1817. ERNE PACKET. Typhus deaths, Kościuszko, Robbery of the Belfast Mail.

25-12-1817. THE MARQUIS D’ANTONELLE, better known in the revolutionary history of France by the name of Pierre Antoine, died lately at Arles, his native place, aged seventy, he was a Member of the Convention, in which he acted a very distinguished part; was persecuted by Robespierre; pursued by the Directory; and neglected by Bonaparte. His political writings were numerous, and memorable for their ability. He was one of the principal Editors of the famous Journal des Hombres Libres. At the restoration of the Bourbons in 1814, he published a pamphlet, in which he openly embraced their cause.

25-12-1817. ADVANTAGES OF CLEANLINESS.—Tuesday, at a meeting of the Subscribers to the House of Recovery, or Fever Hospital, Waterford, it was stated from the proper Committee, that 1,120 dwellings, which had been whitewashed for the poor people, and provided with fresh straw beds, had since whitewashing, sent but four patients to the House. It would be difficult to conceive a stronger proof of the advantages of cleanliness.— Waterford Mirror.

25-12-1817. AT THE I’ECOLE ROYALE, IN PARIS, lectures are now delivering in the Persian, Arabic, Turkish, Armenian, and Modern Greek languages.

25-12-1817. THE INQUISITION, say the last accounts from Spain, has been very active for some time past, particularly in the Provinces, where several persons have been arrested, the greater part of them charges with Freemasonry.

25-12-1817. ON SUNDAY LAST THE following prayer for deliverance from the prevailing sickness or plague, was offered up in several of the churches in Limerick, “Oh Almighty God, who in thy wrath didst send a plague upon thine own people in the wilderness, for their obstinate rebellion against Moses and Aaron, and also in the time of King David, didst stay with the plague of pestilence three score and ten??

18-12-1817. A BOXING MATCH which took place on Monday near Westport, between two men of the names of Patrick McDonagh and Patrick Browne. The former, either in a fall, or by a blow from his opponent, received what appeared to be a slight wound on the forehead, when the persons present interfered and reconciled the combatants, and conducted McDonagh to his home, where he had scarcely arrived when he expired. He was in appearance a much stronger man than Browne. An inquest was held on the body of the deceased and a verdict of Manslaughter was returned against the survivor.

13-11-1817. KOSCIUSKO. The hero of Poland, the brave, disinterested and virtuous Kosciusko is stated, in an article from Lausanne, to have died at Soleure on the 15th instant. A singular felicity of reputation has even attended this amiable citizen and Warrior. — In the case of genuine liberty he fought against injustice, and shamed both the tyrants and Jacobins of the age. In his days of power, at the head of armies that adored his name, no false glory dazzled him nor corrupt ambition could betray him. He nobly resisted the foreign potentates who had laid waste his country; not because they were Kings and Emperors, but because they were invaders and oppressors. He combated with no rebellious sword—far no ambiguous object. When Poland lost her independence, Kosciusko lost his home; as she sunk he rose; but not upon her ruins. The Court of Russia would have allured this illustrious defender of the people whom he had subjugated, by temptations irresistible to vulgar minds: Bonaparte would have made him the flattered instrument of a spurious and hollow liberality to his countrymen: but Kosciusko saw that their lot was irretrievable; and his own he refused to change.— as a soldier and a patriot, in public life and in retirement, his principles were untainted, and his name unsullied: the Monarchs whom he opposed respected him: the factions who failed to seduce, forebore to slander him; and he would have been the Washington, had he not been the Wallace, of Poland.

(From the Internet) Andrzej Tadeusz Bonawentura Kościuszko (Andrew Thaddeus Bonaventure Kościuszko; February 4 or 12, 1746 – October 15, 1817 was a Polish–Lithuanian military engineer and a military leader who became a national hero in Poland, Lithuania, Belarus, and the United States. He fought in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth’s struggles against Russia and Prussia, and on the American side in the American Revolutionary War. As Supreme Commander of the Polish National Armed Forces, he led the 1794 Kościuszko Uprising. Kościuszko was born in February 1746 in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, in a village that is now in Belarus; his exact birthdate is unknown. At age 20, he graduated from the Corps of Cadets in Warsaw, Poland, but after the outbreak of a civil war involving the Bar Confederation in 1768, Kościuszko moved to France in 1769 to pursue further studies. He returned to Poland in 1774, two years after its First Partition, and took a position as tutor in Józef Sylwester Sosnowski’s household. After Kościuszko attempted to elope with his employer’s daughter and was severely beaten by the father’s retainers, he returned to France. In 1776, Kościuszko moved to North America, where he took part in the American Revolutionary War as a colonel in the Continental Army. An accomplished military architect, he designed and oversaw the construction of state-of-the-art fortifications, including those at West Point, New York. In 1783, in recognition of his services, the Continental Congress promoted him to brigadier general.

Returning to Poland in 1784, Kościuszko was commissioned a major general in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth Army in 1789. After the Polish–Russian War of 1792 had resulted in the Second Partition of Poland, he organized an uprising against Russia in March 1794, serving as its Naczelnik (commander-in-chief). Russian forces captured him at the Battle of Maciejowice in October 1794. The defeat of the Kościuszko Uprising that November led to Poland’s Third Partition in 1795, which ended the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth’s independent existence for 123 years. In 1796, following the death of Tsaritsa Catherine the Great, Kościuszko was pardoned by her successor, Tsar Paul I, and he emigrated to the United States. A close friend of Thomas Jefferson, with whom he shared ideals of human rights, Kościuszko wrote a will in 1798 dedicating his American assets to the education and freedom of U.S. slaves. He eventually returned to Europe and lived in Switzerland until his death in 1817. The execution of his will later proved difficult and the funds were never used for the purpose he had intended.

13-11-1817. MARRIED, In St. Mark’s Church, by the Rev. Joseph Druitt, James Johnson, of Drum, County of Monaghan, Esq. to Miss E. Reeves, daughter of the late D. H. Reeves, Esq. and niece to Colonel Reeves of the 27th Regiment.

13-11-1817. On the 21st inst. at Eyrecourt, Walter Lambert, Esq. eldest son of Walter Lambert, Esq. of Castle Lambert, county Galway, to the amiable and accomplished Anne, eldest daughter of Giles Eyre, Esq. of Eyrecourt-Castle, and Lieut. Col. of the Galway Militia.

13-11-1817. DIED. On Saturday last, in the prime of life, of Typhus fever, the Rev. James McKenna, Parish Priest of Tempo. — A young man of the most amiable character and exemplary conduct, and deeply lamented by his acquaintances, and congregation.

On the same day, of Typhus fever, Mrs, McDonald, wife of Mr. Edward McDonald of this town. Baker.

On Monday morning, of Typhus fever, at Mount-Irvine, near Clogher, in the prime of life, Surgeon George Irvine, R, N., son of Mr. Acheson Irvine, of Derrygore, near this town.

At Strabane, on the 20th ult. of  Typhus fever, John Glasse, Esq. Attorney.

On the same day, of Typhus fever, Mr. Spence, Saddler.

At same place, on the 2nd inst., of Typhus fever, Mrs. Perry, wife of Mr. John Perry.

At same place, on the 31st ult. after a few days illness, of Typhus fever, Mr. Adam Burrell.

On the 31st ult., Mrs. Saunders, wife of Mr. Saunders, of Foyle College, Derry.

In Bishop Street, Derry, Mr. Billington.

In Ferry-quay-street, Derry, Mrs. Kelly, in the prime of life.

On the 1st. inst., near Sligo, deeply regretted by all who knew him, Charles Dawson, Esq. A. M., late first assistant in Sligo School.—Amongst his numerous attainments, he had acquired some knowledge of medicine, which he applied in his leisure hours towards the relief of the sick poor—and in his visits of mercy he caught the fever, which in a few days hurried him, in the prime of life, to another World, where, we trust, he “now rests from his Labours, and his Works have followed him.”

At Swords, on the 5th inst., of Typhus fever, caught in the execution of his clerical duties, the Rev. James Wallace a Gentleman regretted by all who knew him.

On the 30th, of Typhus fever, Anna, only surviving child of John Fetherston H., Esq. of Grangemore, County of Westmeath.

(From the Internet.) Typhus is any of several similar diseases caused by Rickettsia bacteria.[1] The name comes from the Greek typhus (τύφος) meaning smoky or hazy, describing the state of mind of those affected with typhus. The causative organism Rickettsia is an obligate intracellular parasitic bacterium that cannot survive for long outside living cells. It is transmitted to humans via external parasites such as lice, fleas, and ticks. While “typhoid” means “typhus-like”, typhus and typhoid fever are distinct diseases caused by different genera of bacteria. The following signs/symptoms refer to epidemic typhus as it is the most important of the typhus group of diseases. Signs and symptoms begin with sudden onset of fever, chills, headache, and other flu-like symptoms about 1 to 2 weeks after being infected. Five to nine days after the symptoms have started; a rash typically begins on the trunk and spreads to the extremities. This rash eventually spreads over most of the body, sparing the face, palms, and soles. Signs of meningoencephalitis begin with the rash and continue into the second or third weeks. Other signs of meningoencephalitis include sensitivity to light (photophobia), altered mental status (delirium), or coma. Untreated cases are often fatal.

In historical times “Gaol Fever”,  was common in English prisons, and is believed by modern authorities to have been Typhus. It often occurred when prisoners were crowded together into dark, filthy rooms where lice spread easily. Thus “Imprisonment until the next term of court” was often equivalent to a death sentence. Prisoners brought before the court sometimes infected members of the court itself. Following the assizes held at Oxford in 1577, later deemed the Black Assize, over 300 died from gaol fever, including Sir Robert Bell, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer. The Black Assize of Exeter 1586 was another notable outbreak. During the Lent assizes court held at Taunton in 1730, gaol fever caused the death of the Lord Chief Baron, as well as the High Sheriff, the sergeant, and hundreds of others. During a time when persons were executed for capital offenses, more prisoners died from ‘gaol fever’ than were put to death by all the public executioners in the British realm. In 1759, an English authority estimated that each year a quarter of the prisoners had died from gaol fever. In London, gaol fever frequently broke out among the ill-kept prisoners of Newgate Prison and then moved into the general city population. In May 1750, the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Samuel Pennant, and a large number of court personnel were fatally infected in the courtroom of the Old Bailey, which adjoined Newgate Prison.

13-11-1817. ROBBERY OF THE BELFAST MAIL COACH. Friday evening, about ten minutes after six o’clock, as the Belfast Day Mail Coach, on its way to Dublin, arrived at Lissen-hall, a short distance beyond Swords, the Coachman found his way obstructed by two carts being placed across the road. Soon afterwards, a body of armed men, ten or twelve in number, appeared; the front horses were seized, and, about the same time, the banditti fired three shots, one of which passed through the hat of one of the guards, Luke Rocheford and unfortunately took effect in the back part of his head, but, we trust, without any serious result. The passengers, eleven in number — seven outside and four inside—many of them females, were then rifled in the most brutal manner, of the valuable effects and property about them; which was a small gold watch, maker’s name, Arnold and Sons, London, and supposed to be Number 217; a gold seal, and the initials marked upon it, W. S., in Irish characters; also, a gold watch, maker’s name, Thomas Moss, Ludgate-street, London; a great variety of bank notes, among which was one of the Bank of Ireland, for five pounds, dated 4th December, 1816. We give this hasty description of those articles, in the hope of their leading to a detection. Two artillery men passed by at the time, but took no notice of the proceedings, more than enquiring, “what was the matter,” and being informed, they went forward quietly- Those men can easily be ascertained to give evidence, if necessary. A carman was also  stopped, but no molestation offered to him.— While the robbers were engaged in plundering the passengers, a post coach came up, in which were the Marquis of Donegal, his son, (Lord Belfast,) and another gentleman, all well armed. An attempt was made to stop the post coach, but, by the exertions of the coachman, in whipping the horses over a large trunk, they most fortunately escaped. They had not proceeded far, when they met a party of horse patrole, who immediately went in quest of the robbers: a foot patrole had also been sent in that direction, in consequence of a robbery having been committed the night previous, at the house of Mr. Harckney. We have the pleasure to state that none of the passengers in the Belfast coach have suffered any personal injury, and also that the entire of the mail-bags have been preserved. We have little doubt that some of the delinquents will be apprehended. The Post Office will, of course, do its duty; and we hope that the poor wounded guard, who preserved the mail bags, will not go without attention and reward. Mr. Farrell requested the attendance of the respective passengers at the Head Police office, this morning when a further investigation will go forward before the Magistrates; and we cannot omit noticing the urbanity and politeness of Lord Belfast, in disclosing and furnishing us with such particulars of this transaction, as came within his immediate knowledge or observation. Carrick’s Morning Post. Five persons have been apprehended for the above Robbery, and after a long examination on Monday last, at the Head Police Office, Dublin, three of them were fully committed for trial.

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Fermanagh Herald 1942.

24-10-1942. BAD ENNISKILLEN “BLACK-OUT” COURT CASES. “I had a letter from the A.R.P. authorities, saying the black-out in Enniskillen is no use, and we will have to take  sterner measures,” said Head Constable Poots at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, when a number .of householders were summoned for blackout offences. Major Dickie, R.M., inquired what the A.R.P. authorities exactly meant. Head Constable Poots said the A.R.P. authorities complained of lights from buildings, and particularly lights from the rear of buildings. The black-out at the rear of buildings was very bad. That had necessitated him putting extra men on duty at night to inspect the rear of premises to locate the lights. It was a very difficult job sometimes. The result of this tightening-up of the regulations would result in there being far more of these prosecutions for the next Court. In the cases before the Court the following decisions were announced: — Mary Heslin, The Brook, .Probation of Offenders Act; Mary McCaffrey, 2 Militia Barracks; 10/6 and costs; Margaret Dooris, 11 Eden St., 10/- and costs; Alfred Dickson, 6 Abbey St., 5/- and costs; Michael Byrne, Old Bonded Stores, 5/- and costs; George P. Haggins; 25 Strand St., 5/- and costs. Constables W. R. Allen and W. H. Walker were the complainants, and Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solicitor, represented two of the defendants.

24-10-1942. NO INTEREST. COMPLAINT AGAINST SCHOOL ATTENDANCE COMMITTEES. Mr. C. McKeown complained at Fermanagh Regional Education Committee on Friday that some school attendance committees were taking no interest in the attendance of the children at school. He asked when did the Roslea attendance committee meet? The secretary (Mr. Maguire); said he could not say. It was some time since he had a report. He knew of a number of cases in which sub-committees did not seem to take an interest in the school attendance in their districts. He had from time to time received reports that it had been practically impossible to obtain a quorum therefore there was no means of dealing with school attendance. Mr. McKeown said the Act was practically 50 years in existence, making attendance compulsory, yet they had districts in Fermanagh that were taking practically no interest in it. There should be some remedy. It was very discreditable in these days. Lord Belmore—We appoint these committees. We should put off those that do not attend.

24-10-1942. CHEAP MILK FOR ALL SCHOOL CHILDREN. MINISTRY’S CIRCULAR TO FERMANAGH COMMITTEE. A circular letter from the Ministry of Education informed Fermanagh Regional Committee on Friday that schools—primary, secondary, junior commercial, junior and technical—can obtain milk for children at the .rate of one-third of a pint per day, the child to bear half of the cost. Milk would .be supplied to the schools by any local supplier at Is per .gallon and the remainder of the cost would be paid for by the Ministry of Agriculture.

24-10-1942. BAZAAR GOODS SEIZED. SEQUEL AT LISNASKEA COURT. At Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Nellie McGovern, Derrynanny, was summoned for having, on 14th April, knowingly harboured 13 men’s shirts, 20 pairs of assorted ladies’ dress material, six pieces of artificial silk, five children’s frocks, one child’s blouse, one pair of silk stockings, and one lady’s nightdress, imported from the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted and Mr. Baldwin Murphy, solicitor, defended.

Sergt. Kirkpatrick told of the finding of the goods in a tin trunk at defendant’s house, which, he searched following information received. In a statement to him, defendant said she was President of the Women’s Committee in connection with the Catholic bazaar in Newtownbutler, and following the bazaar on 17th March, she brought the goods in question to her house as they had not been sold. These goods had been given as gifts to raise funds for the new church. Cross-examined, witness said that at first defendant told him she had no goods of the kind he was inquiring about in the house, but later said she had stuff belonging to the bazaar. She told him the committee meetings in Drumlone School had not been very well attended. Reginald Allen said the shirts were of Japanese manufacture, the importation of which had been, prohibited in the Six Counties since Japan’s entry into the war. Mrs. McGovern, in evidence, said she was President of the Catholic Bazaar Committee, and the goods in question had been gathered into the trunk at different times. Before the box came to her it had been in Drumlone School, where the committee meetings had not been well attended. His Honour said he was prepared to grant defendant a dismiss on the harbouring summons, but he must make the order for forfeiture.

24-10-1942. WALLPAPER AND WOOL. Edward Whelan and his wife, Mary Whelan, Lisnaskea, were summoned for knowingly, harbouring 13 rolls of wallpaper and 32 ozs. of wool imported from, the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. A. Herbert, solicitor, defended. Sergt. Kirkpatrick gave evidence of the seizure at defendants’ house, and said Mr. Whelan denied all responsibility. In all he found 121 ozs. of wool, but only seized 32 ozs. Mrs. Whelan said she got the wool from various drapers in Lisnaskea and Enniskillen. Mrs. Whelan said she brought the wallpaper in a suitcase from the Twenty-Six Counties about a year ago and was not examined by the Customs’ official on the train. It only cost 13/-. The wool, had been obtained in Six-County shops. His Worship said the Customs must prove the intent to evade payment of Customs duty as mentioned in the summons. Mr. Cooper said these prohibited goods had been bought in the Twenty-Six Counties and brought across the Border. His Worship – But if she was not aware they were dutiable? Mr. Cooper cited the case of a London cabby who was held liable for a man he had taken in his cab at London docks. His Worship said that since Mr. Cooper had introduced his cab he must convict as regards the wallpaper. He imposed a fine of £3 saying she might have been fined £100,

24-10-1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER COURT CASES. TURF-STEALING CHARGE. MOTORIST SAYS FINE “1S A BIT SEVERE.” At Newtownbutler Court, before Major Dickie, R.M., Thomas McCarney, labourer, Clonagun, Newtownbutler, was charged with the larceny of a quantity of turf, the property of Thomas Storey, Clontivern. Thos. Storey, in evidence, stated he had bog at Clonagun and discovered some of his turf being stolen. On the night of Sept. 27th he went to his bog and put a private mark on some of the turf which he had in clamps. On Sept. 28th he found some of the turf missing. He reported the matter to the police at Newtownbutler, and later accompanied Const. Ferguson to Carney’s house, where they found half a bag of turf in the kitchen. He picked out some of the turf (produced) which had his mark on them. Const. Ferguson corroborated. Defendant, in evidence, stated he was going to work and there was no turf in the house. If he had not taken the turf his wife and children would have no fire until he came back. District Inspector Smyth said there was an epidemic of turf-stealing in the district. This man had five horse loads stolen. Major Dickie—I will have to start sending people to prison, for these offences. He imposed a fine of 40/s and said if I there had been anything against defendant before he would have put on a much heavier penalty.

DRUNK IN CHARGE. John McCarroll, hackney owner, Lisnaskea, was charged with being drunk in charge of a motor car on October 1.1th. Defendant admitted the offence. Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, gave evidence, and Dr. James Dolan, Newtownbutler, stated he examined defendant, who was so far under the influence of drink as to be incapable of driving a car. Defendant told the Court he had been driving some soldiers and had some drink, but did not think he was incapable of driving. Major Dickie said there was a minimum penalty in these cases. He imposed a fine of £5, with £2 12s 6d, costs, and suspended defendant’s licence for 12 months. He fixed sureties in the event of an appeal. Defendant—I will appeal the case. Major Dickie—But you admit the offence. Defendant—I think that is a bit severe. Major Dickie—But that is the minimum penalty. Defendant—I don’t think I was incapable of driving. Major Dickie—No judge can impose a smaller penalty. If you appeal, I am afraid it would be a waste of time and money. Defendant said he was not in the habit of taking drink, and had driven all over the world. District Inspector Smyth, said it was much too dangerous to have people driving while under the influence of drink. Major Dickie said he would allow defendant to drive until his appeal was heard, but he did not know whether the appeal was wise or not.

24-10-1942. APPELLANT WAS DEAD. NEWTOWNBUTLER CASE UNUSUAL SITUATION. An unusual situation arose at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Wednesday when an appeal case was called in which Hugh Connolly, of Derrysteaton Island, appealed, against a £12 fine for harbouring 10 cwts. of sulphate of ammonia. Mr, V. G. Patterson, solicitor, who had represented Connolly at the Petty Sessions hearing, said the appellant was dead. He had been dead ten days at his island home before being found. Judge Ellison said perhaps the case could be adjourned. Mr. J. Cooper (for the respondent Customs authorities) —I don’t know how you can adjourn the case of a dead man. Judge—There must be some means of correcting an obvious error. Mr. Cooper—Nothing can happen – just strike out the appeal. Judge—If the fine is not paid he cannot be imprisoned which was the alternative. Could the £12 not be levied by distress on his property irrespective of his, death? Mr. Cooper -You cannot levy it on the goods of a dead man. We would not attempt to do it anyhow. Mr. Patterson—If they don’t do that and don’t attempt to follow Mr. Connolly, nothing further will happen. A constable of police from the locality said the dead man had no stock. A brother-in-law was looking after the farm, but nobody was living on it. Mr. Cooper said it would be different if Mr. Patterson said he was going to take out probate and continue the appeal, but he simply came and said he had no instructions. Mr. Patterson—The man was ten days dead before he was found. Judge—Could the Crown not claim it was a creditor? Mr. Patterson said he thought not in this case. The matter was adjourned.

24-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN MARKET, ENNISKILLEN, Tuesday—Pork, 45 carcases; potatoes, 4s 3d per cwt.; straw, 4s per cwt.; hens, 1s to Is 3d per lb.; chickens. Is 4d to Is 6d per lb.; rabbits, 7d to 8d per lb.

24-10-1942. DERRYLIN BURGLARY.“The monotony of their present service got on their nerves and they decided to desert with the intention of joining the Air Force from ‘Eire’ ” said Mr. E. Ferguson at Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday when he was defending two soldiers of the Royal Engineers, Gerard Fitzgerald and Leslie Fuller, who pleaded guilty to having on 11th August, 1942, broken and entered the dwelling house at Cloghan of Dr. S. J. McQuaid, M.O.H., Derrylin, and stolen two gent’s shirts, two pullovers, one gent’s sports jacket, one pair gent’s trousers, one gent’s lounge jacket and two pairs of gent’s socks, the property of Dr. McQuaid.

Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, said there were no convictions of any sort against Fitzgerald, Fuller was convicted on 21st August, 1935, for attempted housebreaking and larceny at Wealdstone Juvenile Court and put under a rule of bail. On 2nd July, 1936, at Middlesex Quarter Sessions he was sent to Borstal for three years. He was later convicted of being an Army deserter. Mr. Ferguson said both accused belonged to the Royal Engineers. Fitzgerald was 21 years of age in July last and before the war was an aircraft worker at Bristol. He joined the Army at 17, although, he was in a reserved service. Fuller was 23 years of age and had been in the Army since the outbreak of war. Although the pair had made repeated applications to get away from the Royal Engineers because of their peacetime occupations, one being an aircraft worker and the other a plumber, they had been refused. They applied to join the commandos but were refused. Wishing to join the Air Force from across the border, they needed civilian, clothes and this caused the offence. They went into the doctor’s house, found no one in and took these clothes. All the clothes had been returned and the only thing broken was one window. Since the offence, the men had been tea weeks in jail and as far as Fitzgerald was concerned he had expiated his crime and it would be a shame if he had to go to jail again. He asked that they should be allowed to go back to the Army where they would be of more use than in jail. Deputy Judge Ellison discharged Fitzgerald under the Probation Act. He bound over Fuller in £10 to keep the peace for two years. Both men were ordered to be detained pending the arrival of a military escort.

24-10-1942. £4 DECREE FOR ASSAULT. IRVINESTOWN MAN’S CLAIM. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, William John Swanson, of Drumbulcan, Irvinestown, sued James Farrell, of same place, for £5 damages for assault. The claim was not defended. Mr. A. Herbert (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented the plaintiff, who said that on 24th July last he was in the townland of Drumbulkin, and had his bicycle with him. He was at the foot of a hill and had dismounted from the machine to walk up the hill. Farrell came out of the house as witness passed and shouted. Witness looked round to see what defendant was talking about and Farrell struck him on the jaw and tumbled him on his back right over the bicycle. As a result, his jaw swelled and he was not able to take his food. Defendant was a forty-acre farmer with fairly good land. A decree for £4 was given with 2s 6d expenses,

24-10-1942. GOOD ATTENDANCE OF JURORS. When out of 102 petty jurors summoned for Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday, it transpired that only one was absent without explanation, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., said the attendance was very good indeed. “I have never heard a jury list before on which so many names were answered,” he added.

REDUCTION IN FINE. NEWTOWNBUTLER MAN’S APPEAL. Hugh P. Maguire, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, appealed at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday against two fines of £50 each imposed at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions in respect of (1) for failing to stop his car at the Border when called upon to do so, and (2) for exporting prohibited, goods. By consent, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., affirmed both convictions, but the fine for failing to stop the car was reduced to £40. Defendant applied for and was given six weeks in which to pay the £90.

24-10-1942. GLANGEVLIN VOCATIONAL SCHOOL. DECISION TO RE-OPEN IT. At the meeting of County Cavan Vocational Education Committee Mr. J. J. Gleeson presided. The Office of Public Works wrote that as Glangevlin School was not in use they were prepared to take it on lease from the committee for a period of ten years. Mr. McGovern proposed, that they reopen the school. Mr. P. Smith said it was a shame to have the school closed. The application was refused it was decided to take steps to have the school reopened.

24-10-1942. BORDER INCIDENT. BELFAST MAN FINED £100 AT CLONES. At Clones District Court before District Justice Lavery, Patrick McIlduff, whose address was given as English St. Belfast, and who was described as a bookmaker, was charged with on May 19, 1941, at Glasslough, Co. Monaghan, exporting prohibited goods consisting of wearing apparel and also rescuing the goods seized by a Customs official. Defendant was fined £100 on the charge of exporting and £1 on the charge of rescuing, and the fines were paid into court immediately. Evidence was given by Customs Officer Lynn of following a motor-car to the Tyrone border. When he arrived he saw defendant standing by the car along with the driver. He examined the car and found two parcels in it. A man came across the Border and seized one of the parcels and took it away with him across the Border. Defendant took up the other parcel and went across the Border with it. He had no doubt it was defendant who took one of the parcels away. Defendant said he knew nothing about the parcels in the car. He had some drink taken.

24-10-1942. CATTLE DEALER’S CLAIM. £12 DECREE AT ENNISKILLEN. In an undefended civil bill at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, John Elliott, 1 Victoria Terrace, Enniskillen,  cattle-dealer, sued Thomas Gallagher, Aghoo, Garrison, for £26, plaintiff alleging that defendant’s warranty in the sale of a heifer was contrary to the facts. Plaintiff said he paid £21 for the heifer on 12th August last, when, defendant said she had cleaned after calving. It transpired, however, he said, that she had not cleaned, and he had to pay £2 for medicine for her. She lost her milk and was now worth only £13. Defendant went to see the animal and promised to take her back. He did not do so, and when plaintiff saw him, again and mentioned the matter he told plaintiff to “make the best of it.” Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., gave plaintiff a decree for £13, plaintiff to retain the animal.

24-10-1942. FOUR MONTHS FOR ASSAULT. At Enniskillen Criminal Sessions Wm. Hynes, Nugent’s Entry, Enniskillen, was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment on a charge to which he pleaded guilty, of assaulting a girl of under thirteen years. He had been found not guilty of a serious charge against the child.

24-10-1942. PETTIGO NOTES. Mr. Patrick Chaucer, Customs officer at Pettigo Customs frontier post, is to be transferred to Clones. Mr. Chaucer since coming to the village has been a very popular young man. He is a keen athlete who took a prominent part in all the local games. He is being replaced in Pettigo by Mr. Denis Bradley.

On Sunday morning while on duty in the vicinity of Termon Creamery, near the Grouselodge border, Constables Mathers and Robinson, R.U.C., seized a quantity of tea, margarine and rice from a young man. The constables removed the goods to Tullyhommon R.U.C. station.

During the week, R.U.C. from Tullyhommon, Pettigo, were successful in tracing and .recovering, a heifer which had been missing from the farm, of Mr. Robt. Brandon, Glenvannon, near Pettigo.

On Sunday, Sergt. Bradley, R.U.C., when on patrol in the townland of Camplagh observed a man carrying a parcel and coming from the Donegal border. The man bolted leaving the parcel behind which contained woollen blankets.

31-10-1942. GIRL ESCAPES JAIL. £50 FINE SUBSTITUTED FOR PRISON SENTENCE. A pretty, well-dressed young woman, Elizabeth Hal, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, escaped a three months’ prison sentence by appealing to Newtownbutler  Quarter Sessions in Enniskillen on Wednesday. She had been sentenced at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions for dealing in prohibited goods, namely, four loaves, a carton of soap and 3½ lbs. flake meal. Mr. A. J. Belford (instructed by Mr. F. J. Patterson, solicitor) represented defendant. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown, Solicitor, for the Customs authorities, said the amount of goods involved was very small, their value being 3/-. On the 18th November, 1941, appellant was fined £3 for dealing in prohibited goods—18 loaves—and also £36 for exporting three tons of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. Cooper was proceeding to tell Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., of the ambushes carried out by, the police on three different days in April, 1942, when Mr. Belford interpolated and said his submission was that that evidence had been wrongly admitted by the magistrate in the Court below, no charge in respect of these allegations having been made. Mr. Cooper said the police had seen people, seventy-five in number, going to and. from the shop, bringing goods into the Free State. Judge – Illegally across the border? Mr. Cooper—Yes. Judge—Why didn’t you prosecute them?

Mr. Belford pointed out that the solicitor for appellant at the Petty Sessions objected to that evidence on the ground that no prosecution had been brought against those people. Mr. Cooper explained that the shop was on the very border and it was practically impossible to catch the offenders. In this particular case the policeman had to run after a woman; he grabbed the bag she was carrying but was unable to get a hold of her. The constable brought the goods back to appellant’s shop and she pleaded guilty. At the Petty Sessions he (Mr, Cooper.) was instructed to press for imprisonment, and his Worship said to her: “I have seen you before’ and sentenced her to three months. Mr. Belford said imprisonment in the case would be rather harsh as appellant was only twenty-five years old. Before the introduction of rationing, three- quarters of her customers were from over the border, and while he frankly admitted there might have been some irregularities, it was true to say she did not realise the enormity of the offences. She had been more or less out of business since her Ministry of Food licence had been withdrawn by the Lisnaskea Food Control Committee. She was now only allowed to sell some hardware and clothes, and she was contemplating giving up the business she had carried on for seven years. That being so, the police would be given no further trouble. Like many other border residents, she did not seem to realise the seriousness of smuggling and she had already been heavily punished by her livelihood being taken away. Mr. Cooper thought the licence was merely suspended pending his Honour’s decision. Mr. Belford said appellant would submit to a fairly substantial penalty in order to avoid the sentence, which would be likely to have unpleasant consequences for her in after life.

31-10-1942. YOUNG BOYS ON LARCENY CHARGES. ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions ion Friday three young boys pleaded guilty before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., to having on 26th July, 1942, broken and entered the shop of William H. Creighton, Church St., Enniskillen, and stolen chocolate and sweets to the value of £1 6s 6d. One of the above-mentioned boys and another boy pleaded guilty to breaking and entering the shop of Thomas Wilson, Garvary, between 11.55 p.m. on 13th Aug. and 3 a.m. on 14th August, and stealing two bicycle free wheels value 11s, pair pliers value Is 6d, 3½ doz. safety razor blades value 7s, two pocket torches value 3s, two fountain pens value 5s, one pair opera glasses value 15s and five bottles lemonade, value 3s 8d.

The boy twice charged, above also pleaded guilty to stealing a bicycle value £5, the property of Harold Cleary, on 20th July. Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented all accused. All the boys were very young and had respectable parents. None had. any previous convictions involving dishonesty. In two of the cases he mentioned that one boy had been earning £3 18s 0d weekly at public works at the age of 15. Another at the same age had been earning almost £5 weekly. This work stopped and the boys were running about with nothing to do. There was no proper control over the boys since the wages terminated until they had settled down again and got used to living with little or no money.

The Judge, sternly warning the boys of what would happen should they ever again be guilty of a similar offence, allowed them off on entering, or their parents’ entering into recognisances in £10 for their good behaviour. An order was made for the return of the stolen property, and £1 found in the possession of the boy who stole the bicycle was ordered to be handed to Cleary to compensate for a coat on the bicycle that was still missing. Mr. Creighton, said Mr. Cooper, was at the loss of the chocolate, which was buried and was rendered unfit. Asked whether he wanted compensation, by Mr. Herbert, who said the parents of the boy involved were very poor. Mr. Creighton said he did not. The Judge highly commended Mr. Creighton for his charitable attitude.

31-10-1942. ARTIFICIAL MANURE ON BORDER ISLAND. APPEAL AGAINST £12 FINE FAILS. At Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday, before Deputy Judge Ellison William Atwell, of Derrysteaton, appealed against a fine of £12 for the harbouring of a quantity of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. V. G. Patterson represented the appellant, and Mr. J. Cooper appeared for the respondent Customs Authorities. Constable Duffy said in an unoccupied house on Gallon Island belonging to defendant, while on boat patrol on Lough Erne, he found eight bags containing 16 cwt. of sulphate of ammonia. The house was approachable in summer time from the shore, but at this time of the year (February) could only be approached by boat. From the point of the island it was only 50 yards across Lough Erne to the 26 counties. In a statement defendant said he bought the ammonia in Newtownbutler for his own, use. It was the only ammonia he had bought that year. Witness discovered on enquiring at the shop where the purchase was made that the latter statement was untrue.

Cross-examined, witness said Mr. Anderson, manager of the Newtownbutler shop which supplied the stuff, said in a statement that on the 5th January defendant ordered a ton of sulphate of ammonia, took half of it that, day, and the remaining half the next day, and paid for it on the second day. Mr. Patterson—You got it in February, he got it in January; if he had wanted to get it across the Border there would have been no difficulty? –No difficulty. Even when taking it to his house he has to go along the shore of the Free State?—Yes. The Ministry actually urged people to get artificial manures early.—Yes.

Mr. Cooper—Atwell’s statement to you was that he had bought 16 cwt.?—Yes. It could be bought for about £12 a ton .here; what was the price in “Eire ?” —The price at the time was as much as £60. So it would be very profitable to get it across these few yards?—Yes. And 4 cwts. of this ammonia was missing?—Yes. George Dixon, Surveyor of Customs and Excise, stated on information from the police as to defendant’s probable requirements for his own cropping, he allowed 6 cwt. to the defendant, and had the remainder seized. Mr. Patterson—Did you know that he was treating for the purchase of another 40-acre farm?—No. And that he would require fertiliser for it?—No. Will you say you knew 6 cwt. was enough for his forty-acre farm, on Derrysteaton, and another 40-acre farm he was going to purchase?—I acted on information from the police. They did not know what he was going to crop?—They knew what he had cropped the previous year. Mf. Cooper—You don’t allocate fertiliser for a farm he has not bought? — No. Mr. Patterson said when he got his potato subsidy from the Government he received a notice stating that the Ministry had arranged for the importation of sufficient supplies of sulphate of ammonia to meet the needs of farmers, but it was most important that farmers should order immediately and where possible take delivery. “It is most important. Act now” stated the notice. Atwell followed that advice. He had 60 acres on Derrysteaton or heavy wet land, and required a quick acting fertilizer.

31-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN’S £200 PRIZE. When Enniskillen Urban Council met on Monday evening to allocate the prize money of £300 won in the recent waste paper salvage competition, a letter was read from Omagh Urban Council, congratulating the Council on winning a £200 prize. ‘The successful collection of waste paper,” stated the letter “requires great effort, organisation and co-operation of the townspeople, and your success shows that you had these three factors.” Mr. T. Algeo thought the County Hospital was the first consideration of the Council, as it catered for all creeds and classes, and he proposed that the Hospital get half of the prize money. Mr. P. Kelly seconded. Mr. T. Devine—I quite agree with Mr. Algeo that our County Hospital has our first claim, but there are a number of other institutions and organisations which 1 think have claims on you also. He proposed that the money be allocated as follows, County Hospital, £60; Enniskillen Nursing Society, £25: Enniskillen Council for Social. Service, £25; Soldiers’, Sailors’ and Airmen’s Association, £25; Inniskillings Comforts Fund, £25; £15 each to the Women’s Section, British Legion and the Earl Haig Fund; and £10 to the Ulster Gift Fund. Mr. W. H. Creighton seconded. Mr- W. J. Monaghan—Have the charities attached to the various churches received any consideration from you in these matters? Chairman, (Senator Whaley)—I don’t think they have been consulted in this matter at all

Mr. Monaghan said they were coming on to winter, and .he thought the various churches should get some little help for their funds, so that they could assist the poor people by either way of coal or other relief that they may be pleased to give to the people. “You have the outlook of a very severe winter; something should be done for these people,” he added. Mr. J. Donnelly (Borough Surveyor) said he had been consulted on the matter when it had been suggested that the St. Vincent De Paul Society should get £20, but this Society was in the most fortunate position that it had ever been in—that they had sufficient money at the present time. They were well able to carry on and meet the demands of the next couple of years or more. Mr. W. J. B. Lee said if they gave all the money to the County Hospital everybody would benefit, and he proposed that it all go to the County Hospital. Mr. Monaghan—It is a State-aided institution.  Mr. Devine—Speaking for the Church I represent, so far as I know they are not in need of any funds. Mr. Monaghan—That satisfies me. Mr. Algeo then altered his proposal and propose that the Hospital get £100 and he asked the Chairman to take a written vote “to see who was for the County Hospital or not.”

Mr. W. E. Johnston—I object to Mr. Algeo’s statement—“to see who is for the County Hospital or not.” Mr. Algeo—I demand a written vote on it. Mr. Johnston–You can have any vote on it you like. Mr. Devine said he would not like it to go out that this was a vote for and against the County Hospital. Mr. J. Logan thought that Mr. Devine’s motion should be passed unanimously. They had always the churches with them and they had always the poor with them, and likely to have them.

31-10-1942. MINOR HALL BOOKINGS DISCUSSED AT ENNISKILLEN URBAN COUNCIL. Enniskillen Urban Council discussed at length, at a special meeting on Monday evening an application from, the Six-County Council for Social Service for the use of the Minor Hall for .at least one night per week as a club for young people, and also for the taking over by them of a small plot of ground, the Council’s property, abutting on the road adjoining Mill Street and the Irvinestown Road us a juvenile recreation centre. The Chairman (Senator Whaley) asked had the Council a room to spare. Town Clerk (Mr. A. W. Ritchie) — For the next two or three months it is booked. Mr. T. Algeo—Haven’t you a resolution on the books that the Minor Hall is closed for three months? Chairman—After present bookings. The Town Clerk said if there was a fixed night each week it would be very difficult. The Minor Hall went usually with the main hall, when the latter was booked for dances.

Mr. Devine— They cannot surely book; up the hall for three months ahead. Mr. J. Logan proposing that Saturday night be granted to the Social Services in the Minor Hall, said all through the week the young people were engaged at their lessons, and it would be a shame to take them away from these to attend a club. The presence of the boys attending in the hall would help to purify the atmosphere. That would be a disappointment to some people. They would miss (the “hop.” The people would also miss the bottles of a Sunday morning. It would do the town a lot of good if they had the young boys in the ball on a Saturday night. There was very seldom a big function in the hall on a Saturday night; therefore, that night would not clash with any other people. He meant this arrangement to start from 1st January. Mr. Algeo seconded. Mr. Devine— We want it before January. Saturday night would not suit. The Town Clerk read a list of bookings of the Minor Hall for some weeks to come which, showed that the same three groups of people have the hall on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, respectively, of each week for some time in advance. Mr. Devine—Shilling “hops.” The Town Clerk said Saturday night was “Football.” Mr. McKeown— What football; there are several football clubs. Town Clerk—I cannot tell you the name of it. Mr. Devine—Corinthian Football Club. Everyone knows it. There is no secret about it. Town Clerk— It is difficult to get a night. Mr. Devine asked Mr. Logan, not to press his motion, because he did not think Saturday night would suit the Social Services. Mr. Logan—Saturday night is the best. The pictures have the main hall, so that there would only be the two parties here. It is all the same to me. Boys always strolled about the streets for an hour or two on that night, he said. Mr. Johnston—Country boys go home. Mr. Logan-The shops are closed earlier

7-11-1942. TRAGIC DEATH OF JAS. A. JONES, ROYAL HOTEL. POISONED BY GAS FUMES IN BEDROOM. Enniskillen got a profound shock on Tuesday with the news of the death that morning of Mr. James A. Jones, popular proprietor of the Royal Hotel, Enniskillen and one of the best-known auctioneers in the North-West. Only the previous evening Mr. Jones had been seen in the best of health and spirits, on his daily walk, and it was tragic to think that within little more than twelve hours he was dead. The tragic event was caused by an accident. A gas tap which had served a disused stove in Mr, Jones’ bedroom had been at some time or other inadvertently turned on. Mr. Jones was resting in bed after his morning cup of tea when the meter serving that pipe and tap was again turned on by the Gas Company’s fitter after having been off for some time. The fitter was unaware of the pipe leading to the bedroom. The turning on of the gas filled Mr. Jones’ room with gas. The window was closed and when the alarm was raised and the doctor arrived, he found Mr. Jones unconscious. He died after a short time. .

An Enniskillen man, Mr. Jones was a member of a popular and much-esteemed family. His brother Frank, a former Superintendent of the Garda Siochana, died less than two years ago in Dublin, where he was the proprietor of the Beresford Hotel. Another, sister, now deceased was a member of the Convent .of Mercy community Newry. The only surviving member of the family is Miss Josephine Jones, who lived at the Hotel with the deceased, gentleman. It was she who first raised the alarm. To her, in her sorrow, the sincere sympathy of the whole community goes out.

The late Mr. Jones, who was aged 59 years, started life as a clerk in the office of the late Mr. Robert W. Wilson, auctioneer, in the present premises of the Royal Hotel. . He became an auctioneer himself in Mr. Wilson’s employment, and on Mr. Wilson’s death succeeded him. He built up for himself one of the most extensive auctioneering practices in the North. He later became the proprietor of the Royal Hotel, and in both capacities he was as popular as he was-well-known. He entertained some of the leading personalities of Ireland in every sphere.

Mr. Jones was a good-living Catholic gentleman, who attended regularly to his religious duties. Although unmarried, he had a wonderful regard and love for children, a love for little ones shared by every member of his family. In life he had borne many crosses, several members of his family dying within a comparatively short time of one another, but he bore his sorrows bravely, even cheerfully, and was always in high spirits outwardly, whatever sorrows his inner soul might feel. He will be much missed by every creed and class in the town.

THE INQUEST. The sad circumstances of his death were investigated by Mr. G. E. Warren, Coroner, at an inquest in the Hotel on Tuesday. Head Constable Conlin represented the police; Mr. R. A. Herbert, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert), the next of kin, and Mr. Gerald Grant, BL., appeared for the Enniskillen Gas Company.

DOCTOR’S EVIDENCE. Dr. Philip Brady said in response to a telephone massage received at 11 a.m., he went to the Royal Hotel, where he arrived in a few minutes and smelled coal gas. He went, to a bedroom on the first floor and found a strong smell of coal gas in the bedroom. In the bed he found deceased in an unconscious condition but alive. He died a few minutes afterward. He was clad in pyjamas. Death was caused by asphyxia due to coal gas poisoning. Mr. Jones was a patient of witness’s and was suffering from myocarditis in a mild degree; otherwise he was in good health.

WAITER’S STORY. Wm. Brady, waiter, said that morning at 10-30 he was tidying up in the dining room when Miss Jones, sister of the deceased, told him to go up to deceased’s room because she had smelled gas escaping there. When he went into the room he found it full of gas and the gas pipe turned on. He turned off the tap and opened the window. The pipe from which the gas was escaping was not connected to the gas stove in the room and had not been for some time. The gas fire in the room was never used and the tap was on the portion of the pipe leading to the main. He saw deceased in the bed and asked him was he all right, but he made no answer. He felt deceased’s hands and face, and, as he appeared to witness to be unconscious, witness went for Dr. Brady. There was a fitter from the hotel working at the oven in the kitchen that morning. To Mr. Grant, witness said this pipe had been disconnected from the fire for some time, but he did not know who disconnected it.

Mr. Grant-How long had it been in that condition?—I don’t know. Had it ever been reported?—I don’t know, unless Mr. Jones did it. Witness said he did not know when he first noticed that it was cut. He was very seldom in Mr. Jones’s room, except to go occasionally for Mr. Jones’ coat. Mr. Herbert -Is it cut or disconnected? Head Constable—There seems to be six inches of pipe cut away altogether. Witness said, he had not seen the gas stove lit this ages. It was not lit last winter. Patrick Cunningham, boots, said between 9.45 and 10 a.m. that morning he was called by Miss Jones to the Hotel office; In this office were two gas metres, and he was asked by Miss Jones to turn on the gas. She opened the press where the meter was and, as witness knew nothing about them, he refused to turn on the gas. There was a gas man there and he got a wrench and went towards the meter. Witness did not know what he did. There was a gas radiator in the hall of the Hotel, and witness was seven months in the hotel and had never seen it lighted. He heard no conversation between Miss Jones and the fitter. Mr. Grant—Had you ever seen the stove lit in Mr. Jones’ bedroom?—I didn’t even know there was a stove in the bedroom.

IN USUAL GOOD SPIRITS. Michael Rooney, boots, said that about 9-15 a.m. that morning he went to Mr. Jones’ bedroom with his tea. Mr. Jones was in bed and seemed to be in good form. Witness gave him the tea and pulled down the black-out blind. The window was closed. Witness did not go near the gas fire in the room as he did not know it was working. It was usual for Mr. Jones to remain in bed in the morning and have his tea there. Witness never saw the gas fire in the room used. He was in the Hotel since August and never saw the radiator in the hall used. Head, Const. Conlin—Was there any smell of gas when you were in the room? —No. Mr. Jones seemed in his usual health, and spoke to him the same as usual. He made no complaint of any kind. To Mr. Herbert, witness said Mr. Jones took his tea. Coroner—You don’t know whether he got out of bed at all or not?—No, I don’t.

Henry Fox, employed as fitter by the Enniskillen Gas Company, said on this morning about 9 a.m. he was sent by Mr. Lusted, manager of the Gasworks, to the Royal Hotel to have a look at the gas radiator. He arrived at the Hotel at 8-50 a.m. and saw Miss Jones, who pointed out the gas radiator in the hall. She said in reply to witness that that was all in the place. Witness turned on the tap of the radiator, but no gas came. Miss Jones called the Boots to turn on the gas in this meter. As there were two meters in the office the boots was not sure what to do so witness turned on the main cock of the meter serving this radiator. The other meter served the cooking stoves in the kitchen and was fully turned on. Witness was not aware that this meter which he turned on served anything but the hall radiator, so he took the word of Miss Jones for this. He had since made a test of this meter which served the hall radiator and found it also, served the pipe which led to the gas stove in Mr. Jones’ room. He lit the gas in the hall radiator and Miss Jones told him to leave it on as it was cold. He was then brought to the kitchen to look at the cooker. He was not up in Mr. Jones’ bedroom on this visit. Head Constable—If the tap in the pipe in Mr. Jones’ room which was cut had been turned off, could any gas escape? — No, certainly not. It would have been perfectly safe. The pipe was not cut it was disconnected. To Mr. Herbert, witness said he asked Miss Jones were there any others in the place to be seen to, and she said that was all that was in the place. The gas in the hall radiator was still on when he left about twenty minutes past ten a.m.

SISTER’S EVIDENCE. Miss Josephine Jones, who, when the inquest was held at five o’clock, was still confined to bed from the results of the shock, gave her evidence in bed. She said her brother arranged with the Gas Company to attend to the gas in the morning. About ten minutes to ten a man from the Gas Company arrived. Before going to the radiator, the gas man asked her were there any other radiators and she said no. To make sure, she asked the waiter, and he also said ho. She did not remember about the stove in Mr, Jones’ room. It never entered her mind. She called Patrick Cunningham to turn on the meter in the office for the gas man, but he was not able, and the gas man did it himself. After the radiator had been fired, she brought the gas man down to the kitchen to look at the stove there. About 10-30 she smelt gas and went upstairs. She found on entering deceased’s room that it was full of gas. She noticed that her brother did not move as usual, felt his hand and found it cold. She then raised the alarm.

To Mr. Grant, witness said she could not definitely remember whether it was the radiator or gas fittings the gas man said when he asked her were there any others in the house. The tap which was turned on in her brother’s room was on the floor underneath the wash-hand basin, and it could easily have been turned on by someone brushing out the room, or hitting it with their foot when at the basin. Mr. Grant said on behalf of Mr. Lusted and the Gas Company, he extended very sincere sympathy in the terrible tragedy that had happened. The Head Constable and Coroner associated themselves with this expression, of sympathy, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL. B., also joined in the expression of sorrow at Mr. Jones’ tragic passing. He had been a personal friend of Mr. Jones and he was sure the relatives felt the blow very much. The Coroner returned a verdict of death from asphyxia caused by coal-gas poisoning, the result of an accident.

7-11-1942. MILITARY LORRY LIGHTS IN ENNISKILLEN. MAGISTRATE’S COMPLAINT. Complaints concerning glaring headlights of motor vehicles belonging to the military were voiced by Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. His Worship said that recently the whole street of Enniskillen was lit up by army vehicle headlights from end to end, and this was far worse than some of the cases which he had to deal with in Court. Those motor lights could certainly be seen for ten or twelve miles away from the air. He also spoke of the glare from torches. Sergt. John. Codd, R.U.C., said a special report had been made by the police on the subject of lights on army vehicles, but no reply had yet been received. His Worship pointed out that except a light could be seen from an altitude of six hundred feet he would not impose a fine.

One of the cases which fell within this category was brought against an air-raid warden in Enniskillen, and no penalty was inflicted. In another case Head Constable Conlon, prosecuting, said the defendant was aged ninety-three. She kept a boarding-house in Forthill Street and according to the constable she had forgotten to put up the black-out blind. His Worship said it was hard to put a penalty on a law-breaker when she reached the age of ninety three, but he had to do it. A. fine of 5/- and costs was ordered. Similar fines were imposed in a number of other summonses.

7-11-1942. PRISONERS ESCAPE FROM MOUNTJOY GAOL. The following statement was issued by the “Eire” Government Information Bureau on Tuesday; “Six prisoners serving sentences imposed by the Special Military Court escaped from Mountjoy Prison on the evening of November 1.”

 

 

1942 Fermanagh Herald. Belleek Attack.

8-8-1942. SMUGGLER ESCAPES BY RIVER SWIM. LARGE LOAVES SEIZURE BY NEWTOWNBUTLER POLICE. A seven a.m. chase of smugglers on the Monaghan-Fermanagh border last week led to the capture by Sergt. Blevins and Constable Freeman, Newtownbutler, of a large quantity of loaves. Sergt. Blevins, newly transferred to Newtownbutler from Belleek, where his customs work had gained him a wide reputation, surprised two men on the banks of the River Finn, which at this point is the border between the two States. The men were conveying loaves to a ‘’cot,” which is a large unwieldy float for carrying cattle across lakes and rivers in Fermanagh. On the arrival of the police, the cot, drawn up at the Six-County side of the river, already held a large consignment of loaves. As the police rushed to the “cot’’ one man made off across fields in the direction of the border. The other man, divesting himself of his clothes, put his pants around his neck and plunged into the icy-cold water and swam the thirty yards of river to Twenty- Six County territory. Both men made good their escape. The police seized all the loaves and the “cot’ which was later conveyed to Enniskillen. They also found and seized the jacket, waistcoat, boots and other clothing, excepting the trousers of the swimmer.

8-8-1942. TYRES SEIZED AT ENNISKILLEN. Seeing a man dragging two large bags along a railway line at Enniskillen, Sergt. McNally and Constable Walker investigated and found in the bags several doz. bicycle tyres which they seized.

8-8-1942. CUSTOM ACTIVITIES INTENSIFIED. Customs officers along the entire stretch of the Border (on both sides) from Pettigo to Clones are redoubling their efforts to prevent smuggling and the quantity of goods finding their way across from either side must have fallen to such an extent as to be a very small proportion of the former quantities. Trains and buses are gone through almost “with a fine comb” and many cross-border time schedules have been completely upset by the customs delay for months past, but more particularly of late. The intensified efforts, while naturally showing fair returns in seizures, are not producing nearly the same proportion of captures as in former times, the reason probably being that those with an inclination to smuggling are being ‘‘headed off” by the knowledge of what awaits them on arrival at the Customs post. This, of course, refers to ordinary travellers, and does not affect the professional smugglers who presumably have other means of getting across their consignments of prohibited goods. But even these find the more intensive police watch on both sides distinctly more discouraging.

5-9-1942. GLENFARNE NEIGHBOURS’ DISPUTE. AN ASSAULT CASE. “ Jealousy Over Land ” CASE AT KILTYCLOGHER COURT. At Kiltyclogher District Court on Tuesday, before Mr., Flattery, District Justice, Patrick McDermott, a minor, through his father, Peter McDermott, Lougnross, summoned Peter Clancy, of the same place, for alleged assault.

Mr. Alfred McMorrow, B.A., L.L.B., appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. P. O’Flynn, solicitor, Manorhamilton, appeared for defendant. Patrick McDermott, in evidence, stated that a few evenings before the alleged assault had taken place, Mrs. Clancy was milking a cow on the road and the cow had .its head across a gate leading into his (plaintiffs) father’s field. There had been some words between defendant’s wife and himself on that occasion about trespass, and a few days later, when he (plaintiff), was riding down the road on a donkey, Peter Clancy had come down the road meeting him and had knocked him off the donkey with a blow of a spade shaft and had got on top of him, pounding him with his knees. He had to take through another man’s land to escape as he could, not pass Clancy’s house.

Mr. O’Flynn—-Were you not prosecuted some time ago in this Court for stealing Clancy’s fowl?

Witness—It was my brother took the fowl; I only accompanied him.

Mr. O’Flynn—You were along with your brother, and for that reason you have spite in for Clancy. Do you know anything of a well between Clancy’s land and the land of a man named Flynn?—There is water in a shough; it is not a well.

Mr. O’Flynn — Why did you put bushes around that well from which the Clancy’s get water ?—I did it to stop trespass of cattle.

Mr. O’Flynn—On the evening of this terrible assault was Clancy thatching? — He was not.

Mr. O’Flynn—I put it to you that Clancy was thatching, and when you came down the road he came down the ladder and asked you what filthy language you had used to his wife. – He was not thatching.

Did you call Clancy a grabber?—-No.

You didn’t go home to tell your father about this terrible assault? A slap was all you got.

Peter McDermott, father of plaintiff, in evidence, stated that he suffered a lot with Clancy, all owing to jealousy over a bit of land he got. Clancy’s cattle were always on his land.

Mr. McMorrow-—You were going to town on the day of the assault? — I was going to the town, and I went to Clancy’s house and asked for a drink of water. Clancy came round the house with a knife in his hand, and said to me “When I get up to that son of yours it won’t be good for him.”

Mr, .O’Flynn — You went to the house of your greatest enemy and you asked for water. Did you get milk? — I did.

Mr. O’Flynn — You got more than you asked for. Was Clancy thatching?—I don’t know.

Mr. O’Flynn — You say he had a knife in his hand? Of course that knife was for cutting the scallops. Did he complain about the language your son used to his wife, and did you tell him to correct your son every time he heard him because he uses language like that at home?—I don’t remember.

5-9-1942. Clones Call for Reprieve—At the meeting of Clones Urban Council on the motion of Mr. McCabe, seconded by Mr. O’Connor, it was decided to send the following telegram to  the Duke of Abercorn:—“The newly elected Urban District Council of Clones composed of all shades of religion and politics, begs your Grace to use your prerogative of mercy for the reprieve of the six young men under sentence of death. By doing so you will ensure goodwill and friendship amongst the people on both sides of the border.”

 

5-9-1942. BELFAST YOUTH EXECUTED. WILLIAMS BORE UP WELL TO THE END. EARLY MORNING SCENES. POUCE PRECAUTIONS IN VICINITY OF PRISON. Thomas Joseph Williams, aged 19 was executed at Belfast Prison on Wednesday morning at 8 o’clock, all efforts to secure his reprieve having failed. At 8.15 a.m. a notice intimating that the death sentence had been carried out in their presence was posted on the prison gate and signed Robert Henderson, Sheriff for Belfast, George Stewart, Justice of the Peace, Thomas Moore Stuart, Governor of the prison, and Rev. T. McAllister, Chaplain.

Young Williams bore up well to the end. He had been visited by relatives a short time prior to the execution and his spiritual comforts were attended to by priests in attendance. Precautions against a demonstration were taken by the police and crowds who gathered at various points at the approaches to the jail and knelt in prayer.

No people were allowed into Crumlin Road for a distance of about 200 yards in front of the prison. A police car patrolled the area around the prison and a strong cordon of police was also drawn around the district.      .

As eight o’clock was striking there was an opposition demonstration in Old Park Road when about 100 women and girls gathered and sung ‘’God Save the King” and British songs and engaged in cheering. They were forced into side streets by the police.

Williams, with five others was convicted and sentenced at the Assize Commission in August on the charge of causing the death of Constable Murphy, R.U.C., by shooting in April. An appeal to the Court of Criminal Appeal over a week ago was dismissed. A Nationwide appeal for the reprieve of the youths was without result in the case of Williams. On Sunday last Lord Abercorn’s statement announcing the reprieve of five of the youths was issued but it stated that the law must take its course in the case of Williams.

LORD ABERCORN’S STATEMENT. The statement issued at Stormont Castle said that the Six-County Governor had considered the cases of Thomas J. Williams, William J. Perry, Henry Cordner, John T. Oliver, Joseph Cahill and Patrick Simpson, ‘’prisoners lying under sentence of death in His Majesty’s Prison Belfast,” and decided that in the case of Williams the law must take its course, that the sentences in the cases of Perry, Cordner, Oliver and Cahill be commuted to penal servitude for life, and that Simpson’s sentence, be commuted to15 years’ penal servitude. The Governor’s decision was conveyed to the parents of the five reprieved men by Mr. D. F. Marrinan, their solicitor.

 

5-9-1942. …. and that such consecration as may be desired by the Church of England or the Catholic Church should be carried out on the individual grave. It was found that this principle met the wishes of the fighting Services better than the use of denominational plots and that it corresponded to a very deep conviction that the graves of men of very different faiths, who died, however, in a single cause, should be side by side. “If the local conditions make it necessary for a Separate Catholic plot to be formed, will you please arrange this through our District Inspector.’’ The Chairman—I suppose the Council would have no objection to that. Mr. William-Kelly—It is all the same, I think. The Council decided to grant Archdeacon Gannon’s request.

5-9-1942. £100 FOR ENNISKILLEN GRAVEYARD CARETAKER. The caretaker of Enniskillen new Cemetery—Mr. Jas. H. Kerr—applied to Enniskillen Rural Council for an increase of salary. The application, made last May, was adjourned till Tuesday, when the members had received the report of the Committee relative to the acquisition by the Catholic people of their hitherto unused plot. Mr. Kerr, who has £50 a year with free house, coal and light, plus £7 10s 0d a year war bonus, said he was afraid of the extension throwing so much additional work on him that, with the scarcity of  labour, he would find it difficult to cope with it. On the proposal of Mr. J. J. Bowler, seconded by Mr. A. Wilson, the Council unanimously agreed to increase Mr. Kerr’s salary to £100 a-year and to make him wholly responsible for the carrying out of all work at the Cemetery. -The Clerk pointed out that on many occasions the Registrar was not given sufficiently early notice of burials.

Old Graveyards—Caretakers’ Replies. Recently complaints were made as to the state of the old graveyards in Enniskillen rural area under the care of the Rural Council, and the Clerk was directed to write to the caretakers drawing their attention, to the complaints. Here are three replies received by the Council from caretakers :— From the caretaker of the old graveyard in Kinawley—‘‘I have mowed it twice this summer—the last time less than a month ago—and am now going to mow it a third time. It is quite possible that the person or persons who complained to you about the appearance of the graveyard, made a mistake about .the identity of .the plot. You can enquire off  some local person around the village about the  appearance of the old graveyard.’’ Devenish graveyard caretaker stated  that he never had failed to mow the graveyard, while the caretaker of. Pubble cemetery, Tempo, said: ‘‘I mow it once every year, and at the same time I remove the weeds, and trim the hedge.”

5-9-1942. GARVARY PENSIONER’S ESCAPE. An old-age pensioner named Mary McQuillan, of Shankhill, Garvary, had a remarkable escape when she was knocked down by a military lorry. Found lying in a pool of blood, she was rushed to hospital where it was found that her injuries were superficial. When knocked down she was going for a jug of milk, and on reaching hospital she was still clutching the jug.

5-9-1942. CAVAN FARMER FOR TRIAL. At Cavan District Court, before District Justice Lavery, Patrick Greene (24) farmer, Enniskeen, Kingscourt, was charged with maliciously burning a quantity of hay, value £100 the property of Patrick Tinnelly, Enniskeen, and maliciously burning a cart and harness and other property, value £50. Accused was returned for trial.

5-9-1942. Rossinver Convent.—The Franciscan Sisters of the Atonement of the Mother Lurana Mary Francis House, Rossinver, County Leitrim, have pleasure in announcing that permission has been given by the Holy See to make the Mother Lurana Mary Francis House a Temporary Novitiate for the duration of the war. The time of receptions will be announced later.

5-9-1942. £2 5s for Graveyard Caretaker.—At Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Mr. J. Murphy enquired if the salary of the caretaker of Cleenish Old Graveyard had been increased recently. The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) said originally the salary was 30/-. Then about two years ago the salaries of all graveyard caretakers were increased by 50 per cent.

5-9-1942. Catholic Burials — Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., presiding, instructed its engineer, Mr. James Donnelly, to prepare a specification for carrying out certain works at the New Cemetery, where the local Catholic community are utilizing their plot in future owing to lack of space at the Catholic Cemetery.

5-9-1942. NOTICE TO OUR CUSTOMERS. THE DERBY CAFÉ,ENNISKILLEN, WILL BE CLOSED ALL DAY THURSDAY,10TH SEPT. RE-OPENING FRIDAY MORNING.

5-9-1942. BUNDORAN LADY DIES IN COUNTY FERMANAGH. The death occurred of Mrs. F. Maguire, late of’ Ocean View, Bundoran. Since the death of her husband she had resided with her son and daughter-in-law at Lattoon, Belcoo, Co. Fermanagh. At the funeral last week the chief mourners were—James Hackett, Clogher (brother); Mrs. P. Carty (daughter); John and Freddie Maguire (sons); Peter Carty (son-in-law); Mrs. J. Maguire and Mrs. F. Maguire (daughters-in-law); Miss M. Maguire (sister-in-law); Nano, Packie and John Maguire, Jose, Jack, Frankie, Paddy, Peter and Michael Carty (grandchildren).

5-9-1942. AMERICAN SOLDIER SENTENCED. SEQUEL TO FATAL STABBING. Found guilty by secret ballot of the manslaughter of a member of the British Pioneer Corps, an American soldier, Pte. William Davis (23), of Texas, was sentenced to eight years’ imprisonment by a United States Army courtmartial in the Six Counties on Tuesday.He was also ordered to be dishonourably discharged from the American Army. Davis, who was found not guilty on the original charge of murdering the Pioneer Private, Owen McLoughlin, of Motherwell, will be sent back to America to serve the sentence in a penitentiary. McLaughlin was fatally stabbed on August 1st during a row at a dance in Randalstown Orange Hall.

5-9-1942. THREE TYRONE SISTERS ENTER RELIGIOUS LIFE. Miss Agnes Murray (Sister Mary Laurence) was finally professed, and her sister Winnie (Sister Bernard Therese) made her first profession at La Sainty Union Convent, Bath, on 15th August. Another sister Miss May Murray, H. Dip., has entered the Loreto order in Llandudno, North Wales. She was educated at St. Louis Convent, Carrickmacross, and University College. Dublin. Miss Winnie Murray was educated at Loreto Convent, Omagh, and the Convent High School, Southampton. They are daughters of Mr. .and Mrs. Patrick Murray, Rathfragan, Fintona.

5-9-1942. TO FIGHT TUBERCULOSIS IN BRITAIN. A number of sets of miniature radiography apparatus-the new weapon to combat tuberculosis—has been ordered and may be ready about the end of the year, Mr. Ernest Brown, British Minister of Health, disclosed on Monday opening a sanatorium at Nottingham. We have many difficult problems to solve in finding how the best use can be made of this new weapon, he said. Ideally everyone ought to undergo a regular examination and look upon it as a normal health measure. The fight against tuberculosis—that scourge happiness and destroyer of manpower has a definite, and by no means unimportant, place in the nation’s war effort.

5-9-1942. TRANSACTIONS IN BRANDY. TWO MEN FINED AT BELFAST.

CASE AGAINST ENNISKILLEN MAN. Fines totalling £125 or in default three months imprisonment were imposed by Major Dickie, R.M., in Belfast Summons Court on Desmond McGratty, Ormond Road, Dublin, in Customs prosecutions arising out of transactions in brandy. Samuel Moore, Down St., Enniskillen, was fined in sums aggregating £101 and ordered 12 months’ imprisonment without hard labour. Immediate warrants were issued against both defendants. The summons against McGratty was for being concerned in dealing in 59 bottles of brandy and a bottle of wine, with dealing wholesale in .spirits without a licence, and for causing to be harboured 446 bottles of brandy. Moore was summoned for dealing in 59 bottles of brandy, delivering spirits without a permit, dealing wholesale in spirits without a licence, and causing spirits to be harboured.

Fines of £10 were imposed on R. M. McLane and John Watters, publicans, Belfast, for failing to make an entry in their stock books and other cases against them were dismissed. The former was summoned for being concerned in dealing with 59 bottles of brandy and a bottle of wine, with receiving spirits without a permit and failing to make the necessary stock book entries, and the latter for being concerned in harbouring 446 bottles of brandy, for receiving spirits without a licence, and for failing to make the necessary stock book entries.

Mr. T. J. Campbell, K.C., M.P. (instructed by Messrs. J. Donnelly & Co.) for the defence, said if there was any offence at all it was a Customs offence, and he submitted that his clients were innocent even of the Customs charge. Mr. R. F. Sheldon (Crown Solicitor), for the Commissioners of Customs and Excise, gave notice of appeal in the Excise Cases against these two defendants.

5-9-1942. POLICE RAIDS IN BELFAST. 200 PERSONS DETAINED. Belfast police raided various districts in the city early this week and as a result 200 men have been detained. The raids began at five o’clock on Tuesday morning and the district covered include Falls Road, Ardoyne, North Queen Street, the Dock area, the Markets area, and portions of Ballymacarret and Short Strand. A very large force of police was engaged and the swoop was made simultaneously in each district. The majority of the suspects were taken from their beds, and the men, having been allowed to dress, were removed in cage cars and taken under strong escort to the cells at Chichester Street. There was intense police activity in the Falls Road area of Belfast all during Tuesday night and into the early hours of Wednesday morning.

A number of houses were raided. One man is known to have been detained. In Lisburn district there were also extensive police raids and a number of persons taken to the local barracks were questioned and afterwards released. There were many raids on Thursday night and early on Friday morning. After a night of patrol activity by armoured cars, police in tenders and on foot carried out concentrated raids at dawn. It is understood that the people detained are mostly youths, but a number of girls are also under detention.    In one case a father and his five sons were taken, leaving the mother the only remaining member of the family. . Police waited outside factories and mills and questioned young men as they left at lunch hour. Some on arriving home were detained.

In one street in the Falls, police with drawn revolvers followed a number of youths and later another chase developed when a young man jumped out the back door of a house when the police entered, and ran across the Bog Meadows. The men detained comprised dockers, factory, mill and munition workers and some A.R.P. wardens and fire watchers were taken to the barracks.

12-9-1942. BELLEEK BARRACKS ATTACKED. BOMBS FAILED TO EXPLODE, SHOTS FIRED. ENNISKILLEN HOUSE SEARCHES. At 4 o’clock on Friday morning the R.U.C. Barracks at Belleek, a short distance from the .Border, was attacked. A homemade time bomb or bombs placed near the building failed to explode. Shots were fired at the barracks and to these the police replied. The telephone wires to Enniskillen were cut but the police got a message through to Kesh from which a police party under Head-Constable  Conlin rushed to the assistance of their Belleek colleagues. After less than half an hour, however, the firing ceased and the only damage caused was a few windows broken in the barracks. About fifty shots in all were fired. Considerable police activity followed, several men in the Belleek district being questioned. Police from County Head-quarters at Enniskillen, under County Inspector Gorman for several hours investigated and received reports on the occurrence.

ENNISKILLEN SEARCHES. In Enniskillen district during Friday six houses were visited by a party of armed police and detectives. Nothing was found it is believed. One mart, Mr. Bertie Love, of Mill St., Enniskillen, was painting on the roof of a hut several miles from the town when he was taken into custody. He was later released. In the interval, he was lengthily and closely questioned by several police officers. His house was one of those searched. Other houses raided included that of Mr. Sean Nethercott, Paget Square, well known Fermanagh Nationalist, and Mr. W. J. Monaghan, U.D.C., P.L.G. Several hours were spent in each search.

OFFICIAL STATEMENT. On Friday night R.U.C. headquarters issued this statement:—“At 4 a.m. to-day Belleek barracks, Co. Fermanagh was attacked by fire and bombs. About fifty shots were fired. Police returned the fire. After calling on the police to surrender, the assailants disappeared.

RANDALSTOWN AFFAIR. The explosion at Randalstown barracks, caused by a bomb placed on the sill, blew in one window and the surrounding brickwork, cut the heavy steel bars over the window, badly damaged adjacent houses and broke windows for a hundred yards on either side of the barracks. One of the injured policemen, Sergeant McCammond was flung across the day room and through a door opposite the window. He had been doing clerical work at the time. Constable Bunting, the other injured man, who was standing in the centre of the room was blown against another door and knocked semi-conscious. The sergeant was found to have a fracture of the left arm and severe abrasions to the left leg when he was removed to the Royal Victoria Hospital, where he was stated last night to be comfortable. The constable was not .seriously hurt. The day room is only 9ft. by 12ft. The floor was littered with bricks and other debris, while the walls were pitted with holes.

12-9-1942. ROSLEA COURT BORDER MERCHANT FINED. At Rosslea Petty Sessions before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., John Maguire, merchant, Lackey, Roslea (near Clones), was charged on three counts with being in possession of the following goods with intent to evade export prohibition— 8 cwts. rice, 5 cwts. barley, 2½ cwts. S/R flour, 3 cwts. currants, 2 stones sultanas, 96 tins salmon and 42 lbs. soap powder. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted, and Mr, Herbert, solicitor defended. Martin Shaw McMullen, of McKay and Leetham, Belfast, deposed to selling the goods to defendant on September 23rd, 1941. He had never seen defendant before. Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness said there were no restrictions on the goods at that time.

Sergeant Moffatt deposed to visiting defendant’s premises, which were about 20 yards from the border, on Oct. 29th. Defendant had a very small stock and the goods which were seized were found in defendant’s dwelling-house. At that time witness could find no trace of baking soda or lentils which defendant had purchased in Belfast. In a statement defendant said half the goods were for a Mr. Somerville who owned a shop about 1½ miles away. Defendant refused to sign the statement.

Defendant, in evidence, stated he was an ex-serviceman and had served in the British army in France and in the East during the last war. He had been in business for himself since 1934 and was on friendly terms with Mr. Somerville, Clones with whom he had previously been employed. His purchases from January, 1941 to August, 1942, were £910. Witness had never any intention of smuggling these goods across the border. Convicting, defendant of being in possession of the goods for export, the R.M, imposed a fine of £60, with time to pay. He dismissed the other two charges. He ordered the forfeiture of 2 cwts. of barley and 2 cwts. of currants.

12-9-1942. MISCONDUCT AT WEEKLY DANCES. AMERICAN OFFICERS’ COMPLAINT.  A letter was read from the officer in charge of U.S.A. military police, regarding dances held in the Minor Townhall—particularly those held on Saturday nights, under the auspices of the football club. It stated: “The door keepers have no limit in admission; the result being that the atmosphere is appalling. There is no room to dance and when evilly disposed. There is no room to dance and when evilly disposed persons start a “brawl’ the hall is so crowded it is impossible to pick out the participants. We suggest that the number of persons admitted be limited to 150 at the outside. We are agreeable to place joint police patrols at the door, who will be responsible for seeing that the service men do not gain admittance after the correct number had been reached, and also our patrols will enter the hall if there is any disorder among the service personnel at the request of the door keeper or a member of the dance committee. We take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation to all classes in Enniskillen for the hospitality and cooperation we have invariably received.” In a subsequent letter it was stated: “We can no longer provide police patrols for duty at the above mentioned dances as we are not getting the cooperation of the organisers.’’

The Chairman (Mr. Johnston) said the difficulty was 200 to 300 people go to this dance and the place gets choked up. One dance last week had to be stopped on account of the conduct. There was only one thing they could do and it would be a drastic remedy—close the hall altogether to these dances. The Council made an order that the number of persons to be admitted to a dance in the Minor Hall be limited to 150.

12-9-1942. LEITRIM COUNCIL SYMPATHY. THE BALLINAMORE TRAGEDY. Mr. Mooney proposed a vote of sympathy with the relatives of the victims of the Ballinamore drowning tragedy. He happened to be in Ballinamore the previous Tuesday, and he witnessed a scene of sorrow there which he hoped never to see again. It was a consolation to know that the children who lost their lives were daily attenders at Mass and communicants. Therefore they were well prepared to meet their Creator, and their parents had the whole-hearted sympathy of the Council in their bereavement. Mr, P. J. Reynolds, in seconding said it was his intention as a member of the Council for Ballinamore area to propose a vote of sympathy as he thought according to procedure the agenda had to be finished first before taking up consideration of such a resolution. The parents had the wholehearted sympathy of the Leitrim County Council in the great loss which they had sustained. The Chairman said the sad occurrence had cast a gloom not alone over the Ballinamore area but it caused a painful shock throughout “Eire.” They sympathised deeply with the relatives of those children.

12-9-1942. DEARER 26-CO. BREAD. The price of the 41b. batch loaf is to be raised in the 26 Counties from ls to ls 1d, delivered, as from September 21. The price will be Is when sold at bakers’ shops. The price of flour (including wheaten meal) will be increased South of the Border from 52s 6d a sack of 280 lbs. to 60s free on rail at port mills, as from September 14th. The flour price increase is attributed to the new guaranteed price of 50s a barrel for Irish wheat,

12-9-1942. GLANGEVLIN TRAGEDY. MAN FOUND HANGED. A distressing tragedy was discovered in Glengevlin on Friday afternoon when Peter McGovern, Bealballie, Glangevlin was found dead, suspended from a rope, in his home. A niece of deceased, who had acted as housekeeper for him, had left on the previous evening to visit her sister’s house, some miles away. On her return on Friday afternoon she found the door bolted and. was unable to gain admittance. Securing assistance the door was forced .and the grim discovery made. THE INQUEST. At an inquest held on Saturday a verdict of suicide while of unsound mind was returned. It was stated that deceased had not been in good health since a recent illness. Sympathy was extended to his relatives. The funeral, which took place to Glangevlin, was largely attended.

12-9-1942. BALLYSHANNON COURT. JAIL SENTENCES FOR ASSAULT. At Ballyshannon District Court, before Mr. J. O’Hanrahan, D.J., Patrick and John Rooney, Single Street, Bundoran, were each sentenced to two months’ imprisonment with hard labour for assaulting Charles Gorman, who said he was cut in several places, Lieut. James Mahony, National Army, said one of the Rooneys held Gorman as the other beat him. Witness interfered and took the man away. John Rooney said Gorman started the row.

12-9-1942. KESH MAN GETS DECREE. A decree for £25 was given in a civil bill brought by Francis Maguire, Derrynieve, Kesh, against Lena Gallagher, Tourist House, Bundoran, for that amount due for. cash lent and advanced by plaintiff to defendant on the 20tk October, 1938.

12-9-1942. 60 DOZEN EGGS SEIZED. Imposing a penalty of £100 with a recommendation that it be reduced to £5 in a case in which James McGonigle, Corlea, was convicted of attempting to smuggle 60 dozen eggs across the Border, the Justice said he hoped it would serve as a warning to people on this side of the Border not to be catspaws for those outside the jurisdiction of the State. Garda McGarvey said when questioned McGonigle, who was carrying three boxes of eggs, in a donkey cart in the direction of Corlea, said he was conveying them for a day’s pay from a shop in Cashelard to a man who lived in the Belleek district. The eggs were seized.

12-9-1942. DRUMKEERAN DISTRICT COURT LICENCE APPLICATIONS. Mr. M, J. C. Keane, District Justice, presided at this Court on Wednesday. DANCE LICENCE. Mr. H. Murray, solicitor (Mr. C. L. Flynn), Carrick-on-Shannon, applied on behalf of Mrs. Celia Crowne, Drumkeeran, for an annual dance licence in respect of Crowne’s Hall, Drumkeeran.

Superintendent McNamara, Carrick-on-Shannon, said there was no objection to the licence and the Justice granted the application as asked by Mr. Murray— twenty dances in the year from 8 p.m. to 12 midnight. Mr. Thomas Dowd, Gluckawn, was granted a licence to hold a dance at Gluckawn National School, the guards having no objection.

ANNUAL LICENCES. The publicans in Drumkeeran and district had their annual applications listed for the renewal of their licence and as there was no objection the applications were granted, as also exemptions for early opening on fair mornings.

Mr. Patrick Dolan, .Drumkeeran, applied for the renewal of his spirit grocery wholesale and retail licence, and the Justice inquired if there was any proof of valuation with regard to the wholesale licence. Mr. Early, court clerk, said the applicant was within the limitation and had been granted a licence on a previous occasion. The renewal of the licence was accordingly granted.

12-9-1942. D.J. SUGGESTS TRANSPORT FACILITIES TO COURT. MINERS’ ABSENCE HOLDS UP CASE. Fifteen miners, summoned to give evidence at Ballyfarnon in a series of cases under the Holidays (Employees) Act, 1939, against Michael Leydon, managing director Arigna Collieries, Ltd., failed to appear, and Mr. Keane, D.J., adjourned the summonses for a month for their attendance. It was alleged that Mr. Leydon had failed to give workers annual leave and public holidays, and had failed to pay, assessor pay when they quitted his employment.

Mr. M. Lavin, Inspector of Mines and Factories, said Mr. Leydon had told him that he thought the Act did not apply to his mines. Mr. Leydon, after the issue of the summonses, sent a letter to the Department enclosing receipts from the persons concerned stating that they had got payment in respect of assessor pay, annual leave and holidays. Mr. C. E. Callan, defending, said the inspector had prevented Mr. Leydon increasing the men’s wages. The men could not be present at court owing to transport difficulties. Mr. Keane thought that some effort to transport them to court might he made.

12-9-1942. SMALL FINES PROTEST. CROWN SOLICITOR AND R.M. When at Tynan Petty Sessions on Saturday, Mr. Austin, R.M., fined Patk. Carbery, Balteagh, Middletown, £15 for having been concerned in carrying 35 bottles whisky, uncustomed goods, Mr, J. P. Best (Crown Solicitor) said it was no use the Commissioners getting small penalties like that.He again protested when Fras. Hughes, Lislanley, was fined £3 in respect of two cycle tyres.

If these penalties were to continue he suggested to the Commissioners that they make the minimum fine £100. Mr. Austin — If you want to fill the prisons well and good. Mr. Best—Small penalties encourage smuggling. Mr. Austin—I don’t believe in imprisonment unless it is absolutely necessary. Mr. Best — You don’t seem to think there is a war on.

SUING FOR £1,000 FINE. When Patrick Hamill, John St., Portadown, was charged in respect of 2 lbs. tea. Mr. Best said that under a new Order the authorities were suing for a. £1,000 fine. The R.M.—Very well, I will fine him £1,000. Then he goes to jail. Defendant—I’ll go to prison rather than pay £1,000. Mr. Best, (to the R.M.)—If you want to make yourself ridiculous you can impose the fine. A fine of £3 was imposed.

12-9-1942. BLACK-OUT WARNING. “I would like people clearly to understand that penalties will be very heavy in the coming winter if they don’t blackout, said Major Dickie, R.M:, at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. Addressing District Inspector Peacocke, his  Worship said: “At the same time, Mr. Peacock, I might suggest, that it would be well to draw, the attention of the military authorities to the practice of military cars and lorries not only passing through Enniskillen, but parking in Enniskillen, with unscreened headlights full on. I counted six of them at midnight with blazing headlights. . The whole town of Enniskillen must have been blazing with lights visible from the air for miles away,” he said. D. I. Peacocke—That matter has been given attention already. Of course you understand we must approach the authorities. In, the black-out cases before the Court, his Worship imposed fines of 5/- and costs in the majority and in one a fine of 20/- and costs was ordered.

COCOA SALE: £31 FINE. Thomas Coogan, merchant, Ballybay, was fined £20 and his brother, Patrick Coogan, £5 when summoned at Ballybay for charging 3/9 for a lb. of cocoa. They were also fined £2 each for selling the  cocoa to a non-customer For refusing to give a. receipt a further fine of £2 was imposed on Patrick Coogan.

12-9-1942. ROSLEA DROWNING TRAGEDY. FATHER’S STORY AT INQUEST. How a horrified father watched his son drown in a lake a short distance from the shore was described at an inquest held in Rosslea on Wednesday of last week into the circumstances of the death of a boy named Frank Morton (18) son of Constable Francis Morton, R.U.C., Rosslea, who: was drowned in Drumacritten Lake on the previous evening. The inquest was held by Mr. James Mulligan, Coroner, sitting without a jury. District Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, conducted the proceedings for the Crown. The death of young Morton, who was a general favourite with everyone, caused a pall of gloom in the district. A lad of fine physique, measuring six feet in height, the deceased was about to be accepted in the police force, and his untimely death has evoked widespread sympathy. A native of Co. Armagh, his father was transferred from Derrylin about five months ago, Deceased was his second eldest child, fond, of all kind of sport and a remarkably strong swimmer.

At the inquest, Constable Horton, who was obviously overcome with grief, stated that on the evening of the tragedy witness left his home about 6.30 to have a shot with his gun. His sons, Frank (dead) and George, asked him where he was going, and witness told them so that they would know where to get him. Later witness shot two wild ducks rising off  Drumacritten Lake. Witness tried to get his setter dog to go out for the ducks, but the dog would not go, as it had not seen the ducks on the water. Witness gave up trying to get the ducks and was going away when his two sons arrived. Frank said he would go in for the ducks, and started to take off his clothes. Deceased was a strong swimmer. His son entered the water, and when he was about halfway turned to come back, shouting for help. Witness ran up to a .field to get assistance, but when, he returned he could only see bubbles where his son had disappeared. A verdict of accidental death was returned and sympathy expressed with the bereaved family and relatives.

12-9-1942. SYMPATHY WITH POLICEMAN. When Constable Frank Morton, R.U.C., was giving evidence in a black-out case, Major Dickie said he would like to mention how much they all sympathised with Constable Morton on the occasion of his recent sad bereavement. They were all extremely sorry. Mr. Cooper also, associated himself with the expression of sympathy and Constable Morton, returned thanks. Constable Morton’s 18-year-old son had been drowned in a lake hear Roslea a couple, of days previously. Fines were imposed in a number of cases against householders for not having their premises effectively blacked-out, and Major Dickie said the .penalties would be much heavier this winter if there were any complaints from the R.A.F.

The Erne Packet. Enniskillen, August 28 1817.

The Erne Packet. Enniskillen, August 28 1817.

Irish Manufacture.—On Tuesday last, three men and a woman were committed to Wexford goal, by A. H. Jacob, who were detected by that active Magistrate, in the neighbourhood of Enniscorthy, in the act of manufacturing leaves of alder, birch, &c. so as to resemble the various kinds of tea imported from China. About two hundred weight of this deleterious article, together with the sheets and blankets used in the process of drying, were lodged in the Custom-house stores.— Wexford Herald.

MOST IMPORTANT. It has long been a desirable object with the Public to have the Currency of the two Countries assimilated. We understand that the thing is effected by the most simple process. The Bank of England has agreed to receive the Notes of the Bank of Ireland the same as their own. To illustrate this subject it is only necessary to state, that a Merchant in Dublin, instead of paying 10 per Cent, for a Bill to meet his engagement in London, may transmit Irish Notes and they will be received as British Currency. It may be a “wonder of nine days,” but Ireland reaps the advantage,—it raises her property 10 per cent, in price, in the great market of the world, and if it be true, as we are confident it is, to owe to the present Minister, on this account alone, more than to all their predecessors since the Revolution. We do not choose at this time, to enter into any particular discussion of the matter. We merely announce the circumstance, and it admits a conclusion of the largest import, which we shall soon fully explain. —Dublin Journal.

HARVEST WEATHER, &.

LIMERICK, AUGUST 23. NEW WHEAT.—Unfavourable as the past rainy weather must have been towards the maturity of all Irish grain we felt pleasure in seeing, at this day’s market new red wheat, of prime quality. — It belonged to Mr. William Watson, near Nenagh, and is enough to shew agriculturists what may be expected from an Irish soil, when properly cultivated, and the seed thereof seasonably deposited. —Chronicle.

A barrel of new oats, reaped fifteen days since, the property of A. French St. George, Esq. appeared in Galway Market, on the 12th inst.

A Cup potatoe, weighing nearly one pound three quarters, was grown at Whitehall, North Liberty of Limerick, the seat of Joseph E. Vize, Esq. It is a very extraordinary natural production at this early period—the stalk was quite green, and would therefore be much larger if left in the ground.

BELFAST, AUGUST 23. Yesterday, an unusual quantity of Oatmeal was brought to market—probably about 150 bags, and little disposition evinced to purchase so that a great quantity remained unsold. The prices were from 23s. to 24s. 6d. per cwt. There was also so large supply of Potatoes, that the market was crowded to excess. They were generally of an excellent quality, and sold for 3½d. to 5d. per stone.

Yesterday Mr. Younghusband commenced reaping a large field of Potatoe Oats, at his house at Ballydrain, near this town. The Oats appear extremely fine, and unusually productive. Another field of Oats, near the old Race Course, between this town and Lisburn, is already partly cut down.

DROGHEDA. AUG. 21. Most of the Liverpool and Preston traders have arrived this week. The markets are in this town most plentifully supplied. Beef and Mutton from 5d. to 6d. per pound. Potatoes, best quality, 7d. per 211b.  Bread, from American flour, 41b. in the Shilling Loaf.—We are happy to state that trade in the above ports is reviving, and business assuming an animated appearance.

The heavy rains that fell last, and beginning of this week, lodged several fields of luxuriant corn, but very little if any injury, we hear has been sustained. The cold winds from the N. and W. that prevailed for some weeks, has shifted to the, S. E, and the temperature of the atmosphere is more genial. Though the sun is partially obscured, the wheats and oats are fast arriving at maturity, and a few weeks will bring in abundance of new corn. Potatoes are at 5d. 6d. and 7d. per stone. Very little grain appeared in the corn market for some weeks and the prices nearly nominal. Our linen market has been brisk for the last fortnight and extensive purchases made for England.

WINDOW LIGHT TAX. A Vestry was held in the Parish of St Michan, Dublin, on last Wednesday week, for the purpose of preparing represent a representation to Mr. Vansittart upon the subject of the Window Tax.

At one o’clock, the Churchwardens took the Chair, and Mr. Wm. Smith immediately rose, and after observing that the subject upon which the Household were assembled, had so recently engaged the attention, as well as that of all the Parishes in the City, and was so generally and well understood, that he felt it would not be necessary form to occupy the time of the meeting by dwelling upon it—proposed a resolution for the appointment of a Committee to wait upon Mr. Vansittart with an address upon the subject of the Window Tax. This mot was immediately carried and the Committee appointed.

Mr. Smith then produced the draft of an Address to Vansittart congratulating the Right Hon. Gentleman on his arrival in this country— complimenting him upon the motives of his journey—representing the distressed state of the Parish of Saint Michan, in which one half of the houses, (amounting in the whole to near 2,000 houses were either shut up, or inhabited by persons unable to pay rent or taxes—in which 12,000 individuals out of a population of 22,000, were reduced from competence, in many cases from affluence, to poverty—and declaring the utter inability of the Parishioners to pay the Window Tax any longer; and therefore praying a repeal of that oppressive impost. After some consultation, this address, being seconded by Mr. Dillon was agreed to, and the Churchwardens were directed to write to the Chancellor of the Exchequer requesting him to appoint a time for receiving the address.

(The window tax was a property tax based on the number of windows in a house. It was a significant social, cultural, and architectural force in England, France, Ireland and Scotland during the 18th and 19th centuries. To avoid the tax some houses from the period can be seen to have bricked-up window-spaces (ready to be glazed or re-glazed at a later date). In England and Wales it was introduced in 1696 and was repealed in 1851, 156 years after first being introduced. France (established 1798, repealed 1926) and Scotland both had window taxes for similar reasons. The tax was introduced in England and Wales under the An Act for granting to His Majesty several Rates or Duties upon Houses for making good the Deficiency of the clipped Money in 1696 under King William III and was designed to impose tax relative to the prosperity of the taxpayer, but without the controversy that then surrounded the idea of income tax. At that time, many people in Britain opposed income tax, on principle, because the disclosure of personal income represented an unacceptable governmental intrusion into private matters, and a potential threat to personal liberty. In fact the first permanent British income tax was not introduced until 1842, and the issue remained intensely controversial well into the 20th century.)

ASCENT AND DESCENT OF THE BALLOON. On the 20th, after repeated postponements, the Balloon ascended from Portobello Barracks with Miss Thompson and Mr. Livingston. The hour had been fixed for half-past one o’clock, but the necessary preliminaries of inflation, adjusting the car &c., were not concluded before half-past three, at which time it was loosed from its fastenings and went off in admirable style, and with great rapidity, taking a southerly direction. The great anxiety of the immense crowd which had assembled within the Barrack enclosure, seemed to be, to see Miss Thompson enter the car, and prepare for her aerial flight—to accomplish this, the pressure was inconceivably great upon those who superintended the arrangements preparatory to the ascent. This lady displayed a perfect composure and self-possession at the time of her departure from the platform, to which the Balloon had been carried, and the apparent intrepidity of her companion was likely to confirm her confidence in the security with which she committed herself to atmospheric space. The shouts and cheerings of the multitude, both within and without the barracks, served to encourage her resolution, and she waved her hand and bade adieu, with seeming gaiety, as she ascended. In four or five minutes after the Balloon departed, a Parachute, to which was attached a small land Tortoise, was separated from it, and in a short period reached the earth and in seventeen minutes from the period of ascent, the Balloon descended on the boundary of the demesne of Marley, the seat of J. D. Latouche, Esq.—the hospitable proprietor of which had watched their progress, and was prepared to assist and receive them and he provided for all the claims their situation presented, with his characteristic kindness and urbanity. The voyagers partook of a dinner at Marley, after which they returned to town, where they were warmly welcomed by their friends. This short trip was in consideration of the course which the Balloon had necessarily taken, and which would have brought it very expeditiously to the sea-coast, and Mr. Livingston, with a laudable gallantry, did not wish to expose his fair partner to the peril which might result from entering upon a marine region, and abridged his voyage in consequently. No accident of any kind occurred.

The attention of Colonel Pelly, and the Officers and men of the 16th Lancers, was friendly and unremitting while the Balloon was preparing for the ascent. Miss Thompson wore a striped sarsnet dress and Spanish hat and feathers. (The first ascent in Ireland was from Ranelagh Gardens in Dublin in 1785 by Richard Crosbie.)

DIED. In the town of Monaghan on the 18th inst. of a fever, Mr. Robert Jackson, Merchant, universally esteemed in life and lamented in death—He was an affectionate husband, an indulgent father, a generous master, a pleasing companion, and an honest man.

Last week, Mr. Con. O’Donnell of Ballyshannon, innkeeper.

On the 13th inst. in the 59th year of his age at his residence Annagheen, near Carrickmacross, greatly regretted by a numerous and respectable circle of friends and acquaintances James Kelly, Esq.

It is under impressions of extreme concern that we have to state the death of Mrs. Richardson, wife of Major Richardson of Rusfad (Rosfad) in this County, and sister to Lieutenant-General Archdall. She expired on the evening of Friday last, after a short but severe illness, in a malignant fever, which baffled all the powers of medicine, and the best efforts of professional skill. This excellent and lamented lady, it may be truly said, fell a victim to her charitable feelings, having caught the infectious and fatal disease, which took away her valuable life, from some of the numerous sick and indigent poor, who sought and found daily relief at Rusfad. Her remains were deposited in the family vault at Templemahery (Templemaghery) (Ardess) on Sunday.

On Thursday night last two cows, one of them belonging to the Rev. Mr. Kernan, were stolen out of a field contiguous to this town. In the fair of Lurganboy on the following day, the thieves were detected offering the cattle for sale, and have been since lodged in Gaol. One of them proves to be a man named John Rorke, who was tried for an offence of a similar nature so recently as the late Assizes here.

We lament to state that, for several nights past, very considerable damage has been done in the potatoe fields situated near this town, by some nocturnal prowlers who destroy the plant, to procure such portion of its produce as is worth removing. The institution of a nightly watch has been adopted in many places, as a protection against the depredations of these wretches, and is a prudent and necessary measure, which should be resorted to everywhere under such circumstances.

A white Swallow has been observed for some days past flying about Castlecoole demesne. Its plumage is pure snow-white, and the beak somewhat of a dark colour. The bird, which is altogether very beautiful, is rather larger than the common species of swallow, and seems to be an object of envy and persecution among its associates of homelier garb.

A malignant fever is at present raging in many parts of the kingdom. Its effects are comparatively unfelt in this neighbourhood, although many cases of a milder character of the disease appear among the lower classes, and a few respectable families have been visited by me calamity.

The weather, since our last, though variable, and rather more moist than could be wished, has, nevertheless, been on the whole pretty favourable to the maturation of the farm crops, which everywhere exhibit, a weighty ear, and a ripening appearance. Yesterday was uninterruptedly fair, and the fineness of this morning would seem to justify the most favourable presages.

Extract of a Letter from Lifford dated 21st instant. “I had a carpenter doing a little job, and I feel much in assuring you that he had, to-day, to go to Strabane to assist in making coffins for the dead and dying in that town and neighbourhood of the contagious Fever now prevalent there. There is also a fever in our Gaol, and there are also several cases in town. The Sick- Report yesterday stated 63 ill in the Fever Hospital.

 

ENNISKILLEN EXECUTION. Last Thursday, Thomas Broughton, pursuant to his sentence at the late Assizes held here, was executed from the drop in front of the New Gaol. The morning war unusually fine and the sun rose bright for every eye but the unfortunate criminal’s. Stimulated by a curiosity which, however it may be censured as cruel, we would not wish to see repressed, in consideration of the appalling lesson it may bring under the eyes of many of our fellow creatures, callous to ordinary admonition, the population of the surrounding country, for many miles, assembled to witness the awful ceremony. The space immediately in front of the Gaol was occupied by the military, consisting of a troop of Dragoons, with a Company of the Royal Scots and the immense concourse of spectators of both sexes extended a considerable distance to right and left,, and in front, as far as the Fort Hill, the sides and summit of which appeared one animated mass.

The Rev. Mr. Duffy, R.C., Chaplain of the Gaol, passed a great part of the preceding night in the cell of the criminal, fortifying his mind against the approaching trial with the sublime consolations of religion; and with such happy effect, that the penitent seemed already almost enfranchised from his mortal coil; in contemplating and desiring the eternity before him. His affections were, in fact wholly disengaged from the things of this world; and he was heard more than, once to regret the few hours delay prescribed by the formalities of the law under such circumstances. Previous to leaving the cell his wife and some of his children, were permitted to take their last fare well, and here, even amid this trying scene, so calculated to wring a father’s heart, he preserved the mastery over his feelings, and that unshaken firmness and composure, which astonished at once and edified the beholders. In every stage of the proceedings his fortitude, leaning upon a Redeemer’s love, and lifted up by a humble confidence in His mercy regained equally unmoved; and the deep, settled resignation of his mind, to a casual observer, might have appeared the effect indifference, or insensibility. Shortly after the departure of his family, he was conducted to the execution room, accompanied by the Rev. Messrs. Kernan and Duffy who there read the sublime affecting office suited to the occasion of a parting soul. There was something beyond what is merely of this earth—something spiritual and heavenly—in the moment. The terrors and ignominy of a public death—the crimes which incurred such punishment—faded from the picture, and the heart only contemplated the spectacle of the frail creature returning to the bosom of his Creator—of the sinner approaching the feet of his Saviour, through the path of repentance and under the mediation of religion.

After some time spent in further acts of devotion, the fatal hour was announced. The prisoner, with the most perfect collectedness, again joined with the Reverend Gentlemen, and some others, present, in fervent prayer. He freely, acknowledged the justice of the sentence, by which he was to suffer, forgave his prosecutors and all others, & expressed himself fully reconciled, and ready, to yield up his life as a small atonement for his crimes. He then cheerfully submitted to the operation of binding his arms by the executioner, who was in attendance, and advanced on the platform, in view of the people, with a firm step, and some appearance of alacrity. Having been fixed in a proper  posture and situation, he raised the cap off his face, as well as the position of his arms would allow, and looked round on the multitude for a moment, apparently with some intention of addressing them. He, however, continued silent—the executioner immediately replaced the cap—retired— and the next instant the unfortunate man was launched into eternity. He expired almost instantaneously, without the slightest struggle or indication of suffering and, after remaining suspended for the usual period, the body was lowered into the coffin underneath and delivered to the relatives, who bore it out of town.

It has been said, and we fear too truly, that, from his early youth up to the advanced age, at which his life terminated thus ignominiously, Broughton was an occasional, if not a habitual violator of the laws. A report prevailed, said to be founded on his own confession, that he was a former associate of Peebles of Lisnaskea, long known as a notorious marauder in this County; and also that he was a party at the robbery of Lisgoole Abbey, near this town, about forty years ago. We feel it but justice to state, that, while under sentence of death, he disclaimed, in the most solemn manner, any sort of connection with Peebles, farther than having afforded him shelter and guidance on one occasion, when flying from pursuit, he accidentally stopped at his house; and that he denied, in the same unequivocal terms, any participation whatever in the attack on Lisgoole alluded to. The solemn lesson taught by his history, and his end, cannot fail to sink deep into the minds of those, who may have unhappily fallen into similar habits of crime. The old and practiced transgressor may be warned, that vengeance, though often slow, and suspended for a time, no doubt for the gracious purpose of holding out an invitation to repentance, is sure to overtake the hardened criminal at last; while the young offender, yet unconfirmed in the ways of guilt, must tremble to perceive the certain fate he is preparing for himself, and learn to remember his Creator in the days of his youth.

All spellings as per original.

July 1915.

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  CROM CASTLE.  Owing to recent events the Crom Demesne with the exception of the Old Castle and the direct road thereto, which is indicated by notices, is closed to the public until further notice.  The public may visit the Old Castle on Fridays, but special permission must be obtained for large parties and pic– nics.  Horse drawn vehicles and carriages must, after depositing visitors at the Old Castle, leave the Demesne and only return when required by the visitors.  Motors, motor cycles, and bicycles can remain outside the Old Castle.  All grounds including the Old Castle and Gad Island are as usual closed to the public on Sundays.

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  THE SCENIC BEAUTIES OF FERMANAGH.  A large party of Southern Pressman are just now journeying through our Northern Provence with the view of describing its scenic attractions to the further development of the tourist traffic.  Northern Journalists are after making a like pleasant pilgrimage to Southern picturesque resorts.  Why has Fermanagh not been included in the Ulster Districts?  Who was responsible for the itinerary?  We notice that the arrangements have been made under influential auspices including those of the Lord Mayors of Belfast and Cork.  The reception and gatherings have shown that the movement is a solid one, practical, and really devised to do good to the country.  Why, then, was one of the most charming lake and mountain counties altogether omitted from the visiting programme?  Very possibly Fermanagh has only itself to blame for being out of most of the enriching and distinguishing activities that mark more enterprising and pushy communities.  Our people want to waken up to a better knowledge of their own possessions.  We want first to get a knowledge of them ourselves, to learn how to appreciate and value them and then to extend that knowledge and appreciation as far afield as possible.  Meanwhile we suffer from our own supineness.

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  THINGS PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW.  Is the White Hart Entry, Townhall Street, Enniskillen, now become the most disordered the part of the town?

Why are we now hearing so very little about the two million pound electrical lighting scheme which was (or is?) to be started at Belleek?  Would one’s money be better invested in that or in the War loan?

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  WAR NEWS.  Among the officers included in the recent casualty list is Lieutenant R. K.  Lloyd, of the 10th King’s Liverpool Regiment (Liverpool Scottish), who is reported wounded.  Lieutenant Lloyd is the brilliant Portora half, who captained Ireland last season and was associated with the wonderful triumphs of the great Liverpool Rugby Football Club.  With him in the Liverpool team were Lieutenant W.  R.  Poulton–Palmer and Lieutenant F.  H.  Turner, the English and Scottish captains, both of whom have been killed in action.

We noticed with very great pleasure that Captain Maurice F.  Day, 2nd King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, who is the youngest son of Right Rev. Dr. Day, Bishop of Clogher, of Bishopscourt, Clones, has been awarded the Military Cross.  Captain Day is adjutant of his battalion, and has been twice mentioned in dispatches.

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  WAR NEWS.  Since the middle of last August never a day has gone by without the names of Ulster Volunteers appearing in the casualty lists.  Even in the so-called Irish Division which went to England a few weeks ago, amidst Mr. Redmond’s demonstrations of joy, over a third of the men are Ulster Protestants, and another third are English Protestants.

Our Ulster Division was equipped and clothed by local enterprise at no trouble to the military authorities and with a notable saving of expense.  This was the work of a few businessmen associated with the headquarters of the Ulster Volunteers.

It is hardly necessary to mention the splendid work which is being done in our shipyards, which Mr. Lloyd George publicly stated were the most satisfactory in the kingdom.  Similarly our great textile resources have been freely placed at the disposal of the Government, and in no class of work has there been any trouble between employers and workers, thanks to their mutual common sense and patriotism.

No doubt we shall have again as before whining about the large number of old men to be found in Ireland.  We have no desire to deal with such persons.  We direct attention solely to men of military age.  Of these one and four has enlisted in Ulster, when only one in 17 has enlisted in the three Nationalist provinces.  If we were to omit the Nationalist counties of Ulster where the recruiting has been very poor, it would be seen how magnificent has been the Unionist response to the call for men.

At the same time we have never been slow to admit that those Nationalists who have joined the colours fought magnificently.  They are a credit not only to Ireland but to the whole Empire.

A hospital ship arrived in Dublin on Sunday morning from France with 731 wounded soldiers, of whom 230 were lying down cases. 300 of the men were sent to Belfast, and the remainder stay in Dublin.

The miners are the most Radical and Socialists of the Labour section of the country, of course, the most adverse to being compelled to increase the output of coal.  They object even to be brought under the terms of the Munitions Bill.  This is probably because all the miners who are patriots have gone to the front, and only those who are not – only Socialists and Radicals – are left.

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  THE GENERALSHIP AND THE SOLDIERSHIP OF THE RUSSIANS HAVE BEEN MAGNIFICENT, but, as Mr. Lloyd George remarked, and it is a only stating the obvious, the best and bravest of troops can be of little avail unless they have guns and ammunition to use against the enemy.  It is, we are convinced, in the failure of these, and not in strategy or courage, that the Russians have failed.  It is a lesson and a home lesson, for all our workers that they must be up and doing, working in season and out of season instead of striking and slacking if our own troops are not to fall in the same way and fail for the same cause.

In two ways lack of British munitions is responsible for the Russian losses in Galicia.  We were unable to supply our Ally with shells, and our own want of machine guns and high explosives in the West enabled the Germans in the middle of April, to transfer some part of their western forces to the Eastern theatre.  The Government conceal these things from us so long as concealment was possible, and it is small wonder that the comparatively sudden realization of our mistakes, and of their costly consequences, has depressed many minds.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  FERMANAGH AMBULANCE.  Next week the motor ambulance ‘Fermanagh’ will be on tour through the county, and people will have an opportunity of viewing it.  It has cost £550, the funds being collected by Mr. E. M. Archdale, D. L.  The ambulance will go to the Ulster Division which will have 21 motor ambulances, all provided by public subscription.  Many other divisions have no ambulance of their own.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  BITS AND PIECES.  Dundalk Prison has been added to the list of closed prisons in Ireland.

The fruit trees and potato crops in of the west of Ireland have been destroyed by frost.

At Chicago on Saturday, Davio Resta won the 500 mile automobile race at an average speed of 97.6 miles per hour.  This is stated to be a record.

The Noxious Weeds Act was sought to be put into force at the Tyrone Committee of Agriculture, but failed.  Irish ‘farmers’ prefer weeds to the trouble of extirpating them.  Our proverbial laziness or indolence prevents us keeping our fields and fences as tidy as they should be.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  TURKS PAINT THEMSELVES GREEN.  Lieutenant Colonel Leslie Wilson, D.S.O., M.P. writing from Gallipoli says: – ‘The Turks are brave and clever snipers.  The frequently place small trees on their back and crawl up to the trenches. I watched a rush which seemed to be shaking a lot although there was no wind then I and another man got on to it with rifles.  It moved quickly enough then.  Some of the Turks paint themselves and their rifles green, and are practically invisible.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  FUNERAL AT ENNISKILLEN.  The remains of Sergeant Major Hall of the 4th Inniskilling Fusiliers where interned at Enniskillen on Friday afternoon with military honours.  Deceased, who had been in the army for a number of years, and served through the South African war, was well known and highly respected in Enniskillen, where he had been stationed for a number of years.  Deceased had undergone an operation and complications followed, terminating fatally.  The cortege was headed by the bands of the 4th Inniskillings stationed at Buncrana, and the funeral was also attended by a company of men from the unit under the command of Captain W. G. Nixon.  The coffin was wrapped in a Union Jack and was borne to the Roman Catholic cemetery.  The deceased had been a member of the Church of England and was attended by Canon Webb just before his death, but he was buried in the Roman Catholic burying ground according to the rights of the Roman Catholic Church, his wife being a member of this church.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  ARMS AND AMMUNITION IN ULSTER.  Mr. Ginnell (N). asked the Under Secretary for War if he would say what quantity of the arms and ammunition privately imported into Ulster in 1913 and 1914 had been placed at the disposal of his Majesty’s Government for the purposes of the war; by whose authority and for what purpose stores of arms and ammunition were kept in the mansions of certain landlords in Ulster; and what action the Army Council proposed to take regarding them.

Mr. Tenant – No arms and ammunition reporting to have been imported into Ulster during the period mentioned have been placed at the disposal of the War Office.  I have no information on the second part of the question, and I am not aware that any action is called for.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  Fermanagh Gaelic Feis.  (Contributed.) It was remarkable that the numbers present were smaller than usual, but still the grounds of the Technical School were well filled with comely maidens and many stalwart young men who might well have been expected to have been filling the ranks of the army.  The number of entries was about the usual.  The Feis although interesting and deserving of more encouragement, was somewhat monotonous from the limited and undeveloped nature of its competitions.  Dancing seemed to evoke most interest, and the little girls looked pretty as they went through the unemotional evolutions of the Irish folk dances which strange to say, are unemotional, and appeared to lack life and colour in comparison with the Russian, Spanish, or even Morris traditional dances; yet to be truly Irish they should be altogether unemotional.

The clear voices in the choral competitions were very pleasant.  The dramatic recitations in Gaelic did not attract much interest, as the words had not the musical assistance which enlivens a performance so much.  In the history competitions, the amount of knowledge shown was rather disappointing, even the battle of the Boyne seeming a misty subject to some.  It was amusing to watch a child when asked its candid opinion of James 11 hesitate between his real opinion and what it thought might be the required answer.  A girl about 15 was asked whether she thought the violation of the Treaty of Limerick or of Belgium’s independence the greater crime.  After a few moments thought she replied the violation of Belgium, and her examiner seem to be well pleased with her answer, although his partner did not seem to agree with that opinion.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  AN INNISKILLINGS KILLS EIGHT GERMANS.  A comrade writing home to his mother in Limavady alludes to Private Robert McLaughlin, 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers by first stating – If every man killed as many Germans has Bob McLaughlin, the war would soon be over.  The letter narrated a hot time a small detachment of the 2nd Inniskillings had somewhere in France.  This small handful of men had taken possession of a house, and as they were being subjected to heavy shelling, their position soon became untenable, as the masonry was falling all round them, and it was decided to clear out.  Just after emerging from the shattered building a German machine gun began to rake the little band of Inniskillings, and all the officers were shot down.  Led by Private Robert McLaughlin the men charged the machine gun and captured it, all its team been stricken down.  McLaughlin, who had a number of hand grenades, hurled them with the unerring aim as he advanced and killed 8 Germans.  It is hoped that his gallantry will be recognized although no officers were present to witness it.  McLaughlin was a reservist and proceeded to the front last November.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  DUELS IN THE AIR.  A THRILLING STORY.  THE AEROPLANE IN FLAMES.  On Friday June 18 there were two engagements in the air on this day.  Near Roulers one of the British machines on reconnaissance duly encountered a hostile aeroplane, and after a machine gun duel, forced it to descend hurriedly to earth.  A combat with machine guns at a height well over a mile above the earth’s surface, though now not uncommon, may be considered to provide some excitement, but on the same day two other officers of the Royal Flying Corps had a still more exciting experience.  While reconnoitring over Poelcapelle at a height of about 4000 feet they engaged a large biplane having a double fuselage, two engines and a pair of propellers.  The German machine at first circled around the British shooting at it with a machine gun but so far as is known not inflicting any damage. Then the observers fire about 50 rounds in return at under 200 yards range.

This had some effect for the hostile biplane was seen to waver.  After some more shots its engine stopped and its guns stopped and its nose dived to the level of 2,000 feet, where it flattened out its course, flying slowly and erratically under heavy fire from the antiaircraft  guns below..  The pilot turned towards the British lines to complete his reconnaissance when his machine was hit and he decided to make for home but the petrol tank had been picked and as the aeroplane glided downwards on the slant the petrol was set alight by the exhaust and run down the front of the body of the aeroplane which travelled on to the accompaniment of a rattle of musketry as the unexpended rounds of the machine gun ammunition exploded in the heat and those in the pilot’s loaded revolver went off.

The pilot however did not lose control and the aeroplane proceeded steadily on its downward course. Before it reached the ground a large part of the framework had been destroyed, and even the hardwood blades of the propeller were so much burned that the propellers ceased to revolve in the rush of air.  When the machine finally landed behind the British lines both officers were severely burnt and the pilot on climbing hurriedly and of the blazing wreck tripped over a wire stay, fell, and sprained his knee.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  THE DEATH OF REV. MR. MITCHELL.  HIS WORK, HIS LIFE, HIS CHARACTER.  The rather sudden illness of the Rev. S. C. Mitchell, Presbyterian minister of Enniskillen terminated rather unexpectedly in his death early on Thursday morning last about 1.00.  It came as a shock to the community and only comparatively few had been aware of his illness. The Rev. Samuel Cuthbert Mitchell was instituted as minister of the Enniskillen congregation 33 years ago in succession to the Rev. Alex Cooper Maclatchy, M.  A., and during his pastorate the present new church in East Bridge Street which was opened in 1897 was provided, and the Manse built.  Of the 25 members of the congregation who had signed the “call” 33 years ago only three remain, Mr. James Harvey, Mr. Thomas Wylie, and Mr W. Copeland Trimble, so great have been the ravages of time. He went to Leghorn in Italy as pastor of the Scots church there and when he returned a great change was noticed in his voice and appearance, not for the better – he appeared to have aged; but he was unconscious of any decadence in health and spirits and spoke of feeling younger and brighter than before.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  A SLANDER ACTION.  A HUSBAND IS RESPONSIBLE FOR HIS WIFE’S TONGUE.  This was held in Fermanagh County Court on Saturday the plaintiff being Mrs. McCaffrey, Sessiagh and the defendants Thomas Owens and his wife Annie Owens.  The plaintiff said that she married 16 years ago to Owen McCaffrey and had no children until the 18th of April last.  It had been told to her and that the child was not her husband’s.  Andrew McManus said that on the 31st of March Mrs. Owen told him that the plaintiff’s husband was not the father of her child but mentioned another man as the father.  On different occasions before that she told him the same story and this became general conversation all over the country.

Maggie McManus on the 14th of August detailed several conversations with Mrs Owens. In cross-examination the witness denied that she was ever put out of houses in the country for carrying stories. His Honour said that he was satisfied that the evidence of McManus was true and there must be a decree and the only question was the amount of the decree.  The decree would fall on the shoulders of Thomas Owens, who was comparatively innocent, but he was liable for his wife’s torts which is one of the privileges of married life.  The costs in that case would be very severe and he would be inclined to give heavy damages if it were not for the fact that the costs would be heavy and amount to between £10 and £20.  This action was only brought to get rid of this very scandalous annoyance and the plaintiff did not want heavy damages.  All she wanted was clear her character and put a stop to these imputations and as Thomas Owens met the case very firmly and was a decent sort of man, the damages would be only £3 and costs.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915. FERMANAGH LADIES DEMAND CONSCRIPTION.  SHOP ASSISTANTS CRITICISED.  RECRUITING COMMITTEES A FAILURE.  11 ATTEND OUT OF 40.  Some weeks ago the Central Recruiting Committee in Fermanagh acting under instruction from headquarters, appointed a Ladies Recruiting Committee, to assist in the campaign to get men for the army.  To further develop the scope of this committee it was decided to ask the ladies of the Central Committee to appoint subcommittees and accordingly a meeting was summoned for Tuesday last when only 11 attended.  Mr. J.  Collum, H.  M.  L. explained the object of the meeting and said that it was thought that Ladies Committees could do a lot more good than men.  There were he continued a lot of shop assistants and certainly it was not man’s duties to be in shops at the present moment when girls could take their places and amongst these the ladies would have influence. Of course proprietors of shops should give them every encouragement and undertake to take back after the war any assistant who enlists.  Among the comments made – Mrs. E.  M.  Archdale – “The women are as bad as the men. I point out that I have four sons serving, and the reply is – it is different for the quality.”  Mrs. Column – “the farmers’ sons have done the worst at the present crisis.”  A unanimous resolution was passed stating that the time has now arrived that some scheme of conscription should be put in force in this country.

Fermanagh Herald July 3rd. 1915.  ANGLING ON THE ERNE.  THE LORD LIEUTENANT IN BALLYSHANNON.  For the week ending Saturday, the 26th of June the fishing has been very good at Ballyshannon. Mr. Glynn had 19 salmon and grilse from 4lb to 17 ½ pounds.  Lough Melvin for the week ending 26th inst., Mr. J. Gallacher took 15 Gillaroo and sonaghan trout weighing 10 ½ pounds on the 24th.  Many anglers over the lake caught between 10 and 20 trout.  On Monday Lord Wimborne, the Lord Lieutenant spent the greater portion of the day angling for salmon in the Erne from Ballyshannon Bridge.

Fermanagh Herald July 3rd. 1915.  IT IS ANNOUNCED THAT LIEUTENANT-COLONEL SIR JOHN MILBANKE, BART., V. C., commanding the Notts Yeomanry, has been killed in action at the Dardanelles.  Sir John, who succeeded to the baronetcy in 1899, was married in the following year to Amelia, daughter of the Hon. Charles Frederick Crichton, eldest surviving brother of the late Earl of Erne.  Lady Milbanke’s only brother, Major H. F. Crichton, of the Irish Guards was killed early in the war.  Sir John Milbanke was born in 1872, and served in the 10th Hussars, retiring with the rank of major in 1911.  He rejoined last October and was posted to the command of the Notts Yeomanry.  During the Boer War he was A. D. C. to Sir John French, and was seriously wounded.  It was in that campaign that he won the VC for gallantry, rescuing a wounded trooper after he himself had been seriously injured.  The baronetcy dates back to 1661, and a daughter of a previous holder of the title was the wife of Lord Byron.

Fermanagh Herald July 3rd. 1915.  THE VALUE OF THE HOLY MASS.  At the hour of death the Masses you have heard will be your greatest consolation.  Every Mass will go with you to judgment and plead for pardon.  Every Mass can diminish the temporal punishment due to your sins, more or less, according to your fervour. The power of Satan over you is diminished.  You afford of the souls in Purgatory the greatest possible relief.  One Mass heard during your life will be of more benefit to you than many heard for you after death. You shorten your Purgatory by every Mass. Every Mass wins for you a higher degree of Glory in heaven. You are blessed in your temporal goods and affairs.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  FACTS AND FANCIES.  THE VICTORIA CROSS.  The Victoria Cross was first established in 1856 and is awarded for conspicuous bravery on the part of naval and military officers, and of any member of either service who has done a brilliant deed in the face of the enemy.  The badge is a plain crosse-patee in bronze with straight bounding lines, and is attached by the letter V to a bronze bar laureated.  The centrepiece is a lion and upon an Imperial Crown with “For Valour” inscrolled below.  The bar bears on the reverse the name and rank of the recipient, and the cross the name and date of the distinguished action or campaign.  In the case of the Army it is suspended from the left breast by the Garter-red ribbon and in the Navy by a blue ribbon.  It carries with it in the case of non–coms and privates a pension of £10 a year, £5 being added for each bar.  Although the intrinsic value of the decoration is but fourpence, its wearer must be saluted by all members of the services no matter what their rank.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  “A GHASTLY AFFAIR.”  A DONEGAL TYPHUS OUTBREAK.  A serious outbreak of typhus fever has occurred in the Dungloe district of Donegal (the County, which has provided fewer men for the war than any other in Ireland), and at Saturday’s meeting of the Glenties Rural Council it was stated that six patients were in the fever hospital attached to the institution.  One man afflicted with the disease had died under horrible circumstances in his own home.  Dr. C. E. R.  Gardiner reported that one of the patients died on Thursday.  He wired to the relieving officer, to bury the body.  When the coffin arrived on Friday, the doctor and a nurse put the body into it and placed it outside the house, where it remained until about 1.00 on Sunday morning, when, owing to the failure of the relieving officer to do his duty, the doctor and two nurses dug a grave and buried the body in a field near the house.  This was not the first time, the doctor added, that they had to bury a fever infected corpse, but it would be the last.  As there was nobody in the house to do anything but a decrepit old woman and a girl of 13 years, we asked relatives and neighbours to leave milk, turf, and water on the roadside.  With great ado the nurses managed to beg a sufficient quantity of milk, mostly sour, but how they managed for turf and water is a puzzle to me, as nobody would bring them either.  There were some cattle about the place which the relatives were very anxious about, thinking that the nurses and I should attend to them.  It seemed not to matter that human beings should die and rot above ground as long as the cattle were all right.  On Tuesday when the three patients were convalescing and the ambulance had been ordered to take them to the fever hospital, a brother of the patient arrived on the scene, assaulted the nurses, frightened the patient’s by shouting and falling over their beds, and was only induced to leave the place when the police arrived.  Next morning, when the police had gone, he reappeared and commenced the same antics.  By threats of imprisonment under the Public Health Act I induced him to go with the fever ambulance.  We burned the bedding, clothes and the fowl that died of the fever.  The byre is in an extremely filthy state, and the house swarming with vermin, and ought, in my opinion, to be burned.  The whole ghastly affair is an almost incredible example of cruelty, selfishness, and cowardice which it is humiliating to think could occur in Ireland in the 20th century.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915. SCOTCHED.  NATIONALIST BUILDING SCHEME.  SANCTION OF L. G. B. REFUSED.  The much discussed scheme of the Nationalist Party in Enniskillen for adding to their voting strength in the East Ward by erecting a number of new houses and peopling them with the faithful “swallows” has received its quietus – at least for a considerable time to come – at the hands of the Local Government Board, the Secretary of which wrote to the or Urban Council at their meeting on Monday as follows: – “I am directed by the Local Government Board for Ireland to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 2nd of June forwarding an application from the Enniskillen Urban District Council for sanction to a loan of £8,500 pounds for the purpose of erecting working class lodging houses under the Housing of the Working Classes Acts, and I am to state that, in the present circumstances the proposed expenditure is not such as the Board would feel justified in sanctioning borrowing for.”

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  THINGS PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW.  Has not Captain J. G. Porter, Belleisle not covered himself, his family and his native county with honour by his gallantry in the present war?

Is there not likely to be another Local Government inquiry and a clearance in Lisnaskea Workhouse over the constant bickering’s going on there between officials?

Has the Scottish Co-operative Wholesale Society not set a wonderfully good example to other great business firms by investing no less than £250,000 in the War Loan?

Does the condition of the lake at the East Bridge, Enniskillen at the present time not constitute a scandal?

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  FERMANAGH MEN REWARDED FOR GALLANTRY.  Captain John Grey Porter, 9th Queen’s Royal Lancers, a son of Mr. J.  Porter Porter, of Belleisle, and who has been twice wounded has also been made a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order.  How he won the coveted honour is officially recorded: – “On 10 May, 1915, when a very heavy attack was made on the front line near Hooge, Captain Porter went up to the infantry line there, and brought back very valuable information regarding the situation.  On the 13th of May he rendered the greatest possible assistance in taking messages under terrific shell fire to various parts of the line, and reporting on various local situations.  He set an example of coolness and total disregard of danger that was beyond all praise.  He had been twice wounded previously in this campaign.

Major Charles William Henry Crichton, 10th Prince of Wales Own Royal Hussars, has been made a Companion of the D. S. O. for gallantry which is officially described as follows: – Near Ypres, on the 13th of May, 1915, showed conspicuous gallantry and ability in collecting and rallying men who were retiring under heavy shell fire through the 10th Hussars position.  In our counter attacks he continued to direct operations, giving great encouragement to his men as he lay in the open under heavy shell fire with his leg shattered.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  OBITUARY. REV. A.  BEATTIE, IRVINESTOWN.  The death of Rev. Archibald Beattie which took place at Irvinestown on Monday cast a gloom over the town, and the news of his demise was heard with heartfelt regret by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances in the neighbourhood.  For 32 years the deceased gentleman laboured with much acceptance in the Irvinestown district and since he was installed in the Presbyterian Church there he has enjoyed the respect and esteem of a devoted congregation and all creeds and classes regarded him as one whom respect was a duty, and his acquaintance was a privilege.  He was ordained as a minister of the gospel in May 1876 and he was installed in Irvinestown in May 1881.  Though he resigned from active duties about four years ago, he took a deep practical interest in Church work up to the time of his death, and the welfare of the congregation of which he had so long been pastor was to him a matter of deep concern.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  A FARMER ASSAULTED.  John Magee, a farmer of Trustan, charged a young fellow named Patrick McCloskey, of Brookeborough, with assault on the 28th ult.  Plaintiff described his movements in Brookeborough that night, and on his way home he was overtaken by the defendant at Mr. Rainbird’s gate. They had some words about witness allowing his servant girl to go to a football match and afterwards about some wood the defendant had bought in Enniskillen to make a press for the priest vestments.  Defendant then shoved witness into the hedge and beat him severely.  The defendant was fined 10 shillings and sixpence and three shillings and sixpence cost or in default a week’s imprisonment.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  A RECRUITING MEETING AT KESH.  SPIRITED APPEALS BY REPRESENTATIVE SPEAKERS.  MEN WHO REMAINED OUT OF EARSHOT AFRAID OF HEARING A FEW HOME TRUTHS.  The recruiting meeting which was held in Kesh, on Monday was remarkable for two reasons fault.  One was the number of young men who purposely remained away, and the other the number of fine young men, who were present but did not respond to the earnest and spirited appeals that were made to them by the different speakers.  It was the fair day and therefore there was a good gathering in the village.  No effort was spared by the local committee to have the objects of the meeting attained, and the arrangements were admirably carried out by the local secretary, Mr. James A. Aiken.  The brass band of the 4th Battalion Inniskillings from Omagh played through the village at intervals and the meeting was held at 11.00 outside the Courthouse, where a platform was erected for the speakers.  The motor ambulance presented by County Fermanagh to the Ulster Division arrived from Riversdale where it had been overnight in charge of Mr. E. M. Archdale, D.  L., and it was immediately surrounded by an admiring crowd.  It is splendidly equipped, having four stretchers, in which four wounded men can be conveyed for treatment, a complete medicine chest comprising all modern first aid requisites, and by the side of the driver there is an ever ready patent fire extinguisher

The meeting started punctually at the hour fixed and there was a large attendance, but although every house in the district where there were two or more available men of military age was communicated with by circular acquainting the house holders of the time and object of the meeting that turnout of likely young men was disappointing.

The village of Kesh itself has sent a practically all its sons to the various camps, but we were informed, the country round can do a great deal better.  In fact we were told that with the exception of several men who had been in the North Irish Horse there were very few in the district round about who had joined the colours.  The earlier part of the day was showery and the meeting had scarcely been opened when rain fell heavily and continued till the end when the clouds rolled away and a beautiful evening followed.

Colonel Leslie who is in command of the 12th Battalion at Finner Camp said that the last time he spoke in his own village of Pettigo they did not obtain one single recruit and he hoped  that day the Kesh district would be shame his own village by at least getting one man into Kitchener’s Army.  “Think it over, men of Fermanagh,” concluded Colonel Leslie, “you’re in absolute danger, the British Fleet once destroyed we’re done; our armies are fighting gallantly, but they are making no progress whenever, and they are just where the where months ago.  I am glad to hear the farmers are making money, but if the Germans come here they are only making money for the Germans to spend.  Think it over men of Fermanagh and join the great and glorious army of King George the Fifth. (Loud cheers.) We understand that four recruits were obtained and it must be admitted that this is but a poor recompense for the energy and forethought displayed by the Kesh Committee, the members of which deserve the warmest congratulations for getting together so many representative and influential speakers and for the manner in which all details were looked after during the day.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  WAR NEWS.  Private James Quigley, Dublin Fusiliers, son of Mr. Patrick Quigley, Clones, is reported to have been killed in action.  His brother Owen, who served in the trenches throughout the winter has been invalided home.

The unofficial report of the death in action of the Private John Roy, Irish Guards, has been officially confirmed.  He was a native of Clones, and his brother is serving with the colours.

Private Stephen Johnston, son of Mr. Robert Johnston, Clones, who enlisted in the Irish Guards after the outbreak of war, and has been missing since the 18th of May, is now unofficially reported killed.

Impartial Reporter.  July 8 1915.  NOTES.  Mr. Harry Lauder the great Scottish comedian has applied for £10,000  of the War Loan.  The Scottish Co-operative Wholesale Society has subscribed £250,000.

Drinking by soldiers’ wives is said to be less excessive than ever in England.

The total British casualties at the storming of Dargai, the charge of Balaclava, the battles of Omdurman, Waterloo and Magersfontein, were in the aggregate 8,480.  Up till recently our losses in the Dardanelles were 38,636.

Trillick.  Longevity in a cat.  “Old Girl” is the pet name of a celebrated mouser belonging to Mr. and Mrs. Stafford, Ivy Cottage, seems to be a most appropriate title.  He is 27 years old and is still doing faithful service in the third generation of that family.  All her teeth are gone except three.

Impartial Reporter.  July 8 1915.  RECRUITING AT KESH.  THE CALL TO ARMS.  THE VISIT OF THE DEPOT BAND.  Monday last being Kesh fair day a recruiting meeting was held on the village for the purpose of trying to bring home to the people of the district the realities and needs of the present great war.  Fewer recruits in proportion to population have perhaps gone to the army from the Kesh district, than any other Unionist portions of Fermanagh, and the recruiting committee for the district up to this have had a poor response to their appeal.  Before the meeting the band from the depot paraded the village under Mr. Ramsay band master and attracted many young people in its wake.  Colonel Stewart of the Depot declared that the farmers’ sons had not done as well as they might.  Mr. John McHugh, J.  P., Chairman of the County Council, took exception to this statement, and in a capable, patriotic address, gave examples of how the farmers’ sons had recruited and the difficulties under which they laboured.  If the government did not get sufficient men, he declared, the only means that were left to them was compulsion.  A half a dozen recruits for the 12th (Reserve) Inniskillings were secured.

Impartial Reporter.  July 8 1915.  INNISKILLING OFFICERS AWARDED THE D.S.O.  Their Distinguished Service Order has been awarded to the following officers: – Captain Edward William Atkinson, 1st Batt. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  On the 2nd of May, 1915 during operations south of Krithin, for gallantly leading a counterattack capturing a Turkish trench 300 yards to his front and for the efficient command of his battalion, all the senior officers having become casualties.

Captain Cecil Ridings, 1st Batt.  the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  On April 28, 1915 during operations the south of Krithin, for exceptionally gallant and capable leading under difficult conditions maintaining a forward position in spite of heavy losses at a critical moment, though unsupported on either flank and being himself severely wounded.

Impartial Reporter.  July 8 1915.  GALLANT FERMANAGHMEN AWARDED THE D.S.O.  This is one of the highest awards that can be granted an officer for service in the field and has been awarded to two Fermanagh officers Captain John Grey Porter, 9th Queen’s Royal Lancers for on the 10th of May, 1915 when a very heavy attack was made on the front line near Hooge, Captain Porter went up to the infantry line their and brought back very valuable information regarding the situation.  On the 13th of May he rendered the greatest possible assistance in taking messages under terrific shell fire to various parts of the line, and reporting on various local situations.  He set an example of coolness and total disregard of danger that was beyond all praise.  He has been twice wounded in this campaign.  He is a son of Mr. J.  Porter Porter, of Belleisle, County Fermanagh.

Major Charles William Henry Crichton, 10th (Prince of Wales Own) Royal Hussars.  Near Ypres on the 13th of May, 1915, showing conspicuous gallantry and ability in collecting and rallying men who were retiring under heavy shell fire through the 10th Hussars position.  In our counter attacks he continued to direct operations giving great encouragement to his men when he lay in the open under heavy shell fire with his leg shattered.  Major Crichton is the eldest son of the Honourable Henry George Louis Crichton, K.C.B, and a brother of the fourth Earl of Erne.

Impartial Reporter.  July 8 1915.  DARDANELLES LOSSES.  Mr. Asquith in the House of Commons on Thursday said the naval and military casualties in the Dardanelles to the 31st of May were as follows: – killed 496 officers and 6927 men.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  AN EX-PAUPER EARNS £15 A WEEK.  THE WORKHOUSES ARE EMPTIED BY THE WAR.  “There are less men in the workhouse today than there have been for the past quarter of a century, and probably for a much longer period than that”, said the master of a large workhouse to a London to Daily Chronicle representative.

“In my own case I have not a single able-bodied man here.  Since the war began several hundred men of every age and condition, have gone out and got work and well-paid work too.  Men who have done no work for many years may now be found doing munitions and other work and earning good wages.

Enquiries made at many metropolitan workhouses confirmed the statement.  The able-bodied male pauper –and often the pauper who is not able bodied has vanished.  He has reappeared as the ordinary honest and industrious workmen, driving his van or shouldering his tool bag in a manner he is not known for years.

In the East End, the Daily Chronicle representative was informed there is a man of over 60 who, until recently, was a pauper receiving outdoor relief.  His Christmas dinner was provided by a charity, but he subsequently got work in a munitions factory, and is now earning sometimes as much as £15 in one week.  The ex-pauper, amusing to relate, has acquired the habit of smoking cigars – and also of outing his own acquaintances in the street.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  POSSIBLE BOOT SHORTAGE.  The demand for army boots has affected the ordinary trade in this country, and the result will be a smaller range of footwear and much advance prices and the disappearance of the lower priced boots, says the Daily Mail.  There is prospect of a shortage in civilian footwear.  Already boots cost an average of three shillings more a pair.  A Northampton manufacturer confessed the other day that he was experiencing no difficulty in securing advanced prices.  The only trouble is in filling orders.  Very few new samples are being shown, and these are mostly boots which can be handled concurrently with army orders.  Special work, though very highly priced, is discouraged.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  FOUR STEAMER ARE SUNK BY GERMAN SUBMARINES.  For more vessels have been sunk off the Scilly isles by a German submarines – the London steamer Richmond (3,214) tons from Queenstown to Boulogne, the Belgian steamer Bodugant (1,441) tons from Bayonne to Barry; the Leith steamer Craigard (3,286 tonnes) from Galveston to Harve; and the steamer Gatsby (3,497) tons, Cape Breton for London.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  JOTTINGS.  Private Stephen Johnston, son of Mr. Robert Johnston, Clones, who enlisted in the Irish Guards after the outbreak of war, and has been missing since the 18th of May, is now unofficially reported killed.

The unofficial reports of the death in action of Private John Roy, Irish Guards, already reported has been officially confirmed.  He was a native of Clones and a brother of his is serving with the colours.

Private James Quigley, Dublin Fusiliers son of Mr. Patrick Quigley, Clones, is reported to have been killed in action.  His brother Owen, who served in the trenches throughout the winter, has been invalided home.

Mr. Patrick McDermott, of Newtownbutler, has been notified by the War Office that his son, Private Mark McDermott, of the second Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, is missing since the 16th of May.  He joined the army immediately after the outbreak of war, and has seen much service in France and Belgium.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  THE WAR LOAN.  BIG SUBSCRIPTIONS.  FIVE MILLION POUNDS FROM GUINNESS.  Today brings a number of notable subscriptions to the War Loan.  They are Messrs. Guinness & Company £5,000,000; Imperial Tobacco Company of Great Britain and Ireland, one million; United Tobacco Company, £50,000; Bath City Council – practically the whole of its sinking fund, amounting to £50,000; Northampton Town Council – All the available funds, approximately £16,000.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  A GREAT ACTIVITY ON THE WESTERN FRONT.  A REPORT FROM SIR JOHN FRENCH.  Since my last report there has been no change in the situation on our front.  Fighting has been mainly confined to intermittent artillery duels, of which a feature has been the employment by the enemy of a large quantity of gas shells, particularly in the neighbourhood of Ypres.  During this period the enemy has exploded eight mines at different points of our front without any damage to our trenches.  On the other hand, on the 30th of June we blew in 50 yards of the enemy’s front line north of Neuve Chapelle.  An evening of the 4th of July, north of Ypres, a German sap was blown in by our artillery fire and a platoon of infantry advanced to complete its destruction.  The few Germans who survived the artillery bombardment were driven out by the bayonet, and a machine gun in the sap was found to be destroyed.  Our casualties were insignificant, and the platoon returned practically intact to its own trench, having completely succeeded in its mission.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  CLONES MAN MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES.  In the list of those mentioned in Sir John French’s dispatches occurs the name of the Clones man, number 64880, Private Reuben C. Farrell, A Company, 1st Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers.  Private Farrell has seen service in the Boer war, for which he holds decorations, and has distinguished himself for bravery in the present war.  During an engagement when an officer was seriously wounded, Private Farrell with others risked his life under heavy shell fire and rescue the wounded officer, whom he conveyed to where his wounds could be dressed.  Private Reuben Farrell is the eldest of three brothers who have served in the army during the present campaign, but, unfortunately, the second eldest (John), a sergeant in the Royal Irish Rifles was accidentally drowned on the 5th of March last in the river Lys, and Thomas, the youngest, a lance-corporal in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, has been discharged through wounds received at Armentières. These soldiers are the sons of Mr. Christopher Farrell, photographer, Clones.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  BRIDES IN BATH CASE.  SMITH FOUND GUILTY.  PRISONER’S OUTBURST.  The trial of George Smith for the alleged murder of Bessie Constance Annie Mundy in a bath at Herne Bay, came to its ninth and final hearing today.  As in all great murder trials, public interest increased as the case reached a climax and this morning the court was besieged by a crowd of people anxious to be spectators of the last dramatic scenes.  Mr. Justice Scrutton, before he commenced his summing up, had to order the fastening of the doors, saying that enough people were already accommodated in court.  Most of the spectators were women.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  A THRILLING STORY FROM THE PEN OF SIR IAN HAMILTON describing in detail the earlier operations by the land forces cooperating with the Fleet in the attack on the Gallipoli Peninsula and the Dardanelles has just been issued.  It is the story of a military operation without precedent in history – the successful landing of troops on a precipitous coast whose natural defensive advantages were accentuated by Turkish cunning, German ingenuity and every conceivable modern military device.  The land forces were under Sir Ian Hamilton, and in graphic language he tells of the deeds of the Irish regiments in the landing operations on “V” beach.  When the enemy defences had been heavily bombarded by the fleet, three companies of the Dublins were to be towed ashore, closely followed by the collier River Clyde – the ship which has been referred to as playing a part like that of the wooden horse of Troy.  She was carrying between decks the balance of the Dublin Fusiliers, the Munster Fusiliers, and the West Riding Field Company, among other details.  No sign was made by the Turks while the collier and the boats were approaching, but a tornado of fire swept them immediately the first boat touched bottom.  The Dublin Fusiliers suffered exceedingly heavy losses while in the boats, but those who gained ground gallantly advanced, taking cover wherever possible.  Many of the Munsters were shot down or were drowned while gallantly pressing to affect the landing, but 24 hours after disembarkation began the survivors of the Dublin and Munster Fusiliers were crouching on the beach, and under Lieutenant–Colonels Doughty-Wylie and Williams they went forward with other regiments, to the brilliant attack which resulted in the capture of Hill 141.  He also pays a tribute to the fine work of the Inniskilling Fusiliers, who he says advanced with their right on the Krithia Ravine and reached a point about ¾ of a mile southwest of Krithia.  This was, however, the farthest limit reached and later on in the day they fell into line with other corps.  The tribute paid by Sir Ian to one section of the force may be applied to the landing operations as a whole – “No finer feat of arms has ever been achieved by the British soldier or any other soldier.”

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  THE LORD LIEUTENANT AS AN ANGLER IN BALLYSHANNON AND BELLEEK DISTRICTS.  On the 28th ult.  his Excellency the Lord Lt.  of Ireland fished the river and caught one salmon and lost another from Ballyshannon Bridge.  His Excellency left Cliff for Dublin on the 29th ult and is expected back on the 8th inst..  The three gillies employed by the Lord Lt.  fished the river for salmon throughout the week, and caught salmon and grilse from 6lbs to 13lbs.  Messers. Glynn and Stone had similar captures of salmon and grilse, as recorded in last Wednesday’s issue.  Sea trout anglers fishing down the estuary and below Assaroe Falls enjoyed fair sport.  Mr. Sweeney took a bag of 13 sea trout on the 28th ult. – largest fish 4lbs.  Mr. Hildebrand and a friend had a similar bag of trout on the 29th ult, largest fish 3½ lbs, and several other good catches were taken.

Lough Melvin, for the week ending the 3rd inst.  – Sport among the trout continued good and many bags of gillaroo and sonaghan and trout were taken by anglers daily, containing from 15 to over 20 trout.  Mr. Burns had a bag of 15 trout, weighing 12 ½ lbs, on the 29th ult, the largest three fish gillaroo trout, 2lbs each, and 1 ½ lbs.  Mr. A.  and Mr. F.  Crawford had several good bags of trout on the first, second and third inst.  Amongst them were a number of gillaroo trout from 1lb to2lb each.

Fermanagh Times July 15th, 1915.  FRICTION AT LISNASKEA.  For a period extending not over weeks or even months, but actually over years there has been what looks uncommonly like a feud going on between the officials engaged in Lisnaskea Workhouse and Infirmary, respectively, with results most prejudicial to the efficient and harmonious workings of those institutions.  First, it is about one thing and then about another; the most trifling incident is magnified into a matter of grave importance and continuous friction and heat and a want of cooperation between the officials concerned is the natural and inevitable result.  It is time this was finally stopped.  Half measures and warnings have already been tried in Lisnaskea and have proved a complete failure. Drastic measures are now absolutely necessary.  Into the merits of the present dispute it is not our intention or province to go.  The Master, (Mr. Lunny) virtually, and in fact called Nurse Power a liar, and she returned the compliment. Suffice to say that two weeks ago the Master made somewhat serious charges and said he would prove them if given an opportunity to do so.  The Guardians took him at his word and appointed Saturday last for the purpose, but when asked to fulfil his promise the Master failed to do so.  Now, these charges are either true or untrue.  If true then the nurses against whom they were made should be held responsible and strong action taken regarding them but if untrue then the Master should be called upon to retract them and apologise as well as to give a satisfactory explanation as to why they were ever made.  The position at present is unsatisfactory to all parties and if allowed to pass will only result in a fresh ebulition of temper and recrimination in a short time.

Fermanagh Times July 15th, 1915.  THE “TWELFTH.” Monday it was only a ghost of a “Twelfth” as we have been accustomed for generations to know it.  Only in the neighbourhood of Belfast were there any processions, and as neither drum was heard nor flag was seen at these they were most unlike their musical and picturesque predecessors.  In Fermanagh here we had not even a silent and colourless parade.  We obeyed strictly the wish of the Grand Lodge that the historic anniversary should be observed solely by special services on a the Sunday in the Churches. Great congregations of the members of the Orange Institution, wearing their sashes attended Divine Worship and listened reverently to the Word and the Gospel discourse had a direct application to the famous events that naturally filled their minds.  But on the 12th the work-a-day was much as usual.  In the town there was no cessation of business; in the country, farmstead’s and field monopolised attention.

Fermanagh Times July 15th, 1915.  WAR PROSPERITY.  AMAZING DISCLOSURES.  “A pound a week and no husband to keep!  Why its Paradise – I tell you ma’am this war is too good to last.”  (Working woman’s remarks quoted by the Lady Seely, The Times, the June 10, 1915.

“The percentage of unemployment among the trade unionists is lower than at any time during the past 25 years.  During the five months ended May 31 the rate of wages of 1,937,440 workers increased upon last year’s rate by £343,374 a week or three shillings and sixpence per head exclusive of overtime.” Paupers to the number of 16,500 have left the workhouses compared with a year ago. (Board of Trade Labour Gazette.)

Any man who can crawl out of the workhouse can get well-paid work today.  (Master of a big London workhouse.)  The working woman was right.  Never were there such times for the working people of this country.  The little chance points emphasized above are but few  among scores that might be quoted, all tending to show that the prosperity of the working classes through the war is, for the moment, such as has never been touched in the history of the country.  But one thing on a moment’s consideration is apparent.  £21,000,000 a week is being spent by the government for war purposes.

Scorers of poorer wives, whose sole income in the past came from her husband’s work, have now in addition the billeting of soldiers, through which work they can add appreciably to the family income.  And lastly there is that great source of revenue to the poorest working families – separation allowance.  Is a well-known fact – sinister, and as it may be on our normal industrial conditions – that thousands of families, especially in the poorer quarters of the great cities and in the rural districts, where wages were low, have a bigger income now through “father” being in the Army than ever they have known before.  “A pound a week and no husband to keep; why it’s Paradise!”

To the ironworking families of the Clyde, were a father and son may bring home £20 a week between them; to munitions making families of Birmingham, where a family income of £30 a week is not unknown; to the woollen and clothing families of Yorkshire, where every boy or girl can now find a place in mill or factory; to the ammunition makers of Woolwich and district, where boys of 17 years can afford to turn up their noses (and have done so) at wages of 27 shillings a week – what is the increased cost of living to these lucky people?  And a there are many such.

Fermanagh Times July 15th, 1915.  FROM THE FRONT TO CLONELLY.  Mr. Harry Hart, a stepson of Mr. Folliott Barton, J. P., Clonelly, and who is at the front with King Edward’s Horse, writing home to his mother says – 2nd K. E. H., June 25? 1915.  My Dear Mother, – We are back in billets again.  Came out last night 24th and had a walk of about 5 miles to a village where we were billeted in some houses and had a most enjoyable sleep on flags, free from the sound of even our own guns, which was something of a relief.  No one is keen to know what is going to happen, but we are moving further down the line for some reason or other.

I had a funny experience last night, as the first thing we do when we have a rest is to go and look for coffee and something to eat.  Another chap and I walked into a house, and he asked in his own good French if we could get some coffee.  The ladies’ reply was, “No, my boy, we have no coffee, but we have some tea on especially for you.”  You should have seen the look on that chaps face.  I don’t know what mine was like.  It turned out she was from Southampton and was a governess out here, and it also turned out that we had a good time.  I can tell you we weren’t sorry to get out, six days at that the redoubt was quite enough.  You can’t exactly keep clean when you are in the trenches no matter what you do.  We were very lucky as our troop got out without any casualties for the week.  There was something doing the last day we were there –the bally Huns put up three mines, but they all missed.  One went up close to us, and I was lucky on being on the lookout just when she went up and let me tell you if you had been on the top of it you would have had a good ride for your shilling a day.  Strange to say we heard no report.  I was waiting to get knocked over with the report after I saw the splash.

July 2 1915 My Dear Mother, -we are shifting out tonight up to the front line for four days and then four days on the reserve – that I believe is the programme.  So if you don’t get a letter for a few days you will know everything is OK.  The trenches here are an easy thing; very little doing they say.  Last night the Germans sent up about a dozen shells over our way and we counted seven squibs – don’t know whether their munition is getting bad or the wet ground was the cause of it; I hope the former.  The weather round here has been rotten lately, it won’t rain and it won’t keep decently fine.  Have struck a better part of the country here, the people are much better, and most of the children talk English some of them very well; they teach it in the schools.

Fermanagh Times July 15th, 1915.  OUR LITTLE WARS.  NYASALAND SKIRMISH. HOW A FERMANAGH AN OFFICER, LIEUTENANT IRVINE WAS KILLED.  The British forces were composed of 50 Northern Rhodesia police and 25 Northern Rhodesia Rifles as they attacked an enemy stockade that was raiding Nyasaland villages under British protection.  The attacking party, under Lt.  Irvine, rushed the gate of the stockade with great bravery and immediately heavy firing started. Irvine was shot and the bullet entering his left arm blew away about 4 inches of bone.  Sergeant Mills got to him first, and, although nearly dead from loss of blood, Irvine said “Leave me, Mills, leave me and take charge of the men.  As the poor fellow was carried away he smiled and waved his right arm in farewell. He was operated on next morning his arm being taken off and died that night.  The fighting was all over in 20 minutes.  Lt. Irvine was a brother of Major Irvine, D. L., of Killadeas and of Mr. Geoffrey Irvine, Goblusk.

Impartial Reporter.  July 15 1915.  TRILLICK RURAL COUNCIL met on Saturday and discussed extracts from the last report of Dr. Stephenson, medical inspector.  In it he referred to common lodging houses not being registered; town pump not in repair; no sewage system in Trillick; no bylaws under the Public Health Act; and no efficient disinfecting apparatus.  A deputation from the road contractors in the district appeared and asked for either an increase in the amount of their contract or a reduction in the amount of road metal, owing to the increased cost of labour and material.

Impartial Reporter.  July 15 1915.  DERRYGONNELLY.  Mister J. Nixon of Cosbystown, was almost killed by his own bull on Friday.  Mr. Nixon was driving his cattle from one field to another when the animal attacked him.  Mr. Nixon held him for a long time by the horns and was getting exhausted and fell upon the ground when Mr. R.  Armstrong and his brother John arrived, and drove off the infuriated brute.

Impartial Reporter.  July 15 1915.  BELLEEK FARMERS SUICIDE.  An inquest has been held on Friday by Mr. George A.  Atkinson, coroner for North Fermanagh, on the body of John Dundas, farmer, of Killybeg, Belleek.  Deceased, who was unmarried, and was aged 65, was found sitting on his bedside with his throat cut by a razor.  He was then dead.  Dr. Kelly Belleek stated that he had treated the deceased his mind had been overbalanced.  The jury returned a verdict of suicide during temporary insanity.

Impartial Reporter.  July 15 1915.  AT DERRYLIN PETTY SESSIONS, before Dr. Irwin, R.M. (in the chair), W. G. Winslow, A. Burns and Thomas Bullock, justices.  District inspector Marrinan charged a man named Francis Reilly, of Derrylea with seriously assaulting one Peter Gunn.  The depositions of Gunn were read that on the 9th of June he was assaulted by Reilly with the result that he had to go to Enniskillen hospital for treatment.  He declined to prosecute and the District Inspector said he had a summons issued against the defendant for a common assault.  Gunn, the injured man told the District Inspector that he was better and nothing the worse of his injuries.  Peter Gunn swore that on the evening in question at about 9.00 he was standing at the Derrylea crossroads when Reilly came up and asked them was he as good a man as he was yesterday.  Witness said nothing and Riley started to use his feet and hands on him.  He was knocked down and kicked in the private parts.  He felt weak and was attended by a doctor who had him sent to Enniskillen hospital.  He did not believe there would be any repetition of the assault.  Defendant admitted the offence and the chairman in cautioning him said he was getting off very lightly for a fine of five shillings.

Impartial Reporter.  July 15 1915.  THE TWELFTH – A DRUMLESS CELEBRATION.  In the ordinary course of events the anniversary of the battle of the Boyne would have been celebrated with all its old time ceremonial on Monday last, but owing to the present Great War, all demonstrations were vetoed, and the only outward celebrations by the orange brethren were the church parades in various parts of the country.  It was a drumless Twelfth  No bands paraded to herald the anniversary, no drums sounded as the flags were hoisted on the churches.  The flags this year were in most cases Union Jacks instead of the Orange and Blue.

Fermanagh Herald July 17th. 1915.  A BELFAST EXTERMINATION CAMPAIGN.  THE CORPORATION SERVES EVICTION NOTICES ON 160 POOR FAMILIES IN WEST BELFAST TO DISENFRANCHISE SOLDIERS.  Writing to the Irish News Mr. Joseph Devlin, M.P. for West Belfast says “I wish to call attention to what I think will be admitted to be one of the most outrageous transactions which have ever disgraced any community, and which, I am sure will shocked people of humane and patriotic instincts in every part of the United Kingdom. In one small area of West Belfast steps have been taken by the Corporation to throw out on the roadside some 160 poor Nationalist families, who owe no rent, and scarcely one of which is not represented in the Army by one or more members.  It is safe to say that, outside the Unionists of Belfast, there is no political party in these countries who would take advantage of the present unparalleled national situation to perpetuate such an outrage.

On Thursday last, by order of the Public Health Committee of the Belfast Cooperation, which is dominated by two leading members of the West Belfast Unionist Association, 160 families in a small and very limited area of West Belfast were served with notices to quit.  This order was made at a meeting not called for this purpose, but, as the notice states to consider the supply of coal to a local asylum.  The notices are served to terminate the tenancies on July 19th, so that the votes of the absent soldiers would be lost, because they would not be in possession of their houses has tenants on July 20th, the last day of the qualifying period and they or their families would be unable, even if other houses where available, which they are not, to get into other houses in time to preserve their franchise.  This makes the motive of the notices to quit tolerably clear.

Fermanagh Herald July 17th. 1915.  THE WELSH COAL CRISIS.  DRASTIC GOVERNMENT DECISION.  It has been decided by the government to put down the threatened Welsh coal will strike, under the provisions of the Munitions of War Act.  The proclamation, which will be issued on Wednesday, will have the effect of making it an offence to take part in a strike or lockout unless the difference has been reported to the Board of Trade and the Board of Trade have not, within 21 days of such report, referred it for settlement by one of the methods prescribed in the Act.  The announcement in Parliament was received with cheers.

Fermanagh Herald July 17th. 1915.  IT IS WITH SINCERE SYMPATHY that we announce the death in action of Private John Spillane, Head Street, Enniskillen, while serving with the British Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.  Deceased leaves a widow and four small children to mourn his loss.  Sincere sympathy is extended to the deceased’s father and his wife and other relatives in their sad loss.  Prayers were offered up for the repose of his soul in St., Michael’s church on Sunday.  R.I.P.

LIEUTENANT CHRISTOPHER T. C.  IRVINE, OF THE INDIAN ARMY, who belonged to a well-known Fermanagh family, was killed at the Dardanelles a few days ago.  He was the younger son of the late Inspector General G. J. Irvine, R. N. and brother of Mr. Charles E. Irvine, Drumgoon Manor, Maguiresbridge, Co., Fermanagh, and Enniskillen whose two sons are serving their country.  In 1909 he entered the army as a second lieutenant in the Connaught Rangers, transferring three years later to the Indian army, and being attached to the 25th Punjab Cavalry.  His eldest brother was wounded at an early stage of the war.

Fermanagh Times July 22nd, 1915.  RECRUITING DEMONSTRATIONS IN FERMANAGH.  GOOD GATHERINGS IN PETTIGO, BALLINAMALLARD AND LISNASKEA.  On Tuesday the recruiting party with their band visited Pettigo.  The weather conditions were very unfavourable, but as it was a fair day there was a large crowd in the village.  The meeting was held in the open the speakers addressing the crowd from a wagonette drawn across the roadway.  Very little enthusiasm or concern was displayed by the crowd who gather round and it took little to distract their attention from listening to the words of warning and appeal of the various speakers. During the speech of Lieutenant Kettle, Professor in the National University, and one of Ireland’s foremost orators, a car was passing down one side of the broad street and the majority of the farmers, dealers, and labourers present turned and watched it, and for the time being seemed more interested in its progress than in the spirited words of the speaker.  As another speaker Mr. Lloyd, of Dublin was speaking a man who was bringing some sheep along the street drew the attention of a section of the audience.  There were many who were impressed by the speakers but the general demeanour of the crowd bore eloquent testimony to the fact that in that district at any rate the seriousness of the situation and the peril of the country is little understood.

Impartial Reporter.  July 22 1915.  ENLIST NOW.  A BIG RECRUITING RALLY THROUGHOUT COUNTY FERMANAGH.  THE ORANGE AND GREEN UNITE WITH A STIRRING ADDRESS BY LIEUT. KETTLE AND HE IS CHEERED BY ORANGEMEN.  There was a large crowd at the recruiting meeting held on yesterday Wednesday afternoon at Lisnaskea when Mr. J.  Porter Porter, D.L. occupied the chair.  On the platform were men of all shades of politics and religion as the chairman appealed for young men to join the ranks and help to keep their country free.  They would have a speech from Lieutenant Kettle, one of the leading lieutenants of Mr. John Redmond.  He was a good fighter, and he would go and fight the Germans with them and when the war was over he would be glad to fight Lieutenant Kettle himself.  (Cheers.)  Lieutenant Kettle, in describing German atrocities, said that when the war began he was in Belgium and he would tell them a secret that had not yet been told in the Press.  He was over there engaged running rifles for the Nationalist Volunteers and he was proud to say he got them into Ireland.  He had this claim on Ireland: he represented for a time East Tyrone and when he left the Orangemen made him a presentation; one of the few he ever got in his life.  (Cheers.)  The evening before he had been addressing the Ballinamallard Orangemen and in all his experience he had never got a better hearing.  Party politics were now aside, and in Flanders and the Dardanelles there was no question of religion.

Fermanagh Herald July 24th. 1915.  THE DARDANELLES.  CASUALTIES TO THE END OF JUNE.  In the house of commons Mr. Asquith said the total casualties sustained by both naval and military forces in the Dardanelles to the end of June were as follows: – OFFICERS –  killed 541, wounded, 1,257, missing 135.  Total 1,933. MEN – killed, 7,543, wounded, 25,557, missing 7,401.  Total 40,501.

Fermanagh Herald July 24th. 1915.  NO PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL.  The Football Association Council have decided that no international matches or matches for the Challenge Cup or Amateur Cup of the Association, will be played next season, that no remuneration shall be paid to players, and that there shall be no registration of players.  Association leagues and clubs can arrange matches to suit local conditions but such matches must be without cups, medals, or other rewards, and must be played only on Saturday afternoons, early closing days, and recognized holidays.

Fermanagh Herald July 24th. 1915.  THE KAISER’S FINANCES.  The Paris Newspapers, says a Press Association War Special, publish a letter from a private source received in Rome according to which the Kaiser is reported to be in a very precarious financial situation.  The war has already cost him 100,000,000 marks and other German Princes are also very embarrassed pecuniarly.

Fermanagh Herald July 24th. 1915.  LISNASKEA MAN KILLED AT THE DARDANELLES.  Mrs. McFarland of Lisnaskea has been notified that her son James a private in the Inniskilling Fusiliers has been killed at the Dardanelles.  He had only landed two days before.

Fermanagh Herald July 24th. 1915.  DEATH OF A BRAVE DERRYGONNELLY MAN.  The news of the sad death of J. J.  O’Dare, Lance Corporal., Royal Irish Fusiliers, from wounds and gas poisoning at Ypres, has been received in Derrygonnelly with widespread regret. It was on 10th May that he succumbed to his wounds in the  Red Cross ambulance before it reached the clearing station.  A pathetic feature of the matter is that he had been drafted home after nine years’ service in India and had arrived at Winchester, only to be ordered to France on Christmas Eve, and was unable to go home to say goodbye to his relatives and friends.  His death has caused widespread regret in the district and heartfelt sympathy is expressed for his mother and sisters in their great bereavement. He was the youngest son of the late Bernard O’Dare whose pen and brain were ever at the service of the poor of the district, in every negotiation with Estate Commissioners, landlords or old age pension officials and who was always prominent in the Nationalist movement.  To his sorrow-stricken mother the crushing news came doubly hard in so much as the first notifications from the War Office was to the effect that he was only slightly wounded, but the murderous gas only did its work too well.  He has given his life nobly and manfully in his country’s cause and added another name to the long list of Ireland’s heroes. (From a correspondent.)

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  PANDEMONIUM IN LISNASKEA BOARD ROOM. THE CHAIRMAN’S EXTRAORDINARY ATTITUDE.  INSULT HURLED AND BLOWS THREATENED.  The liveliest spot in Fermanagh on Saturday was undoubtedly the Boardroom of the Lisnaskea Workhouse during the progress of the weekly meeting of the Board of Guardians.  The scenes enacted there were both regrettable and unnecessary.  Lisnaskea has of late loomed rather large in the public eye owing to serious disagreements which have taken place there between officials and now apparently the querulous discontented spirit that apparently prevails in the internal management of the workhouse and infirmary has communicated itself to some members of the Board which is responsible for administering the affairs of the whole Union.  The present cause of strife is the appointment of a Medical Officer for Maguiresbridge Dispensary District, which position has been rendered vacant by the resignation of Dr. Thompson, whose application for a slight increase in salary, it will be remembered, was refused by a majority of the Board.  Since his departure it has been found impossible to procure a successor at the meagre salary of £80 a year with the result that a very wide and populous area of the County has been left without the services of the resident dispensary doctor.  What to do under these circumstances is a question that has been exercising the minds of the Guardians for the past month or two, and finally they came to the somewhat Quixotic decision that rather than pay a resident doctor £100 a year they would prefer to pay a locum tenens £130 pounds a year, for to visit the dispensary each week.  This appointment is to be for an indefinite period as they decided not to re-advertise the vacancy.

A peculiar situation has thus been created, which has naturally given rise to a considerable amount of feeling throughout the Maguiresbridge District and has been the cause of much heated controversy among the members of the Lisnaskea Board. This culminated on Saturday in a condition of things which our reporter describes as chaos.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  THINGS PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW IN DIFFERENT FERMANAGH DISTRICTS.  How many people in Fermanagh are now learning the Irish language?  And if the craze, so popular among certain classes a couple of years ago is not now obsolete so far as this district is concerned?

If the large band of slackers belonging to the Ballyshannon Irish Nationalist Volunteers who paraded Bundoran streets on Sunday heard the pitying and contemptuous remarks which were made by all sections of visitors regarding them?  And if all these men, the great majority of whom were of military age, should not have felt ashamed to be seen parading their cowardice in the public streets in such a conspicuous manner?

What will the next row in Lisnaskea be about.

If the habit of some young ladies of utilising public entertainments such as that given by Mr. Brown–Leckie in Bundoran, on Monday night, to personally approach members of the audience, about whose private circumstances they know nothing, and urge them to join the army is not most reprehensible and should not be tolerated?  And if such mistaken tactics do not do a great deal more harm than good to recruiting.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  THE MEETING OF THE ENNISKILLEN PRESBYTERIAN CONGREGATION TO ELECT A CLERGYMAN FAILED TO DO SO.  A meeting of the members of the Enniskillen Presbyterian Church qualified to vote was held on Monday night to elect a successor to the late Rev S. C. Mitchell.  There are 47 members so qualified, but only 39 of these were present.  The chair was occupied by the Rev John Wilson, Tempo.  The first query put to the meeting was – are you prepared to make a call to a particular minister or licentiate?  To this there was a conflicting response, and on a vote being taken 25 answered in the affirmative and 13 in the negative.  One did not vote.  Then came the inquiry – who is the minister or licentiate you propose to appoint?  The minister or licentiate named in answer to this demand would require a 2/3 vote to insure his acceptance, and as it was evident from the previous vote that there would not be a 2/3 majority for any individual no response was made.  This was the more significant because if a name had been mentioned and the clergyman nominated did not secure the 2/3 majority he would have been disqualified from any for their candidature in the election.  Matters where thus, so to speak at the deadlock.

In such an eventuality General Church Regulations require a list to be prepared out of which a selection can be, after due care and trial, subsequently made.  Accordingly, the Moderator declared that a list should be now opened and asked if any present who had a clergyman to bring forward should now name him.  Whether the name would be allowed to go on the list was subject to a vote.  The Rev Mr. Jenkins, who had charge of the pastorate during the Rev Mr. Mitchell’s absence in Italy was then proposed and passed on to the list.  Several other names followed but the 25 who voted solidly at the earlier stage of the proceedings steadily vetoed every one of them.  The result was that the meeting, which was pretty animated at times, was adjourned for a fortnight, when it is hoped that the good sense of the congregation will find some means of coming to a united and wise decision.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  BUNDORAN.  100 YOUNG MEN, WHY DO THEY NOT ENLIST?  Bundoran, where holidaymakers of both sexes were in scorers, was visited by the recruiting party on Friday.  The meeting, which was held from a wagonette drawn up just outside Mr. Rennison’s establishment opposite the Station Road, was largely attended – women being in the majority.  The day was bright and bracing and speeches, having as their object the enrolment of men to do their share amid the shot and shell and carnage of France and Belgium seemed out of place in this peaceful seaside resort of South Donegal.  So serious, however, is the situation in which the Country and Empire is placed that every corner of the land must be reached and every man, and woman too, called upon to do something in defence of the liberties which they enjoy under the British Constitution.  Every speaker was accorded a patient and attentive hearing.  The members of the gathering gave evidence every now and then of their appreciation of the arguments placed before them concerning the necessity for more men, but, we understand that there was not one to offer his services at the end of the meeting.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  BALLYSHANNON.  A PRIEST A DECLARATION AT THE RECRUITING MEETING.  From Bundoran the party motored to Ballyshannon where a meeting was held at 7.00.  The most noticeable feature of the crowd here was the very large number of physically fit young men who attended it.  There must have been nearly 200 men of military age around the motor car and from which the speakers addressed the meeting.  The parish priest, Rev Canon Rogers, presided, and made one of the strongest and most sincere appeals we have heard during the tour.  The Canons fine personality and convincing delivery is lost in the retelling of what he said, but we give his remarks almost in full, because they are the words of a gentleman of learning and distinction, whom the people of the district greatly respect and esteem The band of the 4th fourth Inniskillings as usual played selections of lively areas and the speakers were given a respectable hearing. But there were no recruits at the conclusion.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  DERRYGONNELLY.  At a recruiting meeting in Derrygonnelly it was said that it had sent more to the army out of its population of 212 than any small town in Ireland, and in proportion to its population Derrygonnelly had more men killed and wounded than in any other town or city in Ireland.  (Cheers).  After the meeting the speakers and the band were entertained to luncheon by the local committee of which Mr. C. Parke is the capable Secretary.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  PETTIGO AND RECRUITING.  Rev T. C. Magee, The Rectory, Pettigo, writes: – I wish at once to correct the false impression left in the minds of the readers of the Fermanagh Times concerning the number of young men who have enlisted from Pettigo.  Up to the present 42 young men from the district of Pettigo have joined the colours; a number which I think he’s very creditable considering the scattered population of the neighbourhood and the smallness of the town. Colonel Leslie has held recruiting meetings in Pettigo on the fair days during the last four months and there was no great flourish of trumpets at these meetings or newspaper reports, although they were worthy of some notice.  There was no expense incurred yet after each of his appeals and for days after young men went off to Enniskillen, others to Derry and a few to Belfast to enlist.

Impartial Reporter.  July 29 1915.  PRIESTS IN THE IN THE TRENCHES.  MASS AND CONFESSION IN THE OPEN.  Rev.  J.  Gwynne, S.  J.  Chaplain attached to the Irish Guards who was wounded some time ago in the course of a letter to Dr. M.  Garvey, Tunaderry, says he had a narrow escape and it was prayer that saved him.  The last thing he remembered was seeing the Guards get to the top of the ridge, when a lurid red blaze seemed to flash into his eyes with a deafening crash.  He was hurled back some 5 yards or so and lay unconscious for some minutes.  When he came to he felt his face all streaming with blood and his leg pained him.  He was suffocated two, with the thick, warmly, vile gas, which came from the shell. “A doctor bandaged me up and I found I was not so bad and in an hour’s time when everything was washed and bandaged, I was able to join and give Extreme Unction to a poor Irish Guardsman who had been badly hit.  When in the trenches I see any wounded man immediately he’s hit and give him the last Sacraments.  Then I hear the confessions of the men in the trenches, in their dugouts.  I can tell you it is easy to have contrition when the air is simply alive with bullets and shells.

We have to have Mass in a field, here as the Irish Guards are nearly all Catholics and we are at present the strongest battalion in the Guards Brigade.  The men then sing hymns at Mass, and it is fine hearing nearly 1000 men singing out in the open at the top of their voices.  You have no idea what a splendid battalion the Irish Guards are!  You have Sergeant Mike O’Leary, V. C. with you.  I often have a chat with him when he comes to see me.  But do you know that there are plenty of men in the Irish Guards who have done as bravely as O’Leary and there is never a word about it

Father Gwynne in a further letter tells of strange events.  One man he was called to had been shot through the throat and made his confession by signs being unable to speak.  He had to crawl out flat to a Coldstream Guardsman who was shot through the head and give him the last Sacraments.

Impartial Reporter.  July 29 1915.  TWO RUFFIANTLY SOLDIERS DISGRACE THEIR UNIFORMS BY ASSAULTING CHRISTIAN BROTHERS.  Private C. E.  Gillespie and Private Betts, 9th Batt. Inniskilling Fusiliers (Ulster Division) were sentence at Ballycastle Petty Sessions to two months imprisonment with hard labour for an assault on Christian Brothers.  Rev. Brother Craven said when taking a walk on Saturday evening with Brother Conway on the road leading to the Catholic Church he passed some soldiers belonging to the Inniskilling fusiliers who were cursing the Pope and uttering blasphemous language. It was said they never saw a more ferocious and violent crowd than these soldiers. After a severe beating they eventually escaped by running into the church.

Impartial Reporter.  July 29 1915.  AT A COURT MARTIAL EVIDENCE WAS TAKEN  and Lieutenant Colonel C.  Lawrence Prior pleaded not guilty to inviting several officers to a gambling house to the prejudice of good order and military discipline. Evidence was given by a number of officers mentioned in the charge that on February 17 the accused invited his brother officers to dinner in the Café Royale to celebrate his coming promotion.  Towards the end of dinner accuse received a note from a man who was dining at another table and a little later said to his guests, “A fellow has asked me to come and have drinks in this house and there may be cards.  I am thinking of giving £100 a run.  What about you fellows?”  Five or seven officers accepted the invitation and went to a house where they played chemin de fer with two men, one of them spoke with an American or Canadian accent the latter winning a considerable amount of money.  Captain Gibson thought that all of the party had lost money and considered the game was not properly played.

Fermanagh Herald July 31st 1915.  JOTTINGS.  Private John Johnston, 15th Battalion Australian Infantry, has been killed at the Dardanelles.  He was a native of Kesh, Co., Fermanagh and was formerly in the Glasgow Police, subsequently serving with the Queensland Police.  He was a brother of Detective Johnston, of the D. M. P. (Dublin Metropolitan Police.)

Fermanagh Herald July 31st 1915.  SAD OCCURRENCE NEAR GARRISON.  FARMER’S TRAGIC DEATH.  Writing on Tuesday at Derrygonnelly a correspondent says: – A well to do farmer named P.  McManus, who resided at Rogagh, about 8 miles from here in the Garrison police district, shot himself dead on Monday.  The facts to hand are as follows: – McManus visited Belcoo on Monday to purchase some provisions and returned back to his home.  When he entered the house there was a man named Burns in it.  He took down a gun and asked Burns to go out to the mountain to have a shot.  Burns decline to go and he went himself, bringing the gun with him.  He had only gone a few perches when he sat down on a ditch.  He was afterwards discovered lying dead as the result of gunshot wounds to the head, which appeared to have been self-inflicted.  McManus, who was well known, leaves a wife and two small children to mourn his loss.