Fermanagh Herald 1942.

24-10-1942. BAD ENNISKILLEN “BLACK-OUT” COURT CASES. “I had a letter from the A.R.P. authorities, saying the black-out in Enniskillen is no use, and we will have to take  sterner measures,” said Head Constable Poots at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, when a number .of householders were summoned for blackout offences. Major Dickie, R.M., inquired what the A.R.P. authorities exactly meant. Head Constable Poots said the A.R.P. authorities complained of lights from buildings, and particularly lights from the rear of buildings. The black-out at the rear of buildings was very bad. That had necessitated him putting extra men on duty at night to inspect the rear of premises to locate the lights. It was a very difficult job sometimes. The result of this tightening-up of the regulations would result in there being far more of these prosecutions for the next Court. In the cases before the Court the following decisions were announced: — Mary Heslin, The Brook, .Probation of Offenders Act; Mary McCaffrey, 2 Militia Barracks; 10/6 and costs; Margaret Dooris, 11 Eden St., 10/- and costs; Alfred Dickson, 6 Abbey St., 5/- and costs; Michael Byrne, Old Bonded Stores, 5/- and costs; George P. Haggins; 25 Strand St., 5/- and costs. Constables W. R. Allen and W. H. Walker were the complainants, and Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solicitor, represented two of the defendants.

24-10-1942. NO INTEREST. COMPLAINT AGAINST SCHOOL ATTENDANCE COMMITTEES. Mr. C. McKeown complained at Fermanagh Regional Education Committee on Friday that some school attendance committees were taking no interest in the attendance of the children at school. He asked when did the Roslea attendance committee meet? The secretary (Mr. Maguire); said he could not say. It was some time since he had a report. He knew of a number of cases in which sub-committees did not seem to take an interest in the school attendance in their districts. He had from time to time received reports that it had been practically impossible to obtain a quorum therefore there was no means of dealing with school attendance. Mr. McKeown said the Act was practically 50 years in existence, making attendance compulsory, yet they had districts in Fermanagh that were taking practically no interest in it. There should be some remedy. It was very discreditable in these days. Lord Belmore—We appoint these committees. We should put off those that do not attend.

24-10-1942. CHEAP MILK FOR ALL SCHOOL CHILDREN. MINISTRY’S CIRCULAR TO FERMANAGH COMMITTEE. A circular letter from the Ministry of Education informed Fermanagh Regional Committee on Friday that schools—primary, secondary, junior commercial, junior and technical—can obtain milk for children at the .rate of one-third of a pint per day, the child to bear half of the cost. Milk would .be supplied to the schools by any local supplier at Is per .gallon and the remainder of the cost would be paid for by the Ministry of Agriculture.

24-10-1942. BAZAAR GOODS SEIZED. SEQUEL AT LISNASKEA COURT. At Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Nellie McGovern, Derrynanny, was summoned for having, on 14th April, knowingly harboured 13 men’s shirts, 20 pairs of assorted ladies’ dress material, six pieces of artificial silk, five children’s frocks, one child’s blouse, one pair of silk stockings, and one lady’s nightdress, imported from the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted and Mr. Baldwin Murphy, solicitor, defended.

Sergt. Kirkpatrick told of the finding of the goods in a tin trunk at defendant’s house, which, he searched following information received. In a statement to him, defendant said she was President of the Women’s Committee in connection with the Catholic bazaar in Newtownbutler, and following the bazaar on 17th March, she brought the goods in question to her house as they had not been sold. These goods had been given as gifts to raise funds for the new church. Cross-examined, witness said that at first defendant told him she had no goods of the kind he was inquiring about in the house, but later said she had stuff belonging to the bazaar. She told him the committee meetings in Drumlone School had not been very well attended. Reginald Allen said the shirts were of Japanese manufacture, the importation of which had been, prohibited in the Six Counties since Japan’s entry into the war. Mrs. McGovern, in evidence, said she was President of the Catholic Bazaar Committee, and the goods in question had been gathered into the trunk at different times. Before the box came to her it had been in Drumlone School, where the committee meetings had not been well attended. His Honour said he was prepared to grant defendant a dismiss on the harbouring summons, but he must make the order for forfeiture.

24-10-1942. WALLPAPER AND WOOL. Edward Whelan and his wife, Mary Whelan, Lisnaskea, were summoned for knowingly, harbouring 13 rolls of wallpaper and 32 ozs. of wool imported from, the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. A. Herbert, solicitor, defended. Sergt. Kirkpatrick gave evidence of the seizure at defendants’ house, and said Mr. Whelan denied all responsibility. In all he found 121 ozs. of wool, but only seized 32 ozs. Mrs. Whelan said she got the wool from various drapers in Lisnaskea and Enniskillen. Mrs. Whelan said she brought the wallpaper in a suitcase from the Twenty-Six Counties about a year ago and was not examined by the Customs’ official on the train. It only cost 13/-. The wool, had been obtained in Six-County shops. His Worship said the Customs must prove the intent to evade payment of Customs duty as mentioned in the summons. Mr. Cooper said these prohibited goods had been bought in the Twenty-Six Counties and brought across the Border. His Worship – But if she was not aware they were dutiable? Mr. Cooper cited the case of a London cabby who was held liable for a man he had taken in his cab at London docks. His Worship said that since Mr. Cooper had introduced his cab he must convict as regards the wallpaper. He imposed a fine of £3 saying she might have been fined £100,

24-10-1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER COURT CASES. TURF-STEALING CHARGE. MOTORIST SAYS FINE “1S A BIT SEVERE.” At Newtownbutler Court, before Major Dickie, R.M., Thomas McCarney, labourer, Clonagun, Newtownbutler, was charged with the larceny of a quantity of turf, the property of Thomas Storey, Clontivern. Thos. Storey, in evidence, stated he had bog at Clonagun and discovered some of his turf being stolen. On the night of Sept. 27th he went to his bog and put a private mark on some of the turf which he had in clamps. On Sept. 28th he found some of the turf missing. He reported the matter to the police at Newtownbutler, and later accompanied Const. Ferguson to Carney’s house, where they found half a bag of turf in the kitchen. He picked out some of the turf (produced) which had his mark on them. Const. Ferguson corroborated. Defendant, in evidence, stated he was going to work and there was no turf in the house. If he had not taken the turf his wife and children would have no fire until he came back. District Inspector Smyth said there was an epidemic of turf-stealing in the district. This man had five horse loads stolen. Major Dickie—I will have to start sending people to prison, for these offences. He imposed a fine of 40/s and said if I there had been anything against defendant before he would have put on a much heavier penalty.

DRUNK IN CHARGE. John McCarroll, hackney owner, Lisnaskea, was charged with being drunk in charge of a motor car on October 1.1th. Defendant admitted the offence. Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, gave evidence, and Dr. James Dolan, Newtownbutler, stated he examined defendant, who was so far under the influence of drink as to be incapable of driving a car. Defendant told the Court he had been driving some soldiers and had some drink, but did not think he was incapable of driving. Major Dickie said there was a minimum penalty in these cases. He imposed a fine of £5, with £2 12s 6d, costs, and suspended defendant’s licence for 12 months. He fixed sureties in the event of an appeal. Defendant—I will appeal the case. Major Dickie—But you admit the offence. Defendant—I think that is a bit severe. Major Dickie—But that is the minimum penalty. Defendant—I don’t think I was incapable of driving. Major Dickie—No judge can impose a smaller penalty. If you appeal, I am afraid it would be a waste of time and money. Defendant said he was not in the habit of taking drink, and had driven all over the world. District Inspector Smyth, said it was much too dangerous to have people driving while under the influence of drink. Major Dickie said he would allow defendant to drive until his appeal was heard, but he did not know whether the appeal was wise or not.

24-10-1942. APPELLANT WAS DEAD. NEWTOWNBUTLER CASE UNUSUAL SITUATION. An unusual situation arose at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Wednesday when an appeal case was called in which Hugh Connolly, of Derrysteaton Island, appealed, against a £12 fine for harbouring 10 cwts. of sulphate of ammonia. Mr, V. G. Patterson, solicitor, who had represented Connolly at the Petty Sessions hearing, said the appellant was dead. He had been dead ten days at his island home before being found. Judge Ellison said perhaps the case could be adjourned. Mr. J. Cooper (for the respondent Customs authorities) —I don’t know how you can adjourn the case of a dead man. Judge—There must be some means of correcting an obvious error. Mr. Cooper—Nothing can happen – just strike out the appeal. Judge—If the fine is not paid he cannot be imprisoned which was the alternative. Could the £12 not be levied by distress on his property irrespective of his, death? Mr. Cooper -You cannot levy it on the goods of a dead man. We would not attempt to do it anyhow. Mr. Patterson—If they don’t do that and don’t attempt to follow Mr. Connolly, nothing further will happen. A constable of police from the locality said the dead man had no stock. A brother-in-law was looking after the farm, but nobody was living on it. Mr. Cooper said it would be different if Mr. Patterson said he was going to take out probate and continue the appeal, but he simply came and said he had no instructions. Mr. Patterson—The man was ten days dead before he was found. Judge—Could the Crown not claim it was a creditor? Mr. Patterson said he thought not in this case. The matter was adjourned.

24-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN MARKET, ENNISKILLEN, Tuesday—Pork, 45 carcases; potatoes, 4s 3d per cwt.; straw, 4s per cwt.; hens, 1s to Is 3d per lb.; chickens. Is 4d to Is 6d per lb.; rabbits, 7d to 8d per lb.

24-10-1942. DERRYLIN BURGLARY.“The monotony of their present service got on their nerves and they decided to desert with the intention of joining the Air Force from ‘Eire’ ” said Mr. E. Ferguson at Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday when he was defending two soldiers of the Royal Engineers, Gerard Fitzgerald and Leslie Fuller, who pleaded guilty to having on 11th August, 1942, broken and entered the dwelling house at Cloghan of Dr. S. J. McQuaid, M.O.H., Derrylin, and stolen two gent’s shirts, two pullovers, one gent’s sports jacket, one pair gent’s trousers, one gent’s lounge jacket and two pairs of gent’s socks, the property of Dr. McQuaid.

Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, said there were no convictions of any sort against Fitzgerald, Fuller was convicted on 21st August, 1935, for attempted housebreaking and larceny at Wealdstone Juvenile Court and put under a rule of bail. On 2nd July, 1936, at Middlesex Quarter Sessions he was sent to Borstal for three years. He was later convicted of being an Army deserter. Mr. Ferguson said both accused belonged to the Royal Engineers. Fitzgerald was 21 years of age in July last and before the war was an aircraft worker at Bristol. He joined the Army at 17, although, he was in a reserved service. Fuller was 23 years of age and had been in the Army since the outbreak of war. Although the pair had made repeated applications to get away from the Royal Engineers because of their peacetime occupations, one being an aircraft worker and the other a plumber, they had been refused. They applied to join the commandos but were refused. Wishing to join the Air Force from across the border, they needed civilian, clothes and this caused the offence. They went into the doctor’s house, found no one in and took these clothes. All the clothes had been returned and the only thing broken was one window. Since the offence, the men had been tea weeks in jail and as far as Fitzgerald was concerned he had expiated his crime and it would be a shame if he had to go to jail again. He asked that they should be allowed to go back to the Army where they would be of more use than in jail. Deputy Judge Ellison discharged Fitzgerald under the Probation Act. He bound over Fuller in £10 to keep the peace for two years. Both men were ordered to be detained pending the arrival of a military escort.

24-10-1942. £4 DECREE FOR ASSAULT. IRVINESTOWN MAN’S CLAIM. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, William John Swanson, of Drumbulcan, Irvinestown, sued James Farrell, of same place, for £5 damages for assault. The claim was not defended. Mr. A. Herbert (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented the plaintiff, who said that on 24th July last he was in the townland of Drumbulkin, and had his bicycle with him. He was at the foot of a hill and had dismounted from the machine to walk up the hill. Farrell came out of the house as witness passed and shouted. Witness looked round to see what defendant was talking about and Farrell struck him on the jaw and tumbled him on his back right over the bicycle. As a result, his jaw swelled and he was not able to take his food. Defendant was a forty-acre farmer with fairly good land. A decree for £4 was given with 2s 6d expenses,

24-10-1942. GOOD ATTENDANCE OF JURORS. When out of 102 petty jurors summoned for Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday, it transpired that only one was absent without explanation, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., said the attendance was very good indeed. “I have never heard a jury list before on which so many names were answered,” he added.

REDUCTION IN FINE. NEWTOWNBUTLER MAN’S APPEAL. Hugh P. Maguire, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, appealed at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday against two fines of £50 each imposed at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions in respect of (1) for failing to stop his car at the Border when called upon to do so, and (2) for exporting prohibited, goods. By consent, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., affirmed both convictions, but the fine for failing to stop the car was reduced to £40. Defendant applied for and was given six weeks in which to pay the £90.

24-10-1942. GLANGEVLIN VOCATIONAL SCHOOL. DECISION TO RE-OPEN IT. At the meeting of County Cavan Vocational Education Committee Mr. J. J. Gleeson presided. The Office of Public Works wrote that as Glangevlin School was not in use they were prepared to take it on lease from the committee for a period of ten years. Mr. McGovern proposed, that they reopen the school. Mr. P. Smith said it was a shame to have the school closed. The application was refused it was decided to take steps to have the school reopened.

24-10-1942. BORDER INCIDENT. BELFAST MAN FINED £100 AT CLONES. At Clones District Court before District Justice Lavery, Patrick McIlduff, whose address was given as English St. Belfast, and who was described as a bookmaker, was charged with on May 19, 1941, at Glasslough, Co. Monaghan, exporting prohibited goods consisting of wearing apparel and also rescuing the goods seized by a Customs official. Defendant was fined £100 on the charge of exporting and £1 on the charge of rescuing, and the fines were paid into court immediately. Evidence was given by Customs Officer Lynn of following a motor-car to the Tyrone border. When he arrived he saw defendant standing by the car along with the driver. He examined the car and found two parcels in it. A man came across the Border and seized one of the parcels and took it away with him across the Border. Defendant took up the other parcel and went across the Border with it. He had no doubt it was defendant who took one of the parcels away. Defendant said he knew nothing about the parcels in the car. He had some drink taken.

24-10-1942. CATTLE DEALER’S CLAIM. £12 DECREE AT ENNISKILLEN. In an undefended civil bill at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, John Elliott, 1 Victoria Terrace, Enniskillen,  cattle-dealer, sued Thomas Gallagher, Aghoo, Garrison, for £26, plaintiff alleging that defendant’s warranty in the sale of a heifer was contrary to the facts. Plaintiff said he paid £21 for the heifer on 12th August last, when, defendant said she had cleaned after calving. It transpired, however, he said, that she had not cleaned, and he had to pay £2 for medicine for her. She lost her milk and was now worth only £13. Defendant went to see the animal and promised to take her back. He did not do so, and when plaintiff saw him, again and mentioned the matter he told plaintiff to “make the best of it.” Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., gave plaintiff a decree for £13, plaintiff to retain the animal.

24-10-1942. FOUR MONTHS FOR ASSAULT. At Enniskillen Criminal Sessions Wm. Hynes, Nugent’s Entry, Enniskillen, was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment on a charge to which he pleaded guilty, of assaulting a girl of under thirteen years. He had been found not guilty of a serious charge against the child.

24-10-1942. PETTIGO NOTES. Mr. Patrick Chaucer, Customs officer at Pettigo Customs frontier post, is to be transferred to Clones. Mr. Chaucer since coming to the village has been a very popular young man. He is a keen athlete who took a prominent part in all the local games. He is being replaced in Pettigo by Mr. Denis Bradley.

On Sunday morning while on duty in the vicinity of Termon Creamery, near the Grouselodge border, Constables Mathers and Robinson, R.U.C., seized a quantity of tea, margarine and rice from a young man. The constables removed the goods to Tullyhommon R.U.C. station.

During the week, R.U.C. from Tullyhommon, Pettigo, were successful in tracing and .recovering, a heifer which had been missing from the farm, of Mr. Robt. Brandon, Glenvannon, near Pettigo.

On Sunday, Sergt. Bradley, R.U.C., when on patrol in the townland of Camplagh observed a man carrying a parcel and coming from the Donegal border. The man bolted leaving the parcel behind which contained woollen blankets.

31-10-1942. GIRL ESCAPES JAIL. £50 FINE SUBSTITUTED FOR PRISON SENTENCE. A pretty, well-dressed young woman, Elizabeth Hal, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, escaped a three months’ prison sentence by appealing to Newtownbutler  Quarter Sessions in Enniskillen on Wednesday. She had been sentenced at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions for dealing in prohibited goods, namely, four loaves, a carton of soap and 3½ lbs. flake meal. Mr. A. J. Belford (instructed by Mr. F. J. Patterson, solicitor) represented defendant. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown, Solicitor, for the Customs authorities, said the amount of goods involved was very small, their value being 3/-. On the 18th November, 1941, appellant was fined £3 for dealing in prohibited goods—18 loaves—and also £36 for exporting three tons of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. Cooper was proceeding to tell Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., of the ambushes carried out by, the police on three different days in April, 1942, when Mr. Belford interpolated and said his submission was that that evidence had been wrongly admitted by the magistrate in the Court below, no charge in respect of these allegations having been made. Mr. Cooper said the police had seen people, seventy-five in number, going to and. from the shop, bringing goods into the Free State. Judge – Illegally across the border? Mr. Cooper—Yes. Judge—Why didn’t you prosecute them?

Mr. Belford pointed out that the solicitor for appellant at the Petty Sessions objected to that evidence on the ground that no prosecution had been brought against those people. Mr. Cooper explained that the shop was on the very border and it was practically impossible to catch the offenders. In this particular case the policeman had to run after a woman; he grabbed the bag she was carrying but was unable to get a hold of her. The constable brought the goods back to appellant’s shop and she pleaded guilty. At the Petty Sessions he (Mr, Cooper.) was instructed to press for imprisonment, and his Worship said to her: “I have seen you before’ and sentenced her to three months. Mr. Belford said imprisonment in the case would be rather harsh as appellant was only twenty-five years old. Before the introduction of rationing, three- quarters of her customers were from over the border, and while he frankly admitted there might have been some irregularities, it was true to say she did not realise the enormity of the offences. She had been more or less out of business since her Ministry of Food licence had been withdrawn by the Lisnaskea Food Control Committee. She was now only allowed to sell some hardware and clothes, and she was contemplating giving up the business she had carried on for seven years. That being so, the police would be given no further trouble. Like many other border residents, she did not seem to realise the seriousness of smuggling and she had already been heavily punished by her livelihood being taken away. Mr. Cooper thought the licence was merely suspended pending his Honour’s decision. Mr. Belford said appellant would submit to a fairly substantial penalty in order to avoid the sentence, which would be likely to have unpleasant consequences for her in after life.

31-10-1942. YOUNG BOYS ON LARCENY CHARGES. ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions ion Friday three young boys pleaded guilty before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., to having on 26th July, 1942, broken and entered the shop of William H. Creighton, Church St., Enniskillen, and stolen chocolate and sweets to the value of £1 6s 6d. One of the above-mentioned boys and another boy pleaded guilty to breaking and entering the shop of Thomas Wilson, Garvary, between 11.55 p.m. on 13th Aug. and 3 a.m. on 14th August, and stealing two bicycle free wheels value 11s, pair pliers value Is 6d, 3½ doz. safety razor blades value 7s, two pocket torches value 3s, two fountain pens value 5s, one pair opera glasses value 15s and five bottles lemonade, value 3s 8d.

The boy twice charged, above also pleaded guilty to stealing a bicycle value £5, the property of Harold Cleary, on 20th July. Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented all accused. All the boys were very young and had respectable parents. None had. any previous convictions involving dishonesty. In two of the cases he mentioned that one boy had been earning £3 18s 0d weekly at public works at the age of 15. Another at the same age had been earning almost £5 weekly. This work stopped and the boys were running about with nothing to do. There was no proper control over the boys since the wages terminated until they had settled down again and got used to living with little or no money.

The Judge, sternly warning the boys of what would happen should they ever again be guilty of a similar offence, allowed them off on entering, or their parents’ entering into recognisances in £10 for their good behaviour. An order was made for the return of the stolen property, and £1 found in the possession of the boy who stole the bicycle was ordered to be handed to Cleary to compensate for a coat on the bicycle that was still missing. Mr. Creighton, said Mr. Cooper, was at the loss of the chocolate, which was buried and was rendered unfit. Asked whether he wanted compensation, by Mr. Herbert, who said the parents of the boy involved were very poor. Mr. Creighton said he did not. The Judge highly commended Mr. Creighton for his charitable attitude.

31-10-1942. ARTIFICIAL MANURE ON BORDER ISLAND. APPEAL AGAINST £12 FINE FAILS. At Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday, before Deputy Judge Ellison William Atwell, of Derrysteaton, appealed against a fine of £12 for the harbouring of a quantity of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. V. G. Patterson represented the appellant, and Mr. J. Cooper appeared for the respondent Customs Authorities. Constable Duffy said in an unoccupied house on Gallon Island belonging to defendant, while on boat patrol on Lough Erne, he found eight bags containing 16 cwt. of sulphate of ammonia. The house was approachable in summer time from the shore, but at this time of the year (February) could only be approached by boat. From the point of the island it was only 50 yards across Lough Erne to the 26 counties. In a statement defendant said he bought the ammonia in Newtownbutler for his own, use. It was the only ammonia he had bought that year. Witness discovered on enquiring at the shop where the purchase was made that the latter statement was untrue.

Cross-examined, witness said Mr. Anderson, manager of the Newtownbutler shop which supplied the stuff, said in a statement that on the 5th January defendant ordered a ton of sulphate of ammonia, took half of it that, day, and the remaining half the next day, and paid for it on the second day. Mr. Patterson—You got it in February, he got it in January; if he had wanted to get it across the Border there would have been no difficulty? –No difficulty. Even when taking it to his house he has to go along the shore of the Free State?—Yes. The Ministry actually urged people to get artificial manures early.—Yes.

Mr. Cooper—Atwell’s statement to you was that he had bought 16 cwt.?—Yes. It could be bought for about £12 a ton .here; what was the price in “Eire ?” —The price at the time was as much as £60. So it would be very profitable to get it across these few yards?—Yes. And 4 cwts. of this ammonia was missing?—Yes. George Dixon, Surveyor of Customs and Excise, stated on information from the police as to defendant’s probable requirements for his own cropping, he allowed 6 cwt. to the defendant, and had the remainder seized. Mr. Patterson—Did you know that he was treating for the purchase of another 40-acre farm?—No. And that he would require fertiliser for it?—No. Will you say you knew 6 cwt. was enough for his forty-acre farm, on Derrysteaton, and another 40-acre farm he was going to purchase?—I acted on information from the police. They did not know what he was going to crop?—They knew what he had cropped the previous year. Mf. Cooper—You don’t allocate fertiliser for a farm he has not bought? — No. Mr. Patterson said when he got his potato subsidy from the Government he received a notice stating that the Ministry had arranged for the importation of sufficient supplies of sulphate of ammonia to meet the needs of farmers, but it was most important that farmers should order immediately and where possible take delivery. “It is most important. Act now” stated the notice. Atwell followed that advice. He had 60 acres on Derrysteaton or heavy wet land, and required a quick acting fertilizer.

31-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN’S £200 PRIZE. When Enniskillen Urban Council met on Monday evening to allocate the prize money of £300 won in the recent waste paper salvage competition, a letter was read from Omagh Urban Council, congratulating the Council on winning a £200 prize. ‘The successful collection of waste paper,” stated the letter “requires great effort, organisation and co-operation of the townspeople, and your success shows that you had these three factors.” Mr. T. Algeo thought the County Hospital was the first consideration of the Council, as it catered for all creeds and classes, and he proposed that the Hospital get half of the prize money. Mr. P. Kelly seconded. Mr. T. Devine—I quite agree with Mr. Algeo that our County Hospital has our first claim, but there are a number of other institutions and organisations which 1 think have claims on you also. He proposed that the money be allocated as follows, County Hospital, £60; Enniskillen Nursing Society, £25: Enniskillen Council for Social. Service, £25; Soldiers’, Sailors’ and Airmen’s Association, £25; Inniskillings Comforts Fund, £25; £15 each to the Women’s Section, British Legion and the Earl Haig Fund; and £10 to the Ulster Gift Fund. Mr. W. H. Creighton seconded. Mr- W. J. Monaghan—Have the charities attached to the various churches received any consideration from you in these matters? Chairman, (Senator Whaley)—I don’t think they have been consulted in this matter at all

Mr. Monaghan said they were coming on to winter, and .he thought the various churches should get some little help for their funds, so that they could assist the poor people by either way of coal or other relief that they may be pleased to give to the people. “You have the outlook of a very severe winter; something should be done for these people,” he added. Mr. J. Donnelly (Borough Surveyor) said he had been consulted on the matter when it had been suggested that the St. Vincent De Paul Society should get £20, but this Society was in the most fortunate position that it had ever been in—that they had sufficient money at the present time. They were well able to carry on and meet the demands of the next couple of years or more. Mr. W. J. B. Lee said if they gave all the money to the County Hospital everybody would benefit, and he proposed that it all go to the County Hospital. Mr. Monaghan—It is a State-aided institution.  Mr. Devine—Speaking for the Church I represent, so far as I know they are not in need of any funds. Mr. Monaghan—That satisfies me. Mr. Algeo then altered his proposal and propose that the Hospital get £100 and he asked the Chairman to take a written vote “to see who was for the County Hospital or not.”

Mr. W. E. Johnston—I object to Mr. Algeo’s statement—“to see who is for the County Hospital or not.” Mr. Algeo—I demand a written vote on it. Mr. Johnston–You can have any vote on it you like. Mr. Devine said he would not like it to go out that this was a vote for and against the County Hospital. Mr. J. Logan thought that Mr. Devine’s motion should be passed unanimously. They had always the churches with them and they had always the poor with them, and likely to have them.

31-10-1942. MINOR HALL BOOKINGS DISCUSSED AT ENNISKILLEN URBAN COUNCIL. Enniskillen Urban Council discussed at length, at a special meeting on Monday evening an application from, the Six-County Council for Social Service for the use of the Minor Hall for .at least one night per week as a club for young people, and also for the taking over by them of a small plot of ground, the Council’s property, abutting on the road adjoining Mill Street and the Irvinestown Road us a juvenile recreation centre. The Chairman (Senator Whaley) asked had the Council a room to spare. Town Clerk (Mr. A. W. Ritchie) — For the next two or three months it is booked. Mr. T. Algeo—Haven’t you a resolution on the books that the Minor Hall is closed for three months? Chairman—After present bookings. The Town Clerk said if there was a fixed night each week it would be very difficult. The Minor Hall went usually with the main hall, when the latter was booked for dances.

Mr. Devine— They cannot surely book; up the hall for three months ahead. Mr. J. Logan proposing that Saturday night be granted to the Social Services in the Minor Hall, said all through the week the young people were engaged at their lessons, and it would be a shame to take them away from these to attend a club. The presence of the boys attending in the hall would help to purify the atmosphere. That would be a disappointment to some people. They would miss (the “hop.” The people would also miss the bottles of a Sunday morning. It would do the town a lot of good if they had the young boys in the ball on a Saturday night. There was very seldom a big function in the hall on a Saturday night; therefore, that night would not clash with any other people. He meant this arrangement to start from 1st January. Mr. Algeo seconded. Mr. Devine— We want it before January. Saturday night would not suit. The Town Clerk read a list of bookings of the Minor Hall for some weeks to come which, showed that the same three groups of people have the hall on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, respectively, of each week for some time in advance. Mr. Devine—Shilling “hops.” The Town Clerk said Saturday night was “Football.” Mr. McKeown— What football; there are several football clubs. Town Clerk—I cannot tell you the name of it. Mr. Devine—Corinthian Football Club. Everyone knows it. There is no secret about it. Town Clerk— It is difficult to get a night. Mr. Devine asked Mr. Logan, not to press his motion, because he did not think Saturday night would suit the Social Services. Mr. Logan—Saturday night is the best. The pictures have the main hall, so that there would only be the two parties here. It is all the same to me. Boys always strolled about the streets for an hour or two on that night, he said. Mr. Johnston—Country boys go home. Mr. Logan-The shops are closed earlier

7-11-1942. TRAGIC DEATH OF JAS. A. JONES, ROYAL HOTEL. POISONED BY GAS FUMES IN BEDROOM. Enniskillen got a profound shock on Tuesday with the news of the death that morning of Mr. James A. Jones, popular proprietor of the Royal Hotel, Enniskillen and one of the best-known auctioneers in the North-West. Only the previous evening Mr. Jones had been seen in the best of health and spirits, on his daily walk, and it was tragic to think that within little more than twelve hours he was dead. The tragic event was caused by an accident. A gas tap which had served a disused stove in Mr, Jones’ bedroom had been at some time or other inadvertently turned on. Mr. Jones was resting in bed after his morning cup of tea when the meter serving that pipe and tap was again turned on by the Gas Company’s fitter after having been off for some time. The fitter was unaware of the pipe leading to the bedroom. The turning on of the gas filled Mr. Jones’ room with gas. The window was closed and when the alarm was raised and the doctor arrived, he found Mr. Jones unconscious. He died after a short time. .

An Enniskillen man, Mr. Jones was a member of a popular and much-esteemed family. His brother Frank, a former Superintendent of the Garda Siochana, died less than two years ago in Dublin, where he was the proprietor of the Beresford Hotel. Another, sister, now deceased was a member of the Convent .of Mercy community Newry. The only surviving member of the family is Miss Josephine Jones, who lived at the Hotel with the deceased, gentleman. It was she who first raised the alarm. To her, in her sorrow, the sincere sympathy of the whole community goes out.

The late Mr. Jones, who was aged 59 years, started life as a clerk in the office of the late Mr. Robert W. Wilson, auctioneer, in the present premises of the Royal Hotel. . He became an auctioneer himself in Mr. Wilson’s employment, and on Mr. Wilson’s death succeeded him. He built up for himself one of the most extensive auctioneering practices in the North. He later became the proprietor of the Royal Hotel, and in both capacities he was as popular as he was-well-known. He entertained some of the leading personalities of Ireland in every sphere.

Mr. Jones was a good-living Catholic gentleman, who attended regularly to his religious duties. Although unmarried, he had a wonderful regard and love for children, a love for little ones shared by every member of his family. In life he had borne many crosses, several members of his family dying within a comparatively short time of one another, but he bore his sorrows bravely, even cheerfully, and was always in high spirits outwardly, whatever sorrows his inner soul might feel. He will be much missed by every creed and class in the town.

THE INQUEST. The sad circumstances of his death were investigated by Mr. G. E. Warren, Coroner, at an inquest in the Hotel on Tuesday. Head Constable Conlin represented the police; Mr. R. A. Herbert, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert), the next of kin, and Mr. Gerald Grant, BL., appeared for the Enniskillen Gas Company.

DOCTOR’S EVIDENCE. Dr. Philip Brady said in response to a telephone massage received at 11 a.m., he went to the Royal Hotel, where he arrived in a few minutes and smelled coal gas. He went, to a bedroom on the first floor and found a strong smell of coal gas in the bedroom. In the bed he found deceased in an unconscious condition but alive. He died a few minutes afterward. He was clad in pyjamas. Death was caused by asphyxia due to coal gas poisoning. Mr. Jones was a patient of witness’s and was suffering from myocarditis in a mild degree; otherwise he was in good health.

WAITER’S STORY. Wm. Brady, waiter, said that morning at 10-30 he was tidying up in the dining room when Miss Jones, sister of the deceased, told him to go up to deceased’s room because she had smelled gas escaping there. When he went into the room he found it full of gas and the gas pipe turned on. He turned off the tap and opened the window. The pipe from which the gas was escaping was not connected to the gas stove in the room and had not been for some time. The gas fire in the room was never used and the tap was on the portion of the pipe leading to the main. He saw deceased in the bed and asked him was he all right, but he made no answer. He felt deceased’s hands and face, and, as he appeared to witness to be unconscious, witness went for Dr. Brady. There was a fitter from the hotel working at the oven in the kitchen that morning. To Mr. Grant, witness said this pipe had been disconnected from the fire for some time, but he did not know who disconnected it.

Mr. Grant-How long had it been in that condition?—I don’t know. Had it ever been reported?—I don’t know, unless Mr. Jones did it. Witness said he did not know when he first noticed that it was cut. He was very seldom in Mr. Jones’s room, except to go occasionally for Mr. Jones’ coat. Mr. Herbert -Is it cut or disconnected? Head Constable—There seems to be six inches of pipe cut away altogether. Witness said, he had not seen the gas stove lit this ages. It was not lit last winter. Patrick Cunningham, boots, said between 9.45 and 10 a.m. that morning he was called by Miss Jones to the Hotel office; In this office were two gas metres, and he was asked by Miss Jones to turn on the gas. She opened the press where the meter was and, as witness knew nothing about them, he refused to turn on the gas. There was a gas man there and he got a wrench and went towards the meter. Witness did not know what he did. There was a gas radiator in the hall of the Hotel, and witness was seven months in the hotel and had never seen it lighted. He heard no conversation between Miss Jones and the fitter. Mr. Grant—Had you ever seen the stove lit in Mr. Jones’ bedroom?—I didn’t even know there was a stove in the bedroom.

IN USUAL GOOD SPIRITS. Michael Rooney, boots, said that about 9-15 a.m. that morning he went to Mr. Jones’ bedroom with his tea. Mr. Jones was in bed and seemed to be in good form. Witness gave him the tea and pulled down the black-out blind. The window was closed. Witness did not go near the gas fire in the room as he did not know it was working. It was usual for Mr. Jones to remain in bed in the morning and have his tea there. Witness never saw the gas fire in the room used. He was in the Hotel since August and never saw the radiator in the hall used. Head, Const. Conlin—Was there any smell of gas when you were in the room? —No. Mr. Jones seemed in his usual health, and spoke to him the same as usual. He made no complaint of any kind. To Mr. Herbert, witness said Mr. Jones took his tea. Coroner—You don’t know whether he got out of bed at all or not?—No, I don’t.

Henry Fox, employed as fitter by the Enniskillen Gas Company, said on this morning about 9 a.m. he was sent by Mr. Lusted, manager of the Gasworks, to the Royal Hotel to have a look at the gas radiator. He arrived at the Hotel at 8-50 a.m. and saw Miss Jones, who pointed out the gas radiator in the hall. She said in reply to witness that that was all in the place. Witness turned on the tap of the radiator, but no gas came. Miss Jones called the Boots to turn on the gas in this meter. As there were two meters in the office the boots was not sure what to do so witness turned on the main cock of the meter serving this radiator. The other meter served the cooking stoves in the kitchen and was fully turned on. Witness was not aware that this meter which he turned on served anything but the hall radiator, so he took the word of Miss Jones for this. He had since made a test of this meter which served the hall radiator and found it also, served the pipe which led to the gas stove in Mr. Jones’ room. He lit the gas in the hall radiator and Miss Jones told him to leave it on as it was cold. He was then brought to the kitchen to look at the cooker. He was not up in Mr. Jones’ bedroom on this visit. Head Constable—If the tap in the pipe in Mr. Jones’ room which was cut had been turned off, could any gas escape? — No, certainly not. It would have been perfectly safe. The pipe was not cut it was disconnected. To Mr. Herbert, witness said he asked Miss Jones were there any others in the place to be seen to, and she said that was all that was in the place. The gas in the hall radiator was still on when he left about twenty minutes past ten a.m.

SISTER’S EVIDENCE. Miss Josephine Jones, who, when the inquest was held at five o’clock, was still confined to bed from the results of the shock, gave her evidence in bed. She said her brother arranged with the Gas Company to attend to the gas in the morning. About ten minutes to ten a man from the Gas Company arrived. Before going to the radiator, the gas man asked her were there any other radiators and she said no. To make sure, she asked the waiter, and he also said ho. She did not remember about the stove in Mr, Jones’ room. It never entered her mind. She called Patrick Cunningham to turn on the meter in the office for the gas man, but he was not able, and the gas man did it himself. After the radiator had been fired, she brought the gas man down to the kitchen to look at the stove there. About 10-30 she smelt gas and went upstairs. She found on entering deceased’s room that it was full of gas. She noticed that her brother did not move as usual, felt his hand and found it cold. She then raised the alarm.

To Mr. Grant, witness said she could not definitely remember whether it was the radiator or gas fittings the gas man said when he asked her were there any others in the house. The tap which was turned on in her brother’s room was on the floor underneath the wash-hand basin, and it could easily have been turned on by someone brushing out the room, or hitting it with their foot when at the basin. Mr. Grant said on behalf of Mr. Lusted and the Gas Company, he extended very sincere sympathy in the terrible tragedy that had happened. The Head Constable and Coroner associated themselves with this expression, of sympathy, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL. B., also joined in the expression of sorrow at Mr. Jones’ tragic passing. He had been a personal friend of Mr. Jones and he was sure the relatives felt the blow very much. The Coroner returned a verdict of death from asphyxia caused by coal-gas poisoning, the result of an accident.

7-11-1942. MILITARY LORRY LIGHTS IN ENNISKILLEN. MAGISTRATE’S COMPLAINT. Complaints concerning glaring headlights of motor vehicles belonging to the military were voiced by Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. His Worship said that recently the whole street of Enniskillen was lit up by army vehicle headlights from end to end, and this was far worse than some of the cases which he had to deal with in Court. Those motor lights could certainly be seen for ten or twelve miles away from the air. He also spoke of the glare from torches. Sergt. John. Codd, R.U.C., said a special report had been made by the police on the subject of lights on army vehicles, but no reply had yet been received. His Worship pointed out that except a light could be seen from an altitude of six hundred feet he would not impose a fine.

One of the cases which fell within this category was brought against an air-raid warden in Enniskillen, and no penalty was inflicted. In another case Head Constable Conlon, prosecuting, said the defendant was aged ninety-three. She kept a boarding-house in Forthill Street and according to the constable she had forgotten to put up the black-out blind. His Worship said it was hard to put a penalty on a law-breaker when she reached the age of ninety three, but he had to do it. A. fine of 5/- and costs was ordered. Similar fines were imposed in a number of other summonses.

7-11-1942. PRISONERS ESCAPE FROM MOUNTJOY GAOL. The following statement was issued by the “Eire” Government Information Bureau on Tuesday; “Six prisoners serving sentences imposed by the Special Military Court escaped from Mountjoy Prison on the evening of November 1.”

 

 

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