October 1915.

Fermanagh Times October 7th 1915.  CLONES.  CAPTAIN J. C. PARKE HOME AGAIN.  Captain Parke the famous lawn tennis champion and international Rugby player, who was wounded at the Dardanelles on the 10th of August last and spent some time in hospital in Malta, afterwards undergoing treatment in England, has returned to his home in Clones.  Although looking very well he has not yet completely recovered from a wound in the wrist.  Soon after the outbreak of war, Captain Parke, then a practicing solicitor in Clones with his brother, Mr. W. A. Parke, solicitor, obtained a commission in the 6th Leinster Regiment and in a very short time was promoted.  He was in the famous landing with the Australians, at the spot since known as Anzac Cove and took part in the fighting in that neighbourhood for three days – one of the most desperate struggles in the history of the operations on the Gallipoli Peninsula.  On the third day while defending a shallow trench, which was undergoing a heavy bombardment from the Turkish guns, a shrapnel shell burst close to him, and he was struck by several of the bullets and splinters, but fortunately in no vital part.  He lost a great quantity of blood, but owing to the prompt treatment he received and his splendid physique, his recovery was rapid, and in less than a month he was able to sail for England.  Although a bullet went through his wrist from side to side it appears that no bone was broken or sinew torn and it is hoped that he may regain complete use of it.  As soon as he is sufficiently recovered he will rejoin his regiment.

Fermanagh Times October 7th 1915.  CYCLING ACCIDENT.  Mr. Patrick Clarke, Magheraveely, Clones, rural postmen in that district, was throw off his bicycle in Fermanagh Street, Clones on Saturday night and sustained a broken leg.

Fermanagh Times October 7th 1915.  LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GARTSIDE TIPPING, R.N.  The death of Lieutenant Commander Gartside Tipping, R.N. reported from the front is another of those grave incidents that bring home more intimately to us here in Fermanagh the tragedy of the war.  The deceased gentleman was a son of the late Captain Gartside Tipping of Rossferry, near Derrylin, one of Lough Erne’s most picturesque residences, afterwards occupied by the Hon. Cyril Ward on his marriage with a daughter of the Earl of Erne.  He was a brother of Mrs. Richardson, of Rossfad, with whom profound sympathy will be felt in her bereavement.  The family are relatives of the Earl of Erne.  The Lieutenant-Commander, although one of the oldest officers actively engaged in the British navy, being 67 years of age, gallantly offered his services on the outbreak of the war.  When the present King, then Prince George, was undergoing an early course of naval instruction he was lieutenant on of the Royal yacht.  For many years he was inspector of lifeboats in the Irish and West Lancashire districts, and he was well known at the various lifeboat stations on the Antrim and Down coasts.

Fermanagh Herald October 9th. 1915.  LISNASKEA GUARDIANS AND THE ATTENDANCE OF MEMBERS.  It was some time after 12 o’clock before the meeting could be commenced owing to the absence of a quorum, and the minutes were disposed of.  The Chairman drew attention to the fact that laterally there had been a very poor attendance of members, and suggested that it would be advisable for the Board to pass a resolution to the effect that any member who absented himself anyway frequently from the meetings should be penalised.  A lot of them, he said, only put in an appearance when there was a job on, and those men, he was of the opinion, should be disqualified altogether.  The Clerk suggested that the Porter be sent down the town to see if any members were there.  The Chairman objected to this and said if the members did not think it worth their while to attend those who did should not send after them.  This concluded the discussion.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915. THE GREAT ARTILLERY which so easily demolished the forts of Liege and Namur consisted of a gun weighing 87 tons, with a foundation of 37 tons for the carriage.  Two hundred men were engaged in the manipulation of it, and 25 or 26 hours were needed to erect the gun.  The shell weighed 8 cwts, and was 5 feet 4 inches long.  Twelve railway carriages were required to transport the gun. It was fired by electricity from a distance of ¼ mile, and the cost of each shot was £500.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  DERRYLIN PETTY SESSIONS.  At the above petty sessions Richards Meyers of Gortgorgan was fined £2 10 shillings with the recommendation that it be reduced to 10 shillings for carrying a gun without a licence.  A large number of persons were fined for using vehicles without lights and several were also fined for being drunk while in charge of horses and carts on the public road.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  LOCAL MILITARY NOTES.  Lieutenant John Irvine, of the 4th Royal Enniskillen Fusiliers who had been serving at the Dardanelles some time past with the Munster Fusiliers and whom we referred to in these columns last week arrived home yesterday at Killadeas.  He was gassed in action. We are glad to learn he is recovering well.  His elder brother, Lieutenant Gerard, is officer in charge of the Machine-gun Section with the 11th Battalion Inniskillings on the continent.  It is interesting to note the Major J. G. C.  Irvine, D. L. father of the gallant young officers, although incapacitated from taking an active part in the present great struggle was all through the South Africa Campaign and it was while fighting there that he received the injuries which now a preclude him from active service with the forces.  Although not able to go himself he has sent his only two sons, who are worthily maintaining the fighting traditions of the Irvine family in the British Army.

Jack Graham, son of the late Dr. Graham, Irvinestown, has just arrived home from South Africa looking fit and well after 11 months hard fighting under General Botha.  He, like Mr. Thomas Young of Fivemiletown has the unique experience of fighting against Botha in the Boer War and now under him against the Germans.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  MEMBERS PREVIOUSLY WARNED BY THE COUNTY SURVEYOR.  A SALUTARY LESSON FOR THE FUTURE.  In our columns “Things people want to know on the 9th of July in 1914 we queried: – How the ratepayers throughout Fermanagh like the announcement that the newly elected County Council shows decided signs of being the most reckless in expenditure of public money that has ever held office in this county?  This body made a reckless start on Thursday by passing over £2,300 worth of works on roads, many of which were condemned by the County Surveyor as being both illegal and unnecessary and which were strongly opposed by the Unionist members present.  In addition to all this expenditure, provisional proposals for a further £2,461 15shillings worth of roads and other works have already been handed in for consideration at the next meeting.  We asked what action will be taken by the Local Government Board through its auditor and replies to these queries have now been given in the most emphatic and practical manner possible.  Twelve members of the County Council, namely Messrs.  J.  McMahon, O. Hannah, F. Leonard, O. McBarron, Jas. Tierney, J.P.; James McCorry, F. Meehan, J.  Maguire, Jas.  O’Donnell, J.P., John McHugh, J.P. Gillen, and John Crosier, J.P. have been surcharged in the additional sum of £180 in respect of four roads which they voted at the meeting in question.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  PROGRESS OF THE I. A.S.O.  The I. A.S.O started from nothing.  It began to preach its gospel of organisation and self-help to the community to which these ideas were utterly new and strange.  Today it embraces more than 1,000 co-operative societies, with a membership of 106,000 farmers.  The turnover of the movement was £3,333,189 in 1913; last year it was £3,732,818.  Despite results which have attracted the attention and imitation of half the world, the cooperative movement has not yet come into its own in Ireland.  Our readers know the whole wretched story of official jealousy and hostility.

Impartial Reporter.  October 14th 1915.  A FOOTBALL CHARGE.  THE DRAMATIC INCIDENT.  Regarding the advance in France the Rev. C.  L.  Perry says that one officer had a football with the names of his platoon written on it.  Getting on the top of a parapet he kicked off crying ‘follow-up lads,’ and was almost immediately shot down.  The lads followed up, nevertheless.  ‘The fire from the machine guns,’ he adds, ‘was terrible and our men went down like corn before the scythe.’ For 48 hours all who could render first aid had their hands full.  What stories of heroism that will never be written.  An officer with three wounds knelt to bind the wounds of a man next to him, and was shot dead in the act.  Two wounded men stayed out 50 hours by the side of their sergeant, because they would not let him die alone.

Impartial Reporter.  October 14th 1915.  PETTIGO.  At a recent service in Pettigo Church, the Bishop of Clogher preached to a large congregation.  He took the opportunity of presenting to Matilda Taggart the silver medal (Bishop’s) for the highest place in the Diocesan examination in religious knowledge.

Impartial Reporter.  October 14th 1915.  FERMANAGH COUNTY COUNCILLORS SURCHARGES IN THE SUM OF £180.  The auditor, Major Eccles met the Nationalist members of the Fermanagh County Council to hear any explanation they might make as to four roads which he had refused to pass in the audit.  The members of the council affected by surcharges are – the chairman Mr. McHugh, J. P., Messrs J.  Tierney, J.  McGuire, J. Crozier, Felix Leonard, J.  P., J. P. Gillen, F. Meehan, J. McMahon, O. Hanna, J. Coulson.  Unionist members are not affected.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  THE MOTHER AND FOUR CHILDREN ARE BURNED TO DEATH IN A COUNTY DOWN TRAGEDY AS A LAMP EXPLODES IN THE BEDROOM.  The shocking tragedy occurred at Barnmeen about 7 miles from Newry on Sunday evening when the wife of a large farmer named Samuel J.  McKee and four children were burned to death and the extensive farmhouse in which they lived entirely gutted.  On Sunday evening Mr. McKee left to attend an evening service at the Brethren Hall, at Ballygorrian at 5.30 o’clock.  His wife Agnes, 36 and his sons William Murray McKee, four years, George McKee, 2 ½ years, and Louisa and Eliza Jane, twin children, age 16 months died.  The remains of the wife, unrecognisable from the effects of the fire, and two of the children were got out about 10.00 and later the other two.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  Seconded- Lieutenant John Irvine (gassed) is the son of Major J. G. C. Irvine, D. L., Killadeas, County Fermanagh.  He obtained his commission in the 4th Inniskillings on August 15, 1914, and has been temporarily attached at the front to the 2nd Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers.  He is now in hospital at Oxford, where he is progressing satisfactorily.

Lieutenant-Commander Gartside Tipping, Royal Navy, whose death in action was recently reported, was a son of the late Captain Gartside Tipping, of Rossferry, near Derrylin.  He was a brother of Mrs. Richardson, of Rossfad.  When the present King, then Prince George, was undergoing an early course of naval instruction, deceased was lieutenant on the Royal yacht.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  THE DEATH HAS OCCURRED OF MR. JOHN MALLON, J.P., MEIGH, NEAR NEWRY EX-ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER OF THE DUBLIN METROPOLITAN POLICE who expired suddenly on Saturday after attending 8.00 Mass.  Mr. Mallon was for 50 years connected with the Dublin Metropolitan Police and was greatly involved at the time of the Phoenix Park assassinations.  His share in the investigation which led to the arrest and conviction of the men concerned is well known.  Mr. Mallon had the doubtful honour of arresting several Irish patriots, including James Stephens, Charles J Kickham, O’Donovan Rossa, John O’Leary, Parnell, and Davitt.  Some years ago in collaboration with a well-known London journalist, Mr. Mallon essayed to publish a story of his career as a policeman.  Some instalments of the story, which were decidedly unpromising and largely incorrect, were published in the columns of a Sunday newspaper.  The project was dropped, and some futile actions at law between the collaborators were the only outcome of the scheme.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  AT TYRONE OFFICER IS KILLED, CAPTAIN A.M. READ.  Captain Anketell Moutray Read, Northamptonshire regiment, 1st Battalion, killed in action, was well known as an army athlete.  He won the heavyweight championship in India 8 times, and the middleweight twice, winning both in the same meeting.  Three times he won the army and navy heavyweight championship at Aldershot and Portsmouth making an unequal record in service boxing.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  NARROW ESCAPE OF LISBELLAW  MAN.  Mister P. Mulligan, Dromore, County Tyrone, has received an interesting souvenir from the front.  His brother, Private John Mulligan, first Canadian Contingent, 7th Battalion, has sent him a German bullet, which lodged in his cartridge case without inflicting a wound.  In a letter received a few days ago he mentioned that out of his platoon of 150 men only two came unscathed from Bill 60, but they have been reinforced since then.  He was also in the fierce fighting at Hill 90 and around Ypres, but never got a wound.  He has been offered a commission, but refused it as he considers it is sufficient honour to have a chance of fighting for his country.  He is a native of Lisbellaw, where his father resides.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  A ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPLAINS STORY.  BOTH IRISH MEN.  In a letter to his brother, at Navan, the Rev.  E.  J.  Cullen, Roman Catholic Chaplin with the 45th Field Artillery in Flanders writes under the date of September 30th: – “Of course, it was a great victory, but a very bloody one.  The Germans were simply massacred, and whole companies gave themselves up.  What between the gas, bombs, bayonets, rifle fire, machine-guns, and highly explosive shells – poor human nature had no chance, and fragments unrecognisable as belonging to human beings were the result.  The battle commenced with four days of bombardment, and a day and a night of intensive bombardment.  During this – a gun about 20 or 30 yards long, firing at  points 4 to 6 miles away – I went along the artillery, hearing the men’s confessions and giving Holy Communion.  I rode up at midnight to our battery, with a Captain Kenny, London but his parents Irish.  When I got up the colonel had just been killed by a shell – Butcher, related to Bishop Butcher, formerly at Ardbracken, Navan.  The major, two captains, and 16 men were Catholics, so I heard their confessions in a little hole, and it was most touching to see the major (the son of Lord Bellham), his two captains and all the catholic gunners kneeling on the ground behind their guns and receiving Holy Communion, and then making their thanksgiving aloud with me, at twelve o’clock at night. Of course, these expeditions were most perilous; but, what is the priest for save for such things as this?  When I tell you that shells were flying about you know why I always ask for prayers.

Next morning I went to another battery, and the major therein – Hannah, a relative of Hannah, K. C. an Irishman Protestant – told me that we priests were always after men.  When I had finished the Catholics there, he brought me to his big gun and said, as we are both Irishmen we may as well celebrates our meeting by having a crack at the Huns.  So he fired two rounds in my honour.  You see I have had some rare experiences.”

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  GERMAN BARBARITY.  ENGLISH LADY EXECUTED IN BRUSSELS.  SHOT FOR SHELTERING  ALLIES SOLDIERS.  The foreign office is informed by the United States Ambassador that Miss Edith Cavell, lately head of a large training school for nurses in Brussels, who was arrested on the fifth of August last by the German authorities at that place, was executed on the 13th Inst. after sentence of death had been passed on her.  It is understood that the charge against the Miss Cavell was that she had harboured fugitive British and French soldiers and Belgians of military age, and had assisted them to escape from Belgium in order to join the colours.  So far as the Foreign Office are aware no charge of espionage was brought against her.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  FRENCH FIRE. Describing the unprecedented  strength of the French artillery fire during the three days fire in the recent great offensive, the Tägliche Rundschau now says: – “On one position of the front in Champagne the fire was so intense that one shot fell every second on every 20 metres ( 21½ yards), this portion of the front receiving during the three days of consistent firing over 50,000,000 shots.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915. BRITISH GAS. The public have noted with satisfaction Sir John French is intimation that at last our troops at the front her making reprisals on the enemy in the matter of the employment of paralysing gas.  It was never intended, however, to resort to the diabolical he torturing and poisonous vapours used by the Germans, and it is interesting to note that the enemy reports describes are a gas merely as intoxicating

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915. RUSSIA’S “ONLY SONS” CALLED OUT.  Just before I left Russia (Mr. Stephen Graham) writes in The Times the “only sons” were called out, and with them militiamen up to 57 years of age.  Enormous numbers of young men who never expected to serve in the Army, whose parents had trusted in that immunity, are now being trained, and will shortly be advancing to the fighting line.  The act of calling them out synchronised with the Tsar’s taking the command, and it was in a way a further example of Russia’s wholeheartedness and her determination to cast everything on the altar of the nation.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  RELIGIOUS SERVICE BEHIND THEIR GUNS.  Rev E.  J.  Cullen, Catholic Chaplin serving with the 45th  F.  A., British Expeditionary Force, France writes about Hill 70: – The battle of Hill 70 will never be forgotten by me as long as I live.  The sights of horror are simply beyond description.  Imagine a short road so strewn with dead and dying those able to do so were kept very busy lifting the dead into a ditch to allow our guns, ambulance, etc. to pass and this among agonising groans all around and you have some notion of many such scenes.  The evening before the battle I went round hearing confessions and giving Holy Communion on the field or in the remains of houses along the line, and it was very sad to see these poor fellows laid out so soon but sadder still to see practically all young officers, and some of the Commanding Officers whom I knew so well –but for whom I could do nothing spiritually (all Presbyterians) brought in either dead or horribly mutilated.  I expected horrors and had already seen cases of shocking mutilations but I never dreamt of anything like this.  I had the consolation of attending about 19 Germans, and felt so pleased to be able to hear their confessions in their language, has they did not speak a word of French or English.  This murdering business went on in awful weather – rain and black mud and every other inconvenience that can be thought of.  Of course, it was a great victory, but a very bloody one.  The Germans were simply massacred and whole companies gave themselves up.  What between gas, bombs, bayonets, rifle fire, machine guns, and high explosive shells poor human nature had no chance and fragments unrecognisable as belonging to human beings were the result.

The battle commenced with a four day bombardment, and a day and a night of intensive bombardment.  During this a gun about 20 or 30 yards along was firing at points 4 to 6 miles away when I went along the artillery hearing the men’s confessions and giving Holy Communion.  I rode up at midnight to a battery with a Captain Kenny – London, was parents Irish.  When I got up the colonel had just been killed by a shell –Butcher, related to Bishop Butcher, formerly at Ardbracken, Navan.  The major, two captains and 16 men where Catholics so I heard all their confessions in a little hole there and it was most touching to see the major, the son of Lord Belham, his two captains and all the Catholic gunners kneeling on the ground behind their guns and receiving Holy Communion and then making their thanksgiving aloud with me at twelve o’clock at night.

Of course, these expeditions were most perilous; but what is a priest for save such as this?  When I tell you that shells were flying about you know why I always ask your prayers.  Next morning I went to another battery and the Major therein –Hannah, a relative of Hannah, K.  C., and Irishmen Protestant –told me that we priests were always after men.  When I had finished the Catholics there, he brought me to his big guns and said, ‘as we are both Irishmen we may as well celebrates our meeting by having a crack at the Huns.’  So he fired two rounds in my honour.  You see, I have had some rare experiences.

All are very hopeful of events now, as the ammunition seems to be quite sufficient, and a wonderful spirit pervade all ranks. The French are doing marvels.  Their prisoners amount up to 21,000.  We took about 3,000.  It was a wonderful spectacle!  Procession after procession of Germans marched by free.  Their officers seem to feel it, but the men were delighted they were taken, and gave themselves up in hundreds.  I am in the greatest form and most gratified for your prayers.  Get all the prayers around you for me and my work.  It is owing to someone’s prayer is that I escaped a shell in the trenches.  I slept on the floor last night in a wee store room small and smelly.  But this is nothing.  If you saw what the poor soldiers suffer – and officers, even colonels endure you would be shamed into enduring anything. Rev E.  J.  Cullen, Catholic Chaplin serving with the 45th F.  A., British Expeditionary Force.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  LONDON IN WAR TIME.  In my Palace Hotel, it is women who assist the Chief Waiters; it is women who serve in restaurants; it is girls in uniform who act is pages or attend to the lifts; you see women in police uniform; and when you alight from your train your ticket is checked by women.  Woman only attend you in the  Post Offices, and other public offices; women even drive motor wagons, though this work is too great a strain upon the feminine constitution; and women are everywhere, because of the drain of the men caused by the war.  Even at the Harvest Thanksgiving Service in Enniskillen last week the great preponderance of women over men was noticeable.  Every male who was a man, every youth of pluck and not a shirker has joined the navy and army; and only the elderly and married, with responsibility (not the married with no family) are supposed to be at home, along with the weaklings and wastrels and unpatriotic shirkers and loafers. W.C.T.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  London at night is the strangest a thing of all, for it is in London in darkness.  Long since precautions have been taken against wrong lights in the streets, but within a the last few weeks new regulations have been put in force under which with reduced and shrouded lights darkness has become largely invisible.  Gas lights, electric light, street lamps, tram lights are all surrounded either by Or dark paint so that light is thrown downwards and not defused. W.C.T.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  VARIOUS.  A League of Marriage is suggested, so that wounded soldiers from the front may marry respectable girls at home, and maintain the population.

Women from Hell is the term used by the Germans had to describe Highlanders when charging them.  We want more of those ‘women from hell.’

Great Britain declared war against Bulgaria from 10.00 PM on October 15, as Bulgaria had announced that she was at war with Servia.

Fermanagh Herald October 23rd. 1915.  A PRIEST’S GALLANT ACTION AT THE FRONT.  A gallant action by a Catholic chaplain is recorded by a correspondent of the Central News now at the British front.  It is the story of a bombing party of eight that went out in the night and never returned.  When morning came the regiment pictured their comrades lying wounded and dying in the mud and the slush and the decaying corn.  If they could only know for certain what had happened it would be relief of a sort.  But how to know?  It was broad daylight, the German snipers where in position; even to put one’s head over the parapet meant certain death.  While they were still discussing what appeared to be a hopeless situation a Catholic chaplain attach to the regiment came up to the firing line and asked to be allowed to go out in front and try to find the bodies.

After some hesitation his request was granted.  Wearing his surplus and with a crucifix in his hand the priest advanced down one of the saps and climbed out into the open.  With their eyes fixed to the periscope the British watched him anxiously as he proceeded slowly to the German lines.  Not a shot was fired by the enemy.  After a while the chaplain was seen to stop and bend down at the German wire entanglements.  He knelt in prayer.  Then with the same calm step, he returned to his own lines.  He had four identity discs in his hand, and reported that the Germans had held up four khaki caps on their rifles, indicating that the other four were prisoners in their hands.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  CHEQUE FOR BELTURBET’S V.C.  At Cloughjordan on Tuesday Sergeant Somers, V. C., was presented by Major–General Friend with a cheque for £240 which had been subscribed by the people of the district in recognition of the sergeant’s gallant conduct.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  RUDYARD KIPLING’S SON KILLED.  We have the heavy burden of announcing says the Morning Post, that Mr. John Kipling, of the Irish Guards, is reported “missing believed killed.”  John Kipling was the child for whom his father wrote the Just So Stories.  Mr. John Kipling was barely 18, a boy of delicate health, but indomitable zeal and resolution.  He had been nominated for the Irish Guards by Lord Roberts, and was determined to take his share in the war.  The sympathy of the whole Empire will go out to Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard Kipling in their sorrow.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  A HUGE SUM OF MONEY FOR A HAUL OF FISH.  The Don Company’s trawler Beaconmoor, of Aberdeen which had been operating in Iceland waters, landed a 40 ton catch at Aberdeen fish market on Monday morning.  Prices were high and the catch realised £1,220.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  The murder of Miss Edith Cavell is unparalleled.  And even worse than the crime is the cold blooded way in which it has been defended by the German Press.  It has staggered civilised humanity more possibly than any incident of the war, except perhaps the Lusitania; and in many respects it was more cold blooded and barbarous.  Its heartlessness and soullessness have roused the most bitter indignation.  But it has also aroused the recruiting spirit of the nation, and added to the stimulus which the movement was receiving.

Baron Von Bissing, who, it was reported, had followed up the ”ineffective volley” of the shooting party by blowing out Miss Cavell’s brains with a revolver bullet, now denies the assertion.  We are inclined to credit the denial for the act would have been so fiendish in its personal callousness that for the sake of humanity we hope it is untrue.  The King and Queen once more manifested their kindly and thoughtful nature by forwarding a sympathetic letter to the mother of the unfortunate victim expressing horror at the appalling deed.  By the way Miss Cavell visited Enniskillen a few years ago staying with Mrs. McDonnell, wife of the headmaster of Portora.

(Ed. Edith Louisa Cavell; 4 December 1865 – 12 October 1915) was a British nurse. She is celebrated for saving the lives of soldiers from both sides without distinction and in helping some 200 Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium during World War I, for which she was arrested. She was subsequently court-martialled, found guilty of treason and sentenced to death. Despite international pressure for mercy, she was shot by a German firing squad. Her execution received worldwide condemnation and extensive press coverage. She is well known for her statement that “patriotism is not enough”. Her strong Anglican beliefs propelled her to help all those who needed it, both German and Allied soldiers. She was quoted as saying, “I can’t stop while there are lives to be saved.” 12 October is appointed for her commemoration in the Anglican church, although this is not a “saint’s feast day” in the traditional sense. Edith Cavell, who was 49 at the time of her execution, was already notable as a pioneer of modern nursing in Belgium.)

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  THE TRAGIC DEATH OF LADY EDITH CORRY.  A SAD ACCIDENT AT CASTLE COOLE.  DROWNED IN THE DEMESNE.  We voice today a unanimous expression of very deep and sincere sympathy with the Earl of Belmore, the Countess of Belmore, and family, in the loss they have sustained by the death of Lady Edith Corry, who was accidentally drowned on Monday last in Lough Yoan, a sheet of water in the beautiful demesne of Castle Coole.  The deceased lady, who was the sixth sister of the Earl of Belmore and was born in 1878, was out and about the grounds in her usual excellent health and spirits on Monday morning. When she did not arrive at the Castle for lunch her two sisters, Lady Winifred and Lady Violet, went out to look for her.  They searched in vain the immediate vicinity, and then naturally turned towards Lough Yoan for Lady Edith and her sisters made almost daily visits to that picturesque spot where the boathouse is situated.

Lady Violet was the first by a few minutes to arrive there and after a casual look around was shocked to find the body of her sister lying in but two feet of water in a channel at the lake.  She called to the Lady Winifred and at once removed the body to the bank where it was when Lady Winifred came up.  It was then only too apparent that Lady Edith was dead.  She was bleeding from the nose, which was swollen and discoloured showing that her face and had come forcibly in contact with some hard substance, evidently a large stone of which there are many in the channel.  The one and only solution of the painful tragedy is that the deceased lady stumbled on the bank, which is broken and unstable and covered with long grass, fell headlong into the water and was stunned, and thus unable to help herself.  Dr. Kidd was immediately summoned, but could only pronounced life extinct.  The greatest sympathy is everywhere expressed with the noble family in their sad bereavement.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  YOUNG IRISH EMIGRANTS ARE FLYING THE COUNTRY.  The Liverpool correspondent of the Weekly Dispatch telegraphs on Saturday: – Large numbers of men of military age are embarking at Liverpool for the United States for the obvious purpose of evading military duty to their country.  These “runaways” as they have been dubbed, are, it is only fair to others to state, mainly Irishmen.  They have been coming over to Liverpool in large batches and booking their passage here to the United States.  One agent has established a substantial revenue from these bookings.  The emigrants are Irish labourers, illiterate, but fine manly fellows, who would be the envy of any recruiting sergeant.  “It is a scandal that these men should be allowed to leave the country”, remarked an official whose business is to is to meet outward bound boats.  “They are leaving to escape being soldiers.  I have questioned them as to why they are leaving, and all they say is that they are going to meet some uncle or aunt in the the States.  It is a poor excuse, for it is plain that they don’t want to fight.  I suggest that the British government make a law to prevent every single man of military age from leaving the country.”  The Irish emigrants to the United States usually leave in the American liners in the steerage, with little luggage and they seem glad to go.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  THE DEATH OF A GREAT CRICKETER.  Although we are steeled in these days to sad news, there was a special pang in many elderly hearts when the announcement came that Dr. W. G. Grace had been stricken down.  No man, perhaps, ever give more innocent pleasure to a larger number of people, and over a longer period of time.  It was in 1864, when he was only 16 years of age, that he jumped into notice by making scorers of 170 and 56 not out for the South Wales Club against the Gentlemen of Sussex.  In the following year he made his first appearance for the Gentleman verses the Players and from that time onward he was the leading figure in the cricket world for close on 40 years.  As “W. G.”, he was famous all over the English speaking world, and we can quite believe the story that his name and fame were familiar to many people in remote parts of England who had never heard of Mr. Gladstone or even of Queen Victoria.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915. LADY POSTMEN. The letters in Derrygonnelly district are being delivered by young ladies.  There are four of them, and they’re working, says our correspondent, “to perfection.”

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  THE DARDANELLES UNDERTAKING OUR LOSS OF LIFE AND THE RESPONSIBILITY.  We now know from Mr. Asquith’s lips that the unhappy Dardanelles expedition, which has cost 100,000 casualties and 78,000 invalids, was decided upon by the Cabinet against the opinion of the Government’s expert naval adviser, Lord Fisher.  Mr. Asquith accepts full responsibility for this and exculpates Mr. Churchill, who has generally been blamed for the ill-considered enterprise.  For some 20 lawyers and civilians says the Daily Mail to engage in a military operation of the utmost magnitude against the advice of the expert is nothing short of criminal.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  Miss Rice, Darling Street, Enniskillen, has received the following interesting letter from Captain and Dr. A. Geden Wilkinson, Gallipoli peninsula.

Dear Miss Rice, You’re very kind gift of “Woodbines” for the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers arrived today.  As you marked them “For the Wounded” they were given to me, the Medical Officer, to distribute.  I want to thank you very much indeed, especially as “Tommy” loves the Woodbine above all others, and also because when I have had cigarettes to give to men brought down to my dressing station, wounded, it seems to help them to bear the pain wonderfully.  We bind them up, put a “cig” in between their lips and they go away smiling in spite of all their nasty knocks.  I have been regimental medical officer since the Battalion came home from India to Rugby in England, and I may say you’ll be proud to know that our boys by the finest in the British Army.  Irish friends have been very good to us, and among them I would thank you on behalf of those who shortly may not be able to do so themselves.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  NURSE CAVELL EXECUTED.  GERMAN DECEIT AND TREACHERY.  Nurse Edith Cavell was condemned and shot by the Germans in Brussels for aiding English and Belgians to escape from Prussian cruelty.  She had lived in Brussels for nine years.  A trained English nurse she went there and found a nurse’s training home.  She and her pupils were known in Germany.  She was esteemed as an angel of mercy.  She admitted helping her fellow countrymen to cross the frontier and was arrested and calmly told what she had done.  But for her own words there was no evidence to convict her.  She was kept in the cell and had no opportunity of defence.  She said she was happy to die for her country a few hours before her death.  Throughout an ordeal that has no parallel during centuries of civilisation an insuperable spirit had sustained her until the rifles were levelled.  Then she swooned and fell and as she lay a German officers stepped near her and shot her with his pistol.  Only a German officer could do it.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  TRAGIC FATALITY AS LADY EDITH CORRY IS DROWNED AT CASTLE COOLE IN TWO FEET OF WATER.  This distressing fatality occurred on Monday afternoon last Lady Edith being sister of the Earl of Belmore, D.  L., and sixth daughter of the late Earl and the Countess of Belmore.  The deceased was aged 37 years and widespread sympathy goes out to the Countess of Belmore and her family in their bereavement.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  THE KING VISITS HIS ARMY IN THE FIELD.  The King is in France where he is gone to visit his army.  Accompanied by destroyers and aircraft on a gorgeous October midday he landed and was met by Sir John French.  With that sense of imperial affairs of which he is a student, the King elected to visit an English, a Canadian, an Australian and an Indian Hospital in the neighbourhood of the base after he had first investigated the more directly military departments.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  A STITCHED HEART.  One of the most remarkable operations in the annals of surgery has recently been performed on Pipe–Major G.  D.  Taylor of the King’s Own Scottish Borderers.  At Loos he was shot through the heart, but, marvellous to relate was not killed.  He was taken to the base hospital, where an incision was made in the chest and the laceration of the heart was stitched.  Pipe-Major Taylor is not only still alive, but the surgeons express every hope that he will pull through.

Herald October 30th. 1915.  THE EXECUTION OF NURSE CAVELL.  The official story of the execution of Miss Edith Cavell, an English nurse in Brussels, who was shot by the German authorities for assisting British and Belgian soldiers across the frontier, is contained in the correspondence forwarded by the American Legation in Brussels, and issued by the Press Bureau.

The letters reveal that the American Legation made a great but ineffectual fight to save her life.  The German authorities in spite of a promise to give the information, secretly and cunningly endeavour to hide from the Legation officials that sentence of death had been passed on Mr. Cavell.  Miss Cavell was shot at 2.00 a.m.  Sir Edward Grey says: – the news of the execution of this noble Englishwoman will be received with horror and disgust, not only in the Allied States, but throughout the civilised world.  Miss Cavell was not even charged with espionage, and the fact that she had nursed numbers of wounded German soldiers might have been regarded as a complete reason in itself for treating her with leniency.

A New York Telegram dated Saturday says: – the newspapers published long editorial articles upon Miss Cavell’s death roundly castigating Germany for cold blooded inhumanity towards a defenceless woman.  Germany has brought herself into a position where the world turns from her in horror and dread.  The “Press” says the iron hand of soulless Germany has struck another blow that kindles anew the bitter indignation of humanity. Nothing among all her cruel and inhuman acts except the sinking of the Lusitania, has so blackened her and so shocked the world as the hard, soulless, murder of this defenceless sweet-souled woman.

Fermanagh Herald October 30th. 1915.  CLONES INFANTICIDE CHARGE.  For the fourth time Martha Jane Johnston, a girl under 16 years; Mrs. Isabella Johnston her mother; and Isabella Johnston, junior., were brought up in custody on remand at Newtownbutler before Captain Gosselin, RM., charged with the murder of an infant female child of the first named accused about the end of July or beginning of August last.  The police have been scouring the district for over two months for the body of this child which they allege has been the victim of foul play, but up to the present without success.

Fermanagh Herald October 30th. 1915.  CLONES GUARDIANS AND MARGARINE.  The question of substituting margarine for butter was discussed.  Approval has been given by the local Government Board to the use of margarine in such institutions provided that affective steps are taken to ensure that uniformly good quality was supplied.  It was agreed that tenders for margarine be invited, in view of the high price of butter, the officers to be asked to accept the substitute also.  With reference to the application of Dr. D’Arcy, medical officer of Roslea dispensary district, for a year’s leave of absence for the purpose of joining the R.A.M.C. and the Local Government Board’s letter requesting the Guardians to reconsider their decision refusing this unless the doctor provided a qualified substitute who would reside in the dispensary district.  Mr. McCaldin handed in notice of motion that the matter be considered at the next meeting.

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