October 1915.

Fermanagh Times October 7th 1915.  CLONES.  CAPTAIN J. C. PARKE HOME AGAIN.  Captain Parke the famous lawn tennis champion and international Rugby player, who was wounded at the Dardanelles on the 10th of August last and spent some time in hospital in Malta, afterwards undergoing treatment in England, has returned to his home in Clones.  Although looking very well he has not yet completely recovered from a wound in the wrist.  Soon after the outbreak of war, Captain Parke, then a practicing solicitor in Clones with his brother, Mr. W. A. Parke, solicitor, obtained a commission in the 6th Leinster Regiment and in a very short time was promoted.  He was in the famous landing with the Australians, at the spot since known as Anzac Cove and took part in the fighting in that neighbourhood for three days – one of the most desperate struggles in the history of the operations on the Gallipoli Peninsula.  On the third day while defending a shallow trench, which was undergoing a heavy bombardment from the Turkish guns, a shrapnel shell burst close to him, and he was struck by several of the bullets and splinters, but fortunately in no vital part.  He lost a great quantity of blood, but owing to the prompt treatment he received and his splendid physique, his recovery was rapid, and in less than a month he was able to sail for England.  Although a bullet went through his wrist from side to side it appears that no bone was broken or sinew torn and it is hoped that he may regain complete use of it.  As soon as he is sufficiently recovered he will rejoin his regiment.

Fermanagh Times October 7th 1915.  CYCLING ACCIDENT.  Mr. Patrick Clarke, Magheraveely, Clones, rural postmen in that district, was throw off his bicycle in Fermanagh Street, Clones on Saturday night and sustained a broken leg.

Fermanagh Times October 7th 1915.  LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GARTSIDE TIPPING, R.N.  The death of Lieutenant Commander Gartside Tipping, R.N. reported from the front is another of those grave incidents that bring home more intimately to us here in Fermanagh the tragedy of the war.  The deceased gentleman was a son of the late Captain Gartside Tipping of Rossferry, near Derrylin, one of Lough Erne’s most picturesque residences, afterwards occupied by the Hon. Cyril Ward on his marriage with a daughter of the Earl of Erne.  He was a brother of Mrs. Richardson, of Rossfad, with whom profound sympathy will be felt in her bereavement.  The family are relatives of the Earl of Erne.  The Lieutenant-Commander, although one of the oldest officers actively engaged in the British navy, being 67 years of age, gallantly offered his services on the outbreak of the war.  When the present King, then Prince George, was undergoing an early course of naval instruction he was lieutenant on of the Royal yacht.  For many years he was inspector of lifeboats in the Irish and West Lancashire districts, and he was well known at the various lifeboat stations on the Antrim and Down coasts.

Fermanagh Herald October 9th. 1915.  LISNASKEA GUARDIANS AND THE ATTENDANCE OF MEMBERS.  It was some time after 12 o’clock before the meeting could be commenced owing to the absence of a quorum, and the minutes were disposed of.  The Chairman drew attention to the fact that laterally there had been a very poor attendance of members, and suggested that it would be advisable for the Board to pass a resolution to the effect that any member who absented himself anyway frequently from the meetings should be penalised.  A lot of them, he said, only put in an appearance when there was a job on, and those men, he was of the opinion, should be disqualified altogether.  The Clerk suggested that the Porter be sent down the town to see if any members were there.  The Chairman objected to this and said if the members did not think it worth their while to attend those who did should not send after them.  This concluded the discussion.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915. THE GREAT ARTILLERY which so easily demolished the forts of Liege and Namur consisted of a gun weighing 87 tons, with a foundation of 37 tons for the carriage.  Two hundred men were engaged in the manipulation of it, and 25 or 26 hours were needed to erect the gun.  The shell weighed 8 cwts, and was 5 feet 4 inches long.  Twelve railway carriages were required to transport the gun. It was fired by electricity from a distance of ¼ mile, and the cost of each shot was £500.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  DERRYLIN PETTY SESSIONS.  At the above petty sessions Richards Meyers of Gortgorgan was fined £2 10 shillings with the recommendation that it be reduced to 10 shillings for carrying a gun without a licence.  A large number of persons were fined for using vehicles without lights and several were also fined for being drunk while in charge of horses and carts on the public road.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  LOCAL MILITARY NOTES.  Lieutenant John Irvine, of the 4th Royal Enniskillen Fusiliers who had been serving at the Dardanelles some time past with the Munster Fusiliers and whom we referred to in these columns last week arrived home yesterday at Killadeas.  He was gassed in action. We are glad to learn he is recovering well.  His elder brother, Lieutenant Gerard, is officer in charge of the Machine-gun Section with the 11th Battalion Inniskillings on the continent.  It is interesting to note the Major J. G. C.  Irvine, D. L. father of the gallant young officers, although incapacitated from taking an active part in the present great struggle was all through the South Africa Campaign and it was while fighting there that he received the injuries which now a preclude him from active service with the forces.  Although not able to go himself he has sent his only two sons, who are worthily maintaining the fighting traditions of the Irvine family in the British Army.

Jack Graham, son of the late Dr. Graham, Irvinestown, has just arrived home from South Africa looking fit and well after 11 months hard fighting under General Botha.  He, like Mr. Thomas Young of Fivemiletown has the unique experience of fighting against Botha in the Boer War and now under him against the Germans.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  MEMBERS PREVIOUSLY WARNED BY THE COUNTY SURVEYOR.  A SALUTARY LESSON FOR THE FUTURE.  In our columns “Things people want to know on the 9th of July in 1914 we queried: – How the ratepayers throughout Fermanagh like the announcement that the newly elected County Council shows decided signs of being the most reckless in expenditure of public money that has ever held office in this county?  This body made a reckless start on Thursday by passing over £2,300 worth of works on roads, many of which were condemned by the County Surveyor as being both illegal and unnecessary and which were strongly opposed by the Unionist members present.  In addition to all this expenditure, provisional proposals for a further £2,461 15shillings worth of roads and other works have already been handed in for consideration at the next meeting.  We asked what action will be taken by the Local Government Board through its auditor and replies to these queries have now been given in the most emphatic and practical manner possible.  Twelve members of the County Council, namely Messrs.  J.  McMahon, O. Hannah, F. Leonard, O. McBarron, Jas. Tierney, J.P.; James McCorry, F. Meehan, J.  Maguire, Jas.  O’Donnell, J.P., John McHugh, J.P. Gillen, and John Crosier, J.P. have been surcharged in the additional sum of £180 in respect of four roads which they voted at the meeting in question.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  PROGRESS OF THE I. A.S.O.  The I. A.S.O started from nothing.  It began to preach its gospel of organisation and self-help to the community to which these ideas were utterly new and strange.  Today it embraces more than 1,000 co-operative societies, with a membership of 106,000 farmers.  The turnover of the movement was £3,333,189 in 1913; last year it was £3,732,818.  Despite results which have attracted the attention and imitation of half the world, the cooperative movement has not yet come into its own in Ireland.  Our readers know the whole wretched story of official jealousy and hostility.

Impartial Reporter.  October 14th 1915.  A FOOTBALL CHARGE.  THE DRAMATIC INCIDENT.  Regarding the advance in France the Rev. C.  L.  Perry says that one officer had a football with the names of his platoon written on it.  Getting on the top of a parapet he kicked off crying ‘follow-up lads,’ and was almost immediately shot down.  The lads followed up, nevertheless.  ‘The fire from the machine guns,’ he adds, ‘was terrible and our men went down like corn before the scythe.’ For 48 hours all who could render first aid had their hands full.  What stories of heroism that will never be written.  An officer with three wounds knelt to bind the wounds of a man next to him, and was shot dead in the act.  Two wounded men stayed out 50 hours by the side of their sergeant, because they would not let him die alone.

Impartial Reporter.  October 14th 1915.  PETTIGO.  At a recent service in Pettigo Church, the Bishop of Clogher preached to a large congregation.  He took the opportunity of presenting to Matilda Taggart the silver medal (Bishop’s) for the highest place in the Diocesan examination in religious knowledge.

Impartial Reporter.  October 14th 1915.  FERMANAGH COUNTY COUNCILLORS SURCHARGES IN THE SUM OF £180.  The auditor, Major Eccles met the Nationalist members of the Fermanagh County Council to hear any explanation they might make as to four roads which he had refused to pass in the audit.  The members of the council affected by surcharges are – the chairman Mr. McHugh, J. P., Messrs J.  Tierney, J.  McGuire, J. Crozier, Felix Leonard, J.  P., J. P. Gillen, F. Meehan, J. McMahon, O. Hanna, J. Coulson.  Unionist members are not affected.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  THE MOTHER AND FOUR CHILDREN ARE BURNED TO DEATH IN A COUNTY DOWN TRAGEDY AS A LAMP EXPLODES IN THE BEDROOM.  The shocking tragedy occurred at Barnmeen about 7 miles from Newry on Sunday evening when the wife of a large farmer named Samuel J.  McKee and four children were burned to death and the extensive farmhouse in which they lived entirely gutted.  On Sunday evening Mr. McKee left to attend an evening service at the Brethren Hall, at Ballygorrian at 5.30 o’clock.  His wife Agnes, 36 and his sons William Murray McKee, four years, George McKee, 2 ½ years, and Louisa and Eliza Jane, twin children, age 16 months died.  The remains of the wife, unrecognisable from the effects of the fire, and two of the children were got out about 10.00 and later the other two.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  Seconded- Lieutenant John Irvine (gassed) is the son of Major J. G. C. Irvine, D. L., Killadeas, County Fermanagh.  He obtained his commission in the 4th Inniskillings on August 15, 1914, and has been temporarily attached at the front to the 2nd Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers.  He is now in hospital at Oxford, where he is progressing satisfactorily.

Lieutenant-Commander Gartside Tipping, Royal Navy, whose death in action was recently reported, was a son of the late Captain Gartside Tipping, of Rossferry, near Derrylin.  He was a brother of Mrs. Richardson, of Rossfad.  When the present King, then Prince George, was undergoing an early course of naval instruction, deceased was lieutenant on the Royal yacht.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  THE DEATH HAS OCCURRED OF MR. JOHN MALLON, J.P., MEIGH, NEAR NEWRY EX-ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER OF THE DUBLIN METROPOLITAN POLICE who expired suddenly on Saturday after attending 8.00 Mass.  Mr. Mallon was for 50 years connected with the Dublin Metropolitan Police and was greatly involved at the time of the Phoenix Park assassinations.  His share in the investigation which led to the arrest and conviction of the men concerned is well known.  Mr. Mallon had the doubtful honour of arresting several Irish patriots, including James Stephens, Charles J Kickham, O’Donovan Rossa, John O’Leary, Parnell, and Davitt.  Some years ago in collaboration with a well-known London journalist, Mr. Mallon essayed to publish a story of his career as a policeman.  Some instalments of the story, which were decidedly unpromising and largely incorrect, were published in the columns of a Sunday newspaper.  The project was dropped, and some futile actions at law between the collaborators were the only outcome of the scheme.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  AT TYRONE OFFICER IS KILLED, CAPTAIN A.M. READ.  Captain Anketell Moutray Read, Northamptonshire regiment, 1st Battalion, killed in action, was well known as an army athlete.  He won the heavyweight championship in India 8 times, and the middleweight twice, winning both in the same meeting.  Three times he won the army and navy heavyweight championship at Aldershot and Portsmouth making an unequal record in service boxing.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  NARROW ESCAPE OF LISBELLAW  MAN.  Mister P. Mulligan, Dromore, County Tyrone, has received an interesting souvenir from the front.  His brother, Private John Mulligan, first Canadian Contingent, 7th Battalion, has sent him a German bullet, which lodged in his cartridge case without inflicting a wound.  In a letter received a few days ago he mentioned that out of his platoon of 150 men only two came unscathed from Bill 60, but they have been reinforced since then.  He was also in the fierce fighting at Hill 90 and around Ypres, but never got a wound.  He has been offered a commission, but refused it as he considers it is sufficient honour to have a chance of fighting for his country.  He is a native of Lisbellaw, where his father resides.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  A ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPLAINS STORY.  BOTH IRISH MEN.  In a letter to his brother, at Navan, the Rev.  E.  J.  Cullen, Roman Catholic Chaplin with the 45th Field Artillery in Flanders writes under the date of September 30th: – “Of course, it was a great victory, but a very bloody one.  The Germans were simply massacred, and whole companies gave themselves up.  What between the gas, bombs, bayonets, rifle fire, machine-guns, and highly explosive shells – poor human nature had no chance, and fragments unrecognisable as belonging to human beings were the result.  The battle commenced with four days of bombardment, and a day and a night of intensive bombardment.  During this – a gun about 20 or 30 yards long, firing at  points 4 to 6 miles away – I went along the artillery, hearing the men’s confessions and giving Holy Communion.  I rode up at midnight to our battery, with a Captain Kenny, London but his parents Irish.  When I got up the colonel had just been killed by a shell – Butcher, related to Bishop Butcher, formerly at Ardbracken, Navan.  The major, two captains, and 16 men were Catholics, so I heard their confessions in a little hole, and it was most touching to see the major (the son of Lord Bellham), his two captains and all the catholic gunners kneeling on the ground behind their guns and receiving Holy Communion, and then making their thanksgiving aloud with me, at twelve o’clock at night. Of course, these expeditions were most perilous; but, what is the priest for save for such things as this?  When I tell you that shells were flying about you know why I always ask for prayers.

Next morning I went to another battery, and the major therein – Hannah, a relative of Hannah, K. C. an Irishman Protestant – told me that we priests were always after men.  When I had finished the Catholics there, he brought me to his big gun and said, as we are both Irishmen we may as well celebrates our meeting by having a crack at the Huns.  So he fired two rounds in my honour.  You see I have had some rare experiences.”

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  GERMAN BARBARITY.  ENGLISH LADY EXECUTED IN BRUSSELS.  SHOT FOR SHELTERING  ALLIES SOLDIERS.  The foreign office is informed by the United States Ambassador that Miss Edith Cavell, lately head of a large training school for nurses in Brussels, who was arrested on the fifth of August last by the German authorities at that place, was executed on the 13th Inst. after sentence of death had been passed on her.  It is understood that the charge against the Miss Cavell was that she had harboured fugitive British and French soldiers and Belgians of military age, and had assisted them to escape from Belgium in order to join the colours.  So far as the Foreign Office are aware no charge of espionage was brought against her.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  FRENCH FIRE. Describing the unprecedented  strength of the French artillery fire during the three days fire in the recent great offensive, the Tägliche Rundschau now says: – “On one position of the front in Champagne the fire was so intense that one shot fell every second on every 20 metres ( 21½ yards), this portion of the front receiving during the three days of consistent firing over 50,000,000 shots.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915. BRITISH GAS. The public have noted with satisfaction Sir John French is intimation that at last our troops at the front her making reprisals on the enemy in the matter of the employment of paralysing gas.  It was never intended, however, to resort to the diabolical he torturing and poisonous vapours used by the Germans, and it is interesting to note that the enemy reports describes are a gas merely as intoxicating

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915. RUSSIA’S “ONLY SONS” CALLED OUT.  Just before I left Russia (Mr. Stephen Graham) writes in The Times the “only sons” were called out, and with them militiamen up to 57 years of age.  Enormous numbers of young men who never expected to serve in the Army, whose parents had trusted in that immunity, are now being trained, and will shortly be advancing to the fighting line.  The act of calling them out synchronised with the Tsar’s taking the command, and it was in a way a further example of Russia’s wholeheartedness and her determination to cast everything on the altar of the nation.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  RELIGIOUS SERVICE BEHIND THEIR GUNS.  Rev E.  J.  Cullen, Catholic Chaplin serving with the 45th  F.  A., British Expeditionary Force, France writes about Hill 70: – The battle of Hill 70 will never be forgotten by me as long as I live.  The sights of horror are simply beyond description.  Imagine a short road so strewn with dead and dying those able to do so were kept very busy lifting the dead into a ditch to allow our guns, ambulance, etc. to pass and this among agonising groans all around and you have some notion of many such scenes.  The evening before the battle I went round hearing confessions and giving Holy Communion on the field or in the remains of houses along the line, and it was very sad to see these poor fellows laid out so soon but sadder still to see practically all young officers, and some of the Commanding Officers whom I knew so well –but for whom I could do nothing spiritually (all Presbyterians) brought in either dead or horribly mutilated.  I expected horrors and had already seen cases of shocking mutilations but I never dreamt of anything like this.  I had the consolation of attending about 19 Germans, and felt so pleased to be able to hear their confessions in their language, has they did not speak a word of French or English.  This murdering business went on in awful weather – rain and black mud and every other inconvenience that can be thought of.  Of course, it was a great victory, but a very bloody one.  The Germans were simply massacred and whole companies gave themselves up.  What between gas, bombs, bayonets, rifle fire, machine guns, and high explosive shells poor human nature had no chance and fragments unrecognisable as belonging to human beings were the result.

The battle commenced with a four day bombardment, and a day and a night of intensive bombardment.  During this a gun about 20 or 30 yards along was firing at points 4 to 6 miles away when I went along the artillery hearing the men’s confessions and giving Holy Communion.  I rode up at midnight to a battery with a Captain Kenny – London, was parents Irish.  When I got up the colonel had just been killed by a shell –Butcher, related to Bishop Butcher, formerly at Ardbracken, Navan.  The major, two captains and 16 men where Catholics so I heard all their confessions in a little hole there and it was most touching to see the major, the son of Lord Belham, his two captains and all the Catholic gunners kneeling on the ground behind their guns and receiving Holy Communion and then making their thanksgiving aloud with me at twelve o’clock at night.

Of course, these expeditions were most perilous; but what is a priest for save such as this?  When I tell you that shells were flying about you know why I always ask your prayers.  Next morning I went to another battery and the Major therein –Hannah, a relative of Hannah, K.  C., and Irishmen Protestant –told me that we priests were always after men.  When I had finished the Catholics there, he brought me to his big guns and said, ‘as we are both Irishmen we may as well celebrates our meeting by having a crack at the Huns.’  So he fired two rounds in my honour.  You see, I have had some rare experiences.

All are very hopeful of events now, as the ammunition seems to be quite sufficient, and a wonderful spirit pervade all ranks. The French are doing marvels.  Their prisoners amount up to 21,000.  We took about 3,000.  It was a wonderful spectacle!  Procession after procession of Germans marched by free.  Their officers seem to feel it, but the men were delighted they were taken, and gave themselves up in hundreds.  I am in the greatest form and most gratified for your prayers.  Get all the prayers around you for me and my work.  It is owing to someone’s prayer is that I escaped a shell in the trenches.  I slept on the floor last night in a wee store room small and smelly.  But this is nothing.  If you saw what the poor soldiers suffer – and officers, even colonels endure you would be shamed into enduring anything. Rev E.  J.  Cullen, Catholic Chaplin serving with the 45th F.  A., British Expeditionary Force.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  LONDON IN WAR TIME.  In my Palace Hotel, it is women who assist the Chief Waiters; it is women who serve in restaurants; it is girls in uniform who act is pages or attend to the lifts; you see women in police uniform; and when you alight from your train your ticket is checked by women.  Woman only attend you in the  Post Offices, and other public offices; women even drive motor wagons, though this work is too great a strain upon the feminine constitution; and women are everywhere, because of the drain of the men caused by the war.  Even at the Harvest Thanksgiving Service in Enniskillen last week the great preponderance of women over men was noticeable.  Every male who was a man, every youth of pluck and not a shirker has joined the navy and army; and only the elderly and married, with responsibility (not the married with no family) are supposed to be at home, along with the weaklings and wastrels and unpatriotic shirkers and loafers. W.C.T.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  London at night is the strangest a thing of all, for it is in London in darkness.  Long since precautions have been taken against wrong lights in the streets, but within a the last few weeks new regulations have been put in force under which with reduced and shrouded lights darkness has become largely invisible.  Gas lights, electric light, street lamps, tram lights are all surrounded either by Or dark paint so that light is thrown downwards and not defused. W.C.T.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  VARIOUS.  A League of Marriage is suggested, so that wounded soldiers from the front may marry respectable girls at home, and maintain the population.

Women from Hell is the term used by the Germans had to describe Highlanders when charging them.  We want more of those ‘women from hell.’

Great Britain declared war against Bulgaria from 10.00 PM on October 15, as Bulgaria had announced that she was at war with Servia.

Fermanagh Herald October 23rd. 1915.  A PRIEST’S GALLANT ACTION AT THE FRONT.  A gallant action by a Catholic chaplain is recorded by a correspondent of the Central News now at the British front.  It is the story of a bombing party of eight that went out in the night and never returned.  When morning came the regiment pictured their comrades lying wounded and dying in the mud and the slush and the decaying corn.  If they could only know for certain what had happened it would be relief of a sort.  But how to know?  It was broad daylight, the German snipers where in position; even to put one’s head over the parapet meant certain death.  While they were still discussing what appeared to be a hopeless situation a Catholic chaplain attach to the regiment came up to the firing line and asked to be allowed to go out in front and try to find the bodies.

After some hesitation his request was granted.  Wearing his surplus and with a crucifix in his hand the priest advanced down one of the saps and climbed out into the open.  With their eyes fixed to the periscope the British watched him anxiously as he proceeded slowly to the German lines.  Not a shot was fired by the enemy.  After a while the chaplain was seen to stop and bend down at the German wire entanglements.  He knelt in prayer.  Then with the same calm step, he returned to his own lines.  He had four identity discs in his hand, and reported that the Germans had held up four khaki caps on their rifles, indicating that the other four were prisoners in their hands.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  CHEQUE FOR BELTURBET’S V.C.  At Cloughjordan on Tuesday Sergeant Somers, V. C., was presented by Major–General Friend with a cheque for £240 which had been subscribed by the people of the district in recognition of the sergeant’s gallant conduct.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  RUDYARD KIPLING’S SON KILLED.  We have the heavy burden of announcing says the Morning Post, that Mr. John Kipling, of the Irish Guards, is reported “missing believed killed.”  John Kipling was the child for whom his father wrote the Just So Stories.  Mr. John Kipling was barely 18, a boy of delicate health, but indomitable zeal and resolution.  He had been nominated for the Irish Guards by Lord Roberts, and was determined to take his share in the war.  The sympathy of the whole Empire will go out to Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard Kipling in their sorrow.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  A HUGE SUM OF MONEY FOR A HAUL OF FISH.  The Don Company’s trawler Beaconmoor, of Aberdeen which had been operating in Iceland waters, landed a 40 ton catch at Aberdeen fish market on Monday morning.  Prices were high and the catch realised £1,220.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  The murder of Miss Edith Cavell is unparalleled.  And even worse than the crime is the cold blooded way in which it has been defended by the German Press.  It has staggered civilised humanity more possibly than any incident of the war, except perhaps the Lusitania; and in many respects it was more cold blooded and barbarous.  Its heartlessness and soullessness have roused the most bitter indignation.  But it has also aroused the recruiting spirit of the nation, and added to the stimulus which the movement was receiving.

Baron Von Bissing, who, it was reported, had followed up the ”ineffective volley” of the shooting party by blowing out Miss Cavell’s brains with a revolver bullet, now denies the assertion.  We are inclined to credit the denial for the act would have been so fiendish in its personal callousness that for the sake of humanity we hope it is untrue.  The King and Queen once more manifested their kindly and thoughtful nature by forwarding a sympathetic letter to the mother of the unfortunate victim expressing horror at the appalling deed.  By the way Miss Cavell visited Enniskillen a few years ago staying with Mrs. McDonnell, wife of the headmaster of Portora.

(Ed. Edith Louisa Cavell; 4 December 1865 – 12 October 1915) was a British nurse. She is celebrated for saving the lives of soldiers from both sides without distinction and in helping some 200 Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium during World War I, for which she was arrested. She was subsequently court-martialled, found guilty of treason and sentenced to death. Despite international pressure for mercy, she was shot by a German firing squad. Her execution received worldwide condemnation and extensive press coverage. She is well known for her statement that “patriotism is not enough”. Her strong Anglican beliefs propelled her to help all those who needed it, both German and Allied soldiers. She was quoted as saying, “I can’t stop while there are lives to be saved.” 12 October is appointed for her commemoration in the Anglican church, although this is not a “saint’s feast day” in the traditional sense. Edith Cavell, who was 49 at the time of her execution, was already notable as a pioneer of modern nursing in Belgium.)

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  THE TRAGIC DEATH OF LADY EDITH CORRY.  A SAD ACCIDENT AT CASTLE COOLE.  DROWNED IN THE DEMESNE.  We voice today a unanimous expression of very deep and sincere sympathy with the Earl of Belmore, the Countess of Belmore, and family, in the loss they have sustained by the death of Lady Edith Corry, who was accidentally drowned on Monday last in Lough Yoan, a sheet of water in the beautiful demesne of Castle Coole.  The deceased lady, who was the sixth sister of the Earl of Belmore and was born in 1878, was out and about the grounds in her usual excellent health and spirits on Monday morning. When she did not arrive at the Castle for lunch her two sisters, Lady Winifred and Lady Violet, went out to look for her.  They searched in vain the immediate vicinity, and then naturally turned towards Lough Yoan for Lady Edith and her sisters made almost daily visits to that picturesque spot where the boathouse is situated.

Lady Violet was the first by a few minutes to arrive there and after a casual look around was shocked to find the body of her sister lying in but two feet of water in a channel at the lake.  She called to the Lady Winifred and at once removed the body to the bank where it was when Lady Winifred came up.  It was then only too apparent that Lady Edith was dead.  She was bleeding from the nose, which was swollen and discoloured showing that her face and had come forcibly in contact with some hard substance, evidently a large stone of which there are many in the channel.  The one and only solution of the painful tragedy is that the deceased lady stumbled on the bank, which is broken and unstable and covered with long grass, fell headlong into the water and was stunned, and thus unable to help herself.  Dr. Kidd was immediately summoned, but could only pronounced life extinct.  The greatest sympathy is everywhere expressed with the noble family in their sad bereavement.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  YOUNG IRISH EMIGRANTS ARE FLYING THE COUNTRY.  The Liverpool correspondent of the Weekly Dispatch telegraphs on Saturday: – Large numbers of men of military age are embarking at Liverpool for the United States for the obvious purpose of evading military duty to their country.  These “runaways” as they have been dubbed, are, it is only fair to others to state, mainly Irishmen.  They have been coming over to Liverpool in large batches and booking their passage here to the United States.  One agent has established a substantial revenue from these bookings.  The emigrants are Irish labourers, illiterate, but fine manly fellows, who would be the envy of any recruiting sergeant.  “It is a scandal that these men should be allowed to leave the country”, remarked an official whose business is to is to meet outward bound boats.  “They are leaving to escape being soldiers.  I have questioned them as to why they are leaving, and all they say is that they are going to meet some uncle or aunt in the the States.  It is a poor excuse, for it is plain that they don’t want to fight.  I suggest that the British government make a law to prevent every single man of military age from leaving the country.”  The Irish emigrants to the United States usually leave in the American liners in the steerage, with little luggage and they seem glad to go.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  THE DEATH OF A GREAT CRICKETER.  Although we are steeled in these days to sad news, there was a special pang in many elderly hearts when the announcement came that Dr. W. G. Grace had been stricken down.  No man, perhaps, ever give more innocent pleasure to a larger number of people, and over a longer period of time.  It was in 1864, when he was only 16 years of age, that he jumped into notice by making scorers of 170 and 56 not out for the South Wales Club against the Gentlemen of Sussex.  In the following year he made his first appearance for the Gentleman verses the Players and from that time onward he was the leading figure in the cricket world for close on 40 years.  As “W. G.”, he was famous all over the English speaking world, and we can quite believe the story that his name and fame were familiar to many people in remote parts of England who had never heard of Mr. Gladstone or even of Queen Victoria.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915. LADY POSTMEN. The letters in Derrygonnelly district are being delivered by young ladies.  There are four of them, and they’re working, says our correspondent, “to perfection.”

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  THE DARDANELLES UNDERTAKING OUR LOSS OF LIFE AND THE RESPONSIBILITY.  We now know from Mr. Asquith’s lips that the unhappy Dardanelles expedition, which has cost 100,000 casualties and 78,000 invalids, was decided upon by the Cabinet against the opinion of the Government’s expert naval adviser, Lord Fisher.  Mr. Asquith accepts full responsibility for this and exculpates Mr. Churchill, who has generally been blamed for the ill-considered enterprise.  For some 20 lawyers and civilians says the Daily Mail to engage in a military operation of the utmost magnitude against the advice of the expert is nothing short of criminal.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  Miss Rice, Darling Street, Enniskillen, has received the following interesting letter from Captain and Dr. A. Geden Wilkinson, Gallipoli peninsula.

Dear Miss Rice, You’re very kind gift of “Woodbines” for the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers arrived today.  As you marked them “For the Wounded” they were given to me, the Medical Officer, to distribute.  I want to thank you very much indeed, especially as “Tommy” loves the Woodbine above all others, and also because when I have had cigarettes to give to men brought down to my dressing station, wounded, it seems to help them to bear the pain wonderfully.  We bind them up, put a “cig” in between their lips and they go away smiling in spite of all their nasty knocks.  I have been regimental medical officer since the Battalion came home from India to Rugby in England, and I may say you’ll be proud to know that our boys by the finest in the British Army.  Irish friends have been very good to us, and among them I would thank you on behalf of those who shortly may not be able to do so themselves.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  NURSE CAVELL EXECUTED.  GERMAN DECEIT AND TREACHERY.  Nurse Edith Cavell was condemned and shot by the Germans in Brussels for aiding English and Belgians to escape from Prussian cruelty.  She had lived in Brussels for nine years.  A trained English nurse she went there and found a nurse’s training home.  She and her pupils were known in Germany.  She was esteemed as an angel of mercy.  She admitted helping her fellow countrymen to cross the frontier and was arrested and calmly told what she had done.  But for her own words there was no evidence to convict her.  She was kept in the cell and had no opportunity of defence.  She said she was happy to die for her country a few hours before her death.  Throughout an ordeal that has no parallel during centuries of civilisation an insuperable spirit had sustained her until the rifles were levelled.  Then she swooned and fell and as she lay a German officers stepped near her and shot her with his pistol.  Only a German officer could do it.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  TRAGIC FATALITY AS LADY EDITH CORRY IS DROWNED AT CASTLE COOLE IN TWO FEET OF WATER.  This distressing fatality occurred on Monday afternoon last Lady Edith being sister of the Earl of Belmore, D.  L., and sixth daughter of the late Earl and the Countess of Belmore.  The deceased was aged 37 years and widespread sympathy goes out to the Countess of Belmore and her family in their bereavement.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  THE KING VISITS HIS ARMY IN THE FIELD.  The King is in France where he is gone to visit his army.  Accompanied by destroyers and aircraft on a gorgeous October midday he landed and was met by Sir John French.  With that sense of imperial affairs of which he is a student, the King elected to visit an English, a Canadian, an Australian and an Indian Hospital in the neighbourhood of the base after he had first investigated the more directly military departments.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  A STITCHED HEART.  One of the most remarkable operations in the annals of surgery has recently been performed on Pipe–Major G.  D.  Taylor of the King’s Own Scottish Borderers.  At Loos he was shot through the heart, but, marvellous to relate was not killed.  He was taken to the base hospital, where an incision was made in the chest and the laceration of the heart was stitched.  Pipe-Major Taylor is not only still alive, but the surgeons express every hope that he will pull through.

Herald October 30th. 1915.  THE EXECUTION OF NURSE CAVELL.  The official story of the execution of Miss Edith Cavell, an English nurse in Brussels, who was shot by the German authorities for assisting British and Belgian soldiers across the frontier, is contained in the correspondence forwarded by the American Legation in Brussels, and issued by the Press Bureau.

The letters reveal that the American Legation made a great but ineffectual fight to save her life.  The German authorities in spite of a promise to give the information, secretly and cunningly endeavour to hide from the Legation officials that sentence of death had been passed on Mr. Cavell.  Miss Cavell was shot at 2.00 a.m.  Sir Edward Grey says: – the news of the execution of this noble Englishwoman will be received with horror and disgust, not only in the Allied States, but throughout the civilised world.  Miss Cavell was not even charged with espionage, and the fact that she had nursed numbers of wounded German soldiers might have been regarded as a complete reason in itself for treating her with leniency.

A New York Telegram dated Saturday says: – the newspapers published long editorial articles upon Miss Cavell’s death roundly castigating Germany for cold blooded inhumanity towards a defenceless woman.  Germany has brought herself into a position where the world turns from her in horror and dread.  The “Press” says the iron hand of soulless Germany has struck another blow that kindles anew the bitter indignation of humanity. Nothing among all her cruel and inhuman acts except the sinking of the Lusitania, has so blackened her and so shocked the world as the hard, soulless, murder of this defenceless sweet-souled woman.

Fermanagh Herald October 30th. 1915.  CLONES INFANTICIDE CHARGE.  For the fourth time Martha Jane Johnston, a girl under 16 years; Mrs. Isabella Johnston her mother; and Isabella Johnston, junior., were brought up in custody on remand at Newtownbutler before Captain Gosselin, RM., charged with the murder of an infant female child of the first named accused about the end of July or beginning of August last.  The police have been scouring the district for over two months for the body of this child which they allege has been the victim of foul play, but up to the present without success.

Fermanagh Herald October 30th. 1915.  CLONES GUARDIANS AND MARGARINE.  The question of substituting margarine for butter was discussed.  Approval has been given by the local Government Board to the use of margarine in such institutions provided that affective steps are taken to ensure that uniformly good quality was supplied.  It was agreed that tenders for margarine be invited, in view of the high price of butter, the officers to be asked to accept the substitute also.  With reference to the application of Dr. D’Arcy, medical officer of Roslea dispensary district, for a year’s leave of absence for the purpose of joining the R.A.M.C. and the Local Government Board’s letter requesting the Guardians to reconsider their decision refusing this unless the doctor provided a qualified substitute who would reside in the dispensary district.  Mr. McCaldin handed in notice of motion that the matter be considered at the next meeting.

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March 1915.

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  ANOTHER ZEPPELIN WRECKED.  From the Hague comes a report that a Zeppelin, which engaged in guarding the bridges over the Rhine at Cologne, has been blown down and destroyed, though the crew escaped.  This is the third of these unwieldy gasbags that has been wrecked in the past fortnight, if the report is correct.

 

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  THE TAX OF TEA.  FEARS OF HIGHER DUTY.  There seems to be a strong probability of still it dearer tea in the near future, says the London Daily Express.  In November the duty was raised from five pence to eight pence per pound.  Some of the largest multiple shop tea firms are preparing for the possibility that the Budget will add a further 4d, making the duty one shilling a pound.  This would mean that the cheapest tea would be about two shillings and one penny per pound retail.

 

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  THE MARQUIS OF LONDONDERRY’S WILL.  The Marquis of Londonderry, K.G., P.C., who died on the 8th of February last, aged 62 years, left unsettled property provisionally valued at £500,000, “so far as at present can be ascertained.” Probate of his will has been granted to his son, the Most Hon. Charles Stewart Henry, now seventh Marquis of Londonderry, the sole executor.  He bequeathed £100,000, a carriage and pair of horses, and a motor car, as she may select, to his wife, together with the selection of any two of his thoroughbred brood mares, with either foals or yearlings; £150,000 to his daughter, the Countess of Ilchester; £100,000 to his sister Lady Allendale; and all other property to his son.

He stated: – “It is my wish that my said son should, out of the said gifts of residue, make such presents to my faithful agents, and also to such of my servants I shall have been in my service for 10 years and upwards at the date of my death, as in his absolute discretion he may think fit.”

He further stated – I wish that my death shall not be allowed to cast more gloom than is absolutely unavoidable upon those with whom I have been so long and so happily associated but that my relations and kind friends will not allow my death to make any difference in their arrangements, but that they will resume their engagements and diversions exactly as if that event had not happened.

 

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  SANATORIUM FOR FERMANAGH.  THE COUNTY COUNCIL ADOPTS DR. TIMONEY’S SCHEME BY A LARGE MAJORITY.  The vexed question of their provision of a Sanatorium for Fermanagh came up again for discussion at the meeting of the County Council on Thursday, when Dr. Timoney’s report came up for consideration.  Mr. Arnold said he was opposed to the scheme, and he was opposed to it for a very good reason.  If he could prove to him that the scheme was going to be the benefit that it was claimed to be he would agree with that.  If they could prove to him that sanatorium treatment was a cure or a preventative he would be with them.  He deplored the ravages which consumption was making in the country, but he had yet to learn of the advantages which would accrue from a sanatorium scheme in County Fermanagh.  It was said that the scheme would put £5,000 on the rates.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  THE CHANNEL TUNNEL SCHEME.  At present, owing to difficulties arising out of the war, there does not seem to be any possibility of the projected scheme for the construction of the channel tunnel between England and Ireland, materialising, but there are grounds for believing that the project will again come before parliament and after the sensation of hostilities.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  GOLD IN OUR BOGS.  Now that the price of coal is so high, people are asking why it is that up to date methods are not availed off for the production of more fuel from our Irish Bogs.  The bogs are the true gold mines of Ireland and infinitely more valuable than any inexhaustible supply of the precious metal.  Turf dried by machinery has a much higher heating power and will not burn away so quickly as ordinary air-dried turf.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  JOTTINGS.  Lady Erne has written expressing her thanks to the Fermanagh County Council for the resolution recently passed on the death of her husband, Lord Erne.

The various Volunteer Companies in Arney have been reorganised during the past few weeks.  As soon as the good weather sets in drilling will be resumed.

The report of the annual meeting of the Sligo, Leitrim, and Northern Counties Railway will be read with pleasure by the shareholders.  The company has passed through a time of stress and difficulty, and they have surmounted the difficulties successfully, and the directors have pleasure in recommending that the same dividend be payable this year as last year.  This is a matter of congratulation both by the directors and the shareholders, having regard to the fact that practically all of the railway companies in Ireland and Great Britain had to recommend a reduction in their dividends.

News has been received in Enniskillen of the death in Arbroath of Mr. William Alexander Harvey, a son of Mr. James Harvey, Belmore Street, Enniskillen.  The late Mr. Harvey was in Scotland visiting some friends, and death was caused by motor cycling.  At the time of the outbreak of the Boer War he joined the South African Constabulary Force, and in 1912 he returned home and afterwards left for Patagonia to share a ranch with a friend.  At the outbreak of war he disposed of his share, and set out for home with the intention of joining the colours.  His demise under such tragic circumstances will be learnt with regret, and sympathy will be extended to his father, mother and relatives in their great sorrow.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  ENNISKILLEN.  HOUSING SCHEME B.  Chanterhill Road West – 10 houses.  Here the committee propose to erect a row of better class dwellings on the left hand side of the roadway going from the town and beyond Alexandra Terrace.  The houses are to be of 18 feet frontage and to contain kitchen, three rooms, good attic, and bath accommodation with bay window.  The estimated cost of each house is £36 – 7 shillings and 11 pence.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  DEATH OF AN ENNISKILLEN SOLDIER.  A GOOD MAN AND A BRAVE SOLDIER LOSES HIS LIFE IN THE TRENCHES. We briefly announced in our last issue the death in action of Private Francis McKiernan of the 2nd battalion of the Inniskilling Fusiliers.  Private McKiernan was an employee of the Enniskillen Urban Council, and on the outbreak of war answered the mobilization call, as he was on the Special Reserve, and on the 31st of October he left for the firing line, and on the 10th of February he was shot by a sniper.  His mother has received the following letter from the Catholic Chaplain, Fr. McCabe and from the C.Q.M.S.: – Dear Mrs. McKiernan, – I have the sorrowful duty of informing you that your son, number 1724, Private Francis McKiernan, was killed in action on the evening of the 10th of this month.  I trust you will not take this heavy blow too much to heart, and I am sure it will console you to know that your son was well prepared for his death.  Only a few days ago I said Mass for the men of his company, and your son was amongst those who went to Confession and received Holy Communion.  The circumstances of us death were as follows: He was in the advanced trenches and was doing up his pack, when he raised his head above the tranches.  A sniper who was on the lookout immediately fired and hit your son in the head causing almost instantaneous death.  This German was soon after shot himself by his comrades.  Yesterday accompanied by as many men who could be spared I buried him with full Catholic rites in a little country cemetery not far from the firing line and this morning said Mass for the repose of his soul.  R.I.P.

Try then my dear madam to see even in this great sorrow the finger of God.  Your holy faith will comfort you and sustain you.  Your son was a good man, and brave soldier and a devout catholic.  He has died bravely, strengthened with the Sacrament he had received so shortly before.  No better ending can any man have.  God bless you and comfort you.  Yours very sincerely in J.C.  A. E. McCabe, R.C. Chaplain.

 

Dear Mr. McKiernan, – I am very sorry to have to convey to you the sad news of the death of your son.  He was killed on the 10th inst, and buried the next day, a clergyman being present.  I am sending you all the things that were found on him by post, and I hope you will see them safely.  There are other things which you will receive through the Record Office, Dublin.  We are making his grave as nice as possible.  If there is anything you want to know I will be only too pleased to give you any information.  I have just scribbled these few lines in a hurry.  W.  Thompson, C.Q.M.S., “C” company 2nd Bn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  1st Army.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  WITH THE NEXT ISSUE OF THE FERMANAGH HERALD there will be presented a beautiful half-tone portrait suitable for framing of Mr. Joseph Devlin, MP.  It has been reproduced from a special photograph and will be printed on Art Paper.  Orders from newsagents for extra papers should reach us at the latest on Monday next.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  JOTTINGS.  The Enniskillen Guardians have given a grant of £3 3s to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.

Mr. Justice Gibson was presented with white gloves at of the Fermanagh Assizes on Saturday.  His remarks in his address the schoolboys will be ready with interest.  He spoke about the six fruitful years spent in the classrooms of Portora and the “throb and thrill of memories which come over him when he visits Enniskillen.”

The depot Brass Band from Omagh arrived in Enniskillen on Wednesday morning for the purposes of giving a fillip to recruiting.  Wednesday was fair day in the town.

It has been decided that on completion of their tour through Antrim, Derry, and Fermanagh, the 36th Battalion of the Cycling Company will be stationed at Enniskillen until further orders.

Becoming frightened at the burr of a motor bicycle, a horse which was harnessed to a cart took fright on Tuesday night and galloped up Townhall Street.  The animal approaching the Imperial Hotel went in on the footpath and try to dash through the portals of the hotel and in the effort smashed the cart.  The horse continued to drag it up as far as Mr. Taylor’s window, where it fell in a heap.  Mr. Taylor’s windows had certainly a miraculous escape from had being broken.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  LIGHTING CLONES WORKHOUSE.  Clones in Guardians on Tuesday received an account for £7 – 5s – 9d, lighting for two months and 13 days.  Oil lighting for the corresponding period last year it was stated cost £4 – 13s – 4d.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915. NURSES’ CHEERY TASK.  Writing to the Clones Guardians regarding the alleged neglect of the dead, the Local Government Board state that is the duty of the nurse to wash and prepare a body for coffining, but not actually to coffin it.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  THE GAA FERMANAGH COUNTY CONVENTION.  On Sunday, the 7th of March the Fermanagh County Convention of the GAA was held at Derrylin –Mr. P. L. McElgunn, chairman of the County Board presiding.  The following clubs were represented – Shamrocks, O’Connell’s, Brian Borus, Rapparees, Brehons, and Maguires.  The report showed that during the year Fermanagh had made a very creditable display in the Ulster Championship, beating Tyrone and Cavan and thus qualifying for the final in which it was defeated by Monaghan.  In the semi-final of the Croke Cup Competition, Fermanagh was drawn against Louth, and was only beaten by this famous combination by the score of 1 point.  The credit for this is principally due to the Shamrocks, who selected the team.

In the competitions in the county good progress was made during the year.  The 1913 League competition, won by Maguires, had to be finished and all of the championship, which was won by Shamrocks.  In the 1914 championship all the matches were played except the final.  In the league, however, things are not so far advanced owing to unfavourable climatic conditions.

The convention next proceeded to make bylaws.  It was decided to play championships on a league system vis., home and away matches, the home team to take charge of the gate and field arrangements.  Only 10 minutes’ grace is to be allowed after the time appointed for starting matches and the entrance to the Junior League was fixed at had two shillings and sixpence.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  FOOTBALL.  Trillick Football Club and travelled to Brookeborough on Saturday last to play a friendly with the homesters.  A very enjoyable game was the outcome.  Trillick had rather the better of a hard game, which ended with the score: Trillick, six goals; Brookeborough, four goals.  The marksmen for Trillick were McElholm two, McGee two, Slevin and Brennan one each.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  BALLYSHANNON GUARDIANS.  The Master reported that owing to Dr. McMullen, medical officer of the workhouse, been called away on urgent private business, he was obliged to requisition the services of Dr. Gordon to temporarily discharge the duties of medical officer.  He also stated that he lodged a sum of £112 8s 7d to the credit of the Guardians, being repayment for the treatment of military patients.

An application was received from Andrew McShea for the grazing of the hospital field for 11 months at the sum of  £10 16s.  The application was granted.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  THE DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MRS. ANTHONY CASSIDY.  Her death occurred on Friday last the 5th, inst., at the age of 78 at her residence, 16 Upper Pembroke Street, Dublin.  Coming from Enniskillen some years ago with her late husband Mr. Anthony Cassidy, who predeceased her by a little over four years, she has since resided in Pembroke Street.  On Wednesday last she received with edifying piety and resignation the last rites of the church and on Friday morning she passed peacefully away in the presence of her daughter, Mrs. Gordon.

Of the most charitable disposition, the deceased lady will be very much missed by the poor of the parish of Westland Row.  From whatever quarter the appeals came – and they came in numbers – Mrs. Cassidy, once assured of their genuine worthiness, give them with open hand and willing heart and the prayers of the poor will be offered to the God of Mercy for her who was so merciful.  The remains arrived in Enniskillen by the 12.40 train, and the interment took place subsequently in the Catholic Cemetery.  The chief mourners were Dr. John Cassidy, London, and Dr. Louis Cassidy, RAMC, Dublin sons.  Mrs. Gordon, daughter and Mrs. Louis Cassidy daughter-in-law, Michael and Maurice Cassidy brothers in law. (Anthony Cassidy was the owner of a tobacco factory in Enniskillen and also the Graan Monastery farm, Enniskillen.)

 

Fermanagh Herald 20th March, 1915.  JOTTINGS.  Official intimation has just reached his mother in Enniskillen, that Private Sandy Hynes, of the Inniskillings has been killed in action.

The number of dozen eggs required in the Enniskillen Union for the current week is 25.  Some short time ago 60 dozen were required.

Mr. Donnelly was declared the contractor for meat, and Mr. Whaley the contractor for bread, at a meeting of the Enniskillen Guardians on Tuesday.

A case of spotted by fever was reported at a meeting of the Board of Guardians in the county during the past week.  Stringent measures have been adopted for the segregation of the affected person.

 

Fermanagh Herald 20th March, 1915.  THE RESIDENCE OF THE BELLEEK DOCTOR IS TO BE LIGHTED BY ELECTRICITY.  At a meeting of the Ballyshannon Board of Guardians on Saturday Mr. Felix Leonard vice chairman said he believed that it was the intention of the Guardians to have lighted by electricity Dr. Kelly’s house in Belleek, but he saw by the minutes that they were only going to put in the wire is etc., and Dr. Kelly was to supply the globes and shades.  He was of the opinion that as well as putting in the wires they should supply the globes etc., because Dr. Kelly’s residence was the property of the Guardians and they were receiving a big rent from him annually for it.  Mr. D. Gilfedder said in his opinion Dr. Kelly was a man who gave them very little trouble.  He never got a holiday for the past five or six years, which was the means of saving the Guardians a sum of almost £25.00.  If any man was worthy of consideration Dr. Kelly certainly was.

Mr. Gallacher said there was a scheme on foot for the public lighting of Belleek, and it was possible if the scheme matured it would be easier and cheaper to light the Doctor’s residence.  It was also stated that the current for the lighting of the streets of Belleek would be generated at Belleek Pottery.

 

Fermanagh Herald 20th March, 1915.  WAR PICTURES IN MANORHAMILTON FOR SIX NIGHTS IN SAINT CLARE’S HALL.  The people of Manorhamilton and surrounding district will be pleased to learn that Daniells Irish–American Animated Picture and Variety Company are here at present paying their sixth annual visit to Manorhamilton and will remain the whole week.  As everybody knows here, Mr. Daniells always gives a refined and up to date program and shows a complete change each night.  The subjects filmed by this popular company includes exceptionally fine pieces in drama and comedy, as well as the very latest war pictures, which win the unanimous approval of large and representative for audiences.  Mr. Daniels will show during the week, “War scenes in Belgium,” The Russian army in action,” “The Germans entering Brussels,” “The English army in France, etc. etc., which are all highly interesting and attractive.  The popular manager of this company – Mr. Happy Harry Harden – informed our representative that all films are quite new and have been chosen from the best kinematographic works procurable. In addition to the pictures and illustrated songs a variety concert will be given each evening by the following distinguished artistes: -Mr. Jack Seeby, Mr. Happy Harry Harden, Mr. Bert L. Dempster, Mr. Jimmy Greene, Miss S. Ryan, and the Brothers O’Brien, all of whom are great favourites.  A full orchestra will render high class music at each performance.  Doors open at 7.30 to commence at eight o’clock and admission is 6d or 1s with children half price.  Seats may be booked in advance. (Photograph of Mr. Braecy Daniells.)

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THE U.S. THEATRES HUGE SALARIES AND A REFUSAL.  Madame Melba will go to the United States in the autumn and will receive there £1,000 a week.  The New York Tribune which makes this announcement gives details of an interesting “star hunt” of Mr. Edward F.  Albee, who is offering huge salaries to attract the great ones of the concert hall over the Atlantic.  He received, it is said, a rebuff from the Irish tenor Mr. John McCormack, who when offered £300 for every appearance, with a percentage of the profits, or, failing this, £1,000 a week, intimated that the lowest terms in which business could be done where £5,000 a week. Mr. McCormick is the only singer whose price has been so high, and Mr. Albee is now said to be negotiating with Tetrazzini.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  FERMANAGH A SOLDIER KILLED.  Mr. Frank McGovern is the first of the Newtownbutler boys to fall on the battlefield.  A letter has been received from the War Office stating that he was killed in action on the 28th of February.  The following letter has also been received by his father: – “The King commands me to assure you of the true sympathy of the King and Queen. – Kitchener.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  ENNISKILLEN STREET TRAFFIC.  We think the time has come when the Urban Council should pass a by-law compelling all moving carts and vehicles to keep as close to the footpaths on their own side of the street as possible.  At present they seem to have an irresistible tendency to keep the centre of the thoroughfare.  Under any circumstances this leads to inconvenience but now when fast travelling has become one of the permanent facts of our traffic that leads to danger as well as to unnecessary annoyance.

The rule we suggest is being adopted and applied stringently everywhere else.  It gives drivers no extra trouble, but greatly relieves the strain and stress of street locomotion.  There is no reason why Enniskillen should lag behind other places in enforcing so sensible a regulation.  Indeed, our traffic is so concentrated and so continuous that there are few towns which more demand the most accommodating and safest method of travelling.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  OUR LOSS OF OFFICERS.  CASUALTIES NOW EXCEED 5,600.  Up to Saturday morning an analysis of the casualty list showed our loss in officers as follows: – Killed 1,808; Wounded 3,022; Missing or Prisoners 844.  Total 5,674.  Of the Irish regiments the Inniskilling Fusiliers; nine killed, 24 wounded, two missing or prisoners, total 35.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THREE WARSHIPS SUNK IN THE DARDANELLES.  BRITISH SAILORS SAVED.  FRANCE LOOSE 650 OFFICERS AND MEN.  In the Dardanelles operations on Friday H.M.S. Irresistible, H.M.S.  Ocean, and one of the French battleships Bouvet were sunk after striking drifting mines.  Practically all the crews of the British ships were saved, but the crew of the Bouvet, which foundered in three minutes after the explosion, were drowned.  She had a complement of 650 officers and men.  The ships lost were not of modern construction, nor of first class fighting value.  (From the Times.) The first sustained attempt to overcome the defences in the Narrows of the Dardanelles resulted in serious though not unexpected losses, and we must be prepared to lose still more ships before our object is completely achieved.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  MAINSPRING OF THE TRENCHES.  THE WONDERS OF THE BRITISH HEADQUARTERS.  The Special Correspondent (G.  Valentine Williams), of the Daily Mail, writes from the General Headquarters, British Army in the Field (France).  It is related that at one of the blackest stages of the retreat from Mons Sir John French astonished his entourage by announcing, after a long morning’s work at his headquarters, that he thought he would go for a stroll.  And, picking up a walking stick, the Field-Marshall calmly walked fourth to take the air as unconcerned as though he were going to stroll down to the War Office through the park.

That the British Commander–in–Chief should have been able to free himself momentarily from the enormous responsibilities of those days of stress is not only a remarkable instance of his mental detachment, of which I have already written, but it is also a most striking tribute to his absolute confidence in the perfect organisation of the British Army, without which even the undying heroism of the British troops would have availed nothing against the systematised frightfulness of the bosche.

Sir John French knows better than anybody else how admirably organised the British Army machine is.  He devoted his whole life to it when, emerging in a blaze of glory from the South African War, he was not content to rest upon his laurels but embarked on a long spell of silent, unostentatious hard work, the fruits of which are seen in the marvellously efficient army under his command today.

The amount of foresight required to feed an immense army serving on foreign soil may be imagined, yet so perfect are the arrangements of the Quartermaster Generals department that even during the great and glorious retreat from Mons when our troops were constantly on the move, the men never liked anything.  The Director of Supplies is kept daily posted on the number of men to be fed.  Each day the amount of rations required is sent up from the supply base to the nearest railhead, where it is met by the mechanical transport and conveyed to the distribution centre, where the regimental horse transports carry it up to the firing line.  The same procedure is followed with regard to ammunition.

An important part of the department’s duties concerns requisitioning and billeting.  There is a Claims Office at General Headquarters, whither the farmers and peasants of the region occupied by the British troops send in their requisition receipts.  Officers are provided with special requisition forms clearly printed in French and English contained in a book, which has a preface with some concise hints as to what an officer may and may not do when requisitioning from the civil population.

The Royal Army Medical Corps has now many motor ambulance convoys, each with 50 ambulance cars and repairing outfits, cars for officers, and motor cyclists, attached to the army in the field.  When a man is wounded he is taken to the regimental aid post which is just behind the firing line, where the regimental doctor, assisted by a corporal and five Red Cross orderlies, there tends to him.  He is then sent down by horse ambulance to the field hospital, whence he is removed by a motor ambulance to the casualty clearing station.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THE FLIES AS A DISEASE CARRIERS.  Medical authorities are urging the importance of a more energetic campaign than ever against flies in the coming spring.  It is pointed out that the existence of military encampments in all parts of the country must inevitably tend to provide breeding places for these pests, and where troops are billeted in cottages, where sanitary arrangements are primitive, the conditions must also be very favourable to them.  Another factor favourable to flies if the weather is dry will be the clouds of dust which we must expect in the months ahead were grass has been trampled down and roads cut up.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  MUNITIONS OF WAR.  NO STRIKE AGREEMENT.  THE GOVERNMENT AND DRINK.  The draft of an agreement between the workers’ representatives and the employers regarding the output of ammunition and equipment was published last night.  The important terms are: – Free employment of women’s labour.  No restrictions on output for the duration of the war.  In the meantime the government has decided that the profits of armament works shall not exceed 10 per cent during the war and that any surplus shall go to the state.  Mr. Lloyd George addressed the delegates on the excessive drinking among several certain sections of workmen in particular districts throughout the country.  He announced that the Government had under consideration the question of limiting the hours in these areas, and that they would be glad of the views of the conference on their suggestion to allow public houses to open only between 12.00 p.m. and 2.00 p.m. and 7 o’clock to 9 in the evening.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THE WON’T WORKS.  AN ENGLISH TOWN’S PRIDE AND SHAME.  The pride of Sunderland is its claim to be the biggest shipbuilding town in the world; the shame of Sunderland is its large body of shirkers, and that shame is paraded openly and almost ostentatiously in the main streets of the town, says a Times special correspondent.

“At 10.00 a.m. there are hundreds of men, hands in pockets, slouching idly along in little groups, standing talking at street corners, most of them smoking – many of them able bodied men of military age, and a fair proportion of older men, still capable of good work.  “Who are they?”  I asked a young constable.  “Wont works” was the laconic reply.  I put the same question later to an employer.  “My men, many of them,” he answered bitterly, “The Government work is being delayed because they’re taking a holiday.”

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  PATRIOTIC TYRONE POSTMEN.  Enthusiastic scenes were witnessed at Omagh Railway Station on Monday morning, when 11 postmen and post office officials left to join the Post Office Rifles.  The contingent, which consisted of six men from Omagh, four from Dromore and one from Castlederg, left by the 12.39 train for Dublin, and received a great send off from a large crowd of townspeople and their fellow employees of the Post Office.

 

Fermanagh Herald 27th March, 1915.  LICENCED PREMISES IN THE TOWN OF TEMPO FOR SALE.  I have received instructions from the executor of the late owner Mr. Bernard Maguire to sell by public auction on the premises at 1.00 sharp on Monday, the 29th of March, 1915 those valuable premises at present occupied by Mr. Bernard Breen and situated on the Main Street, Tempo subject to a head rent of £3.00 per annum.  The  property consists of a spacious two Storey dwelling house having four rooms on the first floor and five rooms on the second floor, a cellar 40 feet by 20 feet divided into three apartments and fitted throughout with an Electric Lighting System.  The out offices which are extensive and in good repair, consist of ample stabling accommodation, a byre, coach house, etc..  There is also a neat little garden attached.  The entire premises, which are now in occupation of Mr. Bernard Breen as yearly tenant, paying £12 15s yearly rent are well adapted to a Posting Establishment.  Tempo is a very progressive little town and has a good weekly market and a monthly fair.

 

Fermanagh Herald 27th March, 1915.  A REMARKABLE ENNISKILLEN MAN, JOHN MULLANPHY served in the Irish Brigade in France and later created a Cotton Corner in America.  John and Mullanphy was a pioneer in American commerce in cotton and came from Ireland in 1792 as an emigrant with his wife and a year old child.  He was born near Enniskillen, Co., Fermanagh in 1758 and at 20 he went to France and enlisted in the famous Irish Brigade in which he served until the Revolution drove him back to Ireland.  The emigrants remained a year in Philadelphia, and then went to Baltimore, where Mullanphy prospered in business until in 1799 he pushed further west to Frankfurt, Kentucky.  Here his store became the trading centre of the section, and his house the hospitable refuge of the missionaries who visited this district from time to time to minister to the scattered Catholics settled in the neighbourhood.

Mullanphy’s service in France had enabled him to learn the language of that country and St. Louis was then a French settlement. In 1804 Mullanphy fell in with one of its founders, Charles Gratiot, who persuaded him to locate in St. Louis.  As he spoke French he was soon at home there and the store he opened on Second Street was an object of wonder.  He had 15 children, eight of whom lived and continued his benefactions.  His only son, Bryan, who died a bachelor, in 1851, was Mayor of St. Louis in 1847.  Bryan Mullanphy’s will left one third of his estate, about $200,000, to a trust fund, “to furnish relief to all poor emigrants passing through St. Louis to settle in the West.”

John Mullanphy’s name is recalled to the St. Louis of today by the Mullanphy Hospital and the Mullanphy Orphanage Asylum as that of his daughter, Mrs. Anne Biddle is preserved in the Biddle Home and St., Anne’s Foundling Asylum. His life in St. Louis was one long deed of charity.