15-4-1950. FERMANAGH IN EASTER WEEK. BY EAMONN MacAINDREIS (Eamon Anderson.)

15-4-1950. FERMANAGH IN EASTER WEEK. BY EAMONN MacAINDREIS (Eamon Anderson.)

“Right proudly high o’er Dublin Town

They hung out the flag of war

’Twas better to die ’neath an Irish sky,

Than at Suvla or Sud-el-Bar.

And from the plains of Royal Meath

“Strong men came hurrying through,

While Brittania’s sons with their long range guns

Sailed in by the Foggy Dew.”

THIRTY-FOUR long years have passed away since the beginning of the last fight for Irish freedom—a fight that must go on till the last square inch of Irish soil is free from the rule and laws of foreign invaders and native traitors. The Rising of Easter Week 1916 was the trumpet blast, which started to awaken the Irish people from the torpor and misery of the “Slave Mind.’’ O’Connell, greatest of our Irish “ Constitutionalist ” leaders died of a broken heart in Black 47 ” after his life-long efforts for “ Repeal of the Union ” had ended in dismal failure, and the corpses of a million victims of an English-made famine lay rotting in the fields and cabins and graves all over Ireland, whilst another million tried to cross the Atlantic, but at least a third of them never landed as they died of famine going over. Later in the last century came Butt and Parnell, also Constitutionalist leaders, who did their best during their lives. Parnell did his best during the whole of his short life for the reduction of rack-rents and the amelioration of the conditions under which the poor Irish tenant farmers had to live, and no Irish Catholic leader—except those who have shed their blood for Ireland— has as high a place in the affections of the Irish people, even to the present day, as the Protestant Charles Stewart Parnell.

SINN FEIN. In 1903 Arthur Griffith started the Sinn Fein movement. Although the name ’Sinn Feiners’ was given by the English to those who rose with the gun in Dublin in 1916, Arthur Griffith’s Sinn Fein policy simply meant passive resistance and he was, through all his life, totally opposed to resistance with gun. The words “Sinn Fein ” are Irish words meaning “We ourselves,” and one of the mottoes of the movement was “Burn everything English except English coal.” To withdraw all our elected representatives from Westminster, and start a National Assembly in Dublin (Just as was really done here after the General Election of 1918—years before the Treaty was signed). To keep all the money possible at home in Ireland and start home industries of all kinds with it, so as to stop emigration. A verse of the song “ Sinn Fein ” made about 1904 said:

“We cultivate each root and plant ’neath Irish skies;

We wear our Irish home-made goods, our flannels, tweeds and frieze,

And every product of the earth, old Ireland does contain

To keep Irish hands from foreign lands, is the motto of Sinn Fein.”

 

But although many of the brainiest people in Ireland joined and supported the Sinn Fein movement from the start it was not a success and a young man named Dolan went forward as a Parliamentary candidate in Leitrim in 1907 on the Sinn Fein policy, and was beaten, although not very badly—as he got all the votes of the survivors of the Fenian movement there. I think it was the same Dolan who was really elected for North Leitrim in the General Election of 1918, but any way I am glad, to say that most of us who were attending Kinawley School in 1907 took his part at that time, although some of us were only about 11 years old at the time. But I was just after finishing the reading of A. M. Sullivan’s ‘Story of Ireland,” which gave no very nice picture of British misrule in Ireland, and which ended with a description of the great 11 days snowstorm—from 5th to 16th March, 1867, which prevented or put a stop to the Fenian Rising. In 1914, when the first European War started, every able-bodied man in Ireland was drilling and some very disabled men too; First Carson started the Ulster Volunteers to fight against even a very mild form of Home Rule for any and every part of Ireland, and then John MacNeill started the Irish Volunteers to fight for it if necessary.

In a little village and countryside like this 160 men of the Irish Volunteers drilled almost every evening, their drill instructors being veterans of the South African War—only about a dozen years over at the time. And then came the first Great European War starting on 4th August, 1914. A Home Rule Bill, (awaiting amendment,  was rushed through the British House of Commons, but not to take effect till the War was over, and, on the strength of that doubtful promise the Irish Party at Westminster made the terrible mistake of starting to recruit for the British Army. Some of us were very fond of reading the Dublin “Leader,” edited by D. P. Moran at the time, and, though not an “extreme” paper by any means, it was very severe in its criticism of the Irish Party for the stand they were taking. The christened the Irish Party “The All is Won Brigade” and said week after week “We do not desire the death of the All is Won Brigade, but that they be converted and live.” Also the question and answer—”When is a Home Rule Bill not a Home Rule Bill…” “When it is awaiting amendment”; also “We have always admired the Irish Party, but we now want to take the recruiting streamer out of their hats.” The ’Leader’ called the European combatants “The British pot, and the German Kettle ” and gave the recitation of an argument between the Pot and Kettle in which both cast up their misdeeds to each other:

“Upon a kettle, plenty black, its not for pot to make attack ” says the kettle; the pot cast up “ the Church of Rheims destroyed by fire,” but the kettle replied “Ah March, 1867, which prevented or think so much of Papist art— which must be full of superstition, of ignorance and Rome’s tradition.”

“When in doubt, consult the “Leader” was another headline in Moran’s paper. The recruiting policy of the Irish Party naturally split the Irish Volunteers from top to bottom. More than 200,000 took Redmond’s advice and joined the British Army—while John MacNeill, founder and leader of the Volunteers, was totally opposed to recruiting at all times. A party in Knockninny parish “who had never lost the old Fenian faith” (i.e., the faith in an Irish Republic) separated from, the rest and went out. and drilled by themselves, whilst we, the 160 Volunteers of the Fermanagh part of Kinawley Parish, avoided the difficulty by ceasing to drill altogether. ”

If an odd unfortunate man did join the, British forces, the saying always was: “He must have been drunk! when he threw himself away like that.

More than a year and a half of the Great War had passed away when the startling news came of the Rising of Easter Week. Although the fight had been going on from noon on Monday the news did not come to to our part of the county till Thursday morning, and I must say that very few understood it or approved of it at the time. However, that day I met an old man named Owen Jones on the road, who had been a long time in America in his day, and he said “It’s time for us to hear good news like this. What are these men only the Fenians? What is this only the Fenian Rising—50 years delayed?”

SIX FERMANAGH MEN. As far as I can find out up to the present at least 6 Fermanagh men; all of them living in Dublin at the time, took part in the Rising. Of course there may have been more, but anything I can find I will publish here—
le cúnamh Dé (With the help of God.). The names of the 6 men were;—George Irvine and a man named Wilson, both natives of Enniskillen; Philip Cassidy and Owen Green, natives of Mullaghdun; and two men named Maguire and Meehan, natives of Derrygonnelly. George Irvine was a captain in the Irish Volunteers, and a Professor in Trinity College. In the early part of his life he lived in East Bridge Street, Enniskillen. but left it when very young. On the 29th June, 1917, he was chaired through the streets of Enniskillen, by a great cheering crowd of Fermanagh Nationalists.

Wilson kept a boot shop in East Bridge Street about 50 years ago, but his place was burned—he lost his money and goods and then went to live in Dublin. Both Irvine and Wilson were Protestants. Owen Green was in business in Dublin at the time, and now  owns and works a farm and drapery store at Kinlough, County Leitrim. He was wounded in the Rising and interned after it. Maguire and Meehan were also in business in Dublin at the time. I have not yet found out their present whereabouts, but it is believed they are in Glasgow. They fought in the G.P.O. Philip Cassidy (trocaire De are a n-anim) passed away in Dublin on 5th May, 1938. His remains were brought home and interred in Arney Churchyard, where a crowd gathers every year at Easter to pray for the repose of his soul. At the time of the Rising he was a young man in business in Dublin and bought his own rifle, revolver and uniform. He fought beside Patrick Pearse in the G.P.O. He had 6 brothers and 3 sisters. Two of his brothers have also passed away. Patrick passed away on 1st June, 1933 in Glasgow. His remains were also brought home and interred in Arney Churchyard. Charles was killed in an accident in New York. Henry emigrated to Australia and lives in Brisbane, Queensland. He is a great writer in Australian papers on Irish affairs and especially on the Border question.

Thomas Gregory is a Civic Guard in Ballyconnell, Co., Cavan. Maurice runs a business in Belmore Street, Enniskillen, while John runs a farm at Carrigans, Enniskillen. Miss Barbara Cassidy also lives with her brother at Carrigans, while Mrs. Alice Corrigan, another sister, lives at Mullaghdun, and Mrs. Annie MacManus. another sister, whose husband is a Free State Customs and Excise man lives at Dungarvan, Co. Waterford. John Cassidy has also suffered great hardships for his country during the trouble, which has left him disabled, long before his time. He did 21 years in the old prison ship in Belfast Lough, the Argenta. Some day before long, I must give the experiences of all the Fermanagh men who have suffered in this way, after having a chat with them one by one. Another man, named Tom O’Shea, who worked in Enniskillen for a while in his time, also took part in the Rising. He was a native of Donegal. He was sentenced to be hanged, was in Peterhead Prison for a while, and also in Derry Jail. I have heard that a number of Volunteers in the Belcoo district were away from home during the whole of Easter Week, but it is not known whether they were in the Rising or not.

George Irvine was over 50 at the time of the Rising. The others were all young men in their 20’s. Much has yet to be written about the War of Independence and Fermanagh’s part in it, but I am now going to finish up this article with a few extracts from the pen of Henry J. Cassidy—written about 5 years ago in the “Brisbane Leader ” on the evils of Partition in Ireland:

“Partly as a result of clever propaganda, many people have a vague sort of idea that the North- Eastern part of Ireland is somewhat like a piece of Great Britain placed on the wrong side of the Irish Sea. In reality this mutilated portion of Ireland’s Northern Province is in most ways about one of the most distinctively Irish parts of Ireland: It even includes one of Ireland’s all too few remaining native Gaelic-speaking districts (despite the fact that Irish is treated as a foreign language by the Six-County education authorities). The North-East corner has rather more than its proportionate share of links with Ireland’s patron saint and her glorious early centuries of Christianity. The ancient city of Armagh with its splendid Cathedral, is the Archiepiscopal seat of the Cardinal Primate of all Iceland, who is the lineal successor of St Patrick. The much-abused “Ulster” has been for such a long time misused and misapplied that it has come to signify in the minds of many people the term “Orangemen.”

In contrast to this loud-mouthed plantation “Ulster” there is the real original Ulster of the Red Branch Knights – an Ulster nurtured on countless generations of legend and folklore, history and tradition, blending and harmonizing with and being part and parcel of the inspiring legends, history and traditions of an unconquerable and indivisible Ireland. This invincible spirit of Irish patriotism is just as vital and indestructible in the Six-Counties cut off from the rest of Ireland, as in the 3 Ulster counties which were left to form part of “Southern Ireland.” “One learns with some misgiving that there is a number of quite sincere Irish patriots, who seemingly hold the belief that Partition must continue till the Orange brethren in the North-East can be won over in favour of a United Ireland. It would appear that these extremely moderate Irish people think their country should submit to mutilation and Six-County Catholics put up with being trodden in the dust for another few generations or so.

 

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March 1915.

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  ANOTHER ZEPPELIN WRECKED.  From the Hague comes a report that a Zeppelin, which engaged in guarding the bridges over the Rhine at Cologne, has been blown down and destroyed, though the crew escaped.  This is the third of these unwieldy gasbags that has been wrecked in the past fortnight, if the report is correct.

 

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  THE TAX OF TEA.  FEARS OF HIGHER DUTY.  There seems to be a strong probability of still it dearer tea in the near future, says the London Daily Express.  In November the duty was raised from five pence to eight pence per pound.  Some of the largest multiple shop tea firms are preparing for the possibility that the Budget will add a further 4d, making the duty one shilling a pound.  This would mean that the cheapest tea would be about two shillings and one penny per pound retail.

 

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  THE MARQUIS OF LONDONDERRY’S WILL.  The Marquis of Londonderry, K.G., P.C., who died on the 8th of February last, aged 62 years, left unsettled property provisionally valued at £500,000, “so far as at present can be ascertained.” Probate of his will has been granted to his son, the Most Hon. Charles Stewart Henry, now seventh Marquis of Londonderry, the sole executor.  He bequeathed £100,000, a carriage and pair of horses, and a motor car, as she may select, to his wife, together with the selection of any two of his thoroughbred brood mares, with either foals or yearlings; £150,000 to his daughter, the Countess of Ilchester; £100,000 to his sister Lady Allendale; and all other property to his son.

He stated: – “It is my wish that my said son should, out of the said gifts of residue, make such presents to my faithful agents, and also to such of my servants I shall have been in my service for 10 years and upwards at the date of my death, as in his absolute discretion he may think fit.”

He further stated – I wish that my death shall not be allowed to cast more gloom than is absolutely unavoidable upon those with whom I have been so long and so happily associated but that my relations and kind friends will not allow my death to make any difference in their arrangements, but that they will resume their engagements and diversions exactly as if that event had not happened.

 

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  SANATORIUM FOR FERMANAGH.  THE COUNTY COUNCIL ADOPTS DR. TIMONEY’S SCHEME BY A LARGE MAJORITY.  The vexed question of their provision of a Sanatorium for Fermanagh came up again for discussion at the meeting of the County Council on Thursday, when Dr. Timoney’s report came up for consideration.  Mr. Arnold said he was opposed to the scheme, and he was opposed to it for a very good reason.  If he could prove to him that the scheme was going to be the benefit that it was claimed to be he would agree with that.  If they could prove to him that sanatorium treatment was a cure or a preventative he would be with them.  He deplored the ravages which consumption was making in the country, but he had yet to learn of the advantages which would accrue from a sanatorium scheme in County Fermanagh.  It was said that the scheme would put £5,000 on the rates.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  THE CHANNEL TUNNEL SCHEME.  At present, owing to difficulties arising out of the war, there does not seem to be any possibility of the projected scheme for the construction of the channel tunnel between England and Ireland, materialising, but there are grounds for believing that the project will again come before parliament and after the sensation of hostilities.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  GOLD IN OUR BOGS.  Now that the price of coal is so high, people are asking why it is that up to date methods are not availed off for the production of more fuel from our Irish Bogs.  The bogs are the true gold mines of Ireland and infinitely more valuable than any inexhaustible supply of the precious metal.  Turf dried by machinery has a much higher heating power and will not burn away so quickly as ordinary air-dried turf.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  JOTTINGS.  Lady Erne has written expressing her thanks to the Fermanagh County Council for the resolution recently passed on the death of her husband, Lord Erne.

The various Volunteer Companies in Arney have been reorganised during the past few weeks.  As soon as the good weather sets in drilling will be resumed.

The report of the annual meeting of the Sligo, Leitrim, and Northern Counties Railway will be read with pleasure by the shareholders.  The company has passed through a time of stress and difficulty, and they have surmounted the difficulties successfully, and the directors have pleasure in recommending that the same dividend be payable this year as last year.  This is a matter of congratulation both by the directors and the shareholders, having regard to the fact that practically all of the railway companies in Ireland and Great Britain had to recommend a reduction in their dividends.

News has been received in Enniskillen of the death in Arbroath of Mr. William Alexander Harvey, a son of Mr. James Harvey, Belmore Street, Enniskillen.  The late Mr. Harvey was in Scotland visiting some friends, and death was caused by motor cycling.  At the time of the outbreak of the Boer War he joined the South African Constabulary Force, and in 1912 he returned home and afterwards left for Patagonia to share a ranch with a friend.  At the outbreak of war he disposed of his share, and set out for home with the intention of joining the colours.  His demise under such tragic circumstances will be learnt with regret, and sympathy will be extended to his father, mother and relatives in their great sorrow.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  ENNISKILLEN.  HOUSING SCHEME B.  Chanterhill Road West – 10 houses.  Here the committee propose to erect a row of better class dwellings on the left hand side of the roadway going from the town and beyond Alexandra Terrace.  The houses are to be of 18 feet frontage and to contain kitchen, three rooms, good attic, and bath accommodation with bay window.  The estimated cost of each house is £36 – 7 shillings and 11 pence.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  DEATH OF AN ENNISKILLEN SOLDIER.  A GOOD MAN AND A BRAVE SOLDIER LOSES HIS LIFE IN THE TRENCHES. We briefly announced in our last issue the death in action of Private Francis McKiernan of the 2nd battalion of the Inniskilling Fusiliers.  Private McKiernan was an employee of the Enniskillen Urban Council, and on the outbreak of war answered the mobilization call, as he was on the Special Reserve, and on the 31st of October he left for the firing line, and on the 10th of February he was shot by a sniper.  His mother has received the following letter from the Catholic Chaplain, Fr. McCabe and from the C.Q.M.S.: – Dear Mrs. McKiernan, – I have the sorrowful duty of informing you that your son, number 1724, Private Francis McKiernan, was killed in action on the evening of the 10th of this month.  I trust you will not take this heavy blow too much to heart, and I am sure it will console you to know that your son was well prepared for his death.  Only a few days ago I said Mass for the men of his company, and your son was amongst those who went to Confession and received Holy Communion.  The circumstances of us death were as follows: He was in the advanced trenches and was doing up his pack, when he raised his head above the tranches.  A sniper who was on the lookout immediately fired and hit your son in the head causing almost instantaneous death.  This German was soon after shot himself by his comrades.  Yesterday accompanied by as many men who could be spared I buried him with full Catholic rites in a little country cemetery not far from the firing line and this morning said Mass for the repose of his soul.  R.I.P.

Try then my dear madam to see even in this great sorrow the finger of God.  Your holy faith will comfort you and sustain you.  Your son was a good man, and brave soldier and a devout catholic.  He has died bravely, strengthened with the Sacrament he had received so shortly before.  No better ending can any man have.  God bless you and comfort you.  Yours very sincerely in J.C.  A. E. McCabe, R.C. Chaplain.

 

Dear Mr. McKiernan, – I am very sorry to have to convey to you the sad news of the death of your son.  He was killed on the 10th inst, and buried the next day, a clergyman being present.  I am sending you all the things that were found on him by post, and I hope you will see them safely.  There are other things which you will receive through the Record Office, Dublin.  We are making his grave as nice as possible.  If there is anything you want to know I will be only too pleased to give you any information.  I have just scribbled these few lines in a hurry.  W.  Thompson, C.Q.M.S., “C” company 2nd Bn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  1st Army.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  WITH THE NEXT ISSUE OF THE FERMANAGH HERALD there will be presented a beautiful half-tone portrait suitable for framing of Mr. Joseph Devlin, MP.  It has been reproduced from a special photograph and will be printed on Art Paper.  Orders from newsagents for extra papers should reach us at the latest on Monday next.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  JOTTINGS.  The Enniskillen Guardians have given a grant of £3 3s to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.

Mr. Justice Gibson was presented with white gloves at of the Fermanagh Assizes on Saturday.  His remarks in his address the schoolboys will be ready with interest.  He spoke about the six fruitful years spent in the classrooms of Portora and the “throb and thrill of memories which come over him when he visits Enniskillen.”

The depot Brass Band from Omagh arrived in Enniskillen on Wednesday morning for the purposes of giving a fillip to recruiting.  Wednesday was fair day in the town.

It has been decided that on completion of their tour through Antrim, Derry, and Fermanagh, the 36th Battalion of the Cycling Company will be stationed at Enniskillen until further orders.

Becoming frightened at the burr of a motor bicycle, a horse which was harnessed to a cart took fright on Tuesday night and galloped up Townhall Street.  The animal approaching the Imperial Hotel went in on the footpath and try to dash through the portals of the hotel and in the effort smashed the cart.  The horse continued to drag it up as far as Mr. Taylor’s window, where it fell in a heap.  Mr. Taylor’s windows had certainly a miraculous escape from had being broken.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  LIGHTING CLONES WORKHOUSE.  Clones in Guardians on Tuesday received an account for £7 – 5s – 9d, lighting for two months and 13 days.  Oil lighting for the corresponding period last year it was stated cost £4 – 13s – 4d.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915. NURSES’ CHEERY TASK.  Writing to the Clones Guardians regarding the alleged neglect of the dead, the Local Government Board state that is the duty of the nurse to wash and prepare a body for coffining, but not actually to coffin it.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  THE GAA FERMANAGH COUNTY CONVENTION.  On Sunday, the 7th of March the Fermanagh County Convention of the GAA was held at Derrylin –Mr. P. L. McElgunn, chairman of the County Board presiding.  The following clubs were represented – Shamrocks, O’Connell’s, Brian Borus, Rapparees, Brehons, and Maguires.  The report showed that during the year Fermanagh had made a very creditable display in the Ulster Championship, beating Tyrone and Cavan and thus qualifying for the final in which it was defeated by Monaghan.  In the semi-final of the Croke Cup Competition, Fermanagh was drawn against Louth, and was only beaten by this famous combination by the score of 1 point.  The credit for this is principally due to the Shamrocks, who selected the team.

In the competitions in the county good progress was made during the year.  The 1913 League competition, won by Maguires, had to be finished and all of the championship, which was won by Shamrocks.  In the 1914 championship all the matches were played except the final.  In the league, however, things are not so far advanced owing to unfavourable climatic conditions.

The convention next proceeded to make bylaws.  It was decided to play championships on a league system vis., home and away matches, the home team to take charge of the gate and field arrangements.  Only 10 minutes’ grace is to be allowed after the time appointed for starting matches and the entrance to the Junior League was fixed at had two shillings and sixpence.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  FOOTBALL.  Trillick Football Club and travelled to Brookeborough on Saturday last to play a friendly with the homesters.  A very enjoyable game was the outcome.  Trillick had rather the better of a hard game, which ended with the score: Trillick, six goals; Brookeborough, four goals.  The marksmen for Trillick were McElholm two, McGee two, Slevin and Brennan one each.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  BALLYSHANNON GUARDIANS.  The Master reported that owing to Dr. McMullen, medical officer of the workhouse, been called away on urgent private business, he was obliged to requisition the services of Dr. Gordon to temporarily discharge the duties of medical officer.  He also stated that he lodged a sum of £112 8s 7d to the credit of the Guardians, being repayment for the treatment of military patients.

An application was received from Andrew McShea for the grazing of the hospital field for 11 months at the sum of  £10 16s.  The application was granted.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  THE DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MRS. ANTHONY CASSIDY.  Her death occurred on Friday last the 5th, inst., at the age of 78 at her residence, 16 Upper Pembroke Street, Dublin.  Coming from Enniskillen some years ago with her late husband Mr. Anthony Cassidy, who predeceased her by a little over four years, she has since resided in Pembroke Street.  On Wednesday last she received with edifying piety and resignation the last rites of the church and on Friday morning she passed peacefully away in the presence of her daughter, Mrs. Gordon.

Of the most charitable disposition, the deceased lady will be very much missed by the poor of the parish of Westland Row.  From whatever quarter the appeals came – and they came in numbers – Mrs. Cassidy, once assured of their genuine worthiness, give them with open hand and willing heart and the prayers of the poor will be offered to the God of Mercy for her who was so merciful.  The remains arrived in Enniskillen by the 12.40 train, and the interment took place subsequently in the Catholic Cemetery.  The chief mourners were Dr. John Cassidy, London, and Dr. Louis Cassidy, RAMC, Dublin sons.  Mrs. Gordon, daughter and Mrs. Louis Cassidy daughter-in-law, Michael and Maurice Cassidy brothers in law. (Anthony Cassidy was the owner of a tobacco factory in Enniskillen and also the Graan Monastery farm, Enniskillen.)

 

Fermanagh Herald 20th March, 1915.  JOTTINGS.  Official intimation has just reached his mother in Enniskillen, that Private Sandy Hynes, of the Inniskillings has been killed in action.

The number of dozen eggs required in the Enniskillen Union for the current week is 25.  Some short time ago 60 dozen were required.

Mr. Donnelly was declared the contractor for meat, and Mr. Whaley the contractor for bread, at a meeting of the Enniskillen Guardians on Tuesday.

A case of spotted by fever was reported at a meeting of the Board of Guardians in the county during the past week.  Stringent measures have been adopted for the segregation of the affected person.

 

Fermanagh Herald 20th March, 1915.  THE RESIDENCE OF THE BELLEEK DOCTOR IS TO BE LIGHTED BY ELECTRICITY.  At a meeting of the Ballyshannon Board of Guardians on Saturday Mr. Felix Leonard vice chairman said he believed that it was the intention of the Guardians to have lighted by electricity Dr. Kelly’s house in Belleek, but he saw by the minutes that they were only going to put in the wire is etc., and Dr. Kelly was to supply the globes and shades.  He was of the opinion that as well as putting in the wires they should supply the globes etc., because Dr. Kelly’s residence was the property of the Guardians and they were receiving a big rent from him annually for it.  Mr. D. Gilfedder said in his opinion Dr. Kelly was a man who gave them very little trouble.  He never got a holiday for the past five or six years, which was the means of saving the Guardians a sum of almost £25.00.  If any man was worthy of consideration Dr. Kelly certainly was.

Mr. Gallacher said there was a scheme on foot for the public lighting of Belleek, and it was possible if the scheme matured it would be easier and cheaper to light the Doctor’s residence.  It was also stated that the current for the lighting of the streets of Belleek would be generated at Belleek Pottery.

 

Fermanagh Herald 20th March, 1915.  WAR PICTURES IN MANORHAMILTON FOR SIX NIGHTS IN SAINT CLARE’S HALL.  The people of Manorhamilton and surrounding district will be pleased to learn that Daniells Irish–American Animated Picture and Variety Company are here at present paying their sixth annual visit to Manorhamilton and will remain the whole week.  As everybody knows here, Mr. Daniells always gives a refined and up to date program and shows a complete change each night.  The subjects filmed by this popular company includes exceptionally fine pieces in drama and comedy, as well as the very latest war pictures, which win the unanimous approval of large and representative for audiences.  Mr. Daniels will show during the week, “War scenes in Belgium,” The Russian army in action,” “The Germans entering Brussels,” “The English army in France, etc. etc., which are all highly interesting and attractive.  The popular manager of this company – Mr. Happy Harry Harden – informed our representative that all films are quite new and have been chosen from the best kinematographic works procurable. In addition to the pictures and illustrated songs a variety concert will be given each evening by the following distinguished artistes: -Mr. Jack Seeby, Mr. Happy Harry Harden, Mr. Bert L. Dempster, Mr. Jimmy Greene, Miss S. Ryan, and the Brothers O’Brien, all of whom are great favourites.  A full orchestra will render high class music at each performance.  Doors open at 7.30 to commence at eight o’clock and admission is 6d or 1s with children half price.  Seats may be booked in advance. (Photograph of Mr. Braecy Daniells.)

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THE U.S. THEATRES HUGE SALARIES AND A REFUSAL.  Madame Melba will go to the United States in the autumn and will receive there £1,000 a week.  The New York Tribune which makes this announcement gives details of an interesting “star hunt” of Mr. Edward F.  Albee, who is offering huge salaries to attract the great ones of the concert hall over the Atlantic.  He received, it is said, a rebuff from the Irish tenor Mr. John McCormack, who when offered £300 for every appearance, with a percentage of the profits, or, failing this, £1,000 a week, intimated that the lowest terms in which business could be done where £5,000 a week. Mr. McCormick is the only singer whose price has been so high, and Mr. Albee is now said to be negotiating with Tetrazzini.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  FERMANAGH A SOLDIER KILLED.  Mr. Frank McGovern is the first of the Newtownbutler boys to fall on the battlefield.  A letter has been received from the War Office stating that he was killed in action on the 28th of February.  The following letter has also been received by his father: – “The King commands me to assure you of the true sympathy of the King and Queen. – Kitchener.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  ENNISKILLEN STREET TRAFFIC.  We think the time has come when the Urban Council should pass a by-law compelling all moving carts and vehicles to keep as close to the footpaths on their own side of the street as possible.  At present they seem to have an irresistible tendency to keep the centre of the thoroughfare.  Under any circumstances this leads to inconvenience but now when fast travelling has become one of the permanent facts of our traffic that leads to danger as well as to unnecessary annoyance.

The rule we suggest is being adopted and applied stringently everywhere else.  It gives drivers no extra trouble, but greatly relieves the strain and stress of street locomotion.  There is no reason why Enniskillen should lag behind other places in enforcing so sensible a regulation.  Indeed, our traffic is so concentrated and so continuous that there are few towns which more demand the most accommodating and safest method of travelling.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  OUR LOSS OF OFFICERS.  CASUALTIES NOW EXCEED 5,600.  Up to Saturday morning an analysis of the casualty list showed our loss in officers as follows: – Killed 1,808; Wounded 3,022; Missing or Prisoners 844.  Total 5,674.  Of the Irish regiments the Inniskilling Fusiliers; nine killed, 24 wounded, two missing or prisoners, total 35.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THREE WARSHIPS SUNK IN THE DARDANELLES.  BRITISH SAILORS SAVED.  FRANCE LOOSE 650 OFFICERS AND MEN.  In the Dardanelles operations on Friday H.M.S. Irresistible, H.M.S.  Ocean, and one of the French battleships Bouvet were sunk after striking drifting mines.  Practically all the crews of the British ships were saved, but the crew of the Bouvet, which foundered in three minutes after the explosion, were drowned.  She had a complement of 650 officers and men.  The ships lost were not of modern construction, nor of first class fighting value.  (From the Times.) The first sustained attempt to overcome the defences in the Narrows of the Dardanelles resulted in serious though not unexpected losses, and we must be prepared to lose still more ships before our object is completely achieved.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  MAINSPRING OF THE TRENCHES.  THE WONDERS OF THE BRITISH HEADQUARTERS.  The Special Correspondent (G.  Valentine Williams), of the Daily Mail, writes from the General Headquarters, British Army in the Field (France).  It is related that at one of the blackest stages of the retreat from Mons Sir John French astonished his entourage by announcing, after a long morning’s work at his headquarters, that he thought he would go for a stroll.  And, picking up a walking stick, the Field-Marshall calmly walked fourth to take the air as unconcerned as though he were going to stroll down to the War Office through the park.

That the British Commander–in–Chief should have been able to free himself momentarily from the enormous responsibilities of those days of stress is not only a remarkable instance of his mental detachment, of which I have already written, but it is also a most striking tribute to his absolute confidence in the perfect organisation of the British Army, without which even the undying heroism of the British troops would have availed nothing against the systematised frightfulness of the bosche.

Sir John French knows better than anybody else how admirably organised the British Army machine is.  He devoted his whole life to it when, emerging in a blaze of glory from the South African War, he was not content to rest upon his laurels but embarked on a long spell of silent, unostentatious hard work, the fruits of which are seen in the marvellously efficient army under his command today.

The amount of foresight required to feed an immense army serving on foreign soil may be imagined, yet so perfect are the arrangements of the Quartermaster Generals department that even during the great and glorious retreat from Mons when our troops were constantly on the move, the men never liked anything.  The Director of Supplies is kept daily posted on the number of men to be fed.  Each day the amount of rations required is sent up from the supply base to the nearest railhead, where it is met by the mechanical transport and conveyed to the distribution centre, where the regimental horse transports carry it up to the firing line.  The same procedure is followed with regard to ammunition.

An important part of the department’s duties concerns requisitioning and billeting.  There is a Claims Office at General Headquarters, whither the farmers and peasants of the region occupied by the British troops send in their requisition receipts.  Officers are provided with special requisition forms clearly printed in French and English contained in a book, which has a preface with some concise hints as to what an officer may and may not do when requisitioning from the civil population.

The Royal Army Medical Corps has now many motor ambulance convoys, each with 50 ambulance cars and repairing outfits, cars for officers, and motor cyclists, attached to the army in the field.  When a man is wounded he is taken to the regimental aid post which is just behind the firing line, where the regimental doctor, assisted by a corporal and five Red Cross orderlies, there tends to him.  He is then sent down by horse ambulance to the field hospital, whence he is removed by a motor ambulance to the casualty clearing station.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THE FLIES AS A DISEASE CARRIERS.  Medical authorities are urging the importance of a more energetic campaign than ever against flies in the coming spring.  It is pointed out that the existence of military encampments in all parts of the country must inevitably tend to provide breeding places for these pests, and where troops are billeted in cottages, where sanitary arrangements are primitive, the conditions must also be very favourable to them.  Another factor favourable to flies if the weather is dry will be the clouds of dust which we must expect in the months ahead were grass has been trampled down and roads cut up.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  MUNITIONS OF WAR.  NO STRIKE AGREEMENT.  THE GOVERNMENT AND DRINK.  The draft of an agreement between the workers’ representatives and the employers regarding the output of ammunition and equipment was published last night.  The important terms are: – Free employment of women’s labour.  No restrictions on output for the duration of the war.  In the meantime the government has decided that the profits of armament works shall not exceed 10 per cent during the war and that any surplus shall go to the state.  Mr. Lloyd George addressed the delegates on the excessive drinking among several certain sections of workmen in particular districts throughout the country.  He announced that the Government had under consideration the question of limiting the hours in these areas, and that they would be glad of the views of the conference on their suggestion to allow public houses to open only between 12.00 p.m. and 2.00 p.m. and 7 o’clock to 9 in the evening.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THE WON’T WORKS.  AN ENGLISH TOWN’S PRIDE AND SHAME.  The pride of Sunderland is its claim to be the biggest shipbuilding town in the world; the shame of Sunderland is its large body of shirkers, and that shame is paraded openly and almost ostentatiously in the main streets of the town, says a Times special correspondent.

“At 10.00 a.m. there are hundreds of men, hands in pockets, slouching idly along in little groups, standing talking at street corners, most of them smoking – many of them able bodied men of military age, and a fair proportion of older men, still capable of good work.  “Who are they?”  I asked a young constable.  “Wont works” was the laconic reply.  I put the same question later to an employer.  “My men, many of them,” he answered bitterly, “The Government work is being delayed because they’re taking a holiday.”

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  PATRIOTIC TYRONE POSTMEN.  Enthusiastic scenes were witnessed at Omagh Railway Station on Monday morning, when 11 postmen and post office officials left to join the Post Office Rifles.  The contingent, which consisted of six men from Omagh, four from Dromore and one from Castlederg, left by the 12.39 train for Dublin, and received a great send off from a large crowd of townspeople and their fellow employees of the Post Office.

 

Fermanagh Herald 27th March, 1915.  LICENCED PREMISES IN THE TOWN OF TEMPO FOR SALE.  I have received instructions from the executor of the late owner Mr. Bernard Maguire to sell by public auction on the premises at 1.00 sharp on Monday, the 29th of March, 1915 those valuable premises at present occupied by Mr. Bernard Breen and situated on the Main Street, Tempo subject to a head rent of £3.00 per annum.  The  property consists of a spacious two Storey dwelling house having four rooms on the first floor and five rooms on the second floor, a cellar 40 feet by 20 feet divided into three apartments and fitted throughout with an Electric Lighting System.  The out offices which are extensive and in good repair, consist of ample stabling accommodation, a byre, coach house, etc..  There is also a neat little garden attached.  The entire premises, which are now in occupation of Mr. Bernard Breen as yearly tenant, paying £12 15s yearly rent are well adapted to a Posting Establishment.  Tempo is a very progressive little town and has a good weekly market and a monthly fair.

 

Fermanagh Herald 27th March, 1915.  A REMARKABLE ENNISKILLEN MAN, JOHN MULLANPHY served in the Irish Brigade in France and later created a Cotton Corner in America.  John and Mullanphy was a pioneer in American commerce in cotton and came from Ireland in 1792 as an emigrant with his wife and a year old child.  He was born near Enniskillen, Co., Fermanagh in 1758 and at 20 he went to France and enlisted in the famous Irish Brigade in which he served until the Revolution drove him back to Ireland.  The emigrants remained a year in Philadelphia, and then went to Baltimore, where Mullanphy prospered in business until in 1799 he pushed further west to Frankfurt, Kentucky.  Here his store became the trading centre of the section, and his house the hospitable refuge of the missionaries who visited this district from time to time to minister to the scattered Catholics settled in the neighbourhood.

Mullanphy’s service in France had enabled him to learn the language of that country and St. Louis was then a French settlement. In 1804 Mullanphy fell in with one of its founders, Charles Gratiot, who persuaded him to locate in St. Louis.  As he spoke French he was soon at home there and the store he opened on Second Street was an object of wonder.  He had 15 children, eight of whom lived and continued his benefactions.  His only son, Bryan, who died a bachelor, in 1851, was Mayor of St. Louis in 1847.  Bryan Mullanphy’s will left one third of his estate, about $200,000, to a trust fund, “to furnish relief to all poor emigrants passing through St. Louis to settle in the West.”

John Mullanphy’s name is recalled to the St. Louis of today by the Mullanphy Hospital and the Mullanphy Orphanage Asylum as that of his daughter, Mrs. Anne Biddle is preserved in the Biddle Home and St., Anne’s Foundling Asylum. His life in St. Louis was one long deed of charity.