.P., auctioneer, Kinawley, to recover £17 for-costs incurred on defendant’s behalf. Mr. Irvine appeared in person and Mr. Clarke (Messrs. Clarke and Gordon) for the defendant. The case was dismissed,

MR, ARCHDALE, M, P. AND LABOURERS’ UNION. At the quarterly meeting of the Fermanagh Co. Council on Thursday, Mr. John McHugh (Pettigo) presiding, a letter was read from Mr. M. Donnelly, Derry, National Amalgamated Union of Labour, applying for an increase of wages on behalf of the members of the Union who were in the Council’s employment as surfacemen, attendants to steamrollers and other works in connection with road maintenance.

Mr. Archdale, M.P. — I think the National Amalgamated Union of Labour is going to destroy the labourers of this country. It will upset them and put them out of work. It is of no help to the labourers. Lord Belmore — What are their present wages?

The Co, Surveyor said that the drivers were paid £2 or 35s: the attendants, 24s; surfacemen from £l to 25s. He believed that none of the men should be paid any less than 22s 6d per week. Mr. Archdale —  None of them are paid less than that fixed by the Wages Board?

Co. Surveyor — I don’t think so. We have very few men who are constantly employed. The application was referred to the Roads and Quarries Committee.

ENNISKILLEN MILLING SOCIETY. The Committee of the Enniskillen Milling Society had under consideration at their last meeting, the question of erecting a new patent kiln in their new mill. It appears that a Belfast firm have arranged to make kilns of the new pattern known as “air drying which dries the grain before milling at the rate of about one ton per hour without any labour whatsoever, thereby saving the very expensive operation of turning the dried grain as it had to be done on the old kiln heads. It was decided to have this new invention established in their new mill.

DECEMBER 21, 1918. ENNISKILLEN WORKHOUSE ‘BURIALS.

DIGGING THE GRAVES. Assistant Clerk’s Report.

At the meeting of the Enniskillen, Guardians on Tuesday, Mr. Edmund Corrigan, vice-chairman, presiding, Mr. Joseph Ross, assistant clerk reported:—“Owing to the illness of the Master and Matron and the inmates who usually assist at burials, being laid up with influenza, I asked Mr. James Harvey to allow a couple of his men to open the, graves for two inmates in the Workhouse Cemetery on Friday last, who died three days previously, but these men were stopped at the work by Felix Cleary (who is at present under suspension), who went up to them. Two others (who are in the employment of Mr. Rutherford) were, got to bury one of the bodies, and the remains of the other man were buried in the new cemetery by Mr. Millar, who kindly undertook to nave a grave ready after a few hours’ notice. In connection with the above I paid a sum of 10s for having the work carried out, which I would ask the Board to refund me under the circumstances.”

Mr. Carson said it was very kind, of Mr. Ross, and it was a most blackguardly and disgraceful act of Cleary. Mr. W. Elliott (Greentown) said the Board must be in a powerful fix if they would tolerate such work. Mr. Ben Maguire suggested that they should consult their solicitor with the object of having proceedings taken. Mr. Cathcart said he had never thought before that the country around Enniskillen had gone to such a pitch.

The Chairman said there was no member of the Board or no man outside the Board who believed more than he did in the principle of a man being paid a living wage, but when it came to this — to try and leave corpses unburied — it was going too far for him. Mr. B. Maguire proposed that their solicitor be consulted with the view of having proceedings taken against Cleary. Mr. Cathcart thought the matter should be reported to the police authorities. Mr. Ross said a police sergeant was sent round with the coffin to the burial ground lest the men would be interfered with. No further action was taken in the matter.