July 1843.

6-7-1843. ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST OF JULY;

Friday evening last being the eve of the First of July, the flags were as usual hoisted on the Church Tower and Town-hall at about eleven o’clock, and the Conservative Band of the town continued playing the accustomed loyal tunes till after twelve, the toils chiming out at intervals. A number of respectable persons promenaded the streets during the playing and, we are happy to add, there was the most marked decorum and quiet.

The Rev. Dr. Greham and Miss Greham returned, to Portora on Saturday from Dublin.

John Brien, Esq., arrived at Castletown last Thursday from Dublin.

43D. Depot.—Saturday last Lieutenant Herbert joined the depot from the service companies in Canada; Major Fraser and Lord Tullamore are expected very shortly to join the depot from the regiment.

Royal Engineers—Lieutenant McCausland re turned to this garrison on Saturday from sick leave, and, left this station yesterday for the head-quarter, Belfast, Captain Lloyd, from Derry, has relieved Lieutenant McCausland here.

The Hon. Major Spencer, 60th Rifles depot, Belturbet; visited his brother, the Hon. Captain Spencer, 43d depot, this week.

CHEVALIER SCHLICK – This celebrated artist left Castlecoole on Monday last for England. We are happy to find that he is now so far recovered from his serious accident, as to enable him to proceed to England, by the advice of his medical attendants, for the restoration of his health.

The Lord Bishop held his Annual Visitation on last Thursday in Monaghan. There was a very full attendance of the clergy of the Diocese. Rev. Mr. Tarleton preached the visitation sermon.

ENNISKILLEN ROYAL SCHOOL. The school resumed business on Monday the vacation having terminated on Saturday.

SERIOUS ACCIDENT. Saturday, as Dr. William Dane, Drumard, about two miles from this town, was alighting from his pony at his own gate, it moved at the instant and his foot catching in the stirrup he fell and broke his leg a little above the ankle.

THE WEATHER.—-Saturday evening last we had some heavy showers, and nearly the entire of Sunday was wet The Crops look much refreshed and promising. Yesterday evening it rained heavily again and continued all night. Hay-making was busily going forward.

NEW POTATOES. — New Potatoes are already beginning to pore into the market. Tuesday we saw a clieve of very fines ones, as large as any old ones and selling at 1¼ and 2d per lb.

CHEVALIER. SCHLICK. The stay of Chevalier Schlick with the Earl of Belmore, at Castlecoole has afforded us an opportune of noticing those powers of art which we find have gained for him the attention and reward of the principal Crowned Heads of Europe and all the leading families of distinction whose position has enabled them to appreciate his unrivalled talents. The Chevalier has devoted upwards of twenty years of uninterrupted and laborious application in studying the paintings and models of the ancients to be found of France, Milan, and Tuscany, Rome and the whole Roman States, Naples, and Paestum, the whole of Sicily with Herculaneum and Pompeii. Of the above he has, we learn, spent no less than twelve years exploring and studying the paintings of the celebrated ruins of Herculaneum and Pompeii cities destroyed by an eruption of Vesuvius in the year 79, since which early date they remained undiscovered till the former in 1711, and the latter in 1750. These paintings of the Grecian School, wonderful as to their design and execution, as well for the peculiarity and richness of their colouring, have been restored to perfect imitation by the pencil of Chevalier Schlick beyond all modern hands that have preceded him, as is satisfactorily proved by the attestation of the most learned men of the age. The following is the opinion of one the first Antiquarians of the day – “These painting have been executed by a process essentially different from any previously known, and which has produced a perfect representation of the original. In these paintings , as in ancient paintings, the contours are not defined by lines brought are brought out by the mere contrast of tints according to nature, as was well understood by the Greeks, and studiously followed up by them in their wonderful works. The colours have no body and are perfectly transparent, producing an effect very different from that of oil painting, pastel or body colour, in the latter of which, truth of expression may be attained.

Inkwell Gift. This wedding anniversary gift from Queen Victoria is a manifestation of the couple’s taste for the Antique, as well as Prince Albert’s fascination with the process of electrotyping. Being made of silver and partly gilded, it is one of the costlier versions of a popular design. Elkingtons had originally produced the model in 1844/5 and offered examples in solid silver or electroplate. Mintons later produced a version in porcelain. The inkwell was designed by the Danish-born architect Benjamin Schlick, who was made a Chevalier of the Légion d’Honneur in 1828 by the French King Charles X, in recognition of his architectural work in Paris. He seems to have attended the British court several times. He was listed in The Times among the guests at the Buckingham Palace Fancy Ball of 1842, and it was at his suggestion that the following year Prince Albert visited Elkington’s Birmingham premises, where his interest in the electrotyping process was born. Schlick’s relationship with George Elkington was vital to the company’s production at this period. His early life, spent in the courts of France, Italy and Denmark, meant that he had access to works of art which provided invaluable source material for electrotyping. Schlick and Elkington were also firm believers in the dissemination of classical source material for the development of good taste. In 1839 Schlick had visited Italy and become one of the leading figures in the preservation and restoration of the ancient remains being uncovered at Pompeii. He made close observations and sketches and developed a pantograph to create reductions of several of the objects uncovered. Although the inkwell was not directly based on an excavated lamp, it was inspired by the sketches Schlick made at that time. The Queen herself seems to have specified the addition of a lid to the inkwell, which was provided not by Elkingtons but by Garrard & Co., the royal goldsmiths, shortly before its presentation in 1850. Text from Victoria & Albert: Art & Love.

DREADFUL ACCIDENT.—On Saturday evening a most afflicting accident occurred on board the canal boat coming to Limerick from Dublin. When the boat was passing the lock near Clonlara, the Rev. Mr. Cousins, a dissenting clergyman from England who with his wife, were on their way to Killarney looked out at one of the side windows of the boat to observe their position when the boat received a sudden side move as it generally does by coming in contact with either side of the gateway and the head of the unfortunate gentleman was caught between the boat and the wall of the dock, and he received such dreadful injury that he died at the hotel in. Limerick a few hours after the occurrence. The accident, it may be supposed, threw a gloom over those present. Every attention that was possible was paid by the gentlemen present to his afflicted partner. The deceased was an aged man, between 60 and 70 years. Clare Journal.   \

USEFUL HINTS.—Never enter a sick room in a, state of perspiration as the moment you become cool your pores absorb. Do not approach contagious disease with an empty stomach, nor sit between the sick and the fire because the heat extracts the thin vapour.

HYDERABAD. The amount of treasure in gold, diamonds, &c., captured by Sir Charles Napier at Hyderabad, falls little short of three millions of money. The share of that gallant general is estimated at no less a sum than £200,000.

PRESENT FROM CHINA. The Chinese bed with the golden posts – the description of which reads so magnificently in the newspapers, is no such Splendid looking affair after all. The golden pillars are hollow, of course, and though covered with engravings of a very oriental character, yet the designs manifesto none of that elegance or fancy, which one would think might have been displayed by the artisans of a country whose pagodas and public buildings are generally so fanciful in their designs and picturesque in their effect. The hangings are of green silk, and worked in a shawl pattern in a manner to delight the hearts of some admirers of this sort of fabric, here and there, there is a little bullion fringe. There are several other cases of presents which have scarcely yet been unpacked, but which are said to contain some shawls of a most recherché character. — Cheltenham Looker-on.

BOY DROWNED. —On Sunday last a promising lad named Wilson, about 16 years of age, went with others to bathe at the West-quay, he swam up towards the Fall, and on returning, the stream, being rapid, was taking him out to sea. He accordingly attempted to swim across to the North quay but his strength failing him, he sank in death. His body has not yet been found although every exertion was immediately made, by his disconsolate parent and the inhabitants. He was the son of a very industrious and well-conducted man who came here from Enniskillen under the employment of Mr Creden, to superintend the building of the Poor-house. Ballyshannon Herald.

ANGLING — During the past week, the anglers had splendid opportunities of indulging in their gentle sport.’ The waters have considerably fallen and trout and salmon were killed in abundance. There are several gentlemen from various parts of Ireland and England at present staying in this town, enjoying the pleasure and amusement of angling. Cockburn’s hotel is nearly full. Ballyshannon Herald.

NEW POTATOES. A fine sample of early potatoes has been sent to our office by Mr. Likely McBride, of this town – they were grown in the open air on his farm; and he expects to be able to supply the market with new potatoes, in eight or ten days. We have also on our table excellent cherries, raspberries, strawberries, and cucumbers, grown in the gardens of several gentlemen in the vicinity of this town. — Ballyshannon Herald.

On Thursday a quantity of fire-arms were lodged in the ordnance store, Enniskillen. They bad been seized in the neighbourhood of Carrick-on-Shannon by the police. Ballyshannon Herald.

The barrack mastership of Boyle and Carrick-on-Shannon is vacant by the death of Lieutenant Allingham, a Waterloo officer who was interred by the 74th depot with military honours.

We feel much pleasure in being able to state that Henry Robert Crofton, Esq., of the Modeste, fifth son of Duke Crofton, Esq., J. P and D.L. of Lakefield, county of Leitrim, has, for his distinguished services in China, received his commission as lieutenant in the Royal Navy, dated the 23d of December, 1842. The following notice of his services is from the New Navy List. When Master of the Modeste his services were officially mentioned in the operations on the coast of China, including the capture of Amoy and Chinghae in 1841 likewise at the destruction of the Chinese fire-raft attack on their camp at Segahon, and the surveying of the river Yant se-Keing in anticipation of the advance on Pekin in 1842.

MARRIAGE OF THE PRINCESS AUGUSTA and the Hereditary Grand Duke Mecklenburg Strelitz.—The solemnization of the nuptials of the daughter of their Royal highness’s the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge with the Hereditary Grand Duke of Mecklenburg Strelitz, look place on Wednesday evening, at half past eight o’clock in the Royal Chapel at Buckingham Palace, The Bishop of London officiated. The King of Hanover gave the young Princess away in the presence of the Queen and Prince Albert, the King and Queen of the Belgians, the Queen Dowager, the Duchess of Kent, the Duchess of Gloucester, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince George, his, Serene Highness Prince Edward of Saxe Weimar, & Immediately after the ceremony the Hereditary, Grand Duke and his Royal bride departed for the Duke of Cambridge’s house at Kew, where they will pass the customary period in privacy, after which they will take their departure for Germany. Her Majesty the Queen gave a grand, banquet in the evening, and there was a very brilliant assemblage after the nuptial ceremony, for which invitations were issued to most of the Nobility.— The presents to the Princess Augusta on the auspicious event of her marriage, are said to be exceedingly numerous. The cadeau (present) from the Queen Dowager, a head-dress of diamonds and precious stones, is of great value. The Queen and the King of Hanover have likewise made valuable souvenirs. The leading Nobility have given several costly presents, a bijou from a fashionable Marchioness having cost 250 guineas. The Princess’s trousseau was most magnificent and in every respect corresponding to her exalted rank. A series of fetes are spoken of as on the tapis, at Cambridge House, in celebration of the happy event of the Princess’s marriage.

GREAT ANTI-REPEAL MEETING AT COLLON. — On Monday evening, a meeting of the Protestants of Derriaghy (Antrim) and the surrounding districts was held at Collon for the purpose of addressing her Most Gracious Majesty in reference to the present distracted state of the country, occasioned by the agitation of Repeal. Long before six o’clock, the hour appointed for the meeting, there were not less than 5,000 persons present. Every mountain path presented its hundreds flocking to the spot, and the roads leading from Belfast, Lisburn, and the adjoining towns and villages were thronged with individuals passing forward to meet their brethren in a common cause, and for a common end, so that at one period of the meeting there could not have been less than 8,000 or 9,000 present. The meeting having been addressed by several Gentlemen, and a number of appropriate resolutions agreed to, the assembly gave three cheers for the Queen, and three groans for O’Connell, and then separated in a peaceable and orderly manner, seemingly much gratified with the proceedings of the evening.— Belfast Chronicle.

DEATH FROM LIGHTNING.—-An inquest was held on the 19th instant, at Carranacross across, before Mr. O’Grady, on the body of James O’Donnell,; who was killed by the lightning in Sunday, the 18th. When he came by his death he was engaged in lighting fires, to burn land, in which, he intended to put potatoes. His body when found lying in the field was much burned by the lightning, and there was a stream of blood from a wound on the face. The jury found that deceased came to his death from injuries caused by lightning. If the unfortunate deceased had not been violating the commandment to keep the Sabbath holy, he might be alive today.—Mayo Constitution.

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1843 May-June

25-5-1843. The family of the Hon. and Rev. J. C. Maude has left Chanter-hill for Dublin, for a short time.

LISNASKEA Union.—At the last meeting of the Board, the following resolutions were unanimously passed on the occasion of a change taking place in the other district Unions, by which Cavan and Lisnaskea will be placed under the superintendence of Mr. Handcock, and Mr. Otway’s district be extended from here to Sligo and along the Western coast   Resolved—“That the Guardians of the Lisnaskea Poor Law Union having heard with regret of the contemplated removal of Mr. Assistant Commissioner Otway from the superintendence of this Union, cannot allow this opportunity to pass without expressing their acknowledgment and thanks for his exertions in the performance of his duties, and for the conciliatory manner he has conducted the duties of his office ever since the formation of the Union, and also for big extreme consideration and anxiety to promote the well working of the system. Resolved “That the Chairman be requested to forward a copy of the foregoing resolution to Mr. Otway.”

LOUGH ERNE NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT. R. Gray, Esq., our County Surveyor, has been appointed Engineer to the Lough Erne Navigation Improvement Committee, and has received directions to prepare plans and estimates for the removal of some of the obstructions, which is to be commenced immediately.

12th Lancers.—We are sorry to find that several of the horses of the troop of this Regiment lately arrived here, are in a hopeless state from glanders, brought on by the hardships they had been subject to attending Repeal meetings, and being obliged, in many places through the country, to put up with very indifferent and unsuitable stabling and forage. One horse has already died, and four or five more are expected to fall.

CLONES RIOTS. NEWTOWNBUTLER PETTY SESSIONS. From a correspondent we learn that on yesterday week there was a case entertained by the magistrates of this bench against a respectable young man named Beatty, for firing a loaded pistol at a person of the name of Maguire on the evening of Easter Monday, on his way home from Clones from the meeting there. A Mr. Clements, Barrister, and a Mr. Gartlan, Solicitor, both from the Repeal Association, attended on behalf of Maguire, and Mr. Scotty Attorney, appeared for Mr. Beatty.

The chief Evidence was Maguire, himself who swore that on the above evening at a place called Doona, between Clones and Newtownbutler, while stooped behind a ditch he heard a shot, and on looking up saw young Mr Beatty on a car with a pistol in his hand directed towards him. Another witness named Cochrane, deposed to having seen Beatty pass near Doona, some short time previous to the supposed occurrence, nine o’clock. Though there was most satisfactory evidence on the part of Beatty, the magistrates thought it better to let it remain for the Quarter Sessions. This will be a singular case and one calculated to show the doings of the party. It appears Maguire was servant to Beatty’s father some time since, which service he left, and therefore, must have well known the person of Beatty had he been at the place of the supposed occurrence.

THURSDAY JUNE 1, 1843. THE UNITED STATES—ARRIVAL OF THE NEW STEAMSHIP HIBERNIA. (From the Correspondent of the Evening Mail.) LIVERPOOL, SUNDAY.—This splendid new steamship, under Captain Judkins, arrived here this morning, and her maiden homeward trip certainly exceeds, in point of speed, anything that has as yet ever been anticipated. She sailed from Halifax late on the evening of the 18th inst and arrived at the Mersey at an early hour this morning, after completing the voyage in a little more than nine days which, at this season of the year, is without a parallel. Her outward voyage was also one of extreme swiftness. The Great Western, which, sailed hence on the 29th of April, reached New York on the 12th inst, and the Caledonia, which carried out the mails from this on the 4th instant, had arrived at Halifax before the Hibernia sailed, and had left for Boston.

The Earl of Erne, Earl Belmore, and George Tipping Esq., are spending some days with F.W. Barton, Esq., at Clonelly availing themselves of the pleasure of angling, off which that part of the lake affords abundance. The Lord Bishop of Clogher has left Dublin, for the Palace, Clogher where his Lordship is expected to arrive this day,

12th Lancers. – The Troop of the 12th Lancers which has been here for the last fortnight, received a sudden rout on Tuesday morning to proceed to Dublin for embarkation to Liver pool, and proceed forward to join the headquarters ordered from Glasgow where they have been but a few weeks. The two Troops of the regiment have likewise been routed from Belfast. The Troop left here on yesterday morning at eight o’clock, under the command of Lieutenant Munroe, and Cornet Williams. This sudden move is evidently in consequence of the present Manchester riots and from apprehension of something equally or more serious about to take place, otherwise the troop here would not have been removed in the present state of their horses: one has died and nine have been left behind to be shot, while several of the remainder of the Troop are very likely to take bad on the march. The illness of the horses wears every appearance of glanders, if so it is very unwise to run the risk of infecting the stables in their line of march.

NEW COACH CONTRACT.  We understand that the new coaches which were brought down to start from Ballyshannon and Enniskillen on Sunday last had to be guarded by police from Dublin and at Navan on Thursday horses could with great difficulty be procured to forward them, neither would any coaches be allowed into any yard for the night.  They had to be left at the police station and watched by the Constabulary throughout the night.  We are happy to observe that both the coaches commenced the running from here and Ballyshannon without any sign of annoyance.

The Hon and Rev. J. C. Maude thankfully acknowledges the receipt of £50 from the Marquis of Ely for the tower of Enniskillen church.

ENNISKILLEN COACH FACTORY.  In directing public attention to the advantages held out by Mr. Ferguson we have the pleasure of adjoining ours with the general praise expressed in favour of Mr. Ferguson’s enterprise.  The new drag built by the proprietor reflects the highest credit on him and vies perhaps with any other posting establishment in so respectable a turn out.

On Friday, the Rev. Loftus Reade and Mrs. Reade entertained the officers of the 43rd depot and a party at dinner at Levelly  Glebe.

JAMES DENHAM, ESQ.  In a recent visit to his tenants near Clonegal in this county made them an abatement of 12 ½ per cent in their rents for the year ending the 29th of September last; he has also offered to pay half the expense of draining their respective farms according to Mr. Smith’s System and for which purpose he has sent down a full set of the necessary implements to commence the work.  He also in the most generous manner forgave one of his tenants a large arrear of rent in consequence of the heavy loss he sustained by disease that crept in among his cattle.  Such kind acts are deserving of justice and of the gratitude of his tenantry.  Carlow Sentinel.

Repeal Riots Enniskillen 1843.

The Repeal Association was an Irish mass membership political movement set up by Daniel O’Connell in 1830 to campaign for a repeal of the Act of Union of 1800 between Great Britain and Ireland. The Association’s aim was to revert Ireland to the constitutional position briefly achieved by Henry Grattan and his patriots in the 1780s, but this time with a full Catholic involvement that was now possible following the Act of Emancipation in 1829, supported by the electorate approved under the Reform Act of 1832. On its failure by the late 1840s the Young Ireland movement developed.

May 18th 1843.REPEAL RIOTS IN ENNISKILLEN.  When the doughty leader of the agitation would not venture his carcass among us to give his respectable followers here the opportunity of kicking up a Repeal row, they must contrive to get up one themselves.  Friday night last a young man of the town in passing home through the streets was attacked at the Market house and well beaten for having been an anti-repealer.  Later as it was (near 11) it was likely to lead to serious consequences as a number of both sides got into the streets in a short time and attacked each other.  Dr. Frith, J.P. was called out of bed and after some difficulty with the assistance of Captain Henderson and the police succeeded in restoring peace.  Next evening, Saturday, the streets began to be thronged at an early hour and about nine a desperate row commenced; from one bridge to the other there was a general attack; sticks and stones were in ample demand and used with no very sparing hands.  In Schoolhouse lane a woman opened her top window and with the strong arm of her Repeal rage sent some three or four pounds weight of a smoothing iron in amongst a Repealing body of Conservatives in the hope of repealing the Union of the parietal-bones of some of their unfortunate skulls. (The parietal bones are two bones in the human skull which, when joined together, form the sides and roof of the cranium. Each bone is roughly quadrilateral in form, and has two surfaces, four borders, and four angles. It is named from the Latin paries meaning a, wall.) Dr. Frith and of the police were likewise on this evening actively employed in endeavouring to suppress this riot which after a considerable time the evinced taking some of the chief of both sides into custody.  Had things gone on a little further this evening it would have been serious enough to call out the military and to such a height it would most surely have arisen but for the very judicious manner in which both Dr. Frith and the Captain Henderson managed them.  On Sunday evening there where apprehensions of the vagabonds of the back streets attempting a renewal of the affray and it was most confidently expected a sally would have been made on the Conservatives but active vigilance and a there dread of the military restrained a movement on either side.  In the first commencement we are not going to say that blame is not in some degree to be attached to both sides.  The young man, it appears, was under the influence of liquor and a gang of designing blackguards with which this town is infested took advantage to cry out for Repeal which was foolishly answered by the other with a counter cry when he was immediately attacked.  The motley and ragged groups of Repeal scamps had evidently determined to try their strength with the Conservatives but from the convincing arguments which was administered to them they felt their noodles just as safe by keeping quiet.  We shall not be surprised to find Mr. O’Connell one of these days proposing a vote of thanks to the ragged Repealers of Enniskillen as a reward for their services as in the case of priest McGuinness in Clones.  In a gratuitous attack there is no blame to the Conservatives to defend themselves but too they should avoid every occasion of aggression.

1843 News.

October 19th 1843. LOUGH ERNE NAVIGATION.—Yesterday the committee held a meeting in the Court-house which was attended by the Earl of Erne, Wm. Archdall, Folliott Barton, Esqrs, Rev. J. G. Porter, George Wood, John Collum, Roderick Grey, and John Halliday, Esqrs. Every remaining arrangement for carrying this great object into effect was finally settled. The purchase of the Weirs was completed, and this principal obstruction is, now to be removed forthwith. The removal of several obstructions was likewise decided upon, and they are to be proceeded with early next spring.

BUTTER IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY.—Yesterday the Earl of Erne, Folliott Barton, Wm. Archdall, James Lendrum, Esqrs., the Rev. J. G. Porter, Robert Archdall, Esq., and others held a meeting in the Grand Jury room which was attended by the Sessions Grand Jury and a number of respectable farmers. Lord Erne addressed the meeting at length, and read some valuable communications on the subject. Mr. Porter also addressed the, meeting, and much useful conversation ensued which is likely to prove of great importance to this county in this material branch of Irish, produce.

3D DRAGOON GUARDS. Captain Nugent’s Troop of this Regiment quartered in this garrison for the last few months, marched yesterday to join headquarters in Dundalk, from which place the Regt. is to proceed to Dublin, and will be relieved by the 5th, or Green Horse, a Troop of which is expected here on the 30th. The troop was played out of town yesterday by the fine band of the 53d,

EXPECTED FACTION FIGHT AT PETTIGO. From information which has reached the local magistrates of the Pettigo district, and forwarded to the military and police authorities here, for detachments to attend the fair there on to-morrow. This day a company of the 53d left this garrison for the purpose, and Captain Henderson and twenty of the Constabulary also, left, this town for Pettigo, and will be reinforced by parties of Police from. Donegal and other stations,

THE WEATHER—Monday night we had a fearful storm here; it blew most violently during the entire night. Some large trees were blown down in the neighbourhood, and hay and corn were knocked about in different places, but neither in the town nor country have any houses suffered. The weather has been fine since,

THE FINE ARTS.—In the collection of prints now on sale with Mr. Caddy, as agent for Mr. Thomas Boys, London, Printseller to the royal family, we were particularly gratified with the splendid style in which “The last moments of Charlies I.” ‘‘Trial of the Earl of Strafford,” and “Cromwell’s family interceding for the life of Charles the First” “Belton Abbey, &c’ are executed. Mr Boys’ Fine Art Distribution takes place in London on Wednesday, 25th October inst. By the prospectus we perceive the prizes vary from four to five hundred guineas, and each subscriber—independent of his chance of drawing a prize on payment of one guinea—receive from the agent a print value for the sum paid—which is selected by the subscriber from unrivaled collection now on view with the agent. We wish Mr. Boys every success in his interesting lottery. Indeed we have in doubt the nobility, gentry, clergy, etc. will justly appreciate this great Artist’s laudable undertaking.

DANCING,—In directing attention to Mt. Sullivan’s advertisement, we are justified in remarking that his patronage in this place has arisen solely from his merits, and that the advantages held out in his proposed evening class are such as are worthy of attention by those wishing instruction in the graceful art.

Saturday last, the Earl and Countess of Belmore, family and suite, arrived at Castlecoole from Cowes, Isle of Wight.

The Lord Lieutenant has appointed the Rev. J. G. Porter Commissioner of Education in the room of Lord Vesey Fitzgerald deceased.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE ERNE PACKET. Sir, beg leave to send you an extract from the last report for 1843, of the Dingle colony, in the county Kerry, which you may probably think worth inserting in your paper. They are valuable, as showing the influence of Gospel truth amongst our poor benighted fellow-countrymen, and at the present moment when there is so much to distract and dishearten, may prove peculiarly gratifying to many of your readers who probably have not have been aware of the satisfactory work now in progress in the above remote corner of our native land and who may be induced to aid it by  their contributions, which I am sure you would readily transmit to any of the following persona appointed to receive the same, namely—Mr. Robertson, 3, Grafton-street; Messrs. William Curry, jun., and Co , 9, Upper Sackville-street; or Messrs. La Touche and Co., Castle-street Dublin; the Treasurer, the Rev. Charles Gayer, Ventry, or the Secretary Miss Mahon, Booterstown, near Dublin. I am etc. A FRIEND OF IRELAND.

In the town of Dingle, which is situated in the most western part of Ireland, on a promontory extending forty miles into the Atlantic ocean, and in the district immediately around it, there have been 750 persons brought out of the Church of Rome by the preaching of the Gospel, within the last seven years. Three entirely new congregations have been formed of converts: two Churches have been erected and five school houses for the children and it is now found necessary to enlarge the Church at Dingle the third time, as in that town alone there are 250 converts added to the original Protestant congregation. In Ventry there are 200 converts, a Church and School-house have been erected, and ten houses are now being built for the protection of the converts. At Dunerlin there are 65 converts, a Church and School house have been erected. In Donequin and the adjacent Blasquett Islands there are 110 converts. At Donequin a commodious building is nearly completed, which will be used as a school-house during the week, and for the Church services on Sundays; a school-house, with a residence for a master, has also been built on the Blasquett Island.

In Kilmechedar parish, there are about 45 converts a school-house is now being erected there. In addition to these enumerated, there are about fifty converts scattered in different places who cannot be counted with any particular .congregation.

Besides those still living, nineteen converts have died since the commencement of the work, all of whom, without any exception, have remained steadfast in the faith, notwithstanding the violent and persevering efforts that in some cases have been used by their Roman Catholic relations to induce them at their dying hour to recant. Such testimonies have been most valuable, proving if anything were needed prove that their change was no tone of mere outward profession to secure for themselves any supposed earthly gain, while the full value of the testimony cannot be felt by those who are not acquainted with the assault of mingled warning and threat, and earnest entreaty which the dying convert has often to endure.

If .more were needed to confirm the reality of the work, the following extracts from the letters of the Bishop of Limerick, and the. Rev. Denis Browne the Rev. Charles Gayer, might be so:—In a letter, dated September 1, 1842, the Bishop of Limerick states—“ Nothing I consider has taken place in Ireland of so much importance to the furthering of true religion, and for the Interest of the Established Church, as the movement that has manifested itself in your parishes.

The Rev. Denis Browne writes September 1, 1842. I cannot tell you the interest which, my late visit to Dingle has produced in my mind in the progress of the work there. I was prepared to expect some little disappointment in visiting and personally inquiring into a work of which I had heard so much at a distance but so far from being disappointed, I have found in reality to exceed far my most sanguine and having visited every post in the district, and in minutely inquired into all the particular work that is going on in it, and having carefully examined some of the principal converts, I am satisfied that the work is of God.

Of the state and progress of the colony, Rev. C. Gayer writes in a letter, dated December 31 1842 “I have now to state that in addition to the houses mentioned in your last report, ten been completed in Dingle, and ten more are now of being built at Ventry, five of which, finished. In the Dingle colony there are one hundred and fifty individuals receiving shelter, among who are twelve widows. The numbers of children attending the Sunday school are one hundred and seventy-six. The adult Sunday class .has increased to one hundred and thirty. Since the operation of the Society have been enlarged three scripture readers and two schoolmasters have been supported by the colony.

SERIOUS LOSS OF PROPERTY BY FIRE,

Early on Sunday morning last, Adam Nixon, Esq., Graan, had his entire, range, of offices, including stables, barn, cow houses &c., entirely consumed, together with between 60 and 70 cocks of hay that were stored on the lofts; a quantity of farming and, jaunting-car harness, &etc., &etc., and the dwelling house and inside properly narrowly escaped falling a prey to the destructive element likewise. The disaster originated in the negligence of a farm servant, who in going to bed in a room over the stables placed the candle against the bed post and fell asleep. About three o’clock the family, of the house was alarmed, and on getting out found the whole range in flames; the alarm was extended in every direction; and messengers were dispatched to town for assistance. Captain Henderson and the police repaired to the place forthwith, and Col. Philips with the utmost promptitude sent out two officers and a company of the 53d. The country people, the military and police used every possible exertion to get the fire under but without effect. The pump on the premises was broken in a short time and water having then to be brought from a distance rendered the most strenuous exertions fruitless. The only object then was to cut off every, communication from the dwelling-house, which was happily effected. The furniture and property of the house were all carried out, and though strewn about the most trifling article was not lost. The military and police remained till the offices were burnt out, and all fears of the mischief extending further removed. All praise is due to these forces for their exertions, both officers and men, as also to the country people who left no labour unemployed. A young stable-boy lying in the room where the fire originated did not awake till surrounded by the flames, and in getting out was severely scorched; he had to be conveyed immediately to the Infirmary. Mr. Nixon’s loss cannot be much less than £200. It is melancholy to reflect that a corporate town like Enniskillen could not afford an Engine, which would on this one occasion have saved more than its own value.

November 1843.

THURSDAY, NOV. 2nd 1843. THE DUBLIN EVENING MAIL. THE IMPARTIAL REPORTER—AND THE DISTURBED STATE OF THE COUNTY FERMANAGH. We were not a little amused seeing the following in the “Impartial” representing the state of this county as bordering on absolute insurrection. “Scarcely, a night passes that multitudes of rustics assemble in martial form blowing horns to the great annoyance of the Protestant inhabitants.. Indeed to such an extent is the spirit of intimidation that some of the most respectable families have determined on abandoning their country dwellings and settling for protection in Enniskillen.”

Where our friend Polly ‘Partial got such information on the state of the County can best be supposed by placing him in conversation with some old woman of enfeebled nerves and constitution, whom the rumours of army pouring into Ireland, the issue of a Government proclamation against O’Connell, the impending state trials &c., are naturally enough calculated to make tremble, and fancy the frame work of society in Ireland about to fall into an universal dissolution. A community of feeling easily creates a similarity of effects, and hence we have this agitated production on the awfully alarming state of Fermanagh. For curiosity sake we should like to hear the names of some of these “most respectable families’ of the county in whom the martial blood of their ancestors, as Enniskilleners and Fermanaghmen, has become so degenerated as to tremble at such an imaginary state of things here; and instead of our reality as ‘the most peaceable County in Ireland, making us decidedly one of the worst at the present moment.

This would all have been allowed to go for the usual worth generally bestowed on the authenticity of the Impartial on local matters, and serve the purpose of laugh and ridicule. But when, we find the Dublin Evening Mail taking up this very piece of childish bugabooism, and making serious use of it we feel bound, from respect to such a respectable portion of the Irish press, to set our cotemporary right.

If there were the slightest foundation for any such rumours as the above, they must have been noticed by the police in their daily reports. Nothing of the kind, we venture to assert, has found its way out through this channel, the only one to be depended on.—And so far from such an impression existing in any respectable mind in the county, we have heard gentlemen from nearly every direction laugh at the credulity of our nervous old friend. It was indeed said that some nights back horns were heard in the neighbourhood of Belview, about two miles from this town. But to suppose it was anything like Repeal work would be very ludicrous. To account in some measure for the publication of this absurdity we have only to direct attention to same number of the Impartial and— FALSEHOOD No. 2. —we find it stated that a large quantity of ammunition, several small pieces of cannon, scaling ladders, and stores, were escorted into this garrison yesterday (Wednesday) by, a party of the 60th Rifles.” It is true, as stated by us last Thursday, that a large, supply of ammunition for the use of the garrison and district arrived, here from Dublin. But where are “several small pieces of cannon, scaling ladders &c.,” to be found. We must only go to the old store-house, the Impartial’s imagination.

No 3. The Impartial further states that “The division of Police force now-quartered in Barrack-lane is to be removed to Darling-street, in order to give accommodation to the military. The Police have occupied for some years, the building formerly used as the military hospital ; but as to their being about to be removed from it for the use of the military, the contrary is the fact—they are to continue to occupy it for a Barrack. So much for the authority of the Impartial on local matters.

We might go. still further in contradicting statements from this respectable local print’s last issue, as for instance, that a brigade of artillery is forthwith to be stationed in this garrison. . This may ultimately be the fact, and would no doubt be desirable, but there is not a conjecture in any creditable quarter that this addition is at present to be made to the garrison. By chance the certainty on which much of the local news of the place is hazarded—this statement of our contemporary may turn out true; however there is now no authority in life for giving it as a piece of information.

These corrections of misstatements given to the public is surely enough in one week—52 weeks at the same rate would form a handsome collection .of information in a newspaper for one year.

We often enjoy our smiles at the shifts to which the Impartial’s and a certain class of its supporters are driven in the vain attempt to counteract the growing influence of the Erne Packet. “LOCAL News! forsooth is the word—“ Local news“ In this respect the Reporter has the most. To wit, we say, last Thursday, and many a Thursday.

One of the principal objects had in view by us in these remarks was setting our Dublin cotemporary right; it requires but little reasoning to do this—their eye is a keen one, and can easily see where argument lies. But we have made an enlarged use of the occasion to give a hint in quarters where we know it will be stingingly felt. There is much of this nature before us which we are reserving for matured opportunities. We promise we shall raise blushes yet. If the Reporter had written a dissertation on the sectarian jealousies and gross bigotry to be found in Fermanagh, he might justly blast but alarms to the peace of society when Repeal thunders at a far distance from us, thank Providence.

 

MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT. A SOLDIER OF THE 53D DROWNED. On Tuesday evening four soldiers of the 53d went a short distance down the lake and on their return near Derrygore point by some accident the boat upset and a fine young man of the name of Leeks was drowned. Two of the other three very narrowly escaped, and without for very great exertions on the part, of a young lad, a civilian, who happened to be on the shore, must have shared the fate of their comrade: the two men are still lying very ill. The body of Leeks was got yesterday about twelve o’clock, and an inquest was held in the afternoon. We understand the officers and men are raising a handsome subscription to reward the country lad for his brave conduct.

 

A PLUNDERER’S STIPEND. Mr. O’Connell having toiled assiduously, and with his wonted energy, another year in his vocation of public plunderer, now comes forward, on the principle that the labourer is worthy of his hire, to demand his well-earned wages. He has accordingly notified to the people of Ireland that they must pay him or take the consequence, on or before Sunday, the 19th of November next. Yea, pay him for swindling them—pay him for gulling them—pay him for deceiving, deluding, and robbing them. This is but perfectly just. Is it for nothing that the Liberator should have devoted his time and talents in levying from the poorest people in Europe the enormous sum of forty-five thousand pounds sterling (for such, we assure our readers, it amounts to in round numbers) since the commencement of the present year, to say nothing of the past? Surety not. Shame, then, on Ireland, if she does not come forward to acknowledge and remunerate so magnificent a service as this. What has become of the £45,000 is certainly no affair of ours; enough to know O’Connell has done with it just what and how he pleased. For this, too, as it must have caused him some exertion, it is surely but right that he should be liberally compensated. By all means, then, let Ireland remember the 19th of next November—Erne Packet.

 

1843 November.

November 2nd 1843. … town, was an evidence for his brother in a case of land, This Lunny, under the cross-examination of Mr. W. A.. Dane, which afforded a crowded court no small amusement, acknowledged he was not always on such good terms with his brother, as to become an evidence for him. That he had had a falling out with him, and processed him for work done was the expression. To further, questions this “work done” was none other than having undertaken to procure a wife for the brother, with the agreement to  receiving a percentage from the Lady’s fortune whatever it might be, viz., £6 for £50, £7 for £60, and £2 for every £10 higher. As far as we understand he did procure the wife, and a differ about the percentage was the cause of the process mentioned, which however did not reach the distance of a trial, as they managed to settle the dispute.

LOUGH ERNE NAVIGATION. Monday, R. Grey, Esq., Engineer to our Navigation Committee, commenced removing the Weirs. The steamer will now be able to ply with ease, and so soon as the forthcoming spring weather will answer, the bed of the river at the Weirs will be deepened as the first principal part of the Works.

Yesterday morning as the steamer, Countess of Erne was plying up the lough, the fireman of the boat fell overboard and was being carried down by the stream, when the pilot, Mulhern, gallantly leaped overboard and saved him from a watery grave, by bearing him up until a boat was sent to them.      ,

ENROLMENT OF OUR PENSIONERS. Captain Beaufoy, h.p, has arrived in Enniskillen for the purpose of enrolling of the pensioners: of the district. (Retired soldiers)

WESLEYAN TEA MEETING.—Yesterday evening the Dissenting Methodist held their Annual Tea Meeting in the Town-hall.

THE WEATHER. — The greater part of last week, up to Sunday evening, was constantly wet. Monday and Tuesday nights we had rather heavy frosts, and the days peculiarly fine. Last night there was also a heavy frost. Tuesday morning there was a dense fog, which cleared off about ten o’clock.

The Treasurer of the county Infirmary has received eight shillings and three pence, fines levied by the Magistrates at Enniskillen petit session.

Tuesday, the Marquis of Ely, and Lord Loftus passed through town to visit Wm. D’Arcy, Esq., Necarn Castle. Yesterday the Earl and Countess of Belmore left Castlecoole for the county Tyrone, to be present at the nuptials of James Lendrum, Esq;, of Jamestown and Miss Vesey, of Derryard House.

GOVERNMENT COMMISSION. Mr. Pennethorne the Commissioner appointed to inquire into the execution of the original Contracts to building certain of the Union Workhouses in Ireland has arrived in Dublin for the purpose. The subjects of inquiry will be 1. The choice of site; 2d—The execution of the building; 3d-The amount of the cost of the building. 4th— The sufficiency of the supply of water. 5th; The sufficiency of the arrangements for drainage. 6th. Whether any unnecessary expense has been incurred for decoration.