1843 May-June

25-5-1843. The family of the Hon. and Rev. J. C. Maude has left Chanter-hill for Dublin, for a short time.

LISNASKEA Union.—At the last meeting of the Board, the following resolutions were unanimously passed on the occasion of a change taking place in the other district Unions, by which Cavan and Lisnaskea will be placed under the superintendence of Mr. Handcock, and Mr. Otway’s district be extended from here to Sligo and along the Western coast   Resolved—“That the Guardians of the Lisnaskea Poor Law Union having heard with regret of the contemplated removal of Mr. Assistant Commissioner Otway from the superintendence of this Union, cannot allow this opportunity to pass without expressing their acknowledgment and thanks for his exertions in the performance of his duties, and for the conciliatory manner he has conducted the duties of his office ever since the formation of the Union, and also for big extreme consideration and anxiety to promote the well working of the system. Resolved “That the Chairman be requested to forward a copy of the foregoing resolution to Mr. Otway.”

LOUGH ERNE NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT. R. Gray, Esq., our County Surveyor, has been appointed Engineer to the Lough Erne Navigation Improvement Committee, and has received directions to prepare plans and estimates for the removal of some of the obstructions, which is to be commenced immediately.

12th Lancers.—We are sorry to find that several of the horses of the troop of this Regiment lately arrived here, are in a hopeless state from glanders, brought on by the hardships they had been subject to attending Repeal meetings, and being obliged, in many places through the country, to put up with very indifferent and unsuitable stabling and forage. One horse has already died, and four or five more are expected to fall.

CLONES RIOTS. NEWTOWNBUTLER PETTY SESSIONS. From a correspondent we learn that on yesterday week there was a case entertained by the magistrates of this bench against a respectable young man named Beatty, for firing a loaded pistol at a person of the name of Maguire on the evening of Easter Monday, on his way home from Clones from the meeting there. A Mr. Clements, Barrister, and a Mr. Gartlan, Solicitor, both from the Repeal Association, attended on behalf of Maguire, and Mr. Scotty Attorney, appeared for Mr. Beatty.

The chief Evidence was Maguire, himself who swore that on the above evening at a place called Doona, between Clones and Newtownbutler, while stooped behind a ditch he heard a shot, and on looking up saw young Mr Beatty on a car with a pistol in his hand directed towards him. Another witness named Cochrane, deposed to having seen Beatty pass near Doona, some short time previous to the supposed occurrence, nine o’clock. Though there was most satisfactory evidence on the part of Beatty, the magistrates thought it better to let it remain for the Quarter Sessions. This will be a singular case and one calculated to show the doings of the party. It appears Maguire was servant to Beatty’s father some time since, which service he left, and therefore, must have well known the person of Beatty had he been at the place of the supposed occurrence.

THURSDAY JUNE 1, 1843. THE UNITED STATES—ARRIVAL OF THE NEW STEAMSHIP HIBERNIA. (From the Correspondent of the Evening Mail.) LIVERPOOL, SUNDAY.—This splendid new steamship, under Captain Judkins, arrived here this morning, and her maiden homeward trip certainly exceeds, in point of speed, anything that has as yet ever been anticipated. She sailed from Halifax late on the evening of the 18th inst and arrived at the Mersey at an early hour this morning, after completing the voyage in a little more than nine days which, at this season of the year, is without a parallel. Her outward voyage was also one of extreme swiftness. The Great Western, which, sailed hence on the 29th of April, reached New York on the 12th inst, and the Caledonia, which carried out the mails from this on the 4th instant, had arrived at Halifax before the Hibernia sailed, and had left for Boston.

The Earl of Erne, Earl Belmore, and George Tipping Esq., are spending some days with F.W. Barton, Esq., at Clonelly availing themselves of the pleasure of angling, off which that part of the lake affords abundance. The Lord Bishop of Clogher has left Dublin, for the Palace, Clogher where his Lordship is expected to arrive this day,

12th Lancers. – The Troop of the 12th Lancers which has been here for the last fortnight, received a sudden rout on Tuesday morning to proceed to Dublin for embarkation to Liver pool, and proceed forward to join the headquarters ordered from Glasgow where they have been but a few weeks. The two Troops of the regiment have likewise been routed from Belfast. The Troop left here on yesterday morning at eight o’clock, under the command of Lieutenant Munroe, and Cornet Williams. This sudden move is evidently in consequence of the present Manchester riots and from apprehension of something equally or more serious about to take place, otherwise the troop here would not have been removed in the present state of their horses: one has died and nine have been left behind to be shot, while several of the remainder of the Troop are very likely to take bad on the march. The illness of the horses wears every appearance of glanders, if so it is very unwise to run the risk of infecting the stables in their line of march.

NEW COACH CONTRACT.  We understand that the new coaches which were brought down to start from Ballyshannon and Enniskillen on Sunday last had to be guarded by police from Dublin and at Navan on Thursday horses could with great difficulty be procured to forward them, neither would any coaches be allowed into any yard for the night.  They had to be left at the police station and watched by the Constabulary throughout the night.  We are happy to observe that both the coaches commenced the running from here and Ballyshannon without any sign of annoyance.

The Hon and Rev. J. C. Maude thankfully acknowledges the receipt of £50 from the Marquis of Ely for the tower of Enniskillen church.

ENNISKILLEN COACH FACTORY.  In directing public attention to the advantages held out by Mr. Ferguson we have the pleasure of adjoining ours with the general praise expressed in favour of Mr. Ferguson’s enterprise.  The new drag built by the proprietor reflects the highest credit on him and vies perhaps with any other posting establishment in so respectable a turn out.

On Friday, the Rev. Loftus Reade and Mrs. Reade entertained the officers of the 43rd depot and a party at dinner at Levelly  Glebe.

JAMES DENHAM, ESQ.  In a recent visit to his tenants near Clonegal in this county made them an abatement of 12 ½ per cent in their rents for the year ending the 29th of September last; he has also offered to pay half the expense of draining their respective farms according to Mr. Smith’s System and for which purpose he has sent down a full set of the necessary implements to commence the work.  He also in the most generous manner forgave one of his tenants a large arrear of rent in consequence of the heavy loss he sustained by disease that crept in among his cattle.  Such kind acts are deserving of justice and of the gratitude of his tenantry.  Carlow Sentinel.

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Repeal Riots Enniskillen 1843.

The Repeal Association was an Irish mass membership political movement set up by Daniel O’Connell in 1830 to campaign for a repeal of the Act of Union of 1800 between Great Britain and Ireland. The Association’s aim was to revert Ireland to the constitutional position briefly achieved by Henry Grattan and his patriots in the 1780s, but this time with a full Catholic involvement that was now possible following the Act of Emancipation in 1829, supported by the electorate approved under the Reform Act of 1832. On its failure by the late 1840s the Young Ireland movement developed.

May 18th 1843.REPEAL RIOTS IN ENNISKILLEN.  When the doughty leader of the agitation would not venture his carcass among us to give his respectable followers here the opportunity of kicking up a Repeal row, they must contrive to get up one themselves.  Friday night last a young man of the town in passing home through the streets was attacked at the Market house and well beaten for having been an anti-repealer.  Later as it was (near 11) it was likely to lead to serious consequences as a number of both sides got into the streets in a short time and attacked each other.  Dr. Frith, J.P. was called out of bed and after some difficulty with the assistance of Captain Henderson and the police succeeded in restoring peace.  Next evening, Saturday, the streets began to be thronged at an early hour and about nine a desperate row commenced; from one bridge to the other there was a general attack; sticks and stones were in ample demand and used with no very sparing hands.  In Schoolhouse lane a woman opened her top window and with the strong arm of her Repeal rage sent some three or four pounds weight of a smoothing iron in amongst a Repealing body of Conservatives in the hope of repealing the Union of the parietal-bones of some of their unfortunate skulls. (The parietal bones are two bones in the human skull which, when joined together, form the sides and roof of the cranium. Each bone is roughly quadrilateral in form, and has two surfaces, four borders, and four angles. It is named from the Latin paries meaning a, wall.) Dr. Frith and of the police were likewise on this evening actively employed in endeavouring to suppress this riot which after a considerable time the evinced taking some of the chief of both sides into custody.  Had things gone on a little further this evening it would have been serious enough to call out the military and to such a height it would most surely have arisen but for the very judicious manner in which both Dr. Frith and the Captain Henderson managed them.  On Sunday evening there where apprehensions of the vagabonds of the back streets attempting a renewal of the affray and it was most confidently expected a sally would have been made on the Conservatives but active vigilance and a there dread of the military restrained a movement on either side.  In the first commencement we are not going to say that blame is not in some degree to be attached to both sides.  The young man, it appears, was under the influence of liquor and a gang of designing blackguards with which this town is infested took advantage to cry out for Repeal which was foolishly answered by the other with a counter cry when he was immediately attacked.  The motley and ragged groups of Repeal scamps had evidently determined to try their strength with the Conservatives but from the convincing arguments which was administered to them they felt their noodles just as safe by keeping quiet.  We shall not be surprised to find Mr. O’Connell one of these days proposing a vote of thanks to the ragged Repealers of Enniskillen as a reward for their services as in the case of priest McGuinness in Clones.  In a gratuitous attack there is no blame to the Conservatives to defend themselves but too they should avoid every occasion of aggression.

1843 News.

October 19th 1843. LOUGH ERNE NAVIGATION.—Yesterday the committee held a meeting in the Court-house which was attended by the Earl of Erne, Wm. Archdall, Folliott Barton, Esqrs, Rev. J. G. Porter, George Wood, John Collum, Roderick Grey, and John Halliday, Esqrs. Every remaining arrangement for carrying this great object into effect was finally settled. The purchase of the Weirs was completed, and this principal obstruction is, now to be removed forthwith. The removal of several obstructions was likewise decided upon, and they are to be proceeded with early next spring.

BUTTER IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY.—Yesterday the Earl of Erne, Folliott Barton, Wm. Archdall, James Lendrum, Esqrs., the Rev. J. G. Porter, Robert Archdall, Esq., and others held a meeting in the Grand Jury room which was attended by the Sessions Grand Jury and a number of respectable farmers. Lord Erne addressed the meeting at length, and read some valuable communications on the subject. Mr. Porter also addressed the, meeting, and much useful conversation ensued which is likely to prove of great importance to this county in this material branch of Irish, produce.

3D DRAGOON GUARDS. Captain Nugent’s Troop of this Regiment quartered in this garrison for the last few months, marched yesterday to join headquarters in Dundalk, from which place the Regt. is to proceed to Dublin, and will be relieved by the 5th, or Green Horse, a Troop of which is expected here on the 30th. The troop was played out of town yesterday by the fine band of the 53d,

EXPECTED FACTION FIGHT AT PETTIGO. From information which has reached the local magistrates of the Pettigo district, and forwarded to the military and police authorities here, for detachments to attend the fair there on to-morrow. This day a company of the 53d left this garrison for the purpose, and Captain Henderson and twenty of the Constabulary also, left, this town for Pettigo, and will be reinforced by parties of Police from. Donegal and other stations,

THE WEATHER—Monday night we had a fearful storm here; it blew most violently during the entire night. Some large trees were blown down in the neighbourhood, and hay and corn were knocked about in different places, but neither in the town nor country have any houses suffered. The weather has been fine since,

THE FINE ARTS.—In the collection of prints now on sale with Mr. Caddy, as agent for Mr. Thomas Boys, London, Printseller to the royal family, we were particularly gratified with the splendid style in which “The last moments of Charlies I.” ‘‘Trial of the Earl of Strafford,” and “Cromwell’s family interceding for the life of Charles the First” “Belton Abbey, &c’ are executed. Mr Boys’ Fine Art Distribution takes place in London on Wednesday, 25th October inst. By the prospectus we perceive the prizes vary from four to five hundred guineas, and each subscriber—independent of his chance of drawing a prize on payment of one guinea—receive from the agent a print value for the sum paid—which is selected by the subscriber from unrivaled collection now on view with the agent. We wish Mr. Boys every success in his interesting lottery. Indeed we have in doubt the nobility, gentry, clergy, etc. will justly appreciate this great Artist’s laudable undertaking.

DANCING,—In directing attention to Mt. Sullivan’s advertisement, we are justified in remarking that his patronage in this place has arisen solely from his merits, and that the advantages held out in his proposed evening class are such as are worthy of attention by those wishing instruction in the graceful art.

Saturday last, the Earl and Countess of Belmore, family and suite, arrived at Castlecoole from Cowes, Isle of Wight.

The Lord Lieutenant has appointed the Rev. J. G. Porter Commissioner of Education in the room of Lord Vesey Fitzgerald deceased.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE ERNE PACKET. Sir, beg leave to send you an extract from the last report for 1843, of the Dingle colony, in the county Kerry, which you may probably think worth inserting in your paper. They are valuable, as showing the influence of Gospel truth amongst our poor benighted fellow-countrymen, and at the present moment when there is so much to distract and dishearten, may prove peculiarly gratifying to many of your readers who probably have not have been aware of the satisfactory work now in progress in the above remote corner of our native land and who may be induced to aid it by  their contributions, which I am sure you would readily transmit to any of the following persona appointed to receive the same, namely—Mr. Robertson, 3, Grafton-street; Messrs. William Curry, jun., and Co , 9, Upper Sackville-street; or Messrs. La Touche and Co., Castle-street Dublin; the Treasurer, the Rev. Charles Gayer, Ventry, or the Secretary Miss Mahon, Booterstown, near Dublin. I am etc. A FRIEND OF IRELAND.

In the town of Dingle, which is situated in the most western part of Ireland, on a promontory extending forty miles into the Atlantic ocean, and in the district immediately around it, there have been 750 persons brought out of the Church of Rome by the preaching of the Gospel, within the last seven years. Three entirely new congregations have been formed of converts: two Churches have been erected and five school houses for the children and it is now found necessary to enlarge the Church at Dingle the third time, as in that town alone there are 250 converts added to the original Protestant congregation. In Ventry there are 200 converts, a Church and School-house have been erected, and ten houses are now being built for the protection of the converts. At Dunerlin there are 65 converts, a Church and School house have been erected. In Donequin and the adjacent Blasquett Islands there are 110 converts. At Donequin a commodious building is nearly completed, which will be used as a school-house during the week, and for the Church services on Sundays; a school-house, with a residence for a master, has also been built on the Blasquett Island.

In Kilmechedar parish, there are about 45 converts a school-house is now being erected there. In addition to these enumerated, there are about fifty converts scattered in different places who cannot be counted with any particular .congregation.

Besides those still living, nineteen converts have died since the commencement of the work, all of whom, without any exception, have remained steadfast in the faith, notwithstanding the violent and persevering efforts that in some cases have been used by their Roman Catholic relations to induce them at their dying hour to recant. Such testimonies have been most valuable, proving if anything were needed prove that their change was no tone of mere outward profession to secure for themselves any supposed earthly gain, while the full value of the testimony cannot be felt by those who are not acquainted with the assault of mingled warning and threat, and earnest entreaty which the dying convert has often to endure.

If .more were needed to confirm the reality of the work, the following extracts from the letters of the Bishop of Limerick, and the. Rev. Denis Browne the Rev. Charles Gayer, might be so:—In a letter, dated September 1, 1842, the Bishop of Limerick states—“ Nothing I consider has taken place in Ireland of so much importance to the furthering of true religion, and for the Interest of the Established Church, as the movement that has manifested itself in your parishes.

The Rev. Denis Browne writes September 1, 1842. I cannot tell you the interest which, my late visit to Dingle has produced in my mind in the progress of the work there. I was prepared to expect some little disappointment in visiting and personally inquiring into a work of which I had heard so much at a distance but so far from being disappointed, I have found in reality to exceed far my most sanguine and having visited every post in the district, and in minutely inquired into all the particular work that is going on in it, and having carefully examined some of the principal converts, I am satisfied that the work is of God.

Of the state and progress of the colony, Rev. C. Gayer writes in a letter, dated December 31 1842 “I have now to state that in addition to the houses mentioned in your last report, ten been completed in Dingle, and ten more are now of being built at Ventry, five of which, finished. In the Dingle colony there are one hundred and fifty individuals receiving shelter, among who are twelve widows. The numbers of children attending the Sunday school are one hundred and seventy-six. The adult Sunday class .has increased to one hundred and thirty. Since the operation of the Society have been enlarged three scripture readers and two schoolmasters have been supported by the colony.

SERIOUS LOSS OF PROPERTY BY FIRE,

Early on Sunday morning last, Adam Nixon, Esq., Graan, had his entire, range, of offices, including stables, barn, cow houses &c., entirely consumed, together with between 60 and 70 cocks of hay that were stored on the lofts; a quantity of farming and, jaunting-car harness, &etc., &etc., and the dwelling house and inside properly narrowly escaped falling a prey to the destructive element likewise. The disaster originated in the negligence of a farm servant, who in going to bed in a room over the stables placed the candle against the bed post and fell asleep. About three o’clock the family, of the house was alarmed, and on getting out found the whole range in flames; the alarm was extended in every direction; and messengers were dispatched to town for assistance. Captain Henderson and the police repaired to the place forthwith, and Col. Philips with the utmost promptitude sent out two officers and a company of the 53d. The country people, the military and police used every possible exertion to get the fire under but without effect. The pump on the premises was broken in a short time and water having then to be brought from a distance rendered the most strenuous exertions fruitless. The only object then was to cut off every, communication from the dwelling-house, which was happily effected. The furniture and property of the house were all carried out, and though strewn about the most trifling article was not lost. The military and police remained till the offices were burnt out, and all fears of the mischief extending further removed. All praise is due to these forces for their exertions, both officers and men, as also to the country people who left no labour unemployed. A young stable-boy lying in the room where the fire originated did not awake till surrounded by the flames, and in getting out was severely scorched; he had to be conveyed immediately to the Infirmary. Mr. Nixon’s loss cannot be much less than £200. It is melancholy to reflect that a corporate town like Enniskillen could not afford an Engine, which would on this one occasion have saved more than its own value.

November 1843.

THURSDAY, NOV. 2nd 1843. THE DUBLIN EVENING MAIL. THE IMPARTIAL REPORTER—AND THE DISTURBED STATE OF THE COUNTY FERMANAGH. We were not a little amused seeing the following in the “Impartial” representing the state of this county as bordering on absolute insurrection. “Scarcely, a night passes that multitudes of rustics assemble in martial form blowing horns to the great annoyance of the Protestant inhabitants.. Indeed to such an extent is the spirit of intimidation that some of the most respectable families have determined on abandoning their country dwellings and settling for protection in Enniskillen.”

Where our friend Polly ‘Partial got such information on the state of the County can best be supposed by placing him in conversation with some old woman of enfeebled nerves and constitution, whom the rumours of army pouring into Ireland, the issue of a Government proclamation against O’Connell, the impending state trials &c., are naturally enough calculated to make tremble, and fancy the frame work of society in Ireland about to fall into an universal dissolution. A community of feeling easily creates a similarity of effects, and hence we have this agitated production on the awfully alarming state of Fermanagh. For curiosity sake we should like to hear the names of some of these “most respectable families’ of the county in whom the martial blood of their ancestors, as Enniskilleners and Fermanaghmen, has become so degenerated as to tremble at such an imaginary state of things here; and instead of our reality as ‘the most peaceable County in Ireland, making us decidedly one of the worst at the present moment.

This would all have been allowed to go for the usual worth generally bestowed on the authenticity of the Impartial on local matters, and serve the purpose of laugh and ridicule. But when, we find the Dublin Evening Mail taking up this very piece of childish bugabooism, and making serious use of it we feel bound, from respect to such a respectable portion of the Irish press, to set our cotemporary right.

If there were the slightest foundation for any such rumours as the above, they must have been noticed by the police in their daily reports. Nothing of the kind, we venture to assert, has found its way out through this channel, the only one to be depended on.—And so far from such an impression existing in any respectable mind in the county, we have heard gentlemen from nearly every direction laugh at the credulity of our nervous old friend. It was indeed said that some nights back horns were heard in the neighbourhood of Belview, about two miles from this town. But to suppose it was anything like Repeal work would be very ludicrous. To account in some measure for the publication of this absurdity we have only to direct attention to same number of the Impartial and— FALSEHOOD No. 2. —we find it stated that a large quantity of ammunition, several small pieces of cannon, scaling ladders, and stores, were escorted into this garrison yesterday (Wednesday) by, a party of the 60th Rifles.” It is true, as stated by us last Thursday, that a large, supply of ammunition for the use of the garrison and district arrived, here from Dublin. But where are “several small pieces of cannon, scaling ladders &c.,” to be found. We must only go to the old store-house, the Impartial’s imagination.

No 3. The Impartial further states that “The division of Police force now-quartered in Barrack-lane is to be removed to Darling-street, in order to give accommodation to the military. The Police have occupied for some years, the building formerly used as the military hospital ; but as to their being about to be removed from it for the use of the military, the contrary is the fact—they are to continue to occupy it for a Barrack. So much for the authority of the Impartial on local matters.

We might go. still further in contradicting statements from this respectable local print’s last issue, as for instance, that a brigade of artillery is forthwith to be stationed in this garrison. . This may ultimately be the fact, and would no doubt be desirable, but there is not a conjecture in any creditable quarter that this addition is at present to be made to the garrison. By chance the certainty on which much of the local news of the place is hazarded—this statement of our contemporary may turn out true; however there is now no authority in life for giving it as a piece of information.

These corrections of misstatements given to the public is surely enough in one week—52 weeks at the same rate would form a handsome collection .of information in a newspaper for one year.

We often enjoy our smiles at the shifts to which the Impartial’s and a certain class of its supporters are driven in the vain attempt to counteract the growing influence of the Erne Packet. “LOCAL News! forsooth is the word—“ Local news“ In this respect the Reporter has the most. To wit, we say, last Thursday, and many a Thursday.

One of the principal objects had in view by us in these remarks was setting our Dublin cotemporary right; it requires but little reasoning to do this—their eye is a keen one, and can easily see where argument lies. But we have made an enlarged use of the occasion to give a hint in quarters where we know it will be stingingly felt. There is much of this nature before us which we are reserving for matured opportunities. We promise we shall raise blushes yet. If the Reporter had written a dissertation on the sectarian jealousies and gross bigotry to be found in Fermanagh, he might justly blast but alarms to the peace of society when Repeal thunders at a far distance from us, thank Providence.

 

MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT. A SOLDIER OF THE 53D DROWNED. On Tuesday evening four soldiers of the 53d went a short distance down the lake and on their return near Derrygore point by some accident the boat upset and a fine young man of the name of Leeks was drowned. Two of the other three very narrowly escaped, and without for very great exertions on the part, of a young lad, a civilian, who happened to be on the shore, must have shared the fate of their comrade: the two men are still lying very ill. The body of Leeks was got yesterday about twelve o’clock, and an inquest was held in the afternoon. We understand the officers and men are raising a handsome subscription to reward the country lad for his brave conduct.

 

A PLUNDERER’S STIPEND. Mr. O’Connell having toiled assiduously, and with his wonted energy, another year in his vocation of public plunderer, now comes forward, on the principle that the labourer is worthy of his hire, to demand his well-earned wages. He has accordingly notified to the people of Ireland that they must pay him or take the consequence, on or before Sunday, the 19th of November next. Yea, pay him for swindling them—pay him for gulling them—pay him for deceiving, deluding, and robbing them. This is but perfectly just. Is it for nothing that the Liberator should have devoted his time and talents in levying from the poorest people in Europe the enormous sum of forty-five thousand pounds sterling (for such, we assure our readers, it amounts to in round numbers) since the commencement of the present year, to say nothing of the past? Surety not. Shame, then, on Ireland, if she does not come forward to acknowledge and remunerate so magnificent a service as this. What has become of the £45,000 is certainly no affair of ours; enough to know O’Connell has done with it just what and how he pleased. For this, too, as it must have caused him some exertion, it is surely but right that he should be liberally compensated. By all means, then, let Ireland remember the 19th of next November—Erne Packet.

 

1843 November.

November 2nd 1843. … town, was an evidence for his brother in a case of land, This Lunny, under the cross-examination of Mr. W. A.. Dane, which afforded a crowded court no small amusement, acknowledged he was not always on such good terms with his brother, as to become an evidence for him. That he had had a falling out with him, and processed him for work done was the expression. To further, questions this “work done” was none other than having undertaken to procure a wife for the brother, with the agreement to  receiving a percentage from the Lady’s fortune whatever it might be, viz., £6 for £50, £7 for £60, and £2 for every £10 higher. As far as we understand he did procure the wife, and a differ about the percentage was the cause of the process mentioned, which however did not reach the distance of a trial, as they managed to settle the dispute.

LOUGH ERNE NAVIGATION. Monday, R. Grey, Esq., Engineer to our Navigation Committee, commenced removing the Weirs. The steamer will now be able to ply with ease, and so soon as the forthcoming spring weather will answer, the bed of the river at the Weirs will be deepened as the first principal part of the Works.

Yesterday morning as the steamer, Countess of Erne was plying up the lough, the fireman of the boat fell overboard and was being carried down by the stream, when the pilot, Mulhern, gallantly leaped overboard and saved him from a watery grave, by bearing him up until a boat was sent to them.      ,

ENROLMENT OF OUR PENSIONERS. Captain Beaufoy, h.p, has arrived in Enniskillen for the purpose of enrolling of the pensioners: of the district. (Retired soldiers)

WESLEYAN TEA MEETING.—Yesterday evening the Dissenting Methodist held their Annual Tea Meeting in the Town-hall.

THE WEATHER. — The greater part of last week, up to Sunday evening, was constantly wet. Monday and Tuesday nights we had rather heavy frosts, and the days peculiarly fine. Last night there was also a heavy frost. Tuesday morning there was a dense fog, which cleared off about ten o’clock.

The Treasurer of the county Infirmary has received eight shillings and three pence, fines levied by the Magistrates at Enniskillen petit session.

Tuesday, the Marquis of Ely, and Lord Loftus passed through town to visit Wm. D’Arcy, Esq., Necarn Castle. Yesterday the Earl and Countess of Belmore left Castlecoole for the county Tyrone, to be present at the nuptials of James Lendrum, Esq;, of Jamestown and Miss Vesey, of Derryard House.

GOVERNMENT COMMISSION. Mr. Pennethorne the Commissioner appointed to inquire into the execution of the original Contracts to building certain of the Union Workhouses in Ireland has arrived in Dublin for the purpose. The subjects of inquiry will be 1. The choice of site; 2d—The execution of the building; 3d-The amount of the cost of the building. 4th— The sufficiency of the supply of water. 5th; The sufficiency of the arrangements for drainage. 6th. Whether any unnecessary expense has been incurred for decoration.

1954 January to June.

National Events.

The Flags and Emblems Act in Northern Ireland (6 April) bans interference with the Union Jack and effectively prohibits the public or private display of the tricolour
Michael Manning (aged 25) becomes the last man to be executed by the state in the Republic of Ireland: he is hanged on 20 April at Mountjoy jail, Dublin, for the murder of a nurse
General election in the Republic (18 May): a second coalition government takes office on 2 June with John A. Costello as Taoiseach
The IRA raids Gough military barracks, Armagh (12 June)
Brendan Behan’s The Quare Fellow opens at the Pike Theatre, Dublin (19 November)
A four-month bank dispute commences in the Republic (4 December)
The last issue of The Bell appears
Christy Brown’s My Left Foot is published
A record 84,856 people watch Cork beat Wexford in the All-Ireland hurling final at Croke Park

Births.

Jimmy Barry Murphy (hurler and Gaelic footballer) in Cork (22/8)
Ollie Campbell (rugby player) in Dublin (3/3)
Maud Cotter (stained-glass artist)
Síle de Valera (Fianna Fáil politician) in Dublin
Bob Geldof (rock musician, charity organizer) in Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin (5/10)
Richard Kearney (philosopher and writer) in Cork
Ger Loughnane (Clare hurler and manager)
Thomas McCarthy (poet) in Cappoquin, Co. Waterford
Kevin Moran (Dublin Gaelic footballer; Manchester United, Sporting Gijon, Blackburn Rovers and Republic of Ireland footballer) in Dublin (29/4)
Brian Mullins (Dublin Gaelic footballer) in Dublin (27/9)
Éilís Ní Dhuibhne (writer and lecturer) in Dublin
Julie O’Callaghan (poet) in Chicago
Mary O’Donnell (writer and broadcaster) in Monaghan
Dennis O’Driscoll (poet) in Thurles, Co. Tipperary
Bobby Sands (IRA member and hunger striker) in Belfast
Mikey Sheehy (Kerry Gaelic footballer) in Co. Kerry (28/7)

Deaths.

John Collins
Margaret Cousins
James Green Douglas
Denis Fahey
Henry Harrison
Elinor Price
Robert Smyllie.

Local Events.

2-1-54 Enniskillen new Fire Station, now completed, will be opened shortly. The brigade consists of 20 members under section leader Robert McCutcheon.

2-1-54 There is no need for alarm in Fermanagh says Dr. Brian Moore, Chief Medical Officer for the County, speaking about the four cases of infantile paralysis reported in Fermanagh in the past month.

2-1-54 A youth named Patrick Barron of Derryrona, Leggs PO, Belleek is in Fermanagh County Hospital suffering from head injuries suffered on Christmas Day while riding a motor cycle.

2-1-54 A Donegal youth, Johnston Morrow of Derrybrick, Clonelly was sentenced to one month imprisonment for driving a tractor while disqualified and without insurance or licence and also for obtaining a license while disqualified. He had been employed by David George Noble of Derrybrick.

9-1-54  St. Mary’s Hall, Devenish, was packed for “The Message of Fatima,” Pageant by the local school children. An enthralled audience drawn from four counties saw unfold scene by scene the wonderful miracle which shook the world only thirty six years ago. I take of my hat to Fr. Marron and his brilliant galaxy of juvenile stars and I think it only fair to hand a special bouquet to little Nuala Gilbride of Rosinver, who played the part of Our Lady of Fatima in a manner worthy of the highest commendation. The parts of the children to whom the apparition appeared were played by Bridie Neilan, Agnes Burns and M. J. Flanagan.

16-1-54 Irvinestown’s unbelievable plight to end soon. For years past they have had the water turned on for only two hours per day and only one hour in the Summer. In January they are to join up to the huge Lough Braden water network.

16-1-54 An application to have the Ballinamallard – Mossfield – Sydare closed for the annual “Enniskillen 100” motor cycle race this year was granted by Fermanagh County Council. Owing to a late application last year there was no race – the first occasion this happened since the war.

16-1-54  Lawyer and cattle dealer summonsed at Belleek as a result of accidents at a bad bend at Keenaghan, Belleek within five days of each other. The defendants were cattle dealer Maurice Leonard, Pettigo and Thomas T. Montague, LLB, Irvinestown. Leonard’s cattle lorry demolished a length of stone wall and had the front axle torn from the vehicle was fined £1 for driving without due care and 10s for not producing his insurance within five days. Evidence was given that the front tyres of the lorry were smooth. In his own defence Montague said that there was no evidence that he was driving without due care and that the skid marks and damage to the wall were just as likely to have been those caused by the lorry. Case dismissed for insufficient evidence.

16-1-54 In a sequel to a row over admission to a dance hall at Brollagh, Frederick Brock was fined £1 and bound over for a year on his own bail of £5. Sydney Brock who was trying to take his brother from the police was fined £3 for obstruction, £3 for disorderly behaviour and bound over for a year for £5. John Dolan was fined £3 for disorderly behaviour and £1 for obstruction and also bound over and Thomas Murphy was fined £1.

16-1-54 It was with regret that his many friends heard of the death of Mr. Patrick Eves, Kesh, one of the oldest and most respected residents of Kesh. Until he retired from business due to failing health he had carried on a long and successful business as a spirit merchant and farmer and had earned a fine reputation as a man of sound judgment, a good counselor and neighbour and the respect of men of all creeds.

23-1-54  Mrs Mary Mc Garrity, (49) wife of John Mc Garrity, tenant of apartments in the old Workhouse, Townhill, Irvinestown, gave her life on Friday night in an effort to save her two daughters, Josie (24) and Veronica (19) who were returning from the cinema at 11.00 when they became entangled in a live electricity cable in the darkness of an enclosed yard in front of their dwelling place. The wire had been broken in the storm. Hearing their screams their parents rushed down to help them and were aided by Samuel Gillespie, an electrician, who helped the father and two daughters get clear. Unfortunately Mrs Mc Garrity was fatally shocked and died on her way to hospital.

23-1-54  Garda William Melly, Dublin Metropolitan Police has retired after 39 year’s service from 1st January 1954. He was stationed all his time in Dublin and was attached to the Dublin District Courts for over 30 years. He served through all the troubled years in the city during his service. He was a native of Castle Caldwell, County Fermanagh.

23-1-54  It was with regret that the people of Devenish heard of the death of Mrs Ellen Feely on January 5th. She had been a member of the Total Abstinence Association since 1911.

6-2-54  Mr. S. Hernon, Secretary of Devenish GAA Club said in his report that last year was not an outstanding success although the Minor team had got to the County final only to be defeated by a very good Lisnaskea team.

13-2-54 The Annual Fermanagh County GAA Convention was held in Enniskillen on the last Sunday in January with 74 delegates present, the greatest ever number. Not counted were Mr. Denis Hogan and Denis Leonard of the newly formed Knocks club who were not allowed to vote since their team did not compete in the last championship in 1953. All three nominees for chairman were unwilling to put their names forward but this was not accepted and Mr. Thomas Campbell, Belleek, was retained in office for a fourth time. The most far-reaching motion to be decided was to reduce the number of players on Senior teams from 15 to 13. This probably suits most Fermanagh pitches better and should lead to a more open brand of football.

27-2-54 Lack Farmer, 54 year old, Francis Mc Cusker, Largy, Lack, was killed while loading trees on to a lorry from an embankment on his farm. A verdict of accidental death was returned at the inquest. He was a brother of Nurse McCusker, Ederney.

27-2-54 Regret has been occasioned by the death of Mrs F. Campbell, wife of Mr. Francis Campbell, Aghoo, Devenish, after a long illness.

6-3-54 A fine of £3 was imposed on Bernard Mc Kenna, Ardees, Roscor, Belleek for stealing an Exide battery from a motor cycle parked at Mahoo. District Inspector Wolseley said that the defendant had previously been convicted of stealing cattle.

6-3-54 The Belleek V Enniskillen Gaels football match was abandoned at half time due to snow with the score Belleek 0-4, Enniskillen 0-1.

6-3-54  Death of Leitrim-Born Christian Brother, founder of Australia’s Boy’s Town. Regret is felt in Kiltyclogher and district by the death of Rev. Bro. Paul Francis Keaney, which occurred suddenly at his Christian Brothers College, Perth, Australia last Friday, 28th February. Known all over the great Australian Continent as the founder of Australia’s Boy’s Town and beloved for his charity and kindness towards the flotsam and jetsam of humanity with whom his social activities brought him into contact. His death is mourned by hundreds of orphaned and abandoned boys who owing to Br Paul’s noble work are today happy and prosperous citizens.  He was born on a small farm at Corraleskin, Kiltyclogher in 1888 he was one of a family of nine of whom seven still survive. He joined the RIC in 1909 and served two years before emigrating. He received the OBE in the Coronation honours list. When he decided recently to return to Ireland after an absence of 42 years he was presented with a cheque for £1,500 by the Australian Prime Minister, Mr. Menzies, on behalf of a group of businessmen as a tribute to his services. However his return to Ireland was not to be. (Another view from the Internet)

Brother Kearney, of Bindoon notoriety, was a saint to the Catholic Church and a monster to the boys placed in his “care”. The Catholic Church erected a huge statue of him at Bindoon. In a case of typical Aussie larrikinism, former boys at the Home knocked its head off one day. Reports indicate that they were observed attempting to use it as a football.

One of the six Royal Commissioners, former Senator for Western Australia, Andrew Murray, once described Kearney as “a sadist who indulged in criminal assault and who knowingly protected rings of predatory Brothers engaged in systemic, long-term sexual assault on defenceless children (Hansard 2001, p.27275 – Matter of Public Interest). Presumably, Mr. Murray will be eager to revisit the matter during the course of the Royal Commission.

Former inmates of Bindoon also pull no punches with regard to “The Orphans’ Friend” (as the plaque on his statue reads) Kearney, an abuser who stood 6ft. tall and weighed 17 stone. Laurie Humphreys says that “I guess you could call him a sadist”. John Hennessy, also from Bindoon, speaks with a stutter which he says is a legacy of being stripped naked and publicly flogged by Kearney. He notes that “At Bindoon, the threat of violence was ever present. The Brothers carried a strap consisting of leather stitched together and a metal weight.”

In a glowing tribute to Kearney, even the Christian Brothers had to acknowledge that “Conversely, some former inmates remember him as a brutal disciplinarian with an ungovernable temper, who neglected their education, exploited their labour and turned a blind eye to sexual abuse of them by other members of the staff.” Note the use of “some” rather than “all” in that statement. The paragraph concludes, for some reason, with the statement that “An enthusiast, Keaney was easily depressed by criticism.”

The 2001 Australian Senate Community Affairs and References Committee Report, titled “Lost Innocents: Righting the Record – Report on Child Migration”, detailed evidence which revealed the “depraved, violent and abusive nature” of Brother Keaney and his role in the “systematic abuse of children under his care”. In submissions to the Committee report, individuals who had been abused by Keaney described his brutality; “I lost my teeth at Bindoon – my face kicked repeatedly by Brother Keaney”. Similarly – “Br. Keaney was a very sadistic, perverted and deviant paedophile. He abused many of the boys… in his care. Tragically, there was just no one that we victims could go to for help. Who would have believed us anyway?”

Another former Bindoon resident stated that “The Christian Brothers used to walk around with a thick 18in leather strap hanging from the waist of their long, black outfits, and they’d give you a wallop at the slightest opportunity. They’d hit you wherever they could – be it on the backside or sole of the foot – and boy, did it hurt. Once I was on the receiving end of a real hiding from one of them. He was giving a younger lad a hard time and I must have said something under my breath. He lashed out with his strap and put in his boot. I ended up cowering under my bed, trying to escape him, and was left covered in bruises.”

Yet another noted that “He liked to prod us with a walking stick, and was one of the cruelest people I’ve ever met.”

A secret church report about Christian Brothers’ institutions such as Bindoon in Western Australia from the mid-30s right up to the mid-60s refers to:

  • brothers who were “odd or mentally unstable”,
  • of a “sex underworld”
  • of brothers who “shared boys” for sexual purposes
  • and that often the church hierarchy knew of the abuse and did nothing about it.

Kearney’s Bindoon was billed as an educational institution, but as one former resident claimed, “There was no teaching at Bindoon, and I know of several former inmates who still cannot read or write.” Another reported that “there wasn’t much in the way of schooling. I’d always been good at school in England but it pretty much ended overnight. A lot of the boys at Bindoon never learnt how to read or write.”

A CBS Television documentary aired in the U.S. claimed that, at Bindoon, “The priority was construction. Brother Francis Keaney, an imposing, white-haired Irishman who ran the place, was obsessed with building the largest Catholic institution in Western Australia. He used his charges as labor. From sunrise to sunset, the boys built Brother Keaney’s shrine, with no shoes, and no questions asked.”

When the Christian Brothers arrived in 1939 with the first group of seven boy labourers, the only building on the property was a mud-brick homestead which became their home. After the work of a generation of boys, the facility is grandiose and has been listed by the West Australian Government as a heritage-listed property.  The “Statement of Significance” refers to “The design, use of local materials, use of child labour, relationships of the buildings, and period during which they were constructed, make the places exceptionally significant, both individually and in their precinct setting. The place has an exceptional ‘sense of place’ for the ‘boys’, and their families.”

When Kearney arrived in 1940, with another eight boys, foundations were dug and one wing of the first building, the dormitory block now known as Edmund House, was officially opened by 1941. Most of the building work was completed by 1953. During construction, two boys died in accidents and a third died from an undefined cause. They are buried in simple graves on the site, while Br. Kearney’s grave has a large marble headstone, and, of course, a (headless) statue.

Not only did Kearney use forced child labour to build his edifice, he treated the boys badly in ways other than sexual abuse and violence. One of his slaves remembered that, on arrival, “We were immediately put to work. I learnt how to milk a cow within a week, and then we began constructing a new building. By the time I was 14, I was driving a truck. We’d work, sleep and eat. That was it.”

He also reported that “We slept on open verandas all-year round – and when a wind blew up, it got pretty cold. Foodwise, we’d get crushed wheat or porridge for breakfast, followed by bread in dripping (cow fat). The rest of the meals were similarly plain: we seemed to subsist on a diet of swedes and turnips.”

For his efforts, Kearney received Imperial Honours awards, known as an MBE and ISO. Despite all of the evidence of his unworthiness for such prestigious awards, attempts by many people to have the awards rescinded have, so far, been unsuccessful.

6-3-54 A Chemist Shop is now open at Mill Street, Pettigo under the management of M. T. Egan, M.P.S.I.

13-3-54 During the weekend telephone engineers started to erect telephone poles from Pettigo village to Tievemore Post Office where a Post Office telephone is being installed.

27-3-54 The Belleek Erne Drainage Strike over the sacking of a fitter who complained about their conditions of employment especially at the Marion crane at which he worked.

27-3-54 Devenish Pioneer Social on Sunday last in St. Mary’s Hall was a great success. The Sligo Pantomime Players provided the entertainment. Rev. Fr. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo was the guest of honour and was welcomed by Rev. Canon Coyle, a member of the Association for 33 years. The Association was first set up in the parish in 1945 and three Councils were established at Cashel, Toura and Devenish. The parish now has 242 Pioneers and 105 probationers and the juvenile section is being especially catered for in the schools.

27-3-54 The residents of Pettigo village and district deeply regret the transfer of Sergeant M. J. Mc Donagh, Garda Siochana, from Pettigo to Newtowncunningham during the week. Sergeant Mc Donagh was a very popular member of the Garda and for his brief stay in Pettigo village had endeared himself to everyone. Of a retiring disposition he was genial and had a most efficient manner in the discharge of his various duties. During his term as Sergeant in charge of Pettigo Garda Station lawlessness had completely disappeared in the area.

27-3-54 During blasting operations in a quarry at Cashelinney a small piece of rock from the quarry travelled 500 yards landing on the roof of Lettercran School and broke a few slates.

3-4-54 The opening of the Adelphi Cinema, Irvinestown on April 5th with the first film “Ivanhoe” with Robert and Elizabeth Taylor. Telephone Irvinestown 242.

3-4-54  Donegal defeat Fermanagh at Glenties. The ex-Fermanagh player Matt Regan (Belleek) was in sparkling form against his old colleagues. Many strange decisions by the referee almost led to the Fermanagh team leaving the field on several occasions in the second half. Sean Gonigle (Belleek) was the best player on the Fermanagh team.

17-4-54 Garrison man, Thomas Murphy, of Knockaraven, was fined £2 for assaulting another youth, Walter George Carson on March 14th. Murphy had caught hold of Carson’s bicycle by the carrier and bounced it up and down several times.

17-4-54 Very Rev. E. Canon Coyle, PP, Devenish paid tribute to the Anti-Partition League after an anti-Partition film show, concert and meeting in St., Mary’s Hall, Devenish on Sunday night. After thanking the speakers, Mr. Cahir Healy and P. J. O’Hare he said, “No other movement is doing anything only talking.”

24-4-54 Junior Football League – Holywell 2-11 – Devenish 1-7.

24-4-54 Garrison Publican, Patrick Casey, of Casey’s Hotel, was fined £1 for allowing the consumption of intoxicating drink on his licensed premises and his wife Margaret was fined £1 for aiding and abetting. Four persons found on the premises were each found 8 shillings. They had drink on the counter in front of them when the police entered at 10.00 p.m.

24-4-54 The O’Donnell Rally opens in Ballyshannon with glorious weather for a memorable occasion. It was attended by Mr. Aiken, Minister of External Affairs, Count O’Donnell and The O’Donnell.

24-4-54 Ballyshannon Notes. The town was gaily decorated with flags and bunting during the Easter weekend. This was to celebrate the opening of An Tostal and the O’Donnell Clan Rally. The Power House was illuminated with bright yellow lights, and viewed from the bridge, was an inspiring sight.

1-5-54 On Friday morning when travelling to her place of employment at Waterfoot, Pettigo, Miss Maggie Mc Caffrey, Mullinagoad, heard a fox barking and on investigation found a young fox which she promptly killed with a stick from the roadside.

1-5-54 Tievemore Post Office was on Thursday officially opened as a telephone call office.

1-5-54 The cuckoo was heard for the first time in the Pettigo area during the weekend, and also the corncrake, which is late compared with previous years.

1-5-54 The “Robe” at the Regal Cinema, Enniskillen. Enniskillen is this week enjoying its most stupendous cinematic treat. And when I say “stupendous” I know I am employing one of the superlatives that Hollywood blurbs have largely made meaningless. But using it with a due sense of proportion, one can only say of the magnificent drama, “The Robe” brought to the Regal, Enniskillen this week, in the new screen medium, cinemascope, that it is a stupendous achievement. Many feel that a wonderful religious performance like “The Robe” should finish only with a suitable religious air at the conclusion. There are three performances daily – Balcony 2/-, stalls 1/-.

1-5-54 In the Junior League Derrygonnelly defeated Devenish by 3-3 to 1-2. Devenish had a grand full back in J. Mulrone, who gave a sound display while others to impress were P. Keown, R, Mc Dermott and J. Treacy.

8-5-54 Enniskillen Unionist majority on the Town Improvements Committee which has Council powers in the allocation of houses voted to give four new Council houses in Derrychara to Protestants. This makes a total of 77 houses let at Derrychara, all to Protestants. There are 18 left to be let.

8-5-54 On Wednesday morning the wedding took place at St. Patrick’s Church Belleek of Mr. George Johnston, Pettigo and Miss Molly Monaghan, daughter of Mr and Mrs Edward Monaghan, Aghafoy, Pettigo. Mr. Edward Monaghan, brother of the bride was best man and Miss Mona Flood, “The Hotel” Pettigo was bridesmaid. Afterwards the happy couple set off for Bundoran for their honeymoon.

8-5-54 The wedding took place of Mr. John J. McGurl, Farrancassidy and Miss Maureen Doogan, Corry, Belleek.

8-5-54 The death is reported of Mr. John Dolan, Drumnasrene who was one of the most respected residents of Devenish Parish.

15-5-54 Ballyshannon’s new GAA Park opens with a Donegal win over Armagh in a challenge game.

5-6-54  The death is announced of Mr. James Maguire, Seemuldoon, building contractor, responsible for the erection (and of the design) of many fine schools, halls, churches and buildings. He had erected the curates house and Ederney Hall in his own parish.

5-6-54 A 22 mile dash by Enniskillen fire brigade saved the world-famous Belleek Pottery from possible destruction on Sunday. They reached Belleek in a record time of half an hour. Workmen and others, including police under Sergeant John Mc Michael, formed a bucket chain which confined the flames to a limited area of the kiln polishing room where the outbreak started. Fire fighting units from Ballyshannon also attended the blaze and Customs formalities were waived as they crossed the Border.

12-6-54 By attaching a wooden frame behind his motorbike, Mr. John O’Connor, Mulleek, was able to “top” two acres of potato drills in a few hours. When done by hand this usually took several days. Miss Rita Dolan, a nurse, of Killybig, Garison, was fined £2 for allowing a juvenile to drive her car without being properly licensed, and covered by the insurance, and she was disqualified for driving for a year. The RM suggested an early application be made to the court for the removal of the disqualification on Miss Dolan.

19-6-54  Daring Raid on Armagh military barracks. Fifteen khaki-clad men seize 700 guns from the Armory. Officers held up at pistol point.

19-6-54 For the second time in a fortnight the River Erne between Belleek and Roscor will be drained of all water.

19-6-54  Juvenile Football League. Ederney’s Grand Win over Gaels by 4-13 to 1-1. Ederney proved to be far too good for Gaels Juveniles. It was a pleasure to watch the Ederney team and especially their grand nippy forwards with their well-worked and constructive moves, and their beautiful finishing. Practice, training and constructive coaching were apparent in every movement. All were splendid but M. Maguire, Joe Turner, J. Moohan and especially A. Mc Grath, a grand little player with a great “pick-up” and a delightful body swerve merit special mention. J Wylie, N. McClurg, H. Herbert, V. Henderson and Nolan in goals were best for Gaels.

19-6-54  Mr E. Thompson, Castle Caldwell had a narrow escape from injury when, swerving to avoid an auto-cyclist, his car mounted a ditch and overturned. After treatment for injuries he was able to resume his journey in a friend’s car.

19-6-54 Senior Football Championship. Enniskillen Gaels qualified for the Divisional Final with a narrow victory over Ederney by 4-2 to 3-4. Best for Ederney were Jim Eves, B. Sheridan, B. Mc Hugh and the McKervey brothers. The stewards had the excellent idea of clearing the goal lines before the game started, thus leaving the two umpires at each goals free to carry out their duties more efficiently. Referee Mr. Bill Thompson.

26-6-54 In the league Irvinestown 1-4, Belleek 1-4. Best for the home team were O’Hanlon, Charlton, McGrory, Lennon (Joe who played for Down) Mahon, Maguire and Hegarty. The visitors were well served by McCann, Gonigle, Rooney, and Tinney. The match was refereed by Fr. Tom Marron, Ederney.

26-6-54  On next Sunday, June 27th, Pettigo village will be en fete for the annual Memorial celebrations which it is hoped will be a success. There will be a fancy dress parade led by Ederney and Irvinestown Bands to the new Memorial Park, where many football teams will compete for the Memorial Cup.

26-6-54 Irvinestown mid-week Tournament, 13-a-side for wristlet watches valued at £120 at St., Molaise Park, Irvinestown. Fixtures include Pettigo V Derrygonnelly Thursday 24th June and Trillick V Ederney Thursday 22nd July.

The Erne Packet 8/2/1844.

THE ERNE PACKET 8-2-1844

ROYAL SPEECH. Our enterprising Dublin contemporary, the Mail, notwithstanding the state of the roads and the severe adverse gales, brought the Royal Speech by express to Dublin, where it reached in twenty two hours after its delivery in the House of Lords. We have to acknowledge our thanks to our contemporaries the Northern Whig and the Dublin Evening Post, for additional copies, since our last publication.

THE WEATHER.—For several days past we have had much storm in addition to constant wet; and yesterday we had several snow showers. The air was excessively cold.

The Hon. and Rev. J. C. Maude has received from the Magistrates at Enniskillen Petit Sessions, part of a fine, 2s. 6d for the poor of Enniskillen.

BIBLE ASSOCIATION MEETING.

On Wednesday the 31st ult. the Belleek and Slavin Bible Association held its first anniversary meeting in Rose Island, at Belleek. (The house built for the Dowager Lady Caldwell where Belleek Pottery is now.) The meeting was respectably attended, but owing to the severity of the day was not so large as might have been expected. The Rev. George Huston being voted to the chair, opened the meeting with prayer; and proceeded by reading letters from several Ladies and Gentlemen regretting their being prevented by the inclemency of the weather from attending the meeting, among which was one from Mrs. Johnston, of Magheramena, enclosing one pound, subscription to the Association. — Wallcott, Esq., apologised for the Rev. J. B. Tuthill being prevented by his parochial duties from attending.  Mr William Knox, Secretary of the Association, having read a most interesting report. The first resolution was moved by the Rev. H. A. Burke Rector of the parish of Trory; seconded by Mr. William Knox, of Belleek. The second resolution was moved by R. M. Hamilton, Esq., T.C.D.; seconded by —Walcott, Esq., of Castle Caldwell.

The third resolution was moved by the Rev. Mr. Auchinleck, Curate of Pettigo; seconded by Mr. Samuel Mills, of Churchhill. Several gentlemen who addressed the meeting spoke in a most animated and impressive manner. The thanks of the meeting having been voted to the Rev. Mr. Huston for his upright and praiseworthy conduct in the chair, the Rev. gentleman addressed the meeting in a very edifying manner, and dismissed it by pronouncing the blessing. All present were highly pleased with the proceedings of the day.

 

COUNTY FERMANAGH. TO BE SOLD. FOR EVER. THE DRESTERNAN ESTATE,

SITUATE in a most desirable part of the above county within ten miles of Enniskillen, six of Belturbet, and four of Ballyconnell. containing: 583 acres 3 roods and 31 perches, statute measure, of which there are 433 acres, 2 roods and 1 perch occupied by solvent under tenants, producing a clear yearly rent of £247 5s. 5d, the remaining 156 acres 1 rood and 13 perches are attached to the Mansion-house, now the residence of the owners of said property, which said Mansion house, with the Garden and Grounds attached thereto, regard: being had to the Timber Trees growing thereon as being of considerable value, would, with a little outlay, make a most desirable country residence, commanding a view of Lough Erne, is estimated at being well worth £250 a-year.

The above property is subject to a fee farm rent of £64 12s 2d a-year, but which is more in the nature of a charge affecting it than a head rent, inasmuch as the fee is in the Vendors.

Application to be made to .Mr. Patrick Kiernan, Solicitor, 40, Upper Gloucester Street, Dublin,, who is authorised to treat with a purchaser.

 

EDUCATION. DARLING STREET, (WEST BRIDGE,) ENNISKILLEN.

THE MISSES STODDART. GIVE Instructions to Young Ladies in the following branches of Education:—per Quarter.

ENGLISH in general, WRITING, and ARITHMETIC.       £1 1 0

FRENCH                                                                                      £010 0

DRAWING and PAINTING IN WATER COLOURS         £1 0 0

PAINTING IN OIL                                                                     £1 10 0

Music (24 Lessons).                                                                   £1  1   0

Children, under Six Years of Age, taught on the Infant School system, 10s. Per Quarter.

A third Child in one family, taken gratis. Summer Vacation not charged.

The Misses Stoddart beg to annex the following Testimonial with which they have been honoured: – We, whose names are hereunto subscribed, having witnessed the advancement of the Pupils under the care of the Misses STODDART, and from a minute and careful inspection of their system of Education, feel it a duty which we owe.to those Ladies to express our decided approval of the course adopted by them.

And feeling, likewise, that all who duly appreciate the importance of education, must be equally interested in the promotion of a plan of study which lays down as a first principle in education that religious knowledge must not only form a part but be a prominent feature in the system, will concur in the approbation above expressed.

Convinced, moreover, that a .system which lays the foundation on such principles must insure the raising of a superstructure at once classic and refined, by blending, therewith the most attractive and useful discoveries of modern science.

JOHN CORNES, Quarter-Master, 53d Regt.

R.P. Cleary, Clk. A. M., Curate of Enniskillen.

JOHN TAYLOR, Clk., Rector of Rossorry.

WILLIAM WATKINS.

GEORGE WOOD.

RICHARD NEWCOMEN.

MARK WHITTAKER, Clk.

Enniskillen, January 24, 1844.

 

John Cunningham, Erne Heritage Tours.
adam4eves@aol.com

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