Fermanagh Herald 1942.

24-10-1942. BAD ENNISKILLEN “BLACK-OUT” COURT CASES. “I had a letter from the A.R.P. authorities, saying the black-out in Enniskillen is no use, and we will have to take  sterner measures,” said Head Constable Poots at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, when a number .of householders were summoned for blackout offences. Major Dickie, R.M., inquired what the A.R.P. authorities exactly meant. Head Constable Poots said the A.R.P. authorities complained of lights from buildings, and particularly lights from the rear of buildings. The black-out at the rear of buildings was very bad. That had necessitated him putting extra men on duty at night to inspect the rear of premises to locate the lights. It was a very difficult job sometimes. The result of this tightening-up of the regulations would result in there being far more of these prosecutions for the next Court. In the cases before the Court the following decisions were announced: — Mary Heslin, The Brook, .Probation of Offenders Act; Mary McCaffrey, 2 Militia Barracks; 10/6 and costs; Margaret Dooris, 11 Eden St., 10/- and costs; Alfred Dickson, 6 Abbey St., 5/- and costs; Michael Byrne, Old Bonded Stores, 5/- and costs; George P. Haggins; 25 Strand St., 5/- and costs. Constables W. R. Allen and W. H. Walker were the complainants, and Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solicitor, represented two of the defendants.

24-10-1942. NO INTEREST. COMPLAINT AGAINST SCHOOL ATTENDANCE COMMITTEES. Mr. C. McKeown complained at Fermanagh Regional Education Committee on Friday that some school attendance committees were taking no interest in the attendance of the children at school. He asked when did the Roslea attendance committee meet? The secretary (Mr. Maguire); said he could not say. It was some time since he had a report. He knew of a number of cases in which sub-committees did not seem to take an interest in the school attendance in their districts. He had from time to time received reports that it had been practically impossible to obtain a quorum therefore there was no means of dealing with school attendance. Mr. McKeown said the Act was practically 50 years in existence, making attendance compulsory, yet they had districts in Fermanagh that were taking practically no interest in it. There should be some remedy. It was very discreditable in these days. Lord Belmore—We appoint these committees. We should put off those that do not attend.

24-10-1942. CHEAP MILK FOR ALL SCHOOL CHILDREN. MINISTRY’S CIRCULAR TO FERMANAGH COMMITTEE. A circular letter from the Ministry of Education informed Fermanagh Regional Committee on Friday that schools—primary, secondary, junior commercial, junior and technical—can obtain milk for children at the .rate of one-third of a pint per day, the child to bear half of the cost. Milk would .be supplied to the schools by any local supplier at Is per .gallon and the remainder of the cost would be paid for by the Ministry of Agriculture.

24-10-1942. BAZAAR GOODS SEIZED. SEQUEL AT LISNASKEA COURT. At Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Nellie McGovern, Derrynanny, was summoned for having, on 14th April, knowingly harboured 13 men’s shirts, 20 pairs of assorted ladies’ dress material, six pieces of artificial silk, five children’s frocks, one child’s blouse, one pair of silk stockings, and one lady’s nightdress, imported from the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted and Mr. Baldwin Murphy, solicitor, defended.

Sergt. Kirkpatrick told of the finding of the goods in a tin trunk at defendant’s house, which, he searched following information received. In a statement to him, defendant said she was President of the Women’s Committee in connection with the Catholic bazaar in Newtownbutler, and following the bazaar on 17th March, she brought the goods in question to her house as they had not been sold. These goods had been given as gifts to raise funds for the new church. Cross-examined, witness said that at first defendant told him she had no goods of the kind he was inquiring about in the house, but later said she had stuff belonging to the bazaar. She told him the committee meetings in Drumlone School had not been very well attended. Reginald Allen said the shirts were of Japanese manufacture, the importation of which had been, prohibited in the Six Counties since Japan’s entry into the war. Mrs. McGovern, in evidence, said she was President of the Catholic Bazaar Committee, and the goods in question had been gathered into the trunk at different times. Before the box came to her it had been in Drumlone School, where the committee meetings had not been well attended. His Honour said he was prepared to grant defendant a dismiss on the harbouring summons, but he must make the order for forfeiture.

24-10-1942. WALLPAPER AND WOOL. Edward Whelan and his wife, Mary Whelan, Lisnaskea, were summoned for knowingly, harbouring 13 rolls of wallpaper and 32 ozs. of wool imported from, the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. A. Herbert, solicitor, defended. Sergt. Kirkpatrick gave evidence of the seizure at defendants’ house, and said Mr. Whelan denied all responsibility. In all he found 121 ozs. of wool, but only seized 32 ozs. Mrs. Whelan said she got the wool from various drapers in Lisnaskea and Enniskillen. Mrs. Whelan said she brought the wallpaper in a suitcase from the Twenty-Six Counties about a year ago and was not examined by the Customs’ official on the train. It only cost 13/-. The wool, had been obtained in Six-County shops. His Worship said the Customs must prove the intent to evade payment of Customs duty as mentioned in the summons. Mr. Cooper said these prohibited goods had been bought in the Twenty-Six Counties and brought across the Border. His Worship – But if she was not aware they were dutiable? Mr. Cooper cited the case of a London cabby who was held liable for a man he had taken in his cab at London docks. His Worship said that since Mr. Cooper had introduced his cab he must convict as regards the wallpaper. He imposed a fine of £3 saying she might have been fined £100,

24-10-1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER COURT CASES. TURF-STEALING CHARGE. MOTORIST SAYS FINE “1S A BIT SEVERE.” At Newtownbutler Court, before Major Dickie, R.M., Thomas McCarney, labourer, Clonagun, Newtownbutler, was charged with the larceny of a quantity of turf, the property of Thomas Storey, Clontivern. Thos. Storey, in evidence, stated he had bog at Clonagun and discovered some of his turf being stolen. On the night of Sept. 27th he went to his bog and put a private mark on some of the turf which he had in clamps. On Sept. 28th he found some of the turf missing. He reported the matter to the police at Newtownbutler, and later accompanied Const. Ferguson to Carney’s house, where they found half a bag of turf in the kitchen. He picked out some of the turf (produced) which had his mark on them. Const. Ferguson corroborated. Defendant, in evidence, stated he was going to work and there was no turf in the house. If he had not taken the turf his wife and children would have no fire until he came back. District Inspector Smyth said there was an epidemic of turf-stealing in the district. This man had five horse loads stolen. Major Dickie—I will have to start sending people to prison, for these offences. He imposed a fine of 40/s and said if I there had been anything against defendant before he would have put on a much heavier penalty.

DRUNK IN CHARGE. John McCarroll, hackney owner, Lisnaskea, was charged with being drunk in charge of a motor car on October 1.1th. Defendant admitted the offence. Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, gave evidence, and Dr. James Dolan, Newtownbutler, stated he examined defendant, who was so far under the influence of drink as to be incapable of driving a car. Defendant told the Court he had been driving some soldiers and had some drink, but did not think he was incapable of driving. Major Dickie said there was a minimum penalty in these cases. He imposed a fine of £5, with £2 12s 6d, costs, and suspended defendant’s licence for 12 months. He fixed sureties in the event of an appeal. Defendant—I will appeal the case. Major Dickie—But you admit the offence. Defendant—I think that is a bit severe. Major Dickie—But that is the minimum penalty. Defendant—I don’t think I was incapable of driving. Major Dickie—No judge can impose a smaller penalty. If you appeal, I am afraid it would be a waste of time and money. Defendant said he was not in the habit of taking drink, and had driven all over the world. District Inspector Smyth, said it was much too dangerous to have people driving while under the influence of drink. Major Dickie said he would allow defendant to drive until his appeal was heard, but he did not know whether the appeal was wise or not.

24-10-1942. APPELLANT WAS DEAD. NEWTOWNBUTLER CASE UNUSUAL SITUATION. An unusual situation arose at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Wednesday when an appeal case was called in which Hugh Connolly, of Derrysteaton Island, appealed, against a £12 fine for harbouring 10 cwts. of sulphate of ammonia. Mr, V. G. Patterson, solicitor, who had represented Connolly at the Petty Sessions hearing, said the appellant was dead. He had been dead ten days at his island home before being found. Judge Ellison said perhaps the case could be adjourned. Mr. J. Cooper (for the respondent Customs authorities) —I don’t know how you can adjourn the case of a dead man. Judge—There must be some means of correcting an obvious error. Mr. Cooper—Nothing can happen – just strike out the appeal. Judge—If the fine is not paid he cannot be imprisoned which was the alternative. Could the £12 not be levied by distress on his property irrespective of his, death? Mr. Cooper -You cannot levy it on the goods of a dead man. We would not attempt to do it anyhow. Mr. Patterson—If they don’t do that and don’t attempt to follow Mr. Connolly, nothing further will happen. A constable of police from the locality said the dead man had no stock. A brother-in-law was looking after the farm, but nobody was living on it. Mr. Cooper said it would be different if Mr. Patterson said he was going to take out probate and continue the appeal, but he simply came and said he had no instructions. Mr. Patterson—The man was ten days dead before he was found. Judge—Could the Crown not claim it was a creditor? Mr. Patterson said he thought not in this case. The matter was adjourned.

24-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN MARKET, ENNISKILLEN, Tuesday—Pork, 45 carcases; potatoes, 4s 3d per cwt.; straw, 4s per cwt.; hens, 1s to Is 3d per lb.; chickens. Is 4d to Is 6d per lb.; rabbits, 7d to 8d per lb.

24-10-1942. DERRYLIN BURGLARY.“The monotony of their present service got on their nerves and they decided to desert with the intention of joining the Air Force from ‘Eire’ ” said Mr. E. Ferguson at Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday when he was defending two soldiers of the Royal Engineers, Gerard Fitzgerald and Leslie Fuller, who pleaded guilty to having on 11th August, 1942, broken and entered the dwelling house at Cloghan of Dr. S. J. McQuaid, M.O.H., Derrylin, and stolen two gent’s shirts, two pullovers, one gent’s sports jacket, one pair gent’s trousers, one gent’s lounge jacket and two pairs of gent’s socks, the property of Dr. McQuaid.

Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, said there were no convictions of any sort against Fitzgerald, Fuller was convicted on 21st August, 1935, for attempted housebreaking and larceny at Wealdstone Juvenile Court and put under a rule of bail. On 2nd July, 1936, at Middlesex Quarter Sessions he was sent to Borstal for three years. He was later convicted of being an Army deserter. Mr. Ferguson said both accused belonged to the Royal Engineers. Fitzgerald was 21 years of age in July last and before the war was an aircraft worker at Bristol. He joined the Army at 17, although, he was in a reserved service. Fuller was 23 years of age and had been in the Army since the outbreak of war. Although the pair had made repeated applications to get away from the Royal Engineers because of their peacetime occupations, one being an aircraft worker and the other a plumber, they had been refused. They applied to join the commandos but were refused. Wishing to join the Air Force from across the border, they needed civilian, clothes and this caused the offence. They went into the doctor’s house, found no one in and took these clothes. All the clothes had been returned and the only thing broken was one window. Since the offence, the men had been tea weeks in jail and as far as Fitzgerald was concerned he had expiated his crime and it would be a shame if he had to go to jail again. He asked that they should be allowed to go back to the Army where they would be of more use than in jail. Deputy Judge Ellison discharged Fitzgerald under the Probation Act. He bound over Fuller in £10 to keep the peace for two years. Both men were ordered to be detained pending the arrival of a military escort.

24-10-1942. £4 DECREE FOR ASSAULT. IRVINESTOWN MAN’S CLAIM. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, William John Swanson, of Drumbulcan, Irvinestown, sued James Farrell, of same place, for £5 damages for assault. The claim was not defended. Mr. A. Herbert (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented the plaintiff, who said that on 24th July last he was in the townland of Drumbulkin, and had his bicycle with him. He was at the foot of a hill and had dismounted from the machine to walk up the hill. Farrell came out of the house as witness passed and shouted. Witness looked round to see what defendant was talking about and Farrell struck him on the jaw and tumbled him on his back right over the bicycle. As a result, his jaw swelled and he was not able to take his food. Defendant was a forty-acre farmer with fairly good land. A decree for £4 was given with 2s 6d expenses,

24-10-1942. GOOD ATTENDANCE OF JURORS. When out of 102 petty jurors summoned for Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday, it transpired that only one was absent without explanation, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., said the attendance was very good indeed. “I have never heard a jury list before on which so many names were answered,” he added.

REDUCTION IN FINE. NEWTOWNBUTLER MAN’S APPEAL. Hugh P. Maguire, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, appealed at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday against two fines of £50 each imposed at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions in respect of (1) for failing to stop his car at the Border when called upon to do so, and (2) for exporting prohibited, goods. By consent, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., affirmed both convictions, but the fine for failing to stop the car was reduced to £40. Defendant applied for and was given six weeks in which to pay the £90.

24-10-1942. GLANGEVLIN VOCATIONAL SCHOOL. DECISION TO RE-OPEN IT. At the meeting of County Cavan Vocational Education Committee Mr. J. J. Gleeson presided. The Office of Public Works wrote that as Glangevlin School was not in use they were prepared to take it on lease from the committee for a period of ten years. Mr. McGovern proposed, that they reopen the school. Mr. P. Smith said it was a shame to have the school closed. The application was refused it was decided to take steps to have the school reopened.

24-10-1942. BORDER INCIDENT. BELFAST MAN FINED £100 AT CLONES. At Clones District Court before District Justice Lavery, Patrick McIlduff, whose address was given as English St. Belfast, and who was described as a bookmaker, was charged with on May 19, 1941, at Glasslough, Co. Monaghan, exporting prohibited goods consisting of wearing apparel and also rescuing the goods seized by a Customs official. Defendant was fined £100 on the charge of exporting and £1 on the charge of rescuing, and the fines were paid into court immediately. Evidence was given by Customs Officer Lynn of following a motor-car to the Tyrone border. When he arrived he saw defendant standing by the car along with the driver. He examined the car and found two parcels in it. A man came across the Border and seized one of the parcels and took it away with him across the Border. Defendant took up the other parcel and went across the Border with it. He had no doubt it was defendant who took one of the parcels away. Defendant said he knew nothing about the parcels in the car. He had some drink taken.

24-10-1942. CATTLE DEALER’S CLAIM. £12 DECREE AT ENNISKILLEN. In an undefended civil bill at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, John Elliott, 1 Victoria Terrace, Enniskillen,  cattle-dealer, sued Thomas Gallagher, Aghoo, Garrison, for £26, plaintiff alleging that defendant’s warranty in the sale of a heifer was contrary to the facts. Plaintiff said he paid £21 for the heifer on 12th August last, when, defendant said she had cleaned after calving. It transpired, however, he said, that she had not cleaned, and he had to pay £2 for medicine for her. She lost her milk and was now worth only £13. Defendant went to see the animal and promised to take her back. He did not do so, and when plaintiff saw him, again and mentioned the matter he told plaintiff to “make the best of it.” Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., gave plaintiff a decree for £13, plaintiff to retain the animal.

24-10-1942. FOUR MONTHS FOR ASSAULT. At Enniskillen Criminal Sessions Wm. Hynes, Nugent’s Entry, Enniskillen, was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment on a charge to which he pleaded guilty, of assaulting a girl of under thirteen years. He had been found not guilty of a serious charge against the child.

24-10-1942. PETTIGO NOTES. Mr. Patrick Chaucer, Customs officer at Pettigo Customs frontier post, is to be transferred to Clones. Mr. Chaucer since coming to the village has been a very popular young man. He is a keen athlete who took a prominent part in all the local games. He is being replaced in Pettigo by Mr. Denis Bradley.

On Sunday morning while on duty in the vicinity of Termon Creamery, near the Grouselodge border, Constables Mathers and Robinson, R.U.C., seized a quantity of tea, margarine and rice from a young man. The constables removed the goods to Tullyhommon R.U.C. station.

During the week, R.U.C. from Tullyhommon, Pettigo, were successful in tracing and .recovering, a heifer which had been missing from the farm, of Mr. Robt. Brandon, Glenvannon, near Pettigo.

On Sunday, Sergt. Bradley, R.U.C., when on patrol in the townland of Camplagh observed a man carrying a parcel and coming from the Donegal border. The man bolted leaving the parcel behind which contained woollen blankets.

31-10-1942. GIRL ESCAPES JAIL. £50 FINE SUBSTITUTED FOR PRISON SENTENCE. A pretty, well-dressed young woman, Elizabeth Hal, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, escaped a three months’ prison sentence by appealing to Newtownbutler  Quarter Sessions in Enniskillen on Wednesday. She had been sentenced at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions for dealing in prohibited goods, namely, four loaves, a carton of soap and 3½ lbs. flake meal. Mr. A. J. Belford (instructed by Mr. F. J. Patterson, solicitor) represented defendant. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown, Solicitor, for the Customs authorities, said the amount of goods involved was very small, their value being 3/-. On the 18th November, 1941, appellant was fined £3 for dealing in prohibited goods—18 loaves—and also £36 for exporting three tons of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. Cooper was proceeding to tell Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., of the ambushes carried out by, the police on three different days in April, 1942, when Mr. Belford interpolated and said his submission was that that evidence had been wrongly admitted by the magistrate in the Court below, no charge in respect of these allegations having been made. Mr. Cooper said the police had seen people, seventy-five in number, going to and. from the shop, bringing goods into the Free State. Judge – Illegally across the border? Mr. Cooper—Yes. Judge—Why didn’t you prosecute them?

Mr. Belford pointed out that the solicitor for appellant at the Petty Sessions objected to that evidence on the ground that no prosecution had been brought against those people. Mr. Cooper explained that the shop was on the very border and it was practically impossible to catch the offenders. In this particular case the policeman had to run after a woman; he grabbed the bag she was carrying but was unable to get a hold of her. The constable brought the goods back to appellant’s shop and she pleaded guilty. At the Petty Sessions he (Mr, Cooper.) was instructed to press for imprisonment, and his Worship said to her: “I have seen you before’ and sentenced her to three months. Mr. Belford said imprisonment in the case would be rather harsh as appellant was only twenty-five years old. Before the introduction of rationing, three- quarters of her customers were from over the border, and while he frankly admitted there might have been some irregularities, it was true to say she did not realise the enormity of the offences. She had been more or less out of business since her Ministry of Food licence had been withdrawn by the Lisnaskea Food Control Committee. She was now only allowed to sell some hardware and clothes, and she was contemplating giving up the business she had carried on for seven years. That being so, the police would be given no further trouble. Like many other border residents, she did not seem to realise the seriousness of smuggling and she had already been heavily punished by her livelihood being taken away. Mr. Cooper thought the licence was merely suspended pending his Honour’s decision. Mr. Belford said appellant would submit to a fairly substantial penalty in order to avoid the sentence, which would be likely to have unpleasant consequences for her in after life.

31-10-1942. YOUNG BOYS ON LARCENY CHARGES. ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions ion Friday three young boys pleaded guilty before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., to having on 26th July, 1942, broken and entered the shop of William H. Creighton, Church St., Enniskillen, and stolen chocolate and sweets to the value of £1 6s 6d. One of the above-mentioned boys and another boy pleaded guilty to breaking and entering the shop of Thomas Wilson, Garvary, between 11.55 p.m. on 13th Aug. and 3 a.m. on 14th August, and stealing two bicycle free wheels value 11s, pair pliers value Is 6d, 3½ doz. safety razor blades value 7s, two pocket torches value 3s, two fountain pens value 5s, one pair opera glasses value 15s and five bottles lemonade, value 3s 8d.

The boy twice charged, above also pleaded guilty to stealing a bicycle value £5, the property of Harold Cleary, on 20th July. Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented all accused. All the boys were very young and had respectable parents. None had. any previous convictions involving dishonesty. In two of the cases he mentioned that one boy had been earning £3 18s 0d weekly at public works at the age of 15. Another at the same age had been earning almost £5 weekly. This work stopped and the boys were running about with nothing to do. There was no proper control over the boys since the wages terminated until they had settled down again and got used to living with little or no money.

The Judge, sternly warning the boys of what would happen should they ever again be guilty of a similar offence, allowed them off on entering, or their parents’ entering into recognisances in £10 for their good behaviour. An order was made for the return of the stolen property, and £1 found in the possession of the boy who stole the bicycle was ordered to be handed to Cleary to compensate for a coat on the bicycle that was still missing. Mr. Creighton, said Mr. Cooper, was at the loss of the chocolate, which was buried and was rendered unfit. Asked whether he wanted compensation, by Mr. Herbert, who said the parents of the boy involved were very poor. Mr. Creighton said he did not. The Judge highly commended Mr. Creighton for his charitable attitude.

31-10-1942. ARTIFICIAL MANURE ON BORDER ISLAND. APPEAL AGAINST £12 FINE FAILS. At Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday, before Deputy Judge Ellison William Atwell, of Derrysteaton, appealed against a fine of £12 for the harbouring of a quantity of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. V. G. Patterson represented the appellant, and Mr. J. Cooper appeared for the respondent Customs Authorities. Constable Duffy said in an unoccupied house on Gallon Island belonging to defendant, while on boat patrol on Lough Erne, he found eight bags containing 16 cwt. of sulphate of ammonia. The house was approachable in summer time from the shore, but at this time of the year (February) could only be approached by boat. From the point of the island it was only 50 yards across Lough Erne to the 26 counties. In a statement defendant said he bought the ammonia in Newtownbutler for his own, use. It was the only ammonia he had bought that year. Witness discovered on enquiring at the shop where the purchase was made that the latter statement was untrue.

Cross-examined, witness said Mr. Anderson, manager of the Newtownbutler shop which supplied the stuff, said in a statement that on the 5th January defendant ordered a ton of sulphate of ammonia, took half of it that, day, and the remaining half the next day, and paid for it on the second day. Mr. Patterson—You got it in February, he got it in January; if he had wanted to get it across the Border there would have been no difficulty? –No difficulty. Even when taking it to his house he has to go along the shore of the Free State?—Yes. The Ministry actually urged people to get artificial manures early.—Yes.

Mr. Cooper—Atwell’s statement to you was that he had bought 16 cwt.?—Yes. It could be bought for about £12 a ton .here; what was the price in “Eire ?” —The price at the time was as much as £60. So it would be very profitable to get it across these few yards?—Yes. And 4 cwts. of this ammonia was missing?—Yes. George Dixon, Surveyor of Customs and Excise, stated on information from the police as to defendant’s probable requirements for his own cropping, he allowed 6 cwt. to the defendant, and had the remainder seized. Mr. Patterson—Did you know that he was treating for the purchase of another 40-acre farm?—No. And that he would require fertiliser for it?—No. Will you say you knew 6 cwt. was enough for his forty-acre farm, on Derrysteaton, and another 40-acre farm he was going to purchase?—I acted on information from the police. They did not know what he was going to crop?—They knew what he had cropped the previous year. Mf. Cooper—You don’t allocate fertiliser for a farm he has not bought? — No. Mr. Patterson said when he got his potato subsidy from the Government he received a notice stating that the Ministry had arranged for the importation of sufficient supplies of sulphate of ammonia to meet the needs of farmers, but it was most important that farmers should order immediately and where possible take delivery. “It is most important. Act now” stated the notice. Atwell followed that advice. He had 60 acres on Derrysteaton or heavy wet land, and required a quick acting fertilizer.

31-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN’S £200 PRIZE. When Enniskillen Urban Council met on Monday evening to allocate the prize money of £300 won in the recent waste paper salvage competition, a letter was read from Omagh Urban Council, congratulating the Council on winning a £200 prize. ‘The successful collection of waste paper,” stated the letter “requires great effort, organisation and co-operation of the townspeople, and your success shows that you had these three factors.” Mr. T. Algeo thought the County Hospital was the first consideration of the Council, as it catered for all creeds and classes, and he proposed that the Hospital get half of the prize money. Mr. P. Kelly seconded. Mr. T. Devine—I quite agree with Mr. Algeo that our County Hospital has our first claim, but there are a number of other institutions and organisations which 1 think have claims on you also. He proposed that the money be allocated as follows, County Hospital, £60; Enniskillen Nursing Society, £25: Enniskillen Council for Social. Service, £25; Soldiers’, Sailors’ and Airmen’s Association, £25; Inniskillings Comforts Fund, £25; £15 each to the Women’s Section, British Legion and the Earl Haig Fund; and £10 to the Ulster Gift Fund. Mr. W. H. Creighton seconded. Mr- W. J. Monaghan—Have the charities attached to the various churches received any consideration from you in these matters? Chairman, (Senator Whaley)—I don’t think they have been consulted in this matter at all

Mr. Monaghan said they were coming on to winter, and .he thought the various churches should get some little help for their funds, so that they could assist the poor people by either way of coal or other relief that they may be pleased to give to the people. “You have the outlook of a very severe winter; something should be done for these people,” he added. Mr. J. Donnelly (Borough Surveyor) said he had been consulted on the matter when it had been suggested that the St. Vincent De Paul Society should get £20, but this Society was in the most fortunate position that it had ever been in—that they had sufficient money at the present time. They were well able to carry on and meet the demands of the next couple of years or more. Mr. W. J. B. Lee said if they gave all the money to the County Hospital everybody would benefit, and he proposed that it all go to the County Hospital. Mr. Monaghan—It is a State-aided institution.  Mr. Devine—Speaking for the Church I represent, so far as I know they are not in need of any funds. Mr. Monaghan—That satisfies me. Mr. Algeo then altered his proposal and propose that the Hospital get £100 and he asked the Chairman to take a written vote “to see who was for the County Hospital or not.”

Mr. W. E. Johnston—I object to Mr. Algeo’s statement—“to see who is for the County Hospital or not.” Mr. Algeo—I demand a written vote on it. Mr. Johnston–You can have any vote on it you like. Mr. Devine said he would not like it to go out that this was a vote for and against the County Hospital. Mr. J. Logan thought that Mr. Devine’s motion should be passed unanimously. They had always the churches with them and they had always the poor with them, and likely to have them.

31-10-1942. MINOR HALL BOOKINGS DISCUSSED AT ENNISKILLEN URBAN COUNCIL. Enniskillen Urban Council discussed at length, at a special meeting on Monday evening an application from, the Six-County Council for Social Service for the use of the Minor Hall for .at least one night per week as a club for young people, and also for the taking over by them of a small plot of ground, the Council’s property, abutting on the road adjoining Mill Street and the Irvinestown Road us a juvenile recreation centre. The Chairman (Senator Whaley) asked had the Council a room to spare. Town Clerk (Mr. A. W. Ritchie) — For the next two or three months it is booked. Mr. T. Algeo—Haven’t you a resolution on the books that the Minor Hall is closed for three months? Chairman—After present bookings. The Town Clerk said if there was a fixed night each week it would be very difficult. The Minor Hall went usually with the main hall, when the latter was booked for dances.

Mr. Devine— They cannot surely book; up the hall for three months ahead. Mr. J. Logan proposing that Saturday night be granted to the Social Services in the Minor Hall, said all through the week the young people were engaged at their lessons, and it would be a shame to take them away from these to attend a club. The presence of the boys attending in the hall would help to purify the atmosphere. That would be a disappointment to some people. They would miss (the “hop.” The people would also miss the bottles of a Sunday morning. It would do the town a lot of good if they had the young boys in the ball on a Saturday night. There was very seldom a big function in the hall on a Saturday night; therefore, that night would not clash with any other people. He meant this arrangement to start from 1st January. Mr. Algeo seconded. Mr. Devine— We want it before January. Saturday night would not suit. The Town Clerk read a list of bookings of the Minor Hall for some weeks to come which, showed that the same three groups of people have the hall on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, respectively, of each week for some time in advance. Mr. Devine—Shilling “hops.” The Town Clerk said Saturday night was “Football.” Mr. McKeown— What football; there are several football clubs. Town Clerk—I cannot tell you the name of it. Mr. Devine—Corinthian Football Club. Everyone knows it. There is no secret about it. Town Clerk— It is difficult to get a night. Mr. Devine asked Mr. Logan, not to press his motion, because he did not think Saturday night would suit the Social Services. Mr. Logan—Saturday night is the best. The pictures have the main hall, so that there would only be the two parties here. It is all the same to me. Boys always strolled about the streets for an hour or two on that night, he said. Mr. Johnston—Country boys go home. Mr. Logan-The shops are closed earlier

7-11-1942. TRAGIC DEATH OF JAS. A. JONES, ROYAL HOTEL. POISONED BY GAS FUMES IN BEDROOM. Enniskillen got a profound shock on Tuesday with the news of the death that morning of Mr. James A. Jones, popular proprietor of the Royal Hotel, Enniskillen and one of the best-known auctioneers in the North-West. Only the previous evening Mr. Jones had been seen in the best of health and spirits, on his daily walk, and it was tragic to think that within little more than twelve hours he was dead. The tragic event was caused by an accident. A gas tap which had served a disused stove in Mr, Jones’ bedroom had been at some time or other inadvertently turned on. Mr. Jones was resting in bed after his morning cup of tea when the meter serving that pipe and tap was again turned on by the Gas Company’s fitter after having been off for some time. The fitter was unaware of the pipe leading to the bedroom. The turning on of the gas filled Mr. Jones’ room with gas. The window was closed and when the alarm was raised and the doctor arrived, he found Mr. Jones unconscious. He died after a short time. .

An Enniskillen man, Mr. Jones was a member of a popular and much-esteemed family. His brother Frank, a former Superintendent of the Garda Siochana, died less than two years ago in Dublin, where he was the proprietor of the Beresford Hotel. Another, sister, now deceased was a member of the Convent .of Mercy community Newry. The only surviving member of the family is Miss Josephine Jones, who lived at the Hotel with the deceased, gentleman. It was she who first raised the alarm. To her, in her sorrow, the sincere sympathy of the whole community goes out.

The late Mr. Jones, who was aged 59 years, started life as a clerk in the office of the late Mr. Robert W. Wilson, auctioneer, in the present premises of the Royal Hotel. . He became an auctioneer himself in Mr. Wilson’s employment, and on Mr. Wilson’s death succeeded him. He built up for himself one of the most extensive auctioneering practices in the North. He later became the proprietor of the Royal Hotel, and in both capacities he was as popular as he was-well-known. He entertained some of the leading personalities of Ireland in every sphere.

Mr. Jones was a good-living Catholic gentleman, who attended regularly to his religious duties. Although unmarried, he had a wonderful regard and love for children, a love for little ones shared by every member of his family. In life he had borne many crosses, several members of his family dying within a comparatively short time of one another, but he bore his sorrows bravely, even cheerfully, and was always in high spirits outwardly, whatever sorrows his inner soul might feel. He will be much missed by every creed and class in the town.

THE INQUEST. The sad circumstances of his death were investigated by Mr. G. E. Warren, Coroner, at an inquest in the Hotel on Tuesday. Head Constable Conlin represented the police; Mr. R. A. Herbert, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert), the next of kin, and Mr. Gerald Grant, BL., appeared for the Enniskillen Gas Company.

DOCTOR’S EVIDENCE. Dr. Philip Brady said in response to a telephone massage received at 11 a.m., he went to the Royal Hotel, where he arrived in a few minutes and smelled coal gas. He went, to a bedroom on the first floor and found a strong smell of coal gas in the bedroom. In the bed he found deceased in an unconscious condition but alive. He died a few minutes afterward. He was clad in pyjamas. Death was caused by asphyxia due to coal gas poisoning. Mr. Jones was a patient of witness’s and was suffering from myocarditis in a mild degree; otherwise he was in good health.

WAITER’S STORY. Wm. Brady, waiter, said that morning at 10-30 he was tidying up in the dining room when Miss Jones, sister of the deceased, told him to go up to deceased’s room because she had smelled gas escaping there. When he went into the room he found it full of gas and the gas pipe turned on. He turned off the tap and opened the window. The pipe from which the gas was escaping was not connected to the gas stove in the room and had not been for some time. The gas fire in the room was never used and the tap was on the portion of the pipe leading to the main. He saw deceased in the bed and asked him was he all right, but he made no answer. He felt deceased’s hands and face, and, as he appeared to witness to be unconscious, witness went for Dr. Brady. There was a fitter from the hotel working at the oven in the kitchen that morning. To Mr. Grant, witness said this pipe had been disconnected from the fire for some time, but he did not know who disconnected it.

Mr. Grant-How long had it been in that condition?—I don’t know. Had it ever been reported?—I don’t know, unless Mr. Jones did it. Witness said he did not know when he first noticed that it was cut. He was very seldom in Mr. Jones’s room, except to go occasionally for Mr. Jones’ coat. Mr. Herbert -Is it cut or disconnected? Head Constable—There seems to be six inches of pipe cut away altogether. Witness said, he had not seen the gas stove lit this ages. It was not lit last winter. Patrick Cunningham, boots, said between 9.45 and 10 a.m. that morning he was called by Miss Jones to the Hotel office; In this office were two gas metres, and he was asked by Miss Jones to turn on the gas. She opened the press where the meter was and, as witness knew nothing about them, he refused to turn on the gas. There was a gas man there and he got a wrench and went towards the meter. Witness did not know what he did. There was a gas radiator in the hall of the Hotel, and witness was seven months in the hotel and had never seen it lighted. He heard no conversation between Miss Jones and the fitter. Mr. Grant—Had you ever seen the stove lit in Mr. Jones’ bedroom?—I didn’t even know there was a stove in the bedroom.

IN USUAL GOOD SPIRITS. Michael Rooney, boots, said that about 9-15 a.m. that morning he went to Mr. Jones’ bedroom with his tea. Mr. Jones was in bed and seemed to be in good form. Witness gave him the tea and pulled down the black-out blind. The window was closed. Witness did not go near the gas fire in the room as he did not know it was working. It was usual for Mr. Jones to remain in bed in the morning and have his tea there. Witness never saw the gas fire in the room used. He was in the Hotel since August and never saw the radiator in the hall used. Head, Const. Conlin—Was there any smell of gas when you were in the room? —No. Mr. Jones seemed in his usual health, and spoke to him the same as usual. He made no complaint of any kind. To Mr. Herbert, witness said Mr. Jones took his tea. Coroner—You don’t know whether he got out of bed at all or not?—No, I don’t.

Henry Fox, employed as fitter by the Enniskillen Gas Company, said on this morning about 9 a.m. he was sent by Mr. Lusted, manager of the Gasworks, to the Royal Hotel to have a look at the gas radiator. He arrived at the Hotel at 8-50 a.m. and saw Miss Jones, who pointed out the gas radiator in the hall. She said in reply to witness that that was all in the place. Witness turned on the tap of the radiator, but no gas came. Miss Jones called the Boots to turn on the gas in this meter. As there were two meters in the office the boots was not sure what to do so witness turned on the main cock of the meter serving this radiator. The other meter served the cooking stoves in the kitchen and was fully turned on. Witness was not aware that this meter which he turned on served anything but the hall radiator, so he took the word of Miss Jones for this. He had since made a test of this meter which served the hall radiator and found it also, served the pipe which led to the gas stove in Mr. Jones’ room. He lit the gas in the hall radiator and Miss Jones told him to leave it on as it was cold. He was then brought to the kitchen to look at the cooker. He was not up in Mr. Jones’ bedroom on this visit. Head Constable—If the tap in the pipe in Mr. Jones’ room which was cut had been turned off, could any gas escape? — No, certainly not. It would have been perfectly safe. The pipe was not cut it was disconnected. To Mr. Herbert, witness said he asked Miss Jones were there any others in the place to be seen to, and she said that was all that was in the place. The gas in the hall radiator was still on when he left about twenty minutes past ten a.m.

SISTER’S EVIDENCE. Miss Josephine Jones, who, when the inquest was held at five o’clock, was still confined to bed from the results of the shock, gave her evidence in bed. She said her brother arranged with the Gas Company to attend to the gas in the morning. About ten minutes to ten a man from the Gas Company arrived. Before going to the radiator, the gas man asked her were there any other radiators and she said no. To make sure, she asked the waiter, and he also said ho. She did not remember about the stove in Mr, Jones’ room. It never entered her mind. She called Patrick Cunningham to turn on the meter in the office for the gas man, but he was not able, and the gas man did it himself. After the radiator had been fired, she brought the gas man down to the kitchen to look at the stove there. About 10-30 she smelt gas and went upstairs. She found on entering deceased’s room that it was full of gas. She noticed that her brother did not move as usual, felt his hand and found it cold. She then raised the alarm.

To Mr. Grant, witness said she could not definitely remember whether it was the radiator or gas fittings the gas man said when he asked her were there any others in the house. The tap which was turned on in her brother’s room was on the floor underneath the wash-hand basin, and it could easily have been turned on by someone brushing out the room, or hitting it with their foot when at the basin. Mr. Grant said on behalf of Mr. Lusted and the Gas Company, he extended very sincere sympathy in the terrible tragedy that had happened. The Head Constable and Coroner associated themselves with this expression, of sympathy, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL. B., also joined in the expression of sorrow at Mr. Jones’ tragic passing. He had been a personal friend of Mr. Jones and he was sure the relatives felt the blow very much. The Coroner returned a verdict of death from asphyxia caused by coal-gas poisoning, the result of an accident.

7-11-1942. MILITARY LORRY LIGHTS IN ENNISKILLEN. MAGISTRATE’S COMPLAINT. Complaints concerning glaring headlights of motor vehicles belonging to the military were voiced by Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. His Worship said that recently the whole street of Enniskillen was lit up by army vehicle headlights from end to end, and this was far worse than some of the cases which he had to deal with in Court. Those motor lights could certainly be seen for ten or twelve miles away from the air. He also spoke of the glare from torches. Sergt. John. Codd, R.U.C., said a special report had been made by the police on the subject of lights on army vehicles, but no reply had yet been received. His Worship pointed out that except a light could be seen from an altitude of six hundred feet he would not impose a fine.

One of the cases which fell within this category was brought against an air-raid warden in Enniskillen, and no penalty was inflicted. In another case Head Constable Conlon, prosecuting, said the defendant was aged ninety-three. She kept a boarding-house in Forthill Street and according to the constable she had forgotten to put up the black-out blind. His Worship said it was hard to put a penalty on a law-breaker when she reached the age of ninety three, but he had to do it. A. fine of 5/- and costs was ordered. Similar fines were imposed in a number of other summonses.

7-11-1942. PRISONERS ESCAPE FROM MOUNTJOY GAOL. The following statement was issued by the “Eire” Government Information Bureau on Tuesday; “Six prisoners serving sentences imposed by the Special Military Court escaped from Mountjoy Prison on the evening of November 1.”

 

 

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1942. October. Fermanagh Herald.

17-10-1942.LICENSING PROSECUTION FAILS. IRVINESTOWN CASE. All five summonses issued in a licensing case heard at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday were dismissed by Major Dickie, R.M. The licensee Mrs. Elizabeth M. Shutt, was summoned on the usual five counts and her husband for aiding and abetting. Three men found on the premises were also defendants. D.I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL. B., defended. Constable Wright gave evidence that at 12.15 a.m. on 30th Sept. they heard noises in the kitchen of the licensed premises and at 12.20 were admitted by the licensee’s husband who said he invited the men in for a chat to await the return of the licensee who was at a dance. Two of the men had drink in front of them. Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness said the bar was closed and everything was in order. Constable Bradley corroborated. Giving evidence, the licensee’s husband said this wife was out at a dance and while awaiting her return, at one o’clock he invited three friends of his for a chat. The drink they had had been left out early in the .night for himself, and no money was paid for it. The bar had not even been opened to get it. After further evidence, the R.M. said he did not think there was any evidence and the explanation given was reasonable. He dismissed all the cases.

17-10-1942. TEN YEARS’ IMPRISONMENT. AMERICAN SOLDIERS’ SENTENCED. There was a dramatic conclusion to the General Court-Martial in Co. Down on Pte. Herbert G. Jacobs, aged 23, Kentucky, and Pte. Embra H. Farley, aged 27, of Arkansas, who were accused of the murder of Edward Clenaghan, of Soldierstown, Aghalee, who died in Lurgan hospital on September 23, shortly after being found with, head injuries, on the roadside near his mother’s public-house in Soldierstown, when at the end of the case for the prosecution, the defending officer stated that he would call no evidence for the defence. Following short statements by the officer for the prosecution and for the defence, the Court was closed. Within a few moments it reassembled to hear evidence of the character and military career of each of the accused, following which each of the accused was found guilty of manslaughter, and sentenced to 10 years’ imprisonment. The court consisted of four colonels and four lieutenant-colonels.

17-10-1942. CAVAN HALL BURNED. Killadoon Hall, situated in the Loughduff area of Mullahoran (County Cavan) Parish and erected by free labour in 1924, has been destroyed by fire. It was constructed of iron and timber with boarded floor seats and stage, and used as a meeting place by the local football club, L.D.F., Red Cross, etc.

17-10-1942.STORY OF ENNISKILLEN TRAGEDY BABY FOUND WITH THROAT CUT. MISSING MOTHER RESPONSIBLE WHILE INSANE. That five months old Claire Henderson died front shock and haemorrhage as the result of a wound inflicted on the throat with a carving knife by her mother while the latter was apparently, temporarily insane, was the verdict of a jury on Friday at the resumed inquest on the baby which had been found at 5.45 p.m. on the 24th Sept. lying dead on the settee in the sitting room of its parents temporary home 3, Erne View, Enniskillen, by its father Major Edward Henderson. Head-Constable Poots represented the police. Mr. B. L. Winslow appeared for Major Henderson and Mr. G. E. Warren, coroner, conducted the proceedings. Mr. W. F. Dewane was jury foreman.

FATHER S GHASTLY FIND. Major Henderson deposed that his wife and child resided with him at 3, Erne View Terrace, where they had rooms taken. On the 24th Sept. at 5.45 he returned from his office and went upstairs to the sitting room of their temporary home. He saw the baby lying on her back on the settee, with her throat cut and .a carving knife beside her on the settee. There was no one else in the room and he immediately went downstairs to the hallway and there saw Dr. McBrien and Miss Ellen Hands. He told them what he had seen, saying, as far as he could recollect ‘‘The baby’s throat is cut.”

Since the birth of the baby on 27th April last his wife had enjoyed good health. During a week or two prior to the tragedy, however, she appeared to be overstrung and suffered from sleeplessness. They had been on holidays at Bundoran from the 14th to the 21st Sept., and during that time his wife worried about the baby’s health. As a result of his wife’s condition and some remarks she made he called with Dr. McBrien on the morning of 24th September and asked him to visit his wife, who had said she thought herself and the baby were both ill. She also said she let witness down and would not go to heaven and that she was becoming mentally deranged. At 2 p.m. on the 24th Sept. he last saw his wife, when they were both coming out of the sitting room. Shortly before he left his wife went to procure a bottle for the baby. He had been at lunch between one and two o’clock and his wife appeared to be worrying unduly. He spent some time in cheering her up and comforting her. She appeared to cheer up while he was there. He had not since seen her and did not know where she was. The carving knife, which he identified (and which was produced bearing bloodstains) had been bought by him some time ago.

LAST TO SEE MRS. HENDERSON. Miss Rebecca Hands, who said she resided with her sifter at Erne View, deposed that the Henderson’s lived in rooms with them. Mrs. Henderson after the return from Bundoran complained that the baby was ill and looked worried. She complained several times that the baby was wasting away and had a cough. On the 24th Sept. she met Mrs Henderson on the stairs on her way to the sitting room. When out on a message later in the afternoon she met Mrs. Henderson in Belmore Street.

“I HAVE DISKED THINGS.’ Miss Eleanor Hands said she did not see Mrs. Henderson leaving the house. She described what took place when Major Henderson ran down the stairs. About: 4 p.m. witness was in Mrs. Henderson’s sitting room and saw Mrs. Henderson and the baby. Mrs. Henderson was sitting on the settee with the baby on her knee, and she seemed quite happy. She had not been too well and was a bit worried. Did she pass any remarks?—she said I have dished things. Witness did not know what she meant by the remark which was passed as witness was leaving the room and she attached no significance to it.

MAID’S STORY. Miss Joan Power, 9, New Row, Enniskillen, said she had been employed as a domestic servant by Mrs. Henderson between July 1942, and 24th Sept., 1942. On the latter date she left the Henderson house at 3.55 p.m. when she had her work finished, and went to her home. When she was going out Mrs. Henderson said her work was finished and told witness to come in at the usual time next morning. That was in the sitting room. Mrs. Henderson was sitting on a chair near the window and was feeding the baby. She appeared to be all right, and did not look worried. She complained to witness about her health shortly after she came back from Bundoran. She had not since seen Mrs. Henderson. The first she knew of the tragedy was at 8.45 the following morning.

DOCTOR’S EVIDENCE. Dr. M. E. McBrien said on the 24th Sept. Major Henderson called with him and asked him to visit his wife. He found the house occupied by Major Henderson about 5.45, that evening. The Major came down the stairs saying “She is gone and she has cut the baby’s throat.” Witness went upstairs to the sitting room and found the baby lying on her back on the settee. Her throat was cut across with the windpipe opened into and the principal vessels cut. The front of the child’s clothing was heavily stained with blood and a bloodstained curving knife was lying on the baby’s left side between the body, and the back of the settee. Life was extinct. Death was due to shock and haemorrhage resulting from the injuries described. Head-Constable Poots said a widespread search had been made for Mrs. Henderson since the tragedy but she had not been found. Sympathy with Major Henderson was expressed by Head-Constable Poots, the jury, foreman and the Coroner Mr. Winslow.

17-10-1942. CRIMELESS COUNTY LEITRIM. When Judge Sheehy was presented with white gloves at Carrick-on-Shannon he said he was glad to hear from Supt. McNamara that conditions in the county were very satisfactory.

17-10-1942. MOTHER S BODY FOUND IN LOUGH ERNE. SUICIDE VERDICT. The body of the dead child’s mother, Mrs. Mary Henderson (aged 26), was found in Lough Erne at the Weirs  Bridge, near Enniskillen, on Sunday afternoon, attired as she had been when last seen by Miss Rebecca Hands, in Belmore .Street, on 24th Sept. At an inquest held at the Workhouse, Enniskillen, on Monday morning by Mr. G. E. Warren, coroner, Capt. J. N. Hughes gave evidence of identification, and said deceased’s home address was Cheviot View, Ponteland, Newcastle-on-Tyne. Sergt. S. J. Sherrard said about 4.30 p.m. on Sunday an object was pointed out to him at the Weirs Bridge. On closer examination he found it to be the body of a woman fully clothed. He sent for assistance and had the body taken to the Workhouse mortuary. The body was found among the rushes near the bathing boxes at the swimming pond. Dr. M. E. McBrien said on examination he found the body in an advanced state of decomposition consistent with having been in the water about 17 days. There were no marks of violence and death was due to drowning. A verdict was returned of suicide by drowning while temporarily insane.

17-10-1942. OBITUARY MISS ANNIE McMANUS, ENNISKILLEN. Deep regret has been occasioned by the death of Annie McManus, Wellington Place, Enniskillen, which on Wednesday last following a short illness. Deceased gained the respect and esteem of everyone with whom she was acquainted. Of a quiet nature, she was deeply sincere in her friendships, and her unfailing good humour and kindness endeared her to a large circle of friends. During her illness she had the happiness of being frequently visited by the local clergy, and she made an edifying preparation for death. All along she retained her wonted cheerfulness, never uttering a word of complaint, .but patiently resigning herself to the Divine Will. The funeral took place on Friday following Requiem Mass in St. Michael’s Church, Enniskillen. Rev. C. O’Daly, C.C., who was celebrant, delivered a touching panegyric in the. course of which he referred to the deceased young lady as a model Catholic and one whose popularity in life was evidenced by the wide sympathy created by her demise. He expressed sympathy with, her relatives who had sustained a severe loss by her passing. The funeral cortege was large and paid eloquent testimony to the widespread regret caused by her death. Rev T. J. Meegan, C.C., officiated at the obsequies in the Catholic Cemetery, where the interment took place. The chief mourners were —Annie McManus (mother), Mary and Nellie (sisters), John and Patrick (brothers).

17-10-1942. HAD UNCUSTOMED CIGARETTES PENALTY AT DERRY COURT. A fine of £10 was imposed at Derry Petty Sessions on Charles McIntyre, 50 Creggan Road, who was prosecuted by the Customs authorities for aiding and abetting some person, unknown in the unlicensed sale of cigarettes. Constable Hinds said in a drawer in defendant’s room he found 1,450 American cigarettes, and the defendant, who was employed by the American technicians, said he bought the cigarettes from American sailors for his own use. No duty had been paid. Defendant, in reply to the R.M., said he was earning £5 13s a week, and had to pay 18s 4d a week income-tax. Captain Bell, R.M.—The more the Revenue is defrauded the more income-tax we will have to pay. Defendant—I was not defrauding the revenue. Captain Bell—Of course, you are. Captain Bell said he was determined to do his best to help the revenue and tobacconists, who had to make their living. A similar penalty was imposed on George Page, 7 Strand Road, who was summoned for being knowingly concerned in selling uncustomed goods, 3 3/16 lbs. cigarettes and 26 boxes of face powder. Police evidence was given that when defendant’s .premises were searched they found. 1,540 American cigarettes in a trunk marked “Eire’’ under a mattress. Defendant said he did not know who put the cigarettes in the trunk which was in a passage. The face powder was lying on a chest of drawers. There was no necessity to him to smuggle face powder when he could buy it in Derry at 6d a box.

17-10-1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER NEWS. During the absence of the family at church the dwelling house and shop of Mrs. E, Williamson, Clonagun, Newtownbutler, situated a few yards from the border, was broken into and raided. Following investigations by the R.U.C. in charge of Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, a man named John J. Connolly, Clonkeelan, Clones, was arrested. Later at a special court in Newtownbutler, before Mr. E. Reilly, J.P., Connolly was charged with breaking and entering the premises and stealing a gold watch and a quantity of cigarettes and tobacco. He was remanded on bail to Newtownbutler Petty Sessions. At the week-end Newtownbutler police in charge of Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, visited a house on the Cavan-Fermanagh border at Cleenagh and seized quantities of flour, candles, boots, horseshoes, thread, rice, loaves, and other articles suspected of being for export across the border. Constables H. Lowry and R. J. Freeman, Newtownbutler, seized a motor-car containing a quantity of rice at Summerhill. The car and contents were taken to Newtownbutler. On Sunday night, Sergt. Blevins, Newtownbutler, intercepted a motor-car coming from Co. Cavan direction at Parson’s Green and seized a quantity of whiskey from one of the occupants which was believed to have been imported.

17-10-1942. PETTIGO NOTES. A pretty wedding took place in St. Mary’s Parish Church, Pettigo, the contracting parties being Mr. William Baird, Dromore, eldest son of David and Mary Baird, Dromore, and Miss Teresa McGrath, youngest daughter of Michael and the late Mrs, M. McGrath, Belault, Pettigo. Miss Sadie McGrath, sister of the bride was bridesmaid, and Mr. John Baird, brother of the bridegroom, was bestman. The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by the Rev. P. McCormack, C.C., Pettigo.

On Friday night a very enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Hall, Lettercran, the proceeds of which were in aid of repairs to the church.

A sad burning-accident resulting in the death of Baby Marshall, the four-year-old daughter of James Marshall, Drumhorick, Pettigo, occurred on Monday. The child during her mother’s absence was in the vicinity of the fire when its frock became ignited; she ran on to the street to the mother who immediately extinguished the flames, but the child had received such severe burns as necessitated removal to hospital where she died a few hours later.

17-10-1942. BLACKLION DISTRICT NEWS. There was a full attendance of the committee at a meeting of the Red Cross branch in Blacklion on Thursday night. Mrs. Chas. Dolan presided. Mrs, Maguire, N.T., read correspondence and financial matters were arranged. A vote of sympathy was passed to. Miss Margt. McGovern, Loughan House, on the death of her father.

There was a large muster of the L.D.F. at Loughan on Sunday, when target practice took place. The highest three marks were recorded by Messrs. Fred Murray, Frank Maguire, Patk. Fitzpatrick, and Capt. Kelly. D.S.O. Magovern and Group Leader Farmer were in charge.

The Harvest Thanksgiving Service took place in Killinagh Protestant Church on Friday night. The special preacher was Rev. Canon Pratt.

D.S.O. Maguire, N.T., Sergt, Rock, and the local officers, were present at a meeting of the L.D.F. in Blacklion on Thursday night. Sergeant Rock read special communications and Group Leader of the L.D.F. was appointed to give lectures.

The wedding took place, with Nuptial Mass, at Drumshambo Church, of Francis, youngest son of the late John and Mrs. McGovern, Barran, Blacklion, and Margaret Teresa, third daughter of the late Mr. Peter Dolan and Mrs. Dolan, Crotty, Drumshambo. Rev. Father Cummins, C.C., performed the ceremony. Mr. Michael McGovern (brother of the groom) was best man, and Miss Dolan, (sister of the bride), was bridesmaid.

There was a large attendance at the funeral in Doobally of Mrs. Patk. McLoughlin, Tullinamoal. Rev. J. J. Murtagh, C.C., officiated in the church and at the graveside. .

17-10-1942. MANORHAMILTON NEWS. Forestry Officials—Mr. Curran who has been Forestry Inspector at Manorhamilton during the past two years has been transferred to Co, Cork, and is replaced by Mr. Madden who comes from Tipperary.

Teacher’s Appointment—Miss Dillon, assistant in the girls’ school, has been appointed assistant in Drumlease N.S., Dromahair. She possesses a lady-like charm, all her own and her departure from Manorhamilton is very much regretted.

Legion Of Mary—To mark the first anniversary of the formation of a branch of the Legion of Mary at Manorhamilton a very enjoyable function was held in the Technical School on Thursday evening (1st inst.). Tea was provided by the Legionaries and vocal, items were contributed, Bro. Ferdinand being the principal contributor. The guests at the evening were Rev. Fr. Brady, C.C.; Rev. Father McGrail, C.C.; Rev, Fr. Gilbride, and Bros. Ferdinand and Leonard. Rev. Fr. Brady congratulated the Legionaries on the good work they had performed during the year.

17-10-1942. SENIOR FOOTBALL FINAL. NEXT SUNDAYS GAME AT THE GAELIC PARK. At the Gaelic Park, Enniskillen on Sunday next Fermanagh’s two star teams— Lisnaskea Emmets and Newtownbutler St. Comgalls—clash once more in quest of county honours when they meet in the county final of the Fermanagh Senior Football Championship. So keen is the rivalry between these teams and so well are they .matched that this contest for premier honours should prove one of the best games seen in Fermanagh for a long time. The championship title has always been the most coveted in G.A. A. competitions and many memorable clashes have occurred in recent years between these teams for the blue riband of Fermanagh football.

Few teams can boast such an array of inter-county talent as the Emmets and St. Comgalls, for between them they comprise two-thirds of the Fermanagh county team. Lisnaskea have the services of such well-known players as T. Durnian, F. Johnston, A. Smith, F. O’Dowd, Duffy and Collins, whilst Newtownbutler have inter-county stars in E. McQuillan, B. Allen, M. McDermott and Murray. Two splendid additions to the .Newtown team lately have been the Smith brothers—M. Smith in particular being a, promising youth of inter-county status.

Only a month or so ago Lisnaskea triumphed over Newtown in the League final by a very narrow margin when the latter seemed favourites for the title. Newtown were short some of their regular team on that occasion however. The St. Comgalls’ victory over Clones-one of Monaghan’s best senior teams—in the Border League a fortnight ago greatly enhances their chances against the. Fermanagh Champions, but the Emmets have always proved they are a difficult combination to beat in championship struggles. Contests between Lisnaskea and Newtownbutler are invariably sparkling exhibitions of fast and clever football which have always attracted bumper crowds, and Sunday’s game should certainly draw a record crowd to the Gaelic Park. The throw-in will be at 4 p.m. and Rev. B. Mahon, Irvinestown, whose competency as a referee is widely recognised, will have charge of the game. Spectators are asked to note carefully that owing to the difficulty in stewarding the pitch at recent matches nobody except players and officials will be allowed inside the paling fences.

17-10-1942. ‘WIN BY STRATEGY BEST FOR ALL OF US” AN AMERICAN VIEW. “In the light of what you are doing in India, how do expect us to talk about principles and look our soldiers in the eye.”? This question is asked in an “Open Letter to the People of England” in the current issue of the magazine “Life.” The document demands one thing from Britain: “Quit fighting the war to hold the Empire together, and join with Russia and your allies to fight the war to win by whatever strategy is best for all of us. “After victory has been won, then the British .people can decide-what to do about .the Empire—for you may be sure we don’t want it. “But if you cling to the Empire at the expense of the United Nations’ victory you will lose the war … because you will lose us.” Briefly, there are two wars,’ the letter goes on “one we are actually. fighting and the other we must fight in order, to win. The war we are actually fighting is a war to save America. Nothing else. “Everyone here is prepared to fight this war to any extremes just as everybody in England will go to any extreme to save England. “But this kind of war of each trying to save himself is just the set-up for Hitler. If we are really going to overwhelm the Axis we must envision and fight for something bigger than either England or the United States. “We Americans are a strange people, maybe you think of us as rather practical. But you cannot understand us at all unless you realise what principles mean to us.” We fought you on principles in the first place. Once in our history we killed 600,000 of our own sons to establish the principle of freedom for the black man.” “Life ” suggests that the British may object that Americans have not defined these principles very well yet—“and that’s a fair objection.” “One reason we have not defined them is that we are not convinced yon would fight for them even if they were defined.” ‘’For instance, we realise that you have difficult problems in India, but we don’t see your “solution” to date provides any evidence of principles of any kind.’

17-10-1942. DISREGARD FOR TRUTH AMD HONESTY. PROTESTANT ARCHBISHOP PERTURBED. Speaking on Tuesday at the Joint Synod of Dublin, Kildare and Glendalough diocese, the Most Rev. Dr Barton, Protestant Archbishop of Dublin, referred to “the growing disregard for the sacredness of truth and honesty,’’ and said he had been, seriously perturbed of late by evidence of that disregard. Could a society be in a healthy state he asked in which a man would boast openly and without shame of how he had treated the Customs, or his neighbours, or in which there was graft and wire-pulling. He was convinced that a nation’s taxes could at once be reduced by 50 per cent, at the very least if its citizens could be trusted to tell the truth and to deal as conscientiously with Government departments as a man was expected to deal with his neighbours.

17-10-1942. NORTH LEITRIM FARMERS’ UNION. MEETING IN MANORHAMILTON. A special meeting of the above was held in McGloin’s Hall, Manorhamilton, on Oct. 7th. Mr. James Kerrigan, president, who presided, said that the appointment of a new Agricultural Commission which was composed almost entirely of professors boded ill for the poor farmers of Connaught. Such a Commission to be effective should be composed of practical farmers, and the Congested Districts should have representation as well as the plains of Boyle. Mr. Kerrigan said that North Leitrim was in a serious position owing to the bad harvest and the destruction of hay and crops by flooding and the drainage scheme which was turned down twelve, years ago should be revived. Mr. John McGarraghy, said that .much damage had been done in Mullies by flooding of the Bonet, and several farmers had lost large quantities of hay. Referring to the increased rates Mr. McGarraghy said the new County Council would be expected to work hard for a reduction in the rates.

Mr. P. J. O’Rourke, secretary, said that after working for four years in trying to establish a. Farmers’ Union  in North Leitrim, and after encountering many difficulties and disappointments he was glad to be able to state that his work and teaching had not been in vain because farmers all over the area were beginning to take a lively interest in the Union. Old prejudices, went on the speaker, are dying fast, and the workers on the land have come to realise the importance of their task in producing the food supply of the Nation. They have also learned after long years of disillusionment that the promise of politicians are made to be broken. I don’t mean to say that all politicians are selfish or dishonest, but I am not overstepping the mark when I say that men who are highly educated and claim to be intensely  patriotic have time and again made promises which they must have known could not possibly be fulfilled. I have it from usually well informed sources that a General Election will take place inside of a few months, and farmers will need to be on the alert if they are not to be fooled all the time. Thousands upon thousands of pounds have been spent for the past few years in building new houses in the cities tod towns, and in providing water schemes for the smallest villages, but when the farmers of North Leitrim apply for a grant to have a corn mill erected no money can be spared to facilitate them. When farmers who have lands which do not require drainage petition the Minister fop Agriculture to give grants for reclamation plots on the old system their appeal is turned down. They must make drains no matter what about the potatoes. The matter boiled down to one important point—that the farmer was disregarded because he generally supported politicians who knew nothing about farming. The farmers were dictated to by officials who had only a theoretical knowledge of farming. The Labour Party were now coming forward asking the people to return them to power at the next Election and hinting that they had a brand new plan for putting the agricultural community on their feet. Judging by letters which had appeared in the daily papers recently from men who are prominent in the Labour movement, the Labour Party expects farmers to produce food below the cost of production. I believe a Labour Government would fix the price of milk going to creameries at about 4d per gallon.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT. The relatives and friends of the Late Monsignor Soden, Manorhamilton, wrote expressing gratitude for the Co. Council’s vote of sympathy, and hoped the note would be accepted in acknowledgment.

NO OBJECTION. A letter was received from the Department stating that the Minister in pursuance of the Local Authorities (Financial Provisions) Act, 1921, had consented to the Leitrim County Council borrowing by way of temporary overdraft for the purpose of providing temporarily for current expenses, a sum not exceeding £15,000.

PARISH COUNCIL’S VIEWS. Mr. J. P, Eames, Secretary, Ballaghameehan Parish Council, wrote that at a meeting of that body on the 13th Sept., the following resolution was proposed by Mr. Joe Fox and seconded by Mr. Jas. Connolly—“That the Parish Council view with alarm the increase in rates, and they consider the time has come to reduce the rates,. and give an opportunity to the ratepayers to pay.” The communication was noted.

17-10-1942. RUBBER SHORTAGE “MAY STOP ROAD TRANSPORT” Major Eastwood, Yorkshire Road Traffic Commissioner, told road transport operators at Halifax on Saturday that if the country continues to use rubber at the present rate road transport will be brought to a complete standstill. Passenger services would have to be cut to the bone, and all road services in Yorkshire might have to be stopped after 9 p.m.

17-10-1942. PERMITS FOR SIX COUNTIES. BRITISH GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCEMENT. DRASTIC. REGULATIONS. STATEMENTS IN WESTMINSTER AND STORMONT. An important announcement regarding the control of emigrants into Northern Ireland from “Eire” and the reinstatement in employment after the war of demobilised soldiers was made in the British House of Commons on Thursday by Mr. Herbert, Morrison, Home Secretary. Mr.. Morrison said: ‘During the past two years there has been a considerable influx into Northern Ireland of persons normally resident elsewhere, and this influx is continuing to a considerable extent. “It has been decided to take power by a Defence Regulation to institute a system of control over persons who come to Northern Ireland from ‘Eire,’ Great Britain, or elsewhere, and to require such persons to furnish particulars as to their address and occupation.” “Subject to exceptions for children and persons in the service of the Crown, all British subjects who were not ordinarily resident in Northern Ireland on January 1, 1940, will be required if they desire to take up. residence there or to continue to reside there for longer than six weeks to obtain permits which will be issued on my behalf by the Ministry of Home Affairs in Northern Ireland. Unless there are security objections in individual cases, permits will be granted for so long as their services, are needed to applicants who are already in occupations and to those who in future come into Northern Ireland to take up work. “They will also be granted to those who ought to be allowed to remain there on compassionate or other special grounds.

“Each permit will bear a photograph of the holder, and will in all cases be issued for a period of six mouths or for the duration of the employment specified in the permit, whichever is the less. “These will be renewable on the same conditions as govern their issue. “Permit-holders will be required to notify the authorities of any change of address. The immediate objective of the schema is to deal with war conditions, but it is also contemplated that the scheme will be of value on the termination of hostilities for the purpose of facilitating the reinstatement in employment of demobilised men from Northern Ireland who join the Forces as volunteers. “At such a time it will be right to give to the demobilised volunteers, preference in the labour market of Northern Ireland over these newcomers, and for this purpose to have power to terminate the permits granted to persons who are in employment.

“It is, accordingly contemplated, that the scheme will be kept in existence for a reasonable time after the war and if the Defence Regulations should expire before the demobilised men have had reasonable opportunity of being absorbed into employment, it will, in the view of the Government, be right that the necessary legislation should be introduced in the United Kingdom Parliament for a temporary prolongation of the system.” Sir Hugh O’Neill-Can you say whether these Regulations will give power to deport people who have come in since Jan., 1940, and in respect of whom it is not thought desirable to give permits? Mr. Morrison.—Yes, there is no obligation on the Northern Ireland Minister of Home Affairs, acting for me, to grant a permit, and it can be withdrawn at any time. I am assured that the Minister for Home Affairs in Northern Ireland will be reasonable in the exercise of this power.

STORMONT ANNOUNCEMENT. A statement on similar lines was made by the Prime Minister, Rt. Hon. J. M. Andrews, in Stormont on Thursday afternoon, and was received with cheers. Mr. J. W. Nixon asked if the Prime Minister would continue the good work by restraining his Cabinet colleagues and other members from going to ‘Eire,’ sometimes in doubtful company?” The Prime Minister—I would remind the House that that was a statement made by the Secretary of State in the British Parliament and as a matter of courtesy I have read it to this House. I have nothing further to add.

24-10-1942. LISNASKEA POTEEN CASE. 23 GALLONS WASH SEIZED. FARMER TO SERVE THREE MONTHS. A farmer, who lives on a small mountain holding and has a wife and seven children, was granted a month at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, in order to get in his crop before serving a three months’ hard labour sentence imposed in connection with a poteen case. The defendant was James Wallace, of Carrowmaculla, Lisnaskea, who was charged by District-Inspector Smyth with having in his possession on 7th October at Carrowmaculla, twenty-three gallons of wash.

Sergeant Kirkpatrick, R.U.C., gave evidence that at 6.10 p.m. on 7th inst., in company with other police, he went to the dwelling house of the defendant to search for illicit spirits. In a bedroom off the kitchen, witness found a barrel containing twenty-three gallons of wash, the barrel being heavily covered with bags. Defendant was not present and witness went to where, he was working a mile away. On being told what the police had found and being asked for an explanation defendant, witness alleged, replied “It is mine. I am only a poor man and I suppose it will put me out of the place.” Witness, then brought him to the house and pointed out the illicit spirits be had found. Witness subsequently destroyed all the wash except the sample taken for analysis.

To Mr. Winslow, witness stated he agreed defendant lived in a very small farm up in the mountains and had a wife and seven children. When Mr. Winslow asked his Worship (Major T. W. Dickie, R.M.) to deal as leniently with the defendant as possible, District-Inspector Smyth said defendant had .been convicted and sentenced to four months’ imprisonment at Lisnaskea, on 10th December. 1927, for having in his possession a still and illicit spirits. Mr. Winslow—This unfortunate man lives on a very poor mountain farm. He had made the poteen and as a result he was now before the Court. He was married and had a lot of small children. In addition he had not got his crop saved. District-Inspector Smyth—It is all right, but he is not quite so innocent as he is made out to be. Our information is that he is making quite a lot out of illicit, spirits at the present time and that some of our visitors to this country have found out his dwelling house and are regular attenders.

His Worship said that having been convicted before defendant must have known perfectly well the risk he was running. In the circumstances he ordered a sentence of three months’ hard labour. On the application of Mr. Winslow, District-Inspector Smyth said he would not execute the order for defendant’s arrest for a month so that he could get his crop saved. Later, Mr. Winslow enquired if his Worship would substitute a monetary penalty which would be paid by some friends. His Warship refused the request stating that in these cases his iron rule was jail and so far as he was concerned he would not depart from that rule even if the defendant was ready to pay a £500 fine. It was the only way to stop it. He was sorry he could not accede to the request.

24-10-1942. SESSIONS ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. Several appeals before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C.,  at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Tuesday resolved themselves into pleas for leniency and a reduction of the penalty. £60 FINE SUBSTITUTED. Mark Prunty, Drumany, Lisnaskea, appealed against sentence of three mouths’ imprisonment for harbouring 6cwt. of white flour for the purpose of unlawfully exporting it. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, said after the conviction the defendant pleaded guilty. He stated that he knew the flour was there, and he had nothing to do with it and that he would not tell who put it there. Judge—He pleaded guilty, and that is an end of it as far as I am concerned. Mr. Cooper—Since then it came to my knowledge through another source—in fact, a party called on me and informed me that they were the real smugglers, and asked me if I would get a penalty of £60 put on this man. They said they would pay the money. I believe the money is in Court. I told Mr. Murphy was prepared to do that. Mr. J. Murphy (for appellant)—I had to advise my client that, there was no case to come before the Court. He was charged with harbouring and admitted he saw the flour put in an outhouse and raised no objection. The Judge withdrew the order for imprisonment and. substituted a penalty of £60. A man immediately walked forward and paid the amount of the fine in notes.

24-10-1942. PRISON SENTENCE TO STAND. Philip Swift, Lisnashillinda, Newtownbutler, for whom Mr. Black appeared, appealed against sentence of four months’ imprisonment without hard labour for harbouring 14cwts. of sulphate of ammonia and 12 stones of flour for the purpose of exporting it. Mr. J. Cooper said that after keeping Swift under observation and seeing three military tracks moving in certain directions Sergeant Green went to Swift’s house and in a byre found two lots in which were the sulphate of ammonia and flour. Soldiers pointed this out as the stuff they had brought there. They were promised £2 for their work. Both soldiers were reduced in rank. It was a bad day for them. The R.M. gave Swift- 6 months’ imprisonment. Mr. Black appealed to him and he reduced it to five months, and he appealed again, and it was reduced to four months.

Mr. Black—There is a further appeal to-day. I advised my client to plead guilty, and I appeal on this boy’s behalf for the substitution of a monetary penalty in lieu of imprisonment. He is 25 years of age, was married about year ago and has one little baby. He lives with his mother and looks after the farm. His mother has 25 acres under tillage, and this boy is responsible for the saving and harvesting of the crops. There will be nobody to work unless he is made available. This is the first time he has been charged with any offence of this nature. Mr. Cooper—He has been fined for making illicit spirits. Mr. Black said the young man was in delicate health, and he handed in a certificate from Dr. Dolan showing that for two years he had been treating him for gastritis and complications. The co-defendant (another man charged in connection with the same offence) had only been fined.

1942 Fermanagh Herald.

.JANUARY 14, 1942. LARCENY CHARGE AT CASTLEDERG. ‘BOUGHT CYCLE FROM FERMANAGH MAN” Before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., at Castlederg Court, two youths, James Hegarty and William John Hegarty, Cormacoll, Drumquin, brothers, pleaded not guilty to the larceny of a cycle, value £4. They were not professionally represented. Thomas Lynch gave evidence that on Sunday, 7th Sept. he left his bicycle outside Castlederg Chapel and when he came out it was gone. On 28th Sept. he observed a cycle outside a house in Scraghey and on examination. identified it as his although the handle grips and oil bath had been removed. James Hegarty claimed the cycle and said he had bought it from his brother William John. Witness reported the matter to the police. Sergt. Blackstock said James Hegarty came to the barracks and said he bought the cycle from his brother for £2.15s.  William John said he bought the bicycle from a Fermanagh man for £3. He described the Fermanagh man but the police could not trace him. Mr. Long at this stage dismissed the case against James. William John Hegarty gave evidence that he met the Fermanagh man on the road and he offered to sell the cycle, but witness had no money at the time, and they arranged to meet at Castlederg later on. He did so and paid 30s and got possession of the cycle; he met him later by appointment and paid a further £2, getting 7s 6d as a lucks penny on condition that witness would give back the oil bath and witness agreed. The Fermanagh man appeared to have plenty of money. Cross-examined by the District-Inspector, witness said the Fermanagh man would turn his back to people who were passing them when they were negotiating the sale. He had not seen the man since he bought the cycle. Mr. Long said there was a doubt in the case and he would dismiss it, but he made an order that the cycle be returned to Thomas Lynch.

JANUARY 14, 1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER FIRE. BUSINESS PREMISES SERIOUSLY DAMAGED. Serious damage was caused by a fire which broke out during the blackout hours in the grocery and drapery premises of Mr. John J. O’Donnell, Main Street, Newtownbutler. The outbreak occurred on Saturday morning. The alarm was given by the proprietor, Mr. O’Donnell, who was awakened by the crackling of burning timber. He ran to his sister’s bedroom and carried her through the flames to the Main Street. R.U.C. and military assisted civilians to fight the outbreak but by the time they arrived the fire had a strong hold and the flames were extending to the adjoining shop. Water was carried by civilians from the two town pumps in buckets, tubs and creamery cans. When it was seen that it was impossible to try and confine it. Mr. Joseph McNamee and his four sons climbed to the roof of an adjoining shop and broke down the roof, portion of which fell on Mr. McNamee, who was rescued by his son, Marcus. The Enniskillen fire brigade was  summoned but when it arrived on the scene the local residents had the fire under control. Mr. O’Donnell’s premises included a private house as well as a large store, all of which were burned to the ground.

JANUARY 14, 1942. G.N.R. OFFICIAL DEAD. NATIVE OF MAGUIRESBRIDGE. The death has taken place at a Belfast nursing home of Mr. W. A. F. Graham, aged 46, deputy traffic manager of the Great Northern Railway Co. He was a native of Maguiresbridge, Co. Fermanagh, and was educated at Enniskillen Model School, and entered the railway service 29 years ago. He is survived by his wife and. one child.

January 7th 1942. A FERMANAGH DONKEY. AMUSING COURT EVIDENCE. An unusual claim in respect of alleged breach of warranty in the sale of a donkey came before Deputy Judge Ellison, K. C at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions in Enniskillen. Plaintiff was John Cassidy, of Cullintagh, and he claimed £4 10s damages for the alleged breach from Morton. Greaves, of Knockdooris, Derrylin, who sold him the animal for £2 10s on the 16th September, 1941.Mr. Cooper, solicitor for plaintiff, said the case was an unusual one. The animal was warranted sound and able to pull a 15 cwts. load. The animal was big but not too well looking. On being brought home the animal’s condition became worse and it died. Plaintiff in evidence said defendant asked him to buy the ass in the fair of Ballyconnell, but he did not like to buy it as it was imported. However, the deal was made and the animal was left for him at Blake’s of Derrylin. Defendant said the animal could draw 15 cwts anywhere, and was the best ass in County Fermanagh. (Laughter). He also told plaintiff that when trotting along the road the feet of the ass made a noise like a pony (laughter), and that it had mowed with a pony. The beast was brought home by plaintiff  but it died on 15th October. On the way home it was dragging its feet. Mr. Cooper – It looked like a lady doing one of these new dances. (Laughter). Plaintiff added that the ass had lumps on its backbone, and was, “jinked.” It also walked sideways. (Laughter). Mr. Ferguson (for defendant) —What did you think you were buying, a horse or a donkey?—-A donkey. I am not that far gone yet that I would not know a donkey. (Laughter). Did you ever see a donkey ploughing? –No, but he told me this one ploughed. Don’t you deal in donkeys?—No, but when I get an order I buy one. Didn’t you inspect this donkey? —No, I did not. I was in a hurry for the bus. (Laughter) Didn’t you run it up and down the fair green in Ballyconnell?—No, I took his word for it. You would think it was a thousand-pound horse he was selling. I could not keep him from warranting it. (Laughter). He told me it was the best in the world and was worth £20. This was .a stallion donkey ?—Yes. Did you find it on its back in a drain? —No. Have you got a girl in your house?— She’s not a girl3 she’s a woman. (Laughter) I will not differ with you about the age, but you have a. girl?—I have a housekeeper, if you want to know my business. (Laughter). I don’t want to know your business any more than necessary, but did it take you, the girl and your nephew to pull it out of the drain? There is not a word about it. Fred Hart, M.R.C.V.S. said he examined the carcass of the animal on 15th October and found that it had suffered ailments of the liver, heart and spine. The animal was about 10 years of age and the ailment of the spine was of five or six months standing. To Mr., Ferguson witness said the spinal trouble would be apparent to any one buying the animal. Mr. Cooper–What did it die of?— Witness— it was dead when I saw it. Laughter.). Apparently it lay down as a result of this spinal trouble and ‘konked out.’ (Laughter). To the Judge witness said his opinion was that the animal could not have pulled a load of 15 cwts.

In the witness box, defendant said he had the donkey in his possession for nine months, and the bargain was made with plaintiff in Ballyconnell fair in September. Plaintiff ‘vetted’ the animal in the fair and defendant told him it could pull a good load. No warranty was given, and the bargain was made by a man called Fitch. The first complaint he got about the animal was in the form of a note given to him in Derrylin fair in October, the note demanding defendant to take it back. Cross-examined by Mr. Cooper, defendant said the animal brought a load of 14 or 15 cwts. For him at times. There was no talk of mowing. Mr. Cooper I notice this ass was smuggled twice as a matter of fact. (Laughter). Defendant. Yes. Mr. Cooper. Well we are not going to say anything about that. (Laughter). You bought another ass? Yes. What age was it? It was a wee foal. Mr. Cooper. To plaintiff – What age was it? Plaintiff. It was an oul ass. (Laughter). What did he pay for him? – 18 shillings. Mr. Cooper. What do you intend to sell him for? Defendant – I don’t intend to sell him. (To the Judge)—-I didn’t notice anything wrong in the way the ass walked to Ballyconnell fair. Foster Greaves, son of the defendant, said the ass in question was a strong one, and had always been kept in the house or tied when let out while in defendants possession.

Thomas Fitch gave evidence of the making of the bargain and said plaintiff had been inspecting the donkey all morning. Mr. McEntee of Clones, “the biggest horse-dealer in the world” (Laughter)—was giving £20 for him not so long ago. Witness did not see anything wrong with the donkey when it was running up and down. It was represented that it could draw a load of 15 cwt., but no warranty was given. Mr. Ferguson questioned witness as to whether the offer of £20 was of recent date or not. Witness—Not so long ago, it was wartime. Mr. Cooper — During this war? I think it was the last one. (Laughter). But we have been told it was ten years old? —bout ten or twelve years. How could it have lived in the last war? I suppose it was the last. (Laughter). .It must have been this war?—No. You said it was not so long ago?—Mr. McEntee could have been here if he had been summoned. If it was not so long ago  when was it. I could not tell; I have not a good memory. Was it a year ago? It was more than a year. Was it more than two years?—It may be four or five. The man who owned him said he did not want him any more for the children. Mr. McEntee wanted him as a sire. It was represented he could pull 15 cwts.?— He could run like mad. He could leap over me or Cassidy either. (Laughter). His Honour held there was a breach, of warranty and allowed a decree for £3 with 15/- costs and expenses.

BALLYGAWLEY—Country butter Is 3d to Is 6d per lb.; potatoes 8d – to l0d per stone; fowl; chickens; 5s to 6s, hens 3s to 3s 6d, ducks 3s 9d to 4s 3d—each; slip pigs 75s to-85s, suckers 50 to- 60s— .each.

February 14th 1942. PETTICO COURT CASES. At Pettigo District Court on Tuesday of last week, before Mr. Justice O’Hanrahan, Guard Gallivan summoned Gerald McMenamin, Minchifin for using an unlighted cycle. Fined 5s.

Supt. Noonan charged Michael McGee, Carntressy, with cutting and carrying away eighteen young trees from a cut away plantation at Carntressy on the lands of William Monaghan. Guard James Ryan proved tracing the trees to McGee’s residence. Mr. Monaghan, the owner, refused to prosecute and pleaded for leniency for defendant. A fine of 10s was imposed.

Guard, Gallivan summoned Adam Eves, Gortnessy, for using an unlighted cycle. Fined 6s.

Guard Treanor summoned J. Fitzpatrick, tractor driver, for driving without licence and no rear light. The Justice fined defendant 10s.

February 14th 1942. BROOKEBORO’ COURT CASES. At Brookeboro’ Petty Sessions, before Major Dickie, R.M., Thos. Clarke, Little Mount, was charged with slaughtering a pig without a licence on 2nd January. D.I. Smith prosecuted, and Mr. Stewart, the Ministry’s Inspector gave evidence of visiting Clark’s house, and Clarke admitted having slaughtered the pig, and at that time there were only l0 lbs. of pork left in the house. Clarke pleaded that he killed the animal in November last, as he had a large number of men working, and wanted the pork to feed them.

His Worship, remarking that it was the worst case he had known, fined defendant 40/-.

CYCLISTS’ DIFFICULTIES. His Worship, when dealing with, a number of cases where cyclists, charged with no rear lights, gave the excuse that they could not get batteries, and he would like to make it known that cyclists should have a clear patch of white paint as a background to a reflector when they could not get batteries.

 

February 14th 1942. FERMANAGH CLAIM FAILS. ACTION AGAINST BELCOO TEACHER. BOY WHO LOST EYE. A denial that he had dictated a story to the pupils as to what they should say when asked about an accident was made by the principal teacher, the defendant in an action for damages, the hearing of which was resumed in the Belfast King’s Bench Division on Wednesday of last week before the Lord Chief Justice. Mr. James Ferguson, P.E.T., of Belcoo, was alleged to have been negligent by not exercising proper supervision over the pupils on March, 25, 1959, when one of the boys, Patrick Anthony Leonard, aged 13 years, of Creenahoe, Belcoo, lost his right eve. The plaintiff’s case was that while playing on the road during the luncheon interval he was struck by a stone and he sought damages against the master for negligence. Mr: C. L. Sheil (instructed by Messrs. Cooper and Cooper) was for plaintiff, Mr. J. D. Chambers, K.C., and Mr. J. Agnew (instructed by Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented the defendant. The defendant said it was customary for the boys to play on the road on which they had played in his predecessor’s time. Answering his Lordship, the witness agreed that he had no personal knowledge of that. Mr. Ferguson added that he had instructed the boys not to play on the road on Blacklion or Belcoo fair days and the days, immediately following. He had warned the children not to go on the road on the day of the accident as the previous day was Blacklion fair day. He said he was quite unaware that there were pupils playing on the road. In order to get a clear story of what happened he had asked the boys to write a letter stating what had occurred, but there was nothing in the nature of dictation.

In reply to Mr. Sheil, the defendant agreed that the road was the best, playground they had, as there was an open sewer in the yard. There had been a dancing class in the school during the lunch hour. Mr; Sheil commented that a girl pupil who had not been on the road had written in her exercise, book— “No one knows whether it was a ball or a stone that hit him,”

“Did that child imagine that story,” asked Counsel, to which the defendant replied that the girl heard the inquiry going on, and could think for herself and form her own conclusions. It was a description of what the girl had heard from other children. That pupil was only writing an essay. The witness mentioned that he had never seen children in Belcoo School throwing stones.         He agreed with Mr. Sheil that the Ministry of Education were apprehensive about children playing on the road, and that in a circular he had produced it was shown that between January and December, 1939, some 569 accidents to children at school had happened in Northern Ireland, and of that number 575 were due to the presence of the children on roads. He reiterated that he had taken all the care possible. Mrs. Annie McCabe, the first assistant in the school, and a number of pupils also gave evidence. The lord Chief Justice held that the supervision exercised was not unreasonable, saying that the accident was caused by a fellow-pupil who was acting playfully. Having detailed his findings as to fact, his Lordship entered judgment for the defendant, with costs.

February 14th 1942. £15 FINE AFFIRMED. KESH FARMER’S FAILURE TO PLOUGH

John. Spence, Bannaghbeg, Clonelly, Kesh, appealed to Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Friday against a fine of £15 and costs imposed on him at Kesh Betty Sessions for having, as alleged, failed to obey a direction of the Ministry of Agriculture to plough five acres. Mr. Aiden Herbert, solicitor, represented the appellant and Mr. J. Cooper was for the Ministry.

Opening the case Mr. Cooper said it was a somewhat peculiar case. The farm in question was almost twenty-five acres in extent. Appellant was visited by a couple of inspectors from the Ministry to whom he spoke of the difficulty of getting tractors to do the ploughing. To another inspector he said the land was not fit for ploughing. That official took him over the lands and, using a spade, pointed out to him that the soil was suitable for cultivation. He should have ploughed five acres but only cultivated a plot for potatoes and at the Petty Sessions a fine of £15 was imposed. At that Court appellant denied ownership of the farm and told the R.M. it was the property of his sister who lived in Co. Donegal for whom he acted as manager. Under the regulations, an occupier meant a person rated or liable to be rated to the poor rate in respect of the holding or who would be so rated or liable to be rated for the provisions of the Local Government (Rating and Finance) Act (N.I.), 1929, that was the Derating Act and included in relation to any holding, the occupier of which was absent from Northern Ireland, any agent or other person entrusted with the management of the land on his behalf. On appellant’s own statement that he managed the farm for his sister and that he was the herd he was convicted. Since then he (Mr. Cooper] had made a search and found that appellant was the person actually rated for the land (certificate produced). Mr. Herbert intimated that the defence was that the land was not arable.

Samuel Jordan, Ministry’s Inspector, said fifteen acres of the farm were arable. When defendant said the land was not arable witness got a spade, and showed him in the field he said was most suitable that there were four or five inches of soil.

Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness agreed that generally Clonelly was not an ideal district for tillage. He did not test the area he said was arable as there was no question raised by appellant at the time. Furrows in the fields showed that cultivation had been carried out previously.

  1. S. Flack, area officer, swore he visited the farm on 7th March and 26th May. Appellant complained of the difficulty of getting tractors to do work. There were about fifteen acres arable. He agreed that in general Fermanagh farmers were not very fond of ploughing. Appellant had taken out a crop of flax in 1940. In the witness box appellant swore that he was reared on this farm, owned by his sister, and never at any time had there been more than six or seven acres cultivated. In 1940 he got Samuel Mills to work the tractor plough on his land but owing to the rocky nature of the field he was unable to do the work. The soil was only two to four inches deep whereas one needed seven inches of soil to do successful work with the tractor. Appellant also got a man with horses and plough but his ploughman was no more successful than Mills. Mr. Cooper—I suggest you are what is known as a lazy farmer?

Appellant—I have had to work hard all my life.

Samuel Mills gave evidence of his unsuccessful effort to work the tractor plough on appellant’s land. On an adjoining farm he broke eight socks in the ploughing of three acres.

To Mr. Cooper—I believe with a different type of tractor yon could plough this land.

James Allen said he started to plough with a chill plough and gave it up as there was a danger of getting killed. He refused to do any more work on the farm. His Honour affirmed the lower court conviction and fine.

FEBRUARY 14, 1942. £120 REWARD FOR DOMESTIC SERVANT. SEVERE BURNS SUSTAINED. A domestic servant who received severe burns while working at eggs in the kitchen of her employer’s house; her clothing catching fire. and causing severe burns to face, right arm, shoulder and body, appeared before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions last week in connection with the recording of an agreement whereby the applicant .had agreed to accept £50 compensation, together with the sum of £10 costs, and £3 11s 0d medical expenses.

The applicant was Margaret Muldoon, Drumcullion, Dernacrieve, Co. Cavan, and the respondent Patrick Rooney, Sessiagh East, Inishmore, Lisbellaw. The matter had been referred to his Honour to see if the compensation was adequate or not. Mr. J; P. Black (for applicant) told his Honour that applicant was employed by respondent as domestic servant, and on the 10th March, 1941, at her employer’s residence she received serious burns.

Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B. (for respondent)—Not arising out of her work, according, to my instructions.

Proceeding, Mr. Black said that applicant was detained in Fermanagh County Hospital for a period of about, 4 weeks, and subsequently the agreement was arrived at as set out in the opening paragraph. Applicant gave evidence in the witness box. She said that respondent was in comfortable circumstances. Applicant had been living with a married sister since the accident had occurred, and had no means in the world at all.

Mr. Herbert—I am afraid it is more than a question of means. The doctor, he added, said that the only limitation she had was limitation of her arm on account of skin grafting. Her beauty might be injured, but beauty was not the subject of the Workmen’s Compensation Act.

Mr. Horace T. Fleming, surgeon in Fermanagh County Hospital, described the extent of applicant’s burns when she was admitted to hospital. He had again examined her that day and she was totally incapacitated for work.

In reply to Mr. Herbert, witness said that he did not think applicant could do the ordinary work of a house servant.

Mr. Herbert made an offer of £75 in settlement.        . .

Mr. Black said that applicant had agreed to accept £100. He thought she was meeting respondent very fairly in accepting £100.

His Honour—I am not inclined to sanction a settlement of £75.

His Honour made an award of £120, with £10 costs and £3 3s 0d medical expenses.

 

February 14th 1942. EVIDENCE AT INQUEST. The tragic death of a Kinawley school boy was investigated by Mr. James Mulligan, coroner; and a jury, at an inquest on 6th inst., on William John Thompson (7), Derryvran, Thompson’s Bridge, Kinawley, who was killed instantaneously the previous day by a motor lorry.

Head-Constable Thornton represented the police authorities, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B. (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) the driver of the lorry. James Molloy, a conductor on the bus, said the boy was travelling from Stragowna School to his home and got off at Thompson’s Bridge Post Office. Witness was helping other children off the bus; he heard the lorry go past and after a few momenta looked up to see that the accident had occurred. Bernard McGovern, Gortgesh, said he was standing on the roadside and saw the boy go forward from the bus and cross the load end collide with the lorry. He had seen the lorry pass the bus and it swerved as it met the boy, who, however, hit against the left front off side and fell, the wheel going over him. Dr. S. McQuaid, Derrylin, said the boy suffered from multiple injuries to the head and neck. Sergt. Devine gave evidence of measurements.

The lorry driver, Patrick Corrigan, Clonatrig, said he was driving from Derrylin—in the same direction as the bus was headed and the boy was walking— and saw the bus by the roadside at the Post Office. He was driving slowly and passed the bus. He saw no traffic on the road. When he had the engine of the lorry past the front of the bus he suddenly saw the boy a few feet in front of him, crossing the road. He applied his brakes and tried to avoid the boy, but after he got the front of the lorry past him he heard a noise and knew the boy was hit. He stopped and got out and found the rear wheel had passed over the boy’s head. There was four or five tons of sand on the lorry. A verdict was returned that death was caused by injuries received when the boy was knocked down and crushed by the lorry, loaded with sand, and that the accident was unavoidable. The funeral to the Protestant Cemetery, Derrylin, on Saturday, was very large and representative of all creeds and classes.

February 14th 1942. EDERNEY FARMER’S APPEAL CATTLE SEIZURE ECHO.

The seizure of seven cattle belonging to a young Ederney farmer and dealer, and the subsequent forfeiture of five of the animals, had a sequel at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Thursday, when David Jones, Crimlin, Ederney, from whom the animals were seized, appealed against their forfeiture of the five animals. Mr. G. Murnaghan appeared for the appellant and Mr. J. Cooper for the respondent authorities. Head Constable Conlin, Kesh, said the cattle were seized on 1st Sept. last on suspicion of being smuggled. Jones’ statement was that two black polly heifers were bought from John Kane, Kilgarry, and three from William Lunny, same place, on 35th June, 1940. Subsequently, Lunny and Kane stated the cattle were sold a year previously. Mr. Murnaghan said the whole thing was the result of a slip in regard to the date of the sale on the part of Lunny, who said 1939 instead of 1940. Kane, when questioned, said he could not remember the date but it was the same date as Lunny’s sale.

Five, witnesses having given evidence for the appellants, and Head-Constable Conlin (recalled) and Mr. J. McMenamy, veterinary surgeon, of the Ministry of Agriculture, for the respondents, Deputy Judge Ellison, G.C., dismissed the appeal.

1911 Donegal Vindicator.

Donegal Vindicator. 10th March 1911. LOCAL NOTES – By way of the coals of fire idea we mention that the Catch-my-Pals and friends are having a good concert in the Church School, on Thursday. 16th March, and if reports are true it promises to be a really good one. Mr Sealy Jeffares comes “with his name and fame” from Dublin. Mrs Lewis Lipsett is expected to make her debut, and rumour credits her with a really good voice. Mr Sparrow will sing, and many others coming with him commas ‘talented amateurs.’ Isn’t this nice of me? Maybe next time they will give me the eighteen pence for printing the posters. I want it badly. Then I’ve to complain that the managers of these affairs do not send the courtesy cards usual where civilization holds sway. Yet now and then reports of the proceedings are sent for publication. All of which, including the eighteen penny item, goes to prove that the bon ten of Ballyshannon are really very, very provincial, that they don’t know enough to go in when it rains.

I’m on this subject now. If they thought at all it would occur to these people and to others that where they are earning their bread and butter—some of them even get jam—is where they should leave any small dribs and drabs of cash they are bound to expend (note the ex).

I do not refer to ‘that awful crowd’ the Lipsett’ as their friends affectionately dub them. They are past praying for, but I do refer to otherwise thoughtful people, who should try, whether in a large way or a small way, to benefit the town, and enable it to keep its head above water. But they don’t. The printing is run mostly by Papists hence they must get good Protestant ink. It is very rubbishy, because the Papists eat Protestant loaves with a clear conscience— even in Lent.

Nor are the heretics only to blame. Every week considerable sums of money go away to Belfast, Dublin and elsewhere, money that could be left in town, but either from want of thought, or with deliberation, it is sent away at prices, in many instances, double what the work could be done for at home.

This may go on, I am powerless to prevent it, but it is not going on underground any longer. The people who are milking the town dry, and not even leaving the buttermilk in it, will have their services acknowledged, even if it is a benefit to them.

The Half-Holiday movement has extended to Ballyshannon, and a couple of meetings have been held on the subject. Unless it is gone about in the right way it will prove a pretty expensive business to make it compulsory. But by getting all the businesses to sign at the same time, and having only one set of advertisements and legal expenses, it can be worked out for a moderate sum. Anything less than compulsion is useless. There will always be a number of mean persons who otherwise would comply with the letter but breakthrough the spirit. Look at the holidays in the licensed trade for instance. All sign and put up shutters, but, with the exception of about half a dozen, trade goes on as usual. Let there be no loophole. A half-holiday for all or for none.

While in Bundoran on the look-out for an invitation to spend the first Sunday in April at the sea-side I dropped into Mr James Carroll’s and had a look at his newly got-up Skating Rink, It is a bit of all right. A splendid maple floor for skating, a room sixty feet long, lit by electricity. What could you wish for more? Adjoining is a fine billiard room, with a good table, and next door a commodious game room, where one may indulge in simple games, but not games of chance,—-just simple, childish games, the highest single stake allowed being a 1 penny. So that for a threepenny bit one can have a whole evening’s amusement. I’ve often had it too.

Donegal Vindicator Ballyshannon Friday June 16th 1911. The progress of Irish Industrial Development has been steady if not rapid. Year after year we have preached the doctrine but our voice was of one crying in the wilderness. But every good movement is sure to win in time and there are signs that the Industries of Ireland will receive a proper measure of support at, home, instead of having to look abroad for it. The importation of blouse lengths is now done almost surreptitiously by those ladies who believe that only, in Leeds can ‘style’ be discovered. Much, however yet remains to be done and not altogether by the purchaser. There are still too many shopkeepers who are afraid and more who are ashamed to push Irish made goods. Why this should be so is a mystery and a phase of Irish character not easily understood. The Irish made article is usually much better in quality—and since manufacturers have learned a little common sense,—it is generally as cheap, cheaper if we consider quality. To be sure the Sunlight myth is still all powerful, but there are no want of signs that as in the tobacco trade Ireland has stood up against an intolerable monopoly, so will it in the soap business. There is no superiority in the English made article over the Irish and if we went further we might not be afraid of being able to prove our statement. Irish housewives are to blame. They have the word in their months, they never take time to think and so it comes first to them, but if not, the grocer is only too willing to oblige. Let us each resolve to give our own country a chance and practise until we get it upon our tongues ‘Irish made, please.’ A branch of the Irish Industrial Association, should be formed in every town and village in Ireland. There are a sufficient number of earnest workers now in Ireland to carry them on. Three men in a town can work wonders when they set about it in earnest and all the average householder requires is to have the matter kept before him and repeated with sufficient persistency.

On Sunday Mr Walter Mitchell’s Pierrot crowd begin operations in Bundoran, and from appearances I would say they mean to make things hum. He has got together a galaxy of talent such as cannot be found many similar shows in Ireland, or perhaps out of it. I am asked to say that anyone may come without fear of vulgar songs offending the ear. That is good news.

There are sixteen policemen, several sergeants, sub-sergeants, and a handsome District Inspector in Ballyshannon, all for the purpose of keeping the inhabitants in order. Said inhabitants do not require such a large force or any force to compel them to keep the peace, but for an entire week two or three tramps—one a foul mouthed virago—have kept the two Ports in a turmoil but the police were conspicuously absent.

June 16th 1911. CO., FERMANAGH TRAGEDY. OLD MAN’S AWFUL FATE – BEATEN TO DEATH- TERRIBLE SCENE IN HOUSE. Lisnaskea, Friday. An appalling case of murder and attempted suicide has taken place near Lisnaskea, in an outlying mountain district. The police at Lisnaskea learned of the occurrence about nine o’clock last night.

The facts ascertained up to the present show that a man named Felix Scollan was living with, an old age pensioner named Owen Nolan, at Carrickawick, a townland about seven miles from Lisnaskea, in the direction of the mountains.

On Thursday a man named John Duffy was working at the house and in the evening the three men sat down to tea. The three men were sitting quietly in the kitchen having tea, when Scollan it is alleged suddenly and without             warning lifted a heavy stick from under the table, and commenced to attack the old man Nolan, belabouring him on the head. After several blows had been delivered Duffy tried to wrest the stick from Scollan but was unable to do so.

Duffy is an old man, and consequently his power to struggle with Scollan was ineffectual Scollan then procured a razor and attempted to commit suicide by cutting his throat. He inflicted a slight wound. Duffy proceeded to Lisnaskea and reported the matter to the police, a large party of whom arrived at the house with the greatest promptitude. Accompanying the police were Dr. Knox, a priest, the clerk of petty session and a magistrate, but on arrival at the scene they found Nolan had been some tine dead. Scollan was immediately arrested and conveyed to Lisnaskea Barracks.

June 16th 1911. GAELIC SPORTS IN BALLYSHANNON. The paths of the organiser of Sports in Ballyshannon is not strewn with roses, rather do his neighbours cart boulders to throw in the way. Last year when the Gaelic Sports were initiated by that most energetic of Irish athletes, Mr Toal, I R., his presumption was resented so fiercely that the Ballyshannon Brass Band refused to turn out on the occasion, but until we grow up to be a city this will probably continue to be our attitude towards any man who is not content to go to sleep with the rest of us.

The Aodh Ruadh Football and Hurling Club has made for itself a position that few similar organisations in the North-West occupy. Success has attended it at every turn, due entirely to steady perseverance and the keeping up in its ranks of a true sporting spirit. The football and hurling teams are popular wherever they go, and it may be added are usually successful. It was therefore only right that they should have real Irish athletic sports, and we have to congratulate them on the success which has met their efforts, modified as it was. Still there are signs that the Irish revival is taking hold, and we venture to predict that within a few years the event will become a regular Irish Carnival for the entire North-West.

Judges—Messrs J. J. Woods, James Daly, Cormac McGowan and M. D. Quigley.

Starters—F. G. Townsend, T J Kelly and J Kane.

DETAILS.

100 Yards—; 1. J. Gallagher; 2, H. Gallagher.

220 Yards Flat Handicap (open)—1. J E Irvine; 2, James Naughton; 3, D Dolan.

440 Yards Flat Handicap (open) — 1, H Gallagher; 2, James Naughton.

High Jump (open)—1, J E Irvine, 4ft. 10½ in. 2, James Naughton, 4ft. l0 in.

Schoolboy’s Race under 16 Years—1, Wm. Crawford; 2, B Dorian; 3, J. Lawn.

Half-Mile Championship (open); — 1, J Gallagher; 2, M Cleary; 2, Hugh Gallagher. Tie for second place.

Throwing the Weight, 161bs—1, E. Carbery; 2. F Dolan.

Sack Race—1, H Gallagher; 2, F Crawford.

One Mile Flat Handicap (open) — 1, M Cleary; 2, Patrick Crawford ; 2, J E, Irvine Tie for second place.

Slinging 581bs between legs without follow— 1. D J Crowley, I5ft. 1 in. 2, Edward Carbery; 3 James Naughton.

Egg and Spoon Race—1, Patrick Crawford; 2, T. J. Kelly.

Pucking Hurley Ball—1, James Daly; 2, J. Sheerin.

Marathon Race—1, Patrick Crawford; 2, J E Irvine; 3, John Sheerin. Time—Thirty minutes.

June 16th 1911. KING’S BAD QUARTER OF AN HOUR. COMES WHEN HE KISSES ‘MERE MEN’. AN EMPHATIC ROYAL OBJECTION. King George has a bad quarter of an hour in store at the Coronation It is when he has to submit to being kissed— not by the charming ladies of the aristocracy, but by quite a number of elderly male dignitaries. The performance will be commenced by the Archbishop of Canterbury, who will kneel at the King’s feet; place his hands between those of the King, and recite the time honoured formula of allegiance. Thereafter the Archbishop ‘kisseth the King’s left cheek.’

November 3rd 1911. Mr Frank Miller, Cycle Agent, Main Street, has removed to Market Street, as per announcement in another column.

During the week a Retreat was given to the children of Inismacsaint Parish, and was conducted by Father Doyle, of the Jesuit Order.

Mr Thomas. J. Kelly, Agent for the Pearl Life Assurance Company, at Ballyshannon, has been appointed Assistant Superintendent. He remains in Ballyshannon for the present to develop South Donegal. Mr William Ward, Bridge – End, Ballyshannon, succeeds him as Agent for the District.

Before purchasing your Winter Boots call at Munday & Co.’s East Port, Ballyshannon, where you can procure Footwear that will resist the excessive damp of the Winter months at lowest cash prices. Don’t forget to see the ‘Lee Boot.’ Special value in Men’s Nailed Derby’s at 8s 6d, wear guaranteed. Immense stock to select from. One price only. Exceptional Value in Blankets, Flannels, Hosiery, Shirts, at Munday & Co-’s, East, Port, Ballyshannon.

HOME RULE MEETING IN GARRISON. A SKETCH OF THE PROCEEDINGS. BY SEAGHAN. A Home Rule Meeting in Garrison is not an everyday occurrence, and, though the day was anything but a pleasant one, in company with a few friends,—Home Rulers,—I put in an appearance. The picturesque village, which is situate on the banks of the far-famed Melvin was, notwithstanding the moisture, in gala attire. The day being a Holiday (1st November) all the country folk crowded in,—not that I wish it to be understood that it was due to the fact of it being a day of rest that the multitude was so large, No ; these men,—and women, too—are always ready to answer the call of duty, and would surmount all obstacles to: further on the cause.

Almost all the surrounding towns sent contingents with bands and banners, and amongst the number I noticed the Erne ’98 Flute Band under the baton of Mr John Kane, the Cashelard Flute Band, and Belleek Flute Band. Several Divisions of the Ancient Order of Hibernians (B.O.E.) were present, and paraded the village immediately before the meeting was held.

There were a lot of people wearing temperance badges—and some few without them. However, on the whole, I think there was more tea than whisky drank on Wednesday.

Very Rev. Fr. McCleary, P.P., Garrison, was moved to the chair, and, after a short criticism of the Home Rule question, and having read statistics as to the loss the country sustained by emigration, introduced Canon Keown, P. P., Enniskillen whom he said, being a parishoner of their own, he was sure would receive a hearty welcome.

Canon Keown, P.P., familiar to every Lough Derg pilgrim, came to the front aud received a great ovation. ; He spoke in a clear, ringing tone, and is, what he looks, a born fighter. He said times were changed sinoe the last Home Rule Meeting was held in Garrison twenty- nine years ago. That meeting was proclaimed, and the village was iuvadad by Lancers from Dundalk, and a large force of police, and the people had to wade the Garrison river to receive William O’Brien. I . expeotad to hear some¬thing more about William but was disappointed. He roferfeclto English misriilo in Ireland, and spoke of the resources of the distriot,

The next speaker was Mr Wray, Eniiiskillsn,. and any person could see; lie was a lawyer-maa by the rapidity with which he turned orer bis notes. He hammered awav at the Lords amidstCanon Keown, P.P., familiar to every Lough Derg pilgrim, came to the front and received a great ovation. He spoke in a clear, ringing tone, and is, what he looks, a born fighter. He said times were changed since the last Home Rule Meeting was held in Garrison twenty- nine years ago. That meeting was proclaimed, and the village was invaded by Lancers from Dundalk, and a large force of police, and the people had to wade the Garrison River to receive William O’Brien. I expected to hear something more about William but was disappointed. He referred to English misrule in Ireland, and spoke of the resources of the district.

The next speaker was Mr Wray, Enniskillen, and any person could see he was a lawyer-man by the rapidity with which he turned over his notes. He hammered away at the Lords amidst cries of ‘Down with them.’ He said they had wrecked Gladstone’s and other great men’s efforts. He referred to the visit of the Lord and Lady Lieutenant to Enniskillen, and had a shie at the landlords en passant. One of the arguments he said that was brought against Home Rule was that they wanted Separation. Before they could have Separation they would have to destroy the Navy, and they all knew what that meant.

The Chairman then introduced Mr John Fitzgibbon, M P of Castlerea, A good-humoured gentleman with a goatee, and. wearing a tile hat, which he doffed before he made his bow. He is like a man that could hustle. I wonder if he is a cattle-driver? He owes the English Government a ‘wee’ grudge, having suffered imprisonment for the cause. There is one thing certain; he must have kissed the blarney stone. That was a well-timed piece of flattery when he said he wondered if Sir William Carson knew, when he was making use of all that bunkum about Ulster going to fight, if there was such fine-looking men and women in the province as he (Mr Fitzgibbon) saw before him. But it was true all the same, and I hae my doots if Maguire’s men would come out second best in the tussle. He advised them —and he felt sure every Nationalist would agree with him — to be tolerant to everybody who differed with them,—whether in politics or religion, and never be the first to start a quarrel. He related a jocular incident that took place between himself and Captain Craig, and said the Captain and he parted the best of friends. He spoke at length on the Home Rule question. He travelled all the way from the West to be present, and I am sure he was well pleased with the reception he got.

Mr Fitzgibbon proposed a vote of thanks to the Chairman, Rev Father McCleary, and said he hoped that when they next came together on that hillside Ireland would have regained its rights. Canon Keown seconded, and spoke of what Father McCleary had done in the way of wiping out landlordism. Father McCleary suitably responded and the meeting terminated.

November 3rd 1911. FUNERAL OF MR WILLIAM McVITTY, CASHEL, BALLYSHANNON. The funeral took place on Saturday last, to the family burying ground, Mullinashea, Cemetery, of the above gentleman. Deceased was one of the most respected inhabitants of the neighbourhood, a fact which was strikingly testified by the large numbers who attended at the obsequies. The chief mourners were—Mr Wm. McVitty, (nephew) and Mr W H Stack. Canon Holmes officiated at the graveside.

November 10th 1911.MRS WINIFRED GAVIGAN. At an advanced age the death took place on Tuesday .last of Mrs Winifred Gavigan, at the residence of her son, James Gavigan, Clyhore, Belleek. For some short time deceased had been ailing, being greatly affected at the departure of her favourite granddaughter for America recently, also a grandson who had recently visited her. By a strange coincidence it was only on the day of her demise a letter was received from her granddaughter from America asking her to cheer up. The Gavigan family are highly respected in the district, and deceased was one of the old inhabitants of Drimholme, the Travers family, a well-known Irish sept in the neighbourhood. As might be expected, on Tuesday the funeral was large and representative, St Patrick’s, Kilbarron, being crowded at the Requiem Mass solemnised by Rev C. Cunningham, C. C. The remains, in a brass mounted oak coffin, were borne to the hearse by immediate relatives after the service in the Church. The chief mourners were her sons, James and Hugh Gavigan; her daughter, Mrs Flynn. Other relatives, John, May, Kate, and James Gavigan; James Flynn, son-in-law; Hugh, John, James, Michael and Charles Flynn, Joseph, James and James Gavigan, junr.; Owen Gavigan, Edward Gallagher, James Cleary, Corner House, Belleek; John and Edward Cleary, Bridget, Michael, and E. J. Cleary, cousins to deceased. Rev C. Cunningham also officiated at the grave, and at his request prayers were offered for the repose of the soul of deceased.—R.I.P. Mr Edward Stephens had charge of the funeral arrangements.

November 10th 1911. DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MR JOHN F. TIMONEY. On October 30th, in the quiet little church- yard of Toura were laid to rest the mortal remains of Mr. John F Timoney, a well-known Dublin business-man, Mr Timoney started his commercial career twenty-five years ago as an apprentice to the late Mr .Robert Sweeny, Ballyshannon. Of a refined nature, good address and gentlemanly bearing, his promotion was rapid, and he passed on to some of the highest positions in the leading Cork and Dublin warehouses enjoying all the time the unbounded confidence of his employers, and the love and esteem of the hands under him. Amid the temptations and trials of city life his example, advice and purse were always available to the unfortunate youths who went under. Some eight years ago he started business on his own account, but a chill caught in crossing the Channel was followed by an attack of pleurisy, the effects of which have brought to a close at the early age of 43 years a career of great promise. Six months ago he bade farewell to city life and returned to his ancestral home to lay down life’s burden in the spot where he was born, and where the happy days of his childhood were spent. During his long illness no murmur or complaint did he utter. Perfectly conscious to the last moment, and fortified by the Rites of Holy Church, he calmly awaited the dread summons with a resignation, confidence and serenity which were not of this world. Of him it may be truly said, ‘As he lived so he died’—in peace. Rev P. A. McCleary, P. P. officiated at the graveside, and delivered an eloquent panegyric on the many good qualities of the deceased, and commending the example of his beautiful life.

The chief mourners were Messrs J Timoney, J P, sad P. Timoney, brothers; P Slavin, brother-in-law, J Flanagan, B Flanagan, J O’Dare, F O’Dare, J Flanagan, M Flanagan, B Flanagan, B Keown, P Keown, T B Feely, cousins. Amongst those present or represented in the immense funeral cortege were:—Dr Timoney, J. P., Rev G. C. O’Keefe, Dr. Kelly, M Cassidy, J. P., E Kelly, J P, J Dully, JP; J. O Reilly, J. P, E Kerr, J P; B Devine, Strabane; J McGonigle, Ballyshannon; J Beacom, T. Beacom, E. Daly, J. Daly, E Knox, M Knox, W Gallagher, S Moohan, J. Cleary, B. Cleary, J Gallagher, R. Donaldson, S. W. Donaldson, J McBrien, J Busbey, P Montgomery, F Slavin, J Gallagher, T Gallagher, R. Freeborn, J. Keown, J. Johnston, R. Elliott. J. Keown, P. Keown, R. J. Dick, N T; Wm Ferguson, J (D) Keown. J. (P) Keown, J Campbell, E. Campbell, J. Earls, P. Keown, W. Treacy, F. McBrien, J Flanagan, J. Duffy, D. Duffy, J. Kelly, R. W. Dundas, J. Campbell, P. Elliott, D. McGuinness, ? McGuinness, P. Elliott, B. O’Brien, E. J. Johnston, O. Mills, P. J. McBrien, R Morrow, J. Earls, J. Owens, J. Gallagher, J. Greene.

It might be mentioned the funeral was the largest to Toura graveyard for many years in fact since its dedication. The greatest sympathy goes out in the district to the family, as all admired John F Timoney.—R.I.P.

November 10th 1911. CHARLES GALLAGHER, DERRYNASEER, BALLYSHANNON. On Thursday last, in the family enclosure, The Rock Graveyard, Ballyshannon, were laid to rest the mortal remains of the late Charles Gallagher, Derrynaseer, Ballyshannon. The respect paid to the memory of deceased and his family was manifested by the large numbers attending the obsequies, including representatives from Counties Donegal, Leitrim, Sligo, and Fermanagh. At his demise he was over eighty years of age and his Christian and patriotic life was portrayed in a neat panegyric delivered by Rev M. Kelly, C. C., Kinlough, who officiated at the grave, and described deceased as a man who never neglected his duties to God, and who ever kept the end of life in view, resigning himself to the Will of the Almighty. He ever kept before him that ‘If man remembers his last end he shall never sin,’ Father Kelly then asked for the prayers of those present for the repose of deceased. The funeral, as mentioned, was very large, and the chief mourners were his sons, Hugh Michael, Francis and Thady Gallagher (sons); Patrick (grandson); Thady, Edward, and P Gallagher (nephew of deceased). At the grave the usual prayers were said, and a large number waited to see the last sod laid on Charles Gallagher. R.I.P.

1908. Irvinestown court, Old Age Pensions, Donegal V Fermanagh in hurling and a fatal drowning.

12th Sept 1908. IRVINESTOWN PETTY SESSIONS. TWO NEW MAGISTRATES. DRUNKS ON THE DECREASE. Small and simple were the cases of drunkenness at these petty sessions on Tuesday last, but long and tedious were the number of summonses against parents by the School Attendance Committee for neglecting to send their children to school. Many were the excuses offered, but the magistrates considered the cases in their proper light, and in nearly all cases imposed a fine. Mr. John Gray, R.M., presided, and there were also present:—Messrs. P. Riley, B. Bleakley, and Wm. Ginn, the two former being sworn in as Justices of the Peace at the beginning of the Court.

Constable Glynn summoned Jas. Doherty, Irvinestown, for being drunk and disorderly. This was an adjourned case from 8th June last. As defendant had conducted himself well in the meantime he was let off with a fine of 1 shilling.

Sergeant Dooley v. James Keys of Legnameltone for being drunk and disorderly. Complainant said the defendant was behaving in a very rowdy manner at Lisnarick Sports. He refused to give his name and when asked where he lived he said at home. Fined 6s. Same V. John Cassidy, for being drunk on the night of the 2nd inst. Defendant’s wife appeared and said he had taken the pledge.

Mr. Gray: Why did lie not appear himself? — He is away at a fair, sir.

Mr. Gray: That is no excuse; he should have appeared if he had any regard for the offence. Fined 7s 6d and costs.

TOO LAZY TO WORK. Sergeant Dooley summoned a youth named Jack Irvine for vagrancy. The sergeant stated that he found the defendant asleep in a shed. He was lately discharged from the workhouse, and was a very bad boy. He was hired with different farmers, but he would only remain, a day or so with any of them.

Mr. Gray: In my opinion he will be a criminal all the days of his life; at least he is on the right road for one. Their worships sent the defendant to gaol for 14 days with hard labour.

SCHOOL ATTENDANCE CASES. The following were fined by the School Attendance Committee, through their officer, Mr. John Dolan, for not sending their children to school:—James Somerville, 2s 6d; Wm. Garrity, 2s 6d; Thomas Hetherington, Is; Ellen Graham, Is; Elizabeth O’Kane, 2s; James Keys, Is; James Balfour, 2s; Patrick McHugh, 2s; Cassie McDonagh, Is. In the cases of John McPike, P. McCaffery, and James Manley the magistrates made school attendance orders against them.

12th Sept 1908. OUR READERS’ VIEWS. OLD AGE PENSION.

Dear Mr. Editor,—As there seems to be some difference of opinion as to how a farmer’s income should be calculated will you kindly allow me space for a few observations about how, in my opinion, this should be done. Of course I don’t pretend to say that the figures I give are exactly accurate to the shilling, but they will point out the lines on which to proceed.

The farmer, being a producer, the only way you can arrive at his income is to leave a value on all he produces and then deduct whatever expenses are incidental in the cost of such production.

Let me take the case of a farmer with whom I am well acquainted. He and his wife are over 70 years of age, and unable to work or attend to themselves. He has one son, and keeps a servant man and a servant girl. The son of course works on the farm, and surely no government or right-thinking person would deny wages to all the sons or daughters of age, that work on the farm. They are neither slaves nor bondsmen.

The total produce of this farm on a good season is as follows (On a bad year it would be about half the value).

10 stacks of oats at £4 each ..£40

3 peaks of hay at £4 each .. £12

1 acre potatoes, value  £15

1 acre flax, value £21

A quantity of turnips, value £10.

Butter and milk of 4 cows, value £36.

4 pigs fattened  £20.

3 calves sold £9.

Value of grazing land              £8.

Total value of all production £171

Expenses incurred in producing the above: — Wages and board to servant man …………£36;

Wages and board to servant girl £30

Wages and board, allowed–to son £40.

Rent, and taxes £8

Cost of feeding 4 Cows and 3 calves, summer and winter £24.

Manures and seed of various kinds £7.

Extra-hands for corn, flax, turf,- &c.  £3.

Price of scutching flax £3.

Price and cost of feeding and fattening 4 pigs. £10.

Cast of feeding and upkeep of horse £26.

Wear and tear of carts, harness, ploughs, harrows, grubbers, rollers, spades, shovels, graips, barrows tubs, pots, pans, &c. &c. £10

Repairs and upkeep of farm, house, and offices £5.

Losses on stock and crop £5

Doctor’s fees, clergymen, beggars of various kinds  £3.

Total                             £210

Please note that I did not allow anything for board and clothing of the old people. Besides there are other expense that I don’t like to occupy your space in mentioning. Fowls of various kinds I have left out, because I firmly believe that the cost is at least , equal to the profit. The income of a farmer is always uncertain,. but the expenses are constant and sure. You will see from the above, and I have quoted from the most favourable season, that the farmer’s income is mostly a negative one. Very sincerely yours. VIGILANT. (Card enclosed.)

19th Sept 1908. GAELIC FIELDS. ULSTER CHAMPIONSHIP.

FERMANAGH V DONEGAL.

On Sunday last at Bundoran, Fermanagh and Donegal crossed camans in their fixture in the provincial championship in hurling. The honour of representing the Maguire County fell to the lot of the Maguires (county champions), and the O’Neill’s. Donegal’s team, was composed principally of the Bundoran teams, Sinn Fein and St. Patrick’s.

The match was fixed originally by the Provincial Council for Sunday, 20th September, but owing to the excursions ceasing on Sunday the 13th, an arrangement was come to by which it was agreed to play the match on that date.

Mr. E. Kerrins N.T., set the ball agoing at 3.30 in the presence of a fairly large crowd of spectators. Donegal were the first to get under way and bore down on the Fermanagh goal, but Wilson and Slevin were not found wanting, and the leather again travelled np field. Again Donegal returned to the attack, and again they were repulsed; Fermanagh backs playing a

splendid game. For some time now the play was in mid-field, but Fermanagh at last got a run up the left wing, and Carleton drove hard and fast for the Donegal citadel, but Gallagher made a fine save, which, however, resulted in a fifty for Fermanagh. Slevin took the fifty, but it proved abortive. Donegal now got possession and from a rush in front of the Fermanagh goal scored their first point—the only point during the first half.

On resuming, the play for the first ten minutes was altogether in favour of Fermanagh—their passing and combination being splendid. Donegal’s backs were sorely pressed, and their custodian Gallagher, was called upon to save on several occasions, which he did coolly and in fine style. Fermanagh, however, returned again and again to the attack, and as last broke down all opposition, and up went the red flag, amidst the cheers of their supporters. The play was now of rather an even nature nevertheless the ball travelled rapidly from wing to wing. Donegal again got possession, and Naughton drove up well in front of Fermanagh’s goal, where a scuffle took place which resulted in a minor for Donegal. After the puck-out some splendid play took place both goals being visited in turn but without result. At last Donegal got the leather and succeeded in scoring the equalising point. There was yet seven minutes to full time—time enough to lose or win a hurling match—and both teams settled down to work with a will, each striving hard for victory, but the gods had decreed otherwise, and a brilliant match ended in a draw of 3 points each.

The game had much in it to commend itself to the spectators to give encouragement to the workers in the cause, and to popularise the game itself. It was played throughout in a spirit worthy of the Gael. It should be set down as a headline to some of our county clubs, who are so prone to bring discredit on the fair name of the Gael. We trust they will copy the headline carefully, and we would then suggest committing it to memory.

19th Sept 1908. SAD FATALITY ON LOUGH ERNE. BOAT OVERTURNED. FOUR YOUNG MEN DROWNED. A drowning accident, of an unusually sad character occurred on. Upper Lough Erne on Tuesday evening. It appears that five young men were coming from Belturbet after seeing a friend away who was leaving for America. On the return journey it is said an altercation took place, with the result that the boat was overturned and four out of the five were drowned. A young man named Fitzpatrick alone escaped. The bodies have not yet been recovered. The names of the young men drowned are Fitzpatrick, Martin, Corey, and Fitzpatrick.

1842 – Knockers, St Angelo,Pills, Stagecoaches and death of Richard Dane.

13 January 1842. TO THE ENNISKILLEN PUBLIC. The Amateur Band and the Band and Impartial Reporter. Our old musical friend has given us a few sulky growls last week — a dying kick of a most harmless strength – evidently a worsted effort. Among his venomous fabrications he attempted to insinuate that the injured rappers and bridge dilapidations were the work of our mischievous hands. In such a stride of his falsity, we felt it only necessary to point to a recollection of the rapper hubbub, when week after week the public were dosed with vollies of his Billingsgate, against the 30th, as the perpetrators. In answer to our simple but staggering argument old sulky says— ‘‘Our townsmen will recollect that we did not spare the 30th depot for its misdeeds, nor rest till they re-placed every knocker and bell-pull that they destroyed, which they did through Mr. Christopher Gamble, and which we then published. Yet in the vain endeavour to falsify, our statement, this military is now charged with the brilliant action.

“The 76th need no defence at our hands. Under Majors Grubbe and Martin their conduct has been a credit to her Majesty’s service, and a comfort to the people of Enniskillen.’’

In the name of common sense what could induce the poor fool to add the last three lines in particular. Why lug in the name of the 76th, who were not here at the time alluded to. We hope, for the credit of the town, he is not itching to blackguard then in the ruffiantly manner he did the officers of the 30th, and for some of which may be remembered an occasion on which a respectable shopkeeper felt called on to tell him that but for the provost’s presence he would treat him as he deserved, and likewise hinted some very appropriate allusions; and now behold his sucking hypocrisy to the 76th!!! Take him from his own low cunning and his redoubtable self and his ass have about an equal quality if not an equal quantity of brains.

As to his prophetic guessing at the writer of these replies one can only tell him in one contradiction of his statement that the youngest among us would deserve to be served as an idle schoolboy if he could not write with more sound sense and evince a better education than the learned editor of the renowned Impartial Reporter.

Signed on behalf of the Band,

  1. L. ELLIOTT,
  2. ELLIOTT,
  3. ELLIOTT,
  4. ELLIOTT,
  5. BLEAKLEY,
  6. S. HURLES,
  7. CADDY.

 

COUNTY OF FERMANAGH. TO BE LET. From the first day of February next for such term as may be agreed upon, SAINT ANGELO, at present occupied by Andrew Johnston Esq. CONTAINING 133 ACRES  IRISH PLANTATION MEASURE Of PRIME LAND in the best condition. THIS most desirable FARM, upon which there is a comfortable Dwelling-house, extensive Offices, a garden and two orchards – is beautifully situate on the banks of Lough Erne, opposite Ely-Lodge, within four miles of Enniskillen—possessing the great advantage of communication by water with the county town and every part of the lake. For particulars apply to Francis G. Johnston Esq, 4, Beak Street, Regent-street, London or Robert Keys, Fort -Lodge, Enniskillen, or 16,Bolton Street, Dublin. Dated 17th Nov, 1841.

KEARSLEY’S ORIGINAL WIDOW WELCHE’S FEMALE P1LIS. So long and justly celebrated for their peculiar virtues, are strongly recommended, haying obtained the sanction and approbation of most Gentlemen of the Medical Profession, as a safe and valuable Medicine in effectually, removing obstructions,, and relieving all the “inconveniences” to which the female frame is liable, especially those which, at an early period of , life, frequency arise from want of exercise and general debility of the system: they create an appetite, correct indigestion, remove giddiness and nervous headache, and are eminently useful in flatulent disorders, pains in the stomach, shortness of breath, and palpitation, of the heart being perfectly innocent, may be used with safety in all seasons and climates.

It is necessary to inform the public that KEARSLEY’S ORIGINAL and GENUINE MEDICINE of this description ever made, and has been prepared by them for more than FIFTY YEARS!! Purchasers are particularly requested to remark that, as a testimony of authenticity, each Bill of Directions contains an affidavit, and bears the signature of “C. KEARSLEY,” in writing, and each box is wrapped in white paper. Sold wholesale and retail, at Butler’s Medical Hall, 54 Lower Sackville Street, Dublin by H. BEVAN, Enniskillen and by the appointed Agents in every city and town in Ireland.

6-1-1842. SHAREHOLDER COACH. By a report of an adjourned meeting of the subscribers it will be seen, the Shareholder has ceased running for the .present. It was well expressed by our former High Sheriff, Simon Armstrong, Esq., “that it was the child of Fermanagh enterprise,” and had proved itself capable of a large amount of benefit to this and surrounding counties, by establishing a heretofore unknown facility between this and the metropolis and was supposed perfectly capable of a permanent existence, had it been as well supported in its trading as it is thought it might have been. The Gentry, Clergy, Traders and Farmers, have certainly at all times subscribed most liberally, but something more was required, and therefore it was thought better to suspend it for the present than continue to draw so heavily, from the subscribers. To Mr Gossen it is due to state the willingness manifested by him and partners to accommodate the inhabitants of Enniskillen, and we trust his coach will meet with a studied support. As regards the Shareholder, we must say for ourselves, that besides being a shareholder we strictly confined our business to it, and believe we may with truth boast that in the way of trade, we paid more money into its parcel office than any other trader in Fermanagh.

6-1-1842. LOCAL CROWN SOLICITORS.-—We perceive that the Local Crown Solicitors of the, different counties throughout Ireland have been placed on salaries, and the situation rendered permanent. Their duty will be to prosecute in all criminal cases at Quarter Sessions in future. This judicious arrangement of the Attorney-General will be the means of having the law carried into Effect in many instance, where offences would otherwise have escaped their due punishment, and will, we have no doubt, tend in a great degree, to repress public crime.

6-1-1842. ACCIDENT BY BELFAST COACH.—Friday evening last as the clerk of the peace was returning from the Newtownbutler Sessions the Belfast mail from Enniskillen came in contact with his car between the Bellview turn and the new entrance to Castle Coole which was near being the cause of very serious mischief. Mr. Frederick Nixon and Mr. Attorney A. Collum sitting on the side of the car next the coach were the sufferers. The coach and car having met at the sudden round of the road came into contact; the wheel of the car got fastened between those of the coach by which one of Mr. Nixon’s legs received an injury that was declared by the Doctor the most severe he ever saw without a fracture and Mr. Collum had his trowsers (sic) quite torn, but fortunately no serious injury to his legs. The car was totally unable to avoid the collision as the coach having had no lamps lighted, nor the horn sounding, at such a critical place which should have been the case. The driver of the car shouted to the coach, but was either unheeded or unheard; this spot was certainly the most unfortunate on the road for the want of those necessary precautions on the part of the coach, and might have led to the loss, of life. The Dublin mail was met half an hour before and had its lamps lighted and its horn sounding and surely a later hour, and a more, dangerous part of the road, must have required the Belfast mail to be equally provided against the chance of accident. We understand the injured gentlemen are about to have legal recourse not only as regards themselves but as a duty to the public, to prevent a like occurrence in future.

6-1-1842. LIBERALITY TO THE POOR. The Right Hon. The Earl and Countess of Belmore have, we understand, within the past and present weeks, distributed large quantities of blanketing and clothing in the district of Castlecoole to meet the very inclement and distressing season to the poor, who have at all times been objects of the kind attention of this noble house.

The Rev. Mr. Storey, with his usual munificence, has given £10 to Mr. Thomas Beatty, of Newtownbutler to buy flannel for the poor of the parish of Galloon.

6-1-1842. Mr. Hill Parkinson, head armourer of the Enniskillen ordnance department, left this town on Monday on a tour of inspection of the constabulary arms, through the Connaught district, having only returned from the inspection of this district through Donegal downwards. We understand the arms of the constabulary force are undergoing a most strict inspection as to effectiveness..

3-2-1842. DEATH OF RICHARD DANE, ESQ. It has seldom been our melancholy duty to record the death of a gentleman more universally regretted throughout a very numerous and extensive circle of relatives and friends, as well as by all to whom he was known, either personally, or by character than the deceased Mr. Dane. Exclusive of the possession of every ennobling principle that prompts the heart to continued acts of benevolence and friendship, Mr, Dane was perhaps, one of the kindest and most indulgent agents that could be selected to preside over so large a body of tenantry as that of the Castlecoole, Fermanagh Estates-in which situation he succeeded his father and grandfather. In him the distressed had a sure friend, and the suffering an attentive ear and a feeling mind; and in many hearts his memory will be long and reverently cherished. Mr. Dane breathed his last at his residence, Killyhevlin, near this town, on Saturday last, the 29th Jan., in his 73rd year, surrounded by all the members of his own family, and several of his affectionate relatives, who diligently attended him through his severe illness. Some time since he underwent amputation in one of his toes, from continued gout, which terminated in mortification in the body, in spite of the best medical skill. He was a Justice of the Peace for the counties Cavan, Tyrone and Fermanagh since the year 1802 and was also a Deputy Lieutenant of this county, and one of its oldest Grand Jurors. He filled the office of Provost of’ Belturbet, in the county of Cavan for thirty years, up to the introduction of the corporate reform act; and his ancestors filled the same honourable situation in the Corporations, both of Enniskillen and Belturbet, at various times for nearly the last three centuries. His remains were interred in Enniskillen church-yard, on Tuesday at twelve o’clock; the funeral was a very large and respectable one, consisting of all creeds, and was attended by the Earl of Belmore, and a number of the gentry of this and the neighbouring counties. The hearse was followed by the town police under the command of Capt. Henderson and by mourning carriages containing his sons, Paul Dane, Esq. Dr. Richard Dane, 29th Regt., W. A. Dane, Esq.; his son-in –law, Acheson O’Brien, Esq., Captain Corry and other immediate connexions, followed by the carriages of Lord Belmore, Daniel Auchinleck, Esq, and a great number of other carriages and cars. About250 walked in scarfs and bands, preceded by several Protestant and Roman Catholic Clergymen, and the entire procession amounted to several thousands. The body was met at the Church yard gate by the Revds. R. P. Cleary and Chas. Maude, by both of whom the funeral service was performed.

The Old Age Pension 1908.

The coming of the Old Age Pension was an absolute milestone in the lives of the elderly of that Era. Most of the elderly were in dire poverty and only family affection kept them in the corner of the cabin and huddled up to the fire. Now in receipt of five shillings a week (Out Door Relief from the Workhouse was just one shilling a week) the elderly pensioners were now a valuable asset to the income of the house – more so than they had ever been before.

The Old-Age Pensions Act 1908 was an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom, passed in 1908. The Act is often regarded as one of the foundations of modern social welfare in the United Kingdom and forms part of the wider social welfare reforms of the Liberal Government of 1906–1914. The Act provided for a non-contributory old age pension for people over the age of 70, with the cost being borne by younger generations. It was enacted in January 1909 and paid a weekly pension of 5s a week (7s 6d for married couples) to half a million who were eligible. The level of benefit was deliberately set low to encourage workers to also make their own provision for retirement. In order to be eligible, they had to be earning less than £31. 10s. per year, and had to pass a ‘character test’; only those with a ‘good character’ could receive the pensions. You also had to have been a UK resident for at least 20 years to be eligible and people who hadn’t worked their whole life were also not eligible. Also excluded were those in receipt of poor relief, ‘lunatics’ in asylums, persons sentenced to prison for ten years after their release, persons convicted of drunkenness (at the discretion of the court), and any person who was guilty of ‘habitual failure to work’ according to one’s ability.

The Night of the Big Wind (Irish: Oíche na Gaoithe Móire) was a powerful European windstorm that swept across Ireland beginning in the afternoon of 6 January 1839, causing severe damage to property and several hundred deaths; 20% to 25% of houses in north Dublin were damaged or destroyed, and 42 ships were wrecked. The storm attained a very low barometric pressure of 918 hectopascals (27.1 inHg) and tracked eastwards to the north of Ireland, with gusts of over 100 knots (185 km/h; 115 mph), before moving across the north of England to continental Europe, where it eventually dissipated. At the time, it was the worst storm to hit Ireland for 300 years. The storm developed after a period of unusual weather. Heavy snow, rare in Ireland, fell across the country on the night of 5 January, which was replaced on the morning of 6 January by an Atlantic warm front, which brought a period of complete calm with dense, motionless, cloud cover. Through the day, temperatures rose well above their seasonal average, resulting in rapid melting of the snow.

Later on 6 January, a deep Atlantic depression began to move towards Ireland, forming a cold front when it collided with the warm air over land, bringing strong winds and heavy rain. First reports of stormy weather came from western County Mayo around noon, and the storm moved very slowly across the island through the day, gathering strength as it moved. By midnight the winds reached hurricane force. Contemporary accounts of damage indicate that the Night of the Big Wind was the most severe storm to affect Ireland for many centuries. It is estimated that between 250 and 300 people lost their lives in the storm.

The Night of the Big Wind became part of Irish folk tradition. Irish folklore held that Judgment Day would occur on the Feast of the Epiphany, 6 January. Such a severe storm led many to believe that the end of the world was at hand. The Old-Age Pensions Act 1908 introduced pensions for over-70s, but many Irish Catholics prior to the Registration of Births and Deaths (Ireland) Act, 1863 had no birth registration. One of the questions used to establish proof of age was whether the applicant remembered the Night of the Big Wind and of course they all clearly remembered it. Joseph Murphy puts it into verse.

OLD AGE PENSIONERS.

“God save you this morning, my dear old friends,

For you both seem hale and hearty,’

Were the words which I said at the foot of the lane

To Kate and Pat McCarthy.

“God save you avic,” said Pat and Kate,

’Twas your name we just had mentioned,

For we know you’ll explain to us fair and straight

How to look for our Old Age Pensions.”

 

I said, our faithful friend “The Herald’

Explained the matter clearly,

If I knew how long they were in the world,

And the rate of their income yearly,

I then could tell them how they stood,

When I’d hear how they were stationed;

And. in order that I might do some good,

I would like an explanation.

 

Scon Pat began to tell his age,

But was inclined to stutter,

Kate begged his pardon at this stage

Till she’d explain the matter.

Kate told me all the days and dates

When both were little babies,

With that characteristic flow of speech—

The birth-right of the ladies.

 

“I was six mouths owl the ‘Windy Night’

That tossed my father’s dwellin,

And Pat’s my senior just a week

I heard his mother, tellin’;

You know our income is not big

Since Pat’s too frail for diggin’.

I work with fowl, and feed a pig.

And do a little spriggin’.”

 

I said they just were in the sun,

That I could see no prevention,

When both were nearing seventy-one,

To keep them from the pension,

And told them not to make delay,

While the days were calm and warm,

But to The Office go today

For their Application Forms.

 

To take their forms to the priest,

And he’d show them how to fill them,

And he’d search the parish books for proof

Of the date when both were children.

The officer would have when round

Their claims investigated,

But they most receive the full amount,

From the facts which she had stated.

 

They’d each receive a crown a week,

’Twould keep them snug and tidy,

’Twould be for them there, in snow or sleet,

At The Office every Friday

Kate wished a blessing on my way,

And love from all the girls

While Pat said every pension day,

He’d always buy ‘The Herald.’

  • Crown = Five shillings.

JOSEPH MURPHY.