15-4-1950. FERMANAGH IN EASTER WEEK. BY EAMONN MacAINDREIS (Eamon Anderson.)

15-4-1950. FERMANAGH IN EASTER WEEK. BY EAMONN MacAINDREIS (Eamon Anderson.)

“Right proudly high o’er Dublin Town

They hung out the flag of war

’Twas better to die ’neath an Irish sky,

Than at Suvla or Sud-el-Bar.

And from the plains of Royal Meath

“Strong men came hurrying through,

While Brittania’s sons with their long range guns

Sailed in by the Foggy Dew.”

THIRTY-FOUR long years have passed away since the beginning of the last fight for Irish freedom—a fight that must go on till the last square inch of Irish soil is free from the rule and laws of foreign invaders and native traitors. The Rising of Easter Week 1916 was the trumpet blast, which started to awaken the Irish people from the torpor and misery of the “Slave Mind.’’ O’Connell, greatest of our Irish “ Constitutionalist ” leaders died of a broken heart in Black 47 ” after his life-long efforts for “ Repeal of the Union ” had ended in dismal failure, and the corpses of a million victims of an English-made famine lay rotting in the fields and cabins and graves all over Ireland, whilst another million tried to cross the Atlantic, but at least a third of them never landed as they died of famine going over. Later in the last century came Butt and Parnell, also Constitutionalist leaders, who did their best during their lives. Parnell did his best during the whole of his short life for the reduction of rack-rents and the amelioration of the conditions under which the poor Irish tenant farmers had to live, and no Irish Catholic leader—except those who have shed their blood for Ireland— has as high a place in the affections of the Irish people, even to the present day, as the Protestant Charles Stewart Parnell.

SINN FEIN. In 1903 Arthur Griffith started the Sinn Fein movement. Although the name ’Sinn Feiners’ was given by the English to those who rose with the gun in Dublin in 1916, Arthur Griffith’s Sinn Fein policy simply meant passive resistance and he was, through all his life, totally opposed to resistance with gun. The words “Sinn Fein ” are Irish words meaning “We ourselves,” and one of the mottoes of the movement was “Burn everything English except English coal.” To withdraw all our elected representatives from Westminster, and start a National Assembly in Dublin (Just as was really done here after the General Election of 1918—years before the Treaty was signed). To keep all the money possible at home in Ireland and start home industries of all kinds with it, so as to stop emigration. A verse of the song “ Sinn Fein ” made about 1904 said:

“We cultivate each root and plant ’neath Irish skies;

We wear our Irish home-made goods, our flannels, tweeds and frieze,

And every product of the earth, old Ireland does contain

To keep Irish hands from foreign lands, is the motto of Sinn Fein.”

 

But although many of the brainiest people in Ireland joined and supported the Sinn Fein movement from the start it was not a success and a young man named Dolan went forward as a Parliamentary candidate in Leitrim in 1907 on the Sinn Fein policy, and was beaten, although not very badly—as he got all the votes of the survivors of the Fenian movement there. I think it was the same Dolan who was really elected for North Leitrim in the General Election of 1918, but any way I am glad, to say that most of us who were attending Kinawley School in 1907 took his part at that time, although some of us were only about 11 years old at the time. But I was just after finishing the reading of A. M. Sullivan’s ‘Story of Ireland,” which gave no very nice picture of British misrule in Ireland, and which ended with a description of the great 11 days snowstorm—from 5th to 16th March, 1867, which prevented or put a stop to the Fenian Rising. In 1914, when the first European War started, every able-bodied man in Ireland was drilling and some very disabled men too; First Carson started the Ulster Volunteers to fight against even a very mild form of Home Rule for any and every part of Ireland, and then John MacNeill started the Irish Volunteers to fight for it if necessary.

In a little village and countryside like this 160 men of the Irish Volunteers drilled almost every evening, their drill instructors being veterans of the South African War—only about a dozen years over at the time. And then came the first Great European War starting on 4th August, 1914. A Home Rule Bill, (awaiting amendment,  was rushed through the British House of Commons, but not to take effect till the War was over, and, on the strength of that doubtful promise the Irish Party at Westminster made the terrible mistake of starting to recruit for the British Army. Some of us were very fond of reading the Dublin “Leader,” edited by D. P. Moran at the time, and, though not an “extreme” paper by any means, it was very severe in its criticism of the Irish Party for the stand they were taking. The christened the Irish Party “The All is Won Brigade” and said week after week “We do not desire the death of the All is Won Brigade, but that they be converted and live.” Also the question and answer—”When is a Home Rule Bill not a Home Rule Bill…” “When it is awaiting amendment”; also “We have always admired the Irish Party, but we now want to take the recruiting streamer out of their hats.” The ’Leader’ called the European combatants “The British pot, and the German Kettle ” and gave the recitation of an argument between the Pot and Kettle in which both cast up their misdeeds to each other:

“Upon a kettle, plenty black, its not for pot to make attack ” says the kettle; the pot cast up “ the Church of Rheims destroyed by fire,” but the kettle replied “Ah March, 1867, which prevented or think so much of Papist art— which must be full of superstition, of ignorance and Rome’s tradition.”

“When in doubt, consult the “Leader” was another headline in Moran’s paper. The recruiting policy of the Irish Party naturally split the Irish Volunteers from top to bottom. More than 200,000 took Redmond’s advice and joined the British Army—while John MacNeill, founder and leader of the Volunteers, was totally opposed to recruiting at all times. A party in Knockninny parish “who had never lost the old Fenian faith” (i.e., the faith in an Irish Republic) separated from, the rest and went out. and drilled by themselves, whilst we, the 160 Volunteers of the Fermanagh part of Kinawley Parish, avoided the difficulty by ceasing to drill altogether. ”

If an odd unfortunate man did join the, British forces, the saying always was: “He must have been drunk! when he threw himself away like that.

More than a year and a half of the Great War had passed away when the startling news came of the Rising of Easter Week. Although the fight had been going on from noon on Monday the news did not come to to our part of the county till Thursday morning, and I must say that very few understood it or approved of it at the time. However, that day I met an old man named Owen Jones on the road, who had been a long time in America in his day, and he said “It’s time for us to hear good news like this. What are these men only the Fenians? What is this only the Fenian Rising—50 years delayed?”

SIX FERMANAGH MEN. As far as I can find out up to the present at least 6 Fermanagh men; all of them living in Dublin at the time, took part in the Rising. Of course there may have been more, but anything I can find I will publish here—
le cúnamh Dé (With the help of God.). The names of the 6 men were;—George Irvine and a man named Wilson, both natives of Enniskillen; Philip Cassidy and Owen Green, natives of Mullaghdun; and two men named Maguire and Meehan, natives of Derrygonnelly. George Irvine was a captain in the Irish Volunteers, and a Professor in Trinity College. In the early part of his life he lived in East Bridge Street, Enniskillen. but left it when very young. On the 29th June, 1917, he was chaired through the streets of Enniskillen, by a great cheering crowd of Fermanagh Nationalists.

Wilson kept a boot shop in East Bridge Street about 50 years ago, but his place was burned—he lost his money and goods and then went to live in Dublin. Both Irvine and Wilson were Protestants. Owen Green was in business in Dublin at the time, and now  owns and works a farm and drapery store at Kinlough, County Leitrim. He was wounded in the Rising and interned after it. Maguire and Meehan were also in business in Dublin at the time. I have not yet found out their present whereabouts, but it is believed they are in Glasgow. They fought in the G.P.O. Philip Cassidy (trocaire De are a n-anim) passed away in Dublin on 5th May, 1938. His remains were brought home and interred in Arney Churchyard, where a crowd gathers every year at Easter to pray for the repose of his soul. At the time of the Rising he was a young man in business in Dublin and bought his own rifle, revolver and uniform. He fought beside Patrick Pearse in the G.P.O. He had 6 brothers and 3 sisters. Two of his brothers have also passed away. Patrick passed away on 1st June, 1933 in Glasgow. His remains were also brought home and interred in Arney Churchyard. Charles was killed in an accident in New York. Henry emigrated to Australia and lives in Brisbane, Queensland. He is a great writer in Australian papers on Irish affairs and especially on the Border question.

Thomas Gregory is a Civic Guard in Ballyconnell, Co., Cavan. Maurice runs a business in Belmore Street, Enniskillen, while John runs a farm at Carrigans, Enniskillen. Miss Barbara Cassidy also lives with her brother at Carrigans, while Mrs. Alice Corrigan, another sister, lives at Mullaghdun, and Mrs. Annie MacManus. another sister, whose husband is a Free State Customs and Excise man lives at Dungarvan, Co. Waterford. John Cassidy has also suffered great hardships for his country during the trouble, which has left him disabled, long before his time. He did 21 years in the old prison ship in Belfast Lough, the Argenta. Some day before long, I must give the experiences of all the Fermanagh men who have suffered in this way, after having a chat with them one by one. Another man, named Tom O’Shea, who worked in Enniskillen for a while in his time, also took part in the Rising. He was a native of Donegal. He was sentenced to be hanged, was in Peterhead Prison for a while, and also in Derry Jail. I have heard that a number of Volunteers in the Belcoo district were away from home during the whole of Easter Week, but it is not known whether they were in the Rising or not.

George Irvine was over 50 at the time of the Rising. The others were all young men in their 20’s. Much has yet to be written about the War of Independence and Fermanagh’s part in it, but I am now going to finish up this article with a few extracts from the pen of Henry J. Cassidy—written about 5 years ago in the “Brisbane Leader ” on the evils of Partition in Ireland:

“Partly as a result of clever propaganda, many people have a vague sort of idea that the North- Eastern part of Ireland is somewhat like a piece of Great Britain placed on the wrong side of the Irish Sea. In reality this mutilated portion of Ireland’s Northern Province is in most ways about one of the most distinctively Irish parts of Ireland: It even includes one of Ireland’s all too few remaining native Gaelic-speaking districts (despite the fact that Irish is treated as a foreign language by the Six-County education authorities). The North-East corner has rather more than its proportionate share of links with Ireland’s patron saint and her glorious early centuries of Christianity. The ancient city of Armagh with its splendid Cathedral, is the Archiepiscopal seat of the Cardinal Primate of all Iceland, who is the lineal successor of St Patrick. The much-abused “Ulster” has been for such a long time misused and misapplied that it has come to signify in the minds of many people the term “Orangemen.”

In contrast to this loud-mouthed plantation “Ulster” there is the real original Ulster of the Red Branch Knights – an Ulster nurtured on countless generations of legend and folklore, history and tradition, blending and harmonizing with and being part and parcel of the inspiring legends, history and traditions of an unconquerable and indivisible Ireland. This invincible spirit of Irish patriotism is just as vital and indestructible in the Six-Counties cut off from the rest of Ireland, as in the 3 Ulster counties which were left to form part of “Southern Ireland.” “One learns with some misgiving that there is a number of quite sincere Irish patriots, who seemingly hold the belief that Partition must continue till the Orange brethren in the North-East can be won over in favour of a United Ireland. It would appear that these extremely moderate Irish people think their country should submit to mutilation and Six-County Catholics put up with being trodden in the dust for another few generations or so.

 

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1951.

CHRISTMAS IN FERMANAGH COUNTY HOSPITAL.

CHRISTMAS is always a very happy time in Fermanagh County Hospital, where Miss McWilliam and her excellent nursing staff so well succeed in bringing an atmosphere of home and good cheer to the patients. As usual, the wards were delightfully decorated, streamers of holly and bunting and a profusion of flowers giving an appropriate effect of joy and happiness. Surgeon Fleming, Doctors Forester and Hamilton joined with Matron and nursing staff in dispelling the “away-from-home-for-Christmas feeling that patients might have had; and a happy, homely spirit made staff and patients one big happy family during the festival time.

A large Christmas tree was erected in the Children’s Ward, and this was laden with gifts and gaily coloured lights. The little ones entered into the spirit of the celebrations and, in a “ home-from-home ” atmosphere, enjoyed themselves immensely. An anonymous donor sent to Sister M. Maye, of the Children’s Ward, a parcel of gifts, “for some poor child” in the ward. These, and the other gifts, were distributed amongst the happy little ones, who quite correctly believe that for such as they, who are away from home for Christmas, Santa Claus has a special love and generosity. Other donors were generous in their supplies of holly, books, papers and toys. The Fermanagh. Male Voice Choir and the Methodist Church Choir visited the hospital before Christmas and provided nice selections of appropriate music.

ERNE HOSPITAL.

Masses of holly and bunting, used tastefully to provide an effect of beauty and gaiety, struck a happy note in the Erne Hospital, where almost, a hundred patients spent a very happy time during Christmas. Special Christmas fare was provided, Sisters Donaghy, Condell and Murphy joining with the Matron, Miss McKay, and the other members of the nursing staff to lighten the burden of illness with which the patients faced the festive season. Presents were sent in by kindly people and these were distributed Carol singers and choirs supplied an enjoyable programme of music in the days leading up to the Feast. Dr. M. E. McBrien and other helpers from outside the hospital assisted the nursing staff in making the patients’ Christmas time a happy one.

27-1-1951. PETTIGO. Pettigo monthly fair on Saturday was small but the demand for all classes, of cattle had improved from the previous fair and prices showed a marked increase. Springer cows sold from £29 10s to £36 10s each; three-year-old heifers sold from £27 10s to £34 10s each; two-year-old heifers sold from £21 10s to £27 10s each; fat bullocks sold from £29 10s to £32 10s each; year-old calves sold from £10 10s to £11 15s each; dropped calves sold from £1 to £1 5s each; young pigs sold from £5 to £7 5s each; farming horses were unsaleable.;

Sympathy is extended from the residents of his native Grouselodge to the brothers and relatives and to the clergy of the diocese of Clogher on the death of the Very Rev. Denis Canon McGrath, P.P., of Bundoran, last week. The late Canon McGrath was beloved by the people of Grouselodge in which townland he was born and reared.

On Friday night a well attended dance was held in St. Mary’s Hall, Pettigo, the proceeds being in aid of the poor and needy of the district, The function was generously supported by all the business people of Pettigo village.

On Saturday Sergeant M. McCabe, from Dublin, took up duty as sergeant in charge of Pettigo Garda station which had been vacant since the transfer of Sergt. Dominic Noone a few weeks ago.

During the past week all the schools in Pettigo village and surrounding districts have been‘closed owing to the flue epidemic which is raging in the area. Many of the business houses in the village are carrying on with depleted staffs. A few cases of pneumonia are reported in the area.

During the past week-end there was heavy flooding in the Lettercran, Cashelinney and Tullylark districts of Pettigo as a result of the long, wished for thaw which set in on Wednesday. In many parts of the district, roads were impassable for motor traffic owing to the floods.

Mr. Andrew Gallagher, of Grouselodge, is the first farmer in the district to have the ground ready for this Season’s potato crop.

3-2-1951. PETTIGO. On Monday a pretty wedding took place in St. Mary’s Church, Pettigo, the contracting parties being Mr. Michael McCrudden, youngest son of the late Patrick and Margaret McCrudden, of Woodlands, Dooish, Ballybofey, and Miss Rosaleen Hilley, third daughter of Patrick and Alice Hilley, of Lettercran, Pettigo. Margaret Hilley (sister of the bride), was bridesmaid, and Mr. Joseph Hilley (brother of the bride), was best man at the ceremony with Nuptial Mass. Rev. J. F. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo, officiated.

The epidemic of flu is still claiming many victims both in Pettigo village and the surrounding districts. In many areas whole families are confined to bed. All schools in the district have been closed as a precaution.

On Wednesday morning the death took place at her daughter’s residence, Main St., Pettigo, of Mrs. Catherine Geelan (75). Deceased was widow of Sergt. Edward Geelan, R.I.C., who prior to his marriage was stationed in Pettigo. At the funeral on Friday to St. Mary’s Cemetery, Pettigo, the chief mourner were—Mrs. J. Egan, Mrs. A. Cox, Pettigo. Mrs. Jim Gallagher. Newcastle (daughters); Eddie Geelan, Coventry, Jim Geelan, Donegal (sons); John Egan, G. Dorrian. J. Gallagher, A. Cox, (sons-in-law); John, Vincent, Seamus, Desmond, Dermot and Monica Egan; Liam, Andrew, Eamon and Maureen Cox, Alan, Dorrian, Jim, Eamon, Kathleen, Bernadette, Anne, Breda, Gertie and Marie Gallagher (grand-children); J. Fogarty, Cardiff (brother); Mrs. P. J. Flood, Pettigo (niece); Mr. John Watters (nephew). Rev. Jas. F. Brennan, C.C., gave an eloquent panegyric and celebrated Requiem Mass and recited the last prayers at the grave-side.

FERMANAGH S MINOR TEAM. John O’Neill (Lisnaskea); Owen Clerkin, (Roslea), Patrick Murphy, (Kinawley), Tom Callaghan (Roslea), Tom McManus (Kinawley), Paddy McComb (Lisnaskea), Jas. O’Hanlon (Newtownbutler), Sean Gonnigle (Belleek), Eamon O’Grady (Gaels), Tommy Devanney, (Irvinestown), Paddy Casey (Devenish), John Maguire (Ederney), Brendan Shannon (Newtownbutler), Tommy McDermott, (Roslea), Peter Murray, Roslea.

Subs. – Liam Slevin (Belleek), Thomas Donohue, Terry Donegan, (Newtownbutler), Hugh Maguire, (Irvinestown) and Kevin Donnelly and Bennie Fitzpatrick (Gaels).

17-2-1951. Tempo.

A MEETING of Fermanagh Co. Board. G.A.A., will be held in Parochial Rooms, Enniskillen, on FRIDAY, 16th FEBRUARY, at 8 p.m. sharp. All Clubs are requested to be represented.

TEMPO SYMPATHY. At a meeting of the Tempo G.F.C. on Tuesday night, a vote of sympathy was passed to the relatives and friends of the late Fr. D. McCaffrey, C.C.

CHANGES IN TEMPO TEAM? The year 1951 is expected to bring about changes on the Tempo team, as the better of the 1950 minors are anxious to fill the positions of their predecessors: These young players together with the remaining members of last years team should build up a fair defence and produce some good football:

Although Tempo. is officially a senior team, it would be unfair to grade them senior, as the result would prove to be a fiasco, and moreover, injuries which would be likely to occur would be the first step towards breaking up the team, which is beginning to prove its worth on the sports field.

The committee for the year 1951 is probably one of the largest of its kind in the county. Men who have hung up their boots are still in co-operation with the G.A.A. and devote, many of their spare hours in the club’s affairs. The officials are:—Eddie Connors (chairman); T. Doherty (vice-chairman), Phil McCarron (treasurer), and Hugh McCaffrey (secretary).

17-2-1951. PETTIGO. The death took, place at Tamlaght, Pettigo, on Tuesday after a prolonged illness of Mrs. Catherine Friel (82). At the funeral on Thursday to Carn cemetery the chief mourners were: James Dowd, Thomas Friel, Glasgow. Bernard Friel, do. (sons); Miss Mary A. Friel, Mrs. Catherine Simmons, Mrs. Winnie Friel (daughters); P. G. Simmons, James Friel (sons-in-law): Mrs. Thos. Friel, Glasgow (daughter-in-law); Thomas Herby, George, Cathleen, Maisie and Winifred Simmons (grandchildren). Rev. Fr. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo, celebrated Requiem Mass and officiated at the graveside.

On Monday night the last dance of the season was held in Cashelinney Hall, the proceeds being in aid of the hall repair fund. Mr. John J. Johnston, Skea, was fear a’ toighe.

Kesh monthly fair on Monday was very small, with practically no buyers in attendance; animals offered for sale were hard to cash.

The death took place at Montiaugh of Patrick McGoldrick (79), formerly a resident of Crilly, Pettigo. At the funeral on Friday morning to Lettercran, the chief mourners were Frank, Owen and James McGoldrick (brothers); Ellen Monaghan, The Cross (sister); Eddie Monaghan, Owne, Jas. J., Eugene and Jim McGoldrick (nephews). Rev. Fr. McKenna celebrated Requiem Mass and recited the last prayers at the grave-side.

On Monday of last week the heaviest snowfall of the season was experienced in the Pettigo district, where snow fell to a depth of 12 inches in a few hours. Many roads in the area are still unfit for vehicular traffic owing to drifts and ice.

On Ash Wednesday, February 7th, the Rev. James F. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo, distributed the ashes and recited the Rosary in Saint Mary’s Parish Church, Pettigo, and in Saint Patrick’s Church, Lettercran.

On Wednesday the death took place suddenly at Killeter of Thos. Irvine (57). The funeral took place to Killeter cemetery.

The flu is still claiming many victims in the Pettigo district.

Repair work by the Irish Land Commission on a bog road in the Grouselodge district had to be abandoned during the week owing to the heavy snowfall in the district.

24-3-1951. PETTIGO. The death took place at Ballymacavanny, Pettigo of Mrs C. Rooney (80). At the funeral to Pettigo Cemetery, the chief mourners were- Kathleen Rooney, Mrs. J Mulrine. Mrs. Mary J. Ward (daughters); Mr. J. Mulrine, Mr. Ward (sons-in-law); Miss Mary Mulrine (grandchild).

Prices at Pettigo monthly fair on Tuesday were—Springer cows, £35 to £39; three year old heifers, £31 to £34; two- year old heifers, £22 to £26; fat bullocks, £29 to £32; year old calves, £11 to £13 10s; dropped calves, 10s to 21s; young pigs, £5 to £7.

The death took place of William Vartue, of High Street, Pettigo (72). He was also well known to pilgrims to Lough Derg. At the funeral to Pettigo the chief mourners were; Mrs. Cochrane (sister); Henry and Geo. Morrow, Rebecca and Susan Morrow (cousins).

On St. Patrick’s Pay the annual pilgrimage took place to St. Patrick’s Well, Magherakeel. Almost 400 took part in the traditional station. The Rosary was recited by Very Rev. P. McGlinchey, P.P.

During the past week there have been losses of both cattle and horses in the Pettigo and Mullinmeen districts. It is believed that the shortage of fodder in. the district is the cause.

On Saturday the death took place at Belault South, Pettigo, after a short Illness, of John Martin (75). At the funeral to St. Mary’s Cemetery, Pettigo, chief mourners were: Thomas and Jas. Martin (sons,; Mrs. Catherine Martin (widow); Mrs. Mary MacMahon, Mrs. Peggy Ginn, Mrs. Jennie Wheatley (daughters); Patrick Martin (brother); John MacMahon, Bert Wheatley (sons-in-law); Phyllis, Marie, Kathleen, Margaret and Ann MacMahon (grandchildren); Wm. and Thos. Reilly (brothers-in-law); Mrs. W. Reilly, (sister-in-law); Thomas Reilly and John Reilly, (nephews) Mrs. P. Monaghan, Pettigo (niece); P. Monaghan, J. Friel (relatives).

Donegal Co. Council workmen are employed widening and paving the main Pettigo to Castlederg road at Grouselodge.

The death took place at her brother’s residence, Gortnessy, Pettigo, of Miss Fanny Porter, who had lived in the U.S.A., where she had spent her youth. The funeral took place on Thursday to Pettigo Cemetery; chief mourners being Bob and Willie Porter (brothers); Mrs. B. Porter (sister-in-law).

Being Irish.

Quotes About Irish

Quotes tagged as “Irish”

“Never wrestle with pigs. You both get dirty and the pig likes it.”
George Bernard Shaw

“I think being a woman is like being Irish… Everyone says you’re important and nice, but you take second place all the time.”
Iris Murdoch

“Your battles inspired me – not the obvious material battles but those that were fought and won behind your forehead.”
James Joyce

“Only Irish coffee provides in a single glass all four essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar and fat.”
Alex Levin

“This is one race of people for whom psychoanalysis is of no use whatsoever.”
Sigmund Freud

“To be Irish is to know that in the end the world will break your heart.”
Daniel Patrick Moynihan

“Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy.”
W.B. Yeats

“The earth makes a sound as of sighs and the last drops fall from the emptied cloudless sky. A small boy, stretching out his hands and looking up at the blue sky, asked his mother how such a thing was possible. Fuck off, she said.”
Samuel Beckett

“Writing in English is the most ingenious torture ever devised for sins committed in previous lives. The English reading public explains the reason why.”
James Joyce

“The great Gaels of Ireland are the men that God made mad,
For all their wars are merry, and all their songs are sad.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Ballad of the White Horse

“The sea, the snotgreen sea, the scrotumtightening sea.”
James Joyce, Ulysses

“Thankfully the rest of the world assumed that the Irish were crazy, a theory that the Irish themselves did nothing to debunk. They had somehow got it into their heads that each fairy lugged around a pot of gold with him wherever he went. While it was true that LEP had a ransom fund, because of its officers’ high-risk occupation, no human had ever taken a chunk of it yet. This didn’t stop the Irish population in general from skulking around rainbows, hoping to win the supernatural lottery.”
Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl

“When anyone asks me about the Irish character, I say look at the trees. Maimed, stark and misshapen, but ferociously tenacious.”
Edna O’Brien

“That’s right, there’s free beer in Irish paradise. Everyone’s jealous.”
Kevin Hearne, Hammered

“Some ghosts are so quiet you would hardly know they were there.”
Bernie Mcgill, The Butterfly Cabinet: A Novel

“You’re not falling for me, are you, Irish?”

-Adam to Gabrielle”
Karen Marie Moning, The Immortal Highlander

“If my last name were Bedient, I’d want to Irishize it and have you call me O’Bedient. Of course, just because you call me, doesn’t mean I’ll come.”
Jarod Kintz, $3.33

“All I know is what the words know, and dead things, and that makes a handsome little sum, with a beginning and a middle and an end, as in the well-built phrase and the long sonata of the dead.”
Samuel Beckett

“[Waiting for Godot] has achieved a theoretical impossibility—a play in which nothing happens, that yet keeps audiences glued to their seats. What’s more, since the second act is a subtly different reprise of the first, he has written a play in which nothing happens, twice.”
Vivian Mercier

“Tír gan teanga, tír gan anam. A country without a language is a country without a soul.”
Pádraig Pearse

“There’s no sense to being Irish unless you know the world’s going to break your heart.”
Thomas Adcock

“If there were only three Irishmen in the world you’d find two of them in a corner talking about the other.”
María Brandán Aráoz

“For you can’t hear Irish tunes without knowing you’re Irish, and wanting to pound that fact into the floor.”
Jennifer Armstrong, Becoming Mary Mehan

“Americans may say they love our accents (I have been accused of sounding ‘like Princess Di’) but the more thoughtful ones resent and rather dislike us as a nation and people, as friends of mine have found out by being on the edge of conversations where Americans assumed no Englishmen were listening. And it is the English, specifically, who are the targets of this. Few Americans have heard of Wales. All of them have heard of Ireland and many of them think they are Irish. Scotland gets a sort of free pass, especially since Braveheart re-established the Scots’ anti-English credentials among the ignorant millions who get their history off the TV.”
Peter Hitchens

“[Kurt Cobain] had a lot of German in him. Some Irish. But no Jew. I think that if he had had a little Jew he would have [expletive] stuck it out.”
Courtney Love

“Never Fight ugly people—they have nothing to Lose.”
“Irish” Wayne Kelly

“He had been thinking of how landscape moulds a language. It was impossible to imagine these hills giving forth anything but the soft syllables of Irish, just as only certain forms of German could be spoken on the high crags of Europe; or Dutch in the muddy, guttural, phlegmish lowlands.”
Alexander McCall Smith, Portuguese Irregular Verbs

“Having placed in my mouth sufficient bread for three minutes’ chewing, I withdrew my powers of sensual perception and retired into the privacy of my mind, my eyes and face assuming a vacant and preoccupied expression. I reflected on the subject of my spare-time literary activities. One Beginning and one ending for a book was a thing I did not agree with. A good book may have three openings entirely dissimilar and inter-related only in the prescience of the author, or for that matter one hundred times as many endings.”
Flann O’Brien

“The Celt, and his cromlechs, and his pillar-stones, these will not change much – indeed, it is doubtful if anybody at all changes at any time. In spite of hosts of deniers, and asserters, and wise-men, and professors, the majority still are adverse to sitting down to dine thirteen at a table, or being helped to salt, or walking under a ladder, of seeing a single magpie flirting his chequered tale. There are, of course, children of light who have set their faces against all this, although even a newspaperman, if you entice him into a cemetery at midnight, will believe in phantoms, for everyone is a visionary, if you scratch him deep enough. But the Celt, unlike any other, is a visionary without scratching.”
W.B. Yeats

“As a member of the Protestant British squirearchy ruling Ireland, he was touchy about his Irish origins. When in later life an enthusiastic Gael commended him as a famous Irishman, he replied “A man can be born in a stable, and yet not be an animal.”
Arthur Wellesley Wellington