May 1942.

DUTY OF PEDESTRIANS ON ROADS. INTERESTING POINT IN IRVINESTOWN PROSECUTION. Ought pedestrians obey the road code and walk on the right-hand side of the road, or follow the custom and walk on the left? This question was discussed at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on. Friday, when a motorist was summoned for driving without due care, etc., arising out of an accident in which the car, travelling in the black-out, knocked down a soldier. Major Dickie, R.M., said it was apparent that defendant did not see the soldiers until he was right on top of them. Everybody knew that soldiers were likely to be moving out of the town about that hour, and surely defendant should have driven in such a way that he would have stopped in time. He (the R.M.) recognised that army uniforms were difficult to see in the black-out. Mr. P. J. Flanagan, LL.B., solr., defending the car driver, said the same thing could be said of the soldier, who knew there was traffic on that road, and he should have kept in. His Worship pointed out that the law said pedestrians had a perfect right to be on the road, and there was no obligation on them to be struggling along on the grass verge. Mr. Flanagan said pedestrians had no right to be all over the road.

His Worship—I do not say for a minute they were all over the road. All the Crown witnesses agree the soldiers were not over the centre of the road. His Worship added that at the present time it was much safer on the right hand side of the road at night. Mr. Flanagan said he understood the Code specified that side for pedestrians, yet if it was used they would be deemed to be negligent.His Worship remarked that in the case of traffic approaching from the front the pedestrian would have to clear into the hedge, and people objected to that. The case in question was that in which Thomas McCrossan, Irvinestown, was summoned under the usual two counts for careless driving and for not having a. P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan was summoned for permitting the latter offence.

Gunner Kane gave evidence that when walking home from Irvines town on 21st March, at 11 p.m., he was on the outside of two other soldiers, with some soldiers in front and some behind. A car came up behind them, and knocked him down. He next found himself being attended by nurses in hospital. He was not seriously injured. Cross-examined, witness could not say why he did not hear the car before it struck him. They had been in Irvinestown for a night’s jollification. He did not remember sitting on a coat on the aide of the road and smoking a cigarette after the accident. Gunner Young said he saw the car go past with the last witness on the front of it between the mudguard and the bonnet. The car had no lights lit when it stopped. Gunner Haydon estimated the speed of the car at fifteen to twenty m.p.h. Gunner Wosley stated he saw Haydon pull the other two soldiers into the left as the car drew near.

Sergt. Kelly, R.U.C., gave evidence of finding the car without lights beyond the scene of the accident. The headlights were in order when switched on, and a side lamp had been broken off in the mishap. The road is 19 feet wide, at the spot where the accident happened. Thomas McCrossan swore he could not find his brother, who had contracted to bring three men out of the town, and he had to drive them, though not duty licensed for the. purpose. He was travelling on the centre of the road, and was just passing the soldiers when he heard the bump. When he stopped he switched off the lights. Later he found that the bulbs were blown. He had since taken out a P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan testified to his having arranged to drive three men home, but was unable to get out in time to do so. He did not authorise his brother to drive the car. His Worship said it was not a bad case but drivers ought to drive within the circle of their own lights. For driving without due care Thomas McCrossan-was fined 40/- and 6/- costs. The second summons concerning the licence was dealt with under the Probation of Offenders Act. The summons against Daniel McCrossan was dismissed on the merits.

16-5-1942. BICYCLE WHEEL THEFTS. A Kinawley Man’s Experience. Thefts of a particularly mean type, of which cyclists are the victims, are now, with the shortage of cycles and accessories, becoming prevalent. A young man who left his bicycle outside a hall while at a dance in the Arney district found his front wheel stolen when the dance was over. Another close by had the tyres and tubes of his bicycle stolen. But a Kinawley man’s experience was worst of all. He cycled across the Border to Swanlinbar and left his bicycle on the street while he visited a house. When he emerged after some time, both, wheels had been removed from, his machine and stolen. He had to walk back across the Border with the frame on his shoulder. R.U.C. men took him to the barracks on suspicion of smuggling the frame, but on telephoning the Swanlinbar Gardaí they confirmed the man’s story that his wheels had been stolen. He had to do the rest of the journey on foot, carrying the frame on his shoulder.

16-5-1942. IDENTITY CARDS. People without National Registration Identity Cards, or with Cards which are inaccurate, will find difficulty in Obtaining new Ration Books, when they are due for issue next month. Anyone who has lost his or her Identity Card, or whose Card is inaccurate, should call at once at the local National Registration Office, which is usually the Food Office, and have the matter rectified. Some local Food Offices (see advertisement pages), intend, opening sub-offices, it which the public will be able to obtain new Personal Ration Books and Clothing Cards on production of properly completed Identity Cards and Ration Books, with the Reference Leaves accurately completed.

16-5-1942. EXCESS FLOUR AND MEAL SUPPLIES. SELLING EGGS TO A NEIGHBOUR. CHARGES AT CASTLEDERG. Before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., at Castlederg Petty Sessions on Friday, Elizabeth Harkin, Garvetagh, was summoned for being in possession of an excess quantity of flour and oatmeal, Henry McAnea and Samuel Greer, both shopkeepers, Castlederg, were summoned for disposing of excess quantifies of flour and meal. Const. Wilson said he found two seven stone packs of flour and a ten-stone bag of meal in Harkin’s house on the 2nd March.. In. a statement she took full responsibility and said about six weeks ago she bought a bag of flour from McAnea and about two weeks later ordered another from him, as one bag had only lasted her six weeks. She also purchased the meal at McAnea’s about six weeks ago. – Witness interviewed McAnea, who said he only supplied Harkin with seven stones flour and ten stones meal. He had no hesitation in giving it as it was a long time since she had obtained any from him. Greer told witness that he supplied Harkin with seven stones flour on the 13th December. Witness seized eleven stones flour and 7½ stones meal. The R.M. said it was now permitted to buy any quantity of’ ‘points’ food legally acquired and a month’s supply of unrationed food. The R.M. applied the Probation of Offenders Act in all cases, and forfeited one sack of flour. The R.M. added that the prosecution was properly brought, and it was only the circumstances of the cases that caused him to deal leniently with them.

Robt. A. Scott, Drumclamph, was summoned for having an excess, quantity of flour, namely, 10 stones. Const. Irvine said on the 31st March he went to defendant’s place and was told by him that he received 3 or 4 bags of flour from his brother-in-law, Mr. Rosborough, Derry. Witness found five ten-stone bags. He seized three of them. There were five resident in the house and four full-time employees. In a statement he said while he was at Derry show, he called with his brother-in-law and told him, to send him some flour. He received eight bags of flax and five of flour. The supply would have lasted him two months. The R.M. applied the P.O. Act and forfeited two ten-stone bags.

John Love, Crewe, was summoned for selling eggs other than to a licensed collector. Jeannie Love, do., was summoned for selling eggs at a price other than at the maximum price, and for selling without a licence. James Donaghey, Faughan Bridge, Drumnahoe, Derry, was summoned for purchasing eggs otherwise than at the fixed price, for obtaining 1 lb. butter otherwise than according to the rationing regulations, and for having one lb. butter without authority. Annie O’Neill, Creeduff, was summoned for disposing of 1 lb. butter without authority.

PETROL SHORTAGE FOR AMBULANCES. SERIOUS COMPLAINT AT ENNISKILLEN. Difficulty in securing supplies of petrol for Enniskillen Union ambulances was referred to at the meeting of the Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry presiding. In a letter to the Board, Mr. John Cathcart, ambulance driver, said: “I beg to inform, you of the difficulties that exist in getting a. supply of petrol for the ambulances. When application, would be made for 140 units 80 would be supplied, and when application- for 80 was made 50 would be supplied. The number of coupons is insufficient to keep the ambulance service going, and on the 8th. inst. an inspector from the Petroleum Office called at the Workhouse and informed me it was illegal to obtain petrol without coupons from any trader. He also called with Messrs. Topping and Co. and told him he would hold him liable if he supplied petrol without coupons. I have eight gallons of petrol in stock, and when this amount is exhausted the ambulance will have to be refused for the want of petrol.”

The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) corroborated Mr. Cathcart’s remarks, and said he (the Clerk) told the Petroleum Board representative that ambulances were of more importance than any other vehicles on the road, and that the general public could not possibly be left without ambulances to convey the sick to hospital. He also told the official that they would get petrol for the ambulances whether by surrender of coupons or not. The official promised to explain the matter at his headquarters. Mr. A. Wilson—Did you not ask the Ministry?Mr. J. J. Coalter—Send that letter to the Ministry of Home Affairs and explain the difficulty.  Clerk — The petrol authorities must have got it into their heads we were using it ourselves. Mr. Coalter’s suggestion was unanimously approved of.

CONFIRMATION AT DEVENISH. St. Mary’s Church, Devenish, was thronged on Friday last when the Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, administered the Sacrament of Confirmation to upwards of 140 children and some adult converts. His Lordship was met at the church by Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, and proceeded through the sacred edifice with a procession of over twenty priests to the High Altar. Mass was celebrated by Rev. P. Monaghan, C.C. Addressing the children after Confirmation, his Lordship congratulated them on being enrolled as soldiers in the army of Christ. Until now they had few responsibilities, but from this hour onwards it would be their duty not only to defend the Kingdom of Christ, but to extend it, and to do this they would have to take an intelligent interest in all that pertains to their faith, and particularly in the liturgy and functions of the Church. It would be easy for them to remain faithful to their religion while they were at home in Catholic Ireland, but if some of them found their way to countries where the faith has grown cold and many people would sneer at their religion, there would be danger for them unless their lives were lived in accordance with the teaching of their faith. They had in the main the Ten Commandments of God to be the general outline of their lives, and they had an informed conscience to tell them what was right and what was wrong. They had a leader, Jesus Christ, and if they were to be enthusiastic about their faith they must always remember the beauty of their Leader, and be ready to sacrifice everything for Him.

During the month of May it is the wish of His Holiness the Pope that all children should pray for his intention, and peace is a necessary preliminary to the restoration of Christian virtue. After administering the Total Abstinence pledge to the children until they attain the age of twenty-one his Lordship said it used to be a mere formality in the past for girls to take the pledge, but times had changed, and there were grave temptations for young girls to take intoxicating drink, particularly in seaside towns during the holiday season. Sponsors were, Mr. Henry McGrath, Devenish; and Mrs. Dick, ex-P.E.T., Cornahilta. His Lordship was much impressed by the splendid new Parochial Hall at Devenish, which competent authorities say is one of the best of its kind in the North.

Confirmation in Cleenish and Derrygonnelly. Administering the Sacrament of Confirmation in St. Mary’s’ Church, Arney, to the children of the three districts of the Cleenish Parish (Arney, Mullaghdun and Belcoo) , Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, referred to the death of Dr. McKenna, late Bishop of Clogher, and expressed sympathy with the people of the diocese in their loss. The children confirmed numbered 130, and his Lordship, told them that the Sacrament strengthened their faith.

GREEN CROSS FUND. ENNISKILLEN I.N.F. CEILIDHE FOR GREEN CROSS. The Devenish (Enniskillen) Branch of the Irish National Foresters on Sunday held a most enjoyable and successful ceilidhe in the Foresters’ Hall, Enniskillen, in aid of the Green Cross Fund. (Ed. a fund to support the families of interned Republicans.)

A very large gathering of patrons assembled, drawn mainly from the surrounding districts, but also fairly representative of a much larger area, parties coming from Omagh, Clones and  other parts. To the excellent music of the Enniskillen St. Molaise Band, the dancers enjoyed a very large selection of Irish dances, these being participated in with the utmost pleasure. Never for a moment did the spirit of pleasure flag, and the dancers parted as they had kept happy dancing company, in the best of humour. Mr. Jim Sheridan, Lackaboy, was an efficient master of ceremonies, his dance announcements being made all in Irish. He was assisted by Mr. C. P. Drumm, secretary of Branch Devenish and organiser-in-chief of the ceilidhe. The proceedings concluded with the National Anthem, played by the band and sung by the large assembly, standing at attention.

OTHER SIMILAR FUNCTIONS. Largely contributing to the great improvement in the Ederney parish contribution to the Fund (already acknowledged) was a similar ceilidhe held in Ederney recently. It is to be hoped that other parishes will follow the Enniskillen and Ederney , examples and organise ceilidhthe or football matches in aid of the Fund apart from the ordinary parish collections.

IRVINESTOWN. The Irvinestown district collection of the Irvinestown Parish is complete, but the lodgement is being held over until the Coa and Whitehill areas have also had an opportunity to contribute to the parish total.

ARNEY. A meeting will be held on Sunday evening next, 17th inst., in the vicinity of St. Mary’s Church, Arney, after Devotions, to arrange for this year’s collection in that area. A large attendance is earnestly requested.

KNOCKNINNY. The parish collection is being taken up, and it is hoped that Teemore will also be organised shortly.

KILLESHER. The parish collection in Lower Killesher is well advanced. Nothing has as yet been done in Upper Killesher, but’ an effort is being made to organise that area.

KINAWLEY. The Kinawley collection is practically finished.

DEVENISH. Very Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, has forwarded to the County Secretary a cheque for £34 10s 0d, being the 1942 Devenish parish collection for the Fund. The total is an increase of about £5 on last year, and Devenish is to he heartily congratulated on its prompt and generous response to the appeal.

OTHER AREAS. Will other parishes or districts in which no effort has as yet been made please arrange to have the collection taken up as soon as possible. It is desired that the county’s total effort should be concluded within a reasonable time.

EDERNEY’S FINE EFFORT. Ederney Branch of the Green Cross Society has forwarded to Mr P. J. O’Hare, Co. Fermanagh secretary, the sum of £30 2s 8d, result of the 1942 collection in the parish. This amount exceeds by nearly £10 the 1941 total, and Ederney is to be congratulated on its prompt and successful effort. Ederney has been the first parish to complete the 1942 collection. Enniskillen is almost complete, but there are still a few books to come in.

23-5-1942. BELLEEK BREAD CASES. At Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Mrs. Margaret McMahon, Ballynadoghy Belleek, was charged with having, on 22nd November, 1941, without a licence granted by the Board of Trade acquired 16 2 lb. loaves, whereby the total quantity of bread in her possession or under her control, exceeded the normal quantity required by her. The following were similarly charged in  respect to the same date, Mrs. Margaret McCann, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Alice Greenan, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Annie McGroarty, Fassagh, for 6 2 lb. loaves; Miss Mary Somerville, Fassagh, 7 2 lb. loaves.

Patrick John McCart, Forthill, Irvinestown, was charged with having on November 22nd unlawfully disposed of a quantity of bread to the above mentioned defendants, knowing that by reason of such disposal the quantity of .bread which may be lawfully acquired by these persons would be exceeded. Head Constable Briggs, Belleek, said that on the 22nd. of November, he visited a number of houses in the Commons district. He went to McMahons and found 19 2lb. loaves in a cardboard box. When questioned Mrs. McMahon told him she was giving some of them to friends in the Free State and made a statement to that effect.

The statement was read by Sergeant Blevin. Continuing Head Constable Briggs said that in McCann’s he found six loaves in a coarse bag and four in a handbag hanging from the roof. There were also two other loaves in the house some homemade bread and 9 stone of flour. There were eight people living in the house. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin, Mrs. McCann said she got six of the loaves from Hughes bread van. Witness sized ten of the loaves. There were five children in McCann’s as well as the defendant and her husband. The bread van only came round twice a week—on Tuesdays and Saturdays. The house was about 250 yards from the village. Head Const. Brigg’s, continuing, said he went to Greenan’s and found 14 loaves there. There was also some homemade bread and 9 stones of flour. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin defendant said she got all the loaves except two from Hughes van.

Sergt. Blevin cross-examined said Mrs. Greenan made no statement concerning her brother-in-law wanting the bread for a dance he was having nor did she mention her sister in hospital. One of the children made some reference to McCabe later. Head Const. Briggs said that in connection with the affair he interviewed McCart, the driver of Hughes bread van, who said he only sold bread for the use of Northern people. He sold one doz.  to McMahons; ½ doz. to McCann’s; 1 doz. to Greenan’s, ½ doz. to Miss Somerville and 5 doz. to Mrs. McGroarty. McCart had one dozen loaves in the van when he was stopped in Garrison. Cross-examined by Mr. Flanagan witness said that when questioned McCart told everything. He had been selling bread in the district for some time.

Constable Green said that on Saturday, November 22, he visited McGroarty’s and saw 9 21b loaves on the table. There were two elderly, and two young people living in the house. Mrs. McGroarty said the loaves were for their own use. Cross-examined witness said the nearest shop was a quarter of a mile away. Mrs. McGroarty would get the same bread there on Monday and Tuesday as she would buy on Saturday. There was flour in the house. Constable Green said he asked Miss Somerville had she any bread in the house and she said she had only two loaves. In a large box he found seven loaves. There were three elderly people in the house. The house was 50 yards from the border. Cross-examined witness said Miss Somerville was an old infirm woman and her brother and the other occupant of the house was much the same.

THE DEFENCE Mr. Flanagan said that his client had been selling bread in the district for some time. He was changed with “knowing” or ‘that he ought reasonably expected to have known, that the amount disposed of was in excess of the quantity to which each person was entitled.” The defendant had no means of knowing how many people lived in each house. His job was to sell bread and like a good businessman he tried to increase his sales. His worship had mentioned, perhaps rightly, that when a poor man was summoned under the Food Order, there were people behind him, but in this case, the firm who employed McCart had nothing whatever to do with it. The defendant had been suspended for a while. He was a young married man with six children.

Capt. Ramage said that Mrs. McMahon had a brother living across the Border, to whom she gave some bread. There was no question of sale. Concerning McCanns there were five, children, two who were working, and the defendant and her husband. There was not an excessive quantity of bread, in the house to last that family from Saturday evening until Tuesday. In McGroartys 9 loaves for four people for three days was not excessive.. All the cases were border line ones.

Mrs. Greenan said she had a brother- in-law John McCabe. At that time her sister Miss Gallagher was in the hospital and, her brother went to see her on that day and the house was locked up. There were three men living in it. On Friday her brother told her to get the bread for him when he was away. Mrs. McCabe was also away seeing her sister and sent a message with witness’s daughter to get some bread as her husband (McCabe) was having a dance on Sunday night, and wanted the bread for the band. She bought six loaves for McCabe, four for her brother and four for herself. Cross-examined, witness said she told the Sergeant about McCabe. There were only seven and a half stones flower in the house. McCart was fined 15/- and 6/7 costs; Mrs. McMahon, 10/6, and Miss Somerville, 10/6. The summonses against the other defendants were dismissed.

HEATH FIRE Peter Maguire, Scribbagh, was fined 8s and 2s costs for displaying a heath fire in an open field. Constable McMullen, Garrison, was complainant.

CAVAN MAN FINED. FOUND WITH CYCLE TYRES AND TEA. CHARGE AT ENNISKILLEN. A young County Cavan man with an address at Lisnaskea—John Stephen J Brady, of Cootehill,—was at a Special court in Enniskillen on Thursday before Major Dickie, R.M., fined £6 4 0d (treble the value of the goods involved) for being on the previous day knowingly concerned in dealing in six cycle tyres and 3lbs, of tea with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereof. Mr. J. Cooper prosecuted, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) defended. Mr. Cooper said the defendant was met by Constable McKeown with a parcel in which the articles were found.

Constable McKeown said defendant went to Westville Terrace, Enniskillen, watched by witness, knocked at two doors, failing to gain admittance, and then went up the Hospital lane. Witness went up by the railway station and met Brady coming down. Asked what was in the parcel Brady said tyres. Witness put his hand in and found another parcel, which Sergt. Sherrard later at the barracks found to contain the tea. Brady had been working for some time in Fermanagh. A. Dickson, surveyor of Customs and Excise, said Brady made a statement to .him in which he said nothing he had was intended for export. Of the tyres two were intended for a man at Lisnaskea, two for a man at Enniskillen and two for himself. He had got them all in Irvinestown or vicinity, and there also, from a woman whose name he would not give, he had got the tea for his own use.

Mr. Herbert said defendant was married and had five children. He had been working in Fermanagh for some time and had been residing in Lisnaskea. At his work his way of subsistence was to take tea three times daily and this as well as the tea he got in Lisnaskea was more than the two-ounce ration would supply. Therefore he took the chance to get this extra tea for himself. In evidence, Brady bore out this, statement and also swore to the statements made to Mr. Dickson. When apprehended at Enniskillen he told Mr. Cooper he was coming from Irvinestown and going to Lisnaskea. He did not go in by train to Lisnaskea because he had a bus ticket. Constable McKeown, recalled, said at the time it was 9.5 p.m. and Brady was looking for lodgings in Enniskillen. Major Dickie — That rather upsets his story. The magistrate convicted and in addition to imposing the penalty ordered the goods to be forfeited.

23-5-1942. 14½-YEAR-OLD GIRL EARNING 35/ – WEEKLY AS CLERK. A fourteen-and-a-half years old girl is earning 35/- weekly as a clerical assistant in the office of the Clerk of Enniskillen Union. (Mr. J. Brown). Referring to the matter at the Board of Guardians’ meeting on Tuesday, Mr. W. A. Thornton, J. P., expressed this view: “If the wage was three times the amount there would be no question about it. It is too cheap, I think.”

The matter arose through a letter from the Ministry to the Board, in which it was stated that in the absence of full details of the qualifications possessed by Ethel Armstrong—(the child concerned) — and the other candidates for the position of assistant in the clerk’s office, they were not prepared to approve of the appointment to this position of a girl of such tender years and lack of experience, particularly at the comparatively high scale of remuneration proposed. The Ministry asked to be furnished with full particulars of the qualifications experience, etc., of the other candidates whom the Board considered eligible for appointment, and that the Board should forward at the same time the original applications of each. It was stated that the little girl was receiving 35/- weekly. Chairman (Hon. C. L. Corry) —What sort of work is she doing ? The Clerk — It is not very important, She is only 14½. Mr. D. Weir — Does she not do the work as well as an applicant of 20 years of age? Clerk — The Ministry say she is too young. Mr. Weir — It’s a good fault. Mr. Thornton then expressed the view j already quoted. It was decided to ask the Ministry to reconsider their decision and to allow the little girl to stay on.

Advertisements

1942 – Lord Erne, Eamon Anderson.

FERMANAGH FOLKLORE. By EAMON ANDERSON. THE TERRIBLE FAMINE DAYS. In the hurry of writing last week there were a couple of sentences towards the end in which I did not choose my words carefully and they might give readers the false impression that the British Government of that day, being pressed by Parnell and his party, actually voted money to relieve the terrible distress and famine in Ireland in 1879 and later. No such thing did they do during any of the terrible famines of the last century, not one penny at that time did they give gratis. The money that came in ’79 and ’80 to supply what was known as “Parnell’s meal’ and ‘Parnell’s bread’ to the starving multitudes in Ireland was raised by subscriptions, principally from the Irish race in America. There is no doubt of course that many charitable people in England, especially of the Quaker persuasion, did subscribe money during famine years, but their Government gave us nothing, only coercion and plenty of it The landlords ignored the distress, they wanted their rents whether the land earned them or not. The Government ignored the distress and sent out their police and military to enable the landlords to collect their pound of flesh off the walking skeletons in the bogs and mountains to protect, the process-servers and the “bone-grippers” and the crow-bar brigade, and the grabbers and emergency men and the agents and bailiffs and all others of that unholy alliance. In ‘Black ’47’, when the people of Ireland were dying in the ditches in tens of thousands, —when the coffin ships were crossing the Atlantic crammed with starving human beings, dying of famine and fever and being thrown overboard to feed the sharks, the London “Times,” chief organ of the Tory party in England, gloated over the extermination of the Irish race in these words; “The Celts are going— with avengeance. Soon a Catholic Celt will be as rare in Ireland as a Red Indian on the shores of Manhattan.” But strange to say, this stiff-necked Irish race (survived it all—and the Catholic Celt is very much alive to-day—in Ireland, and all over the world.

A DUCAL “JOKE.”  And here is what the Duke of Cambridge said during Black ’46 — ‘Ireland is not in so bad a state as has been represented. I understand that rotten potatoes, and even grass properly mixed, afford a very wholesome and nutritious food. We all know that Irishmen can live upon anything, and there is plenty of grass in the fields, even if the potato crop should fail.” This was in the early stage of the famine, before the real horrors began. O’Connell’s answer, to this outburst is well worth recording:— “There” said O’Connell, ,“is the son of a king—the brother, of a king—the uncle of a monarch—there is his description of Ireland for you. Perhaps he has been reading Spencer—who wrote at a time when Ireland was not put down by the strong arm of force or defeated, in battle; but when the plan was laid down to starve the Irish Nation (in 1602).; For three years every portion of the crop was trampled down by mounted soldiers; for 3 years the crops were destroyed and human creatures were found lying dead behind ditches with their mouths green, by eating sorrel and grass. The Duke, I suppose, wishes we should have such scenes again in Ireland. And is it possible that in presence of some of the most illustrious nobility, of England that a royal personage should be found to utter horrors of this description.”

AN OLD LORD ERNE,

Perhaps some people may say that this is not the time—in the midst of a great world, calamity—to go raking up the sins of the past – maybe so. As a Christian people we can forgive, subject of course, to repentance and full restitution of our National rights on the part of the aggressor. As Christians we are bound to forgive. But there is no reason why we should ever forget! Having said this much to clear the misunderstanding which might arise from the slight mistake in last week’s article, I will now continue our Fermanagh folklore. The Derrylin Shanachies tell many tales of the generosity of old Lord Erne—the Lord Erne who flourished during ’69 and ’79 and those times. Of course everyone will agree that a man  with a rent-roll of £80,0000 a year, drawn largely off lands which his ancestors got for nothing, the confiscated property of the Fermanagh chiefs and clansmen, everyone, I say, will agree that a man like that could well afford to be generous when the whim seized him. His estates stretched like a principality on both sides of the lough as far as the eye could see, and in addition he had vast estates in Mayo and elsewhere. His estate on the west side of Lough Erne included practically the whole parish of Knockninny. Most of the Irish landlords of that day—if a tenant showed any little sign of taste or prosperity, if he whitewashed his house, or had middling deceit clothes, would raise the lent on him at once. But Lord Erne, according to the Derrylin Shanachies, was of an entirely different opinion. He liked taste, he liked his tenants to have, at least, neatly patched clothes and a snug well-kept house and place. Once on a journey through his estates he came to a tenant’s place of which he did not at all approve. The man was ragged in his clothing; his house was badly in need of thatch and black for want of limewash. “What is your name,” asked his Lordship. “My name is Darling,” said the man. “On,” said Lord Erne, “you are the devil’s darling.” On another occasion, with his agent, he was .travelling part of his estate in the Slieve Rushen mountain area when he came to a house and farm tenanted by a widow with a family of small children. The house and place were kept neat and clean, and the children’s clothes were neatly patched. He said to his agent “I will venture to say that the rent of this place is paid up to date.” “No, unfortunately, there are five years arrears against it” said the agent. “Well, there must be something serious wrong, so,”-said Lord Erne. Yes, said the woman there is, ‘I have lost my husband and it takes all the money I can make to rear my family.” “Give this woman a. clear receipt up to date and do not ask her to pay any rent until she is able to do so,” said Lord Erne to his agent. “You are a great woman” he continued “and I am proud to have you for a tenant. – In spite of all your difficulties you are keeping your house and place in good styled and keeping your children, neat and clean.” Another tenant also owed several yearns rent as his cattle had died but as he was keeping his place and himself neat and decent, his Lordship commanded the agent to give him a clear receipt. At his castle of Crom, every year the used to give prizes for. home industries, for neatly patched clothes, for sewing, knitting and spinning, etc.          .

 

DERRYLIN MAN’S APPEAL. On the 1st November, 1869, an immense Tenant Right meeting was held in Cavan town, which was attended by great numbers of Fermanagh farmers and people generally. Even Enniskillen town though 32 miles away, sent a large contingent by jaunting cars and horse-drawn waggonettes. At that time bicycles and motor cans were not even dreamt of. A score of years had still to pass before such things were invented and another score of years passed before any of them were seen in Fermanagh. At any rate the Chairman at that meeting was Fr. Pat O’Reilly, the parish priest of Drumlane, in which parish is situated Belturbet town, near the Fermanagh border. In the course of his address the Reverend Chairman said that if all the landlords of Ireland were as good as Lord Erne there would have been no need to hold a meeting like that. Lord Erne, like all his class probably never read any papers, only such as came from the Tory Press. Certainly he would not read the speeches of those whom he would call “disloyal agitators,” so he was unaware of the- compliment paid him by the Rev. Chairman at the meeting. Some time later he found out that a number of his tenants in Derrylin district, had attended the meeting so he gave orders to have them evicted from their holdings without delay. There was a man named Doogan—a Derrylin man, and he was one of the best judges of a horse in Ireland and Lord Erne had always employed him to buy horses, and he had great influence with his Lordship. So the poor men who were  threatened with eviction—which was almost as bad as sentence of death in those days, asked Doogan to do his utmost with his Lordship to have their sentences revoked. Doogan went to Crom Castle and met his Lordship out on the lawn walking with the Countess. He absolutely refused to reconsider his decision and said that, the offending tenants must go out. Doogan then asked him if he had read the speeches at the meeting and he said “No, I would not read the speeches of agitators.” Doogan then handed .him a paper and asked him to read the Rev. Chairman’s speech. At first he refused to read it, but the Countess prevailed on him to do as the man asked him, so he sat down and read the speech. Then said Doogan, “Will you evict your tenants now for attending that meeting?” “No,’’ said. Lord Erne “I will not. That man speaks very fair.’’

ORANGE SHOOTING.

In some future article I will say a lot about that Tenant Right meeting of 73 years ago. Old Francis Cleary, of Kinawley, who died two years ago, aged 91, told me all about it. He with 100 other young men from this district walked to the meeting 22 miles and back that 1st November, 1869. He could repeat every speech almost word for word. Unfortunately, however, that day ended in tragedy. While the Fermanagh and West Cavan contingents were returning and passing through the village of Drumaloor, near Belturbet,, they were fired on by a party of misguided young Orangemen and a young man named. Morton shot dead. Morton was the servant of the Rev. Chairman, the P.P. of Belturbet, and was driving the priest’s car, and the bullets only missed Father O’Reilly by inches. A number of men were tried for the murder at Cavan Assizes the March following but were acquitted by an Orange jury. Apparently the accused exercised the right of challenging each jury man in turn, till they got twelve men of their own choosing to try them. A friend of mine possesses a newspaper of March, 1870 which gives an account of the trial covering two pages. The young men who fired the shots were sons of tenant farmers themselves, who were amongst the first to reap the benefits of the land agitation. And do we not in our own day in the North of Ireland see the same narrow-minded party bitterness, a party standing against the onward march of the nation although it would be to their own benefit, as well as ours, to have a free and united Ireland. Just one more story of Crom Castle and a former Earl of Erne. In the old days a parish priest of Newtownbutler, was transported for performing the ceremony of marriage between a Protestant and a Catholic. Some time later a great regatta was held at Crom Castle, the Prince of Wales—-who was on a visit there at the time being in attendance. The greatest event of the day was a boat race on Lough Erne between a chosen party of boatmen of Lord Erne’s tenants and a party of boatmen of a gentleman named Saunderson who lived between Crom and Belturbet. Saunderson’s boatmen were a family named Latimer, while Lord Erne’s boatmen were a couple of brothers named Goodwin who lived in Derryvore—that peninsula of Knockninny parish which stretches over the lough almost to Crom and a man called big Ned Martin of Killybrack, also in Derrylin district. In the presence of the Prince of Wales, Lord Erne promised the Goodwins and Martin any favour they would ask for if they would only win the boat race in his honour. That boat race became historic in the Knockninny and Newtown butler districts. After tremendous exertions, the Goodwins and Martin won the race against their wiry opponents. Lord Erne was overjoyed at the honour done to his house with the royal guest present, and he called his boatmen up to name their reward. “Now,” he said, “anything you ask, you shall have it even, to the best farms on my estate.” But the Goodwins and Martin answered as one man: ‘Our only request is that you will procure the release of Father Clarke of Newtownbutler.’’ “Oh ask me anything only that” said Lord Erne. But they still persisted till the Prince, who was listening asked what it was all about. The circumstances were explained to him how Fr. Clarke had been transported for marrying a Protestant and a Catholic. The Prince was shocked. “I did not know” he said that there was such, a law as that upon the Statute Book of England. I must get it removed at once.

So Father Clarke was released and sent home to his parishioners and the iniquitous law was removed from the English Statute Book. As far as I can find out this incident happened long after Catholic Emancipation as there are many people still alive who remember big Ned Martin of Kilnabrack.

A correspondent has written me recently requesting that I write the folklore of the great townland of Aughyoule on the slopes of Slieve Rushen, near Derrylin.. As soon as possible I am visiting that townland—which is the second largest in Ireland—to have a few chats with its Shanachies and I will record everything about it. I find that the folklore of Knockninny parish is almost inexhaustible. Up till lately I thought Kinawley could beat all Fermanagh for folklore, but now I find that Derrylin is

 

KILTYCLOCHER AND DISTRICT NEWS. Deep regret has been occasioned in, the district by the death of Mr. Patrick Burns, Straduffy, which occurred on Thursday last following a prolonged illness. The late Mr. Burns was a. well- known sportsman. The funeral, which took place to Kilmakerrill on Saturday, was large and representative. Rev. J. P. Brady, C.C., Kiltyclogher, officiated at the graveside. The chief mourners were— Mrs. M. E. Tyrkell, Dublin, and Miss Lizzie Burns (daughters), Messrs. John Burns, Garrison; Tom Burns, Cashel, and P. Burns (sons); Messrs. Thomas and Michael Burns (brothers).

Garrison Fair held on the 26th. ult., was large and prices for all classes of cattle (especially springers) showed an upward tendency.

A farm of 35 acres at Tullyderrin, Rossinver, was purchased for £195 by Mr. Thomas Sweeney, Garrison. Killasnett School, which was closed down some time ago owing to declining attendance has been sold for £80.

A little boy aged three years had a narrow escape from drowning in the Kiltyclogher River during the week. Deep pools in close proximity to the village are unprotected, and are a constant danger to small children playing along the riverside.

The death occurred recently at an advanced age of Mr. George Acheson, Whealt. Deceased, who was one of the most extensive farmers in the Garrison district, was brother in law of Mr. Mr. T. Allingham, Kilcoo.

An official of the Department of Supplies visited Kiltyclogher last week in connection with the flour shortage, but nothing has been done since to relieve the situation, which is worsening. On Friday and Saturday Kiltyclogher was without flour or loaves. Oatmeal is also extremely scarce, and several families have to depend entirely on potatoes

 

LISNASKEA FATAL ACCIDENT. An R.A.F. corporal was the victim of a fatal accident near Lisnaskea on Friday evening. Corporal Harold Leonard Nieman, a native of Peckham, England, fell from a lorry, sustaining a fracture of the skull from which he died on his way to hospital. The accident took place at Ballindarragh, and, the police being notified, Constable T. McKernan was immediately on the scene.

At the inquest in Fermanagh County Hospital on Saturday, conducted by Mr. G. Warren. Coroner, Head Constable Thornton, Enniskillen, represented the police authorities.

Sergeant H. A. Saberton said the previous night, at 7-30 he was travelling in the rere of a three-ton truck with deceased and two others. As the truck pulled up and crossed the crown, of the road, deceased, who was standing, fell backward to the roadway on his head, and the rere wheel passed over his shoulder. The truck, which had been pulled up gradually, was stopped within three or four yards.

Witness found deceased unconscious and bleeding from mouth, nose and ears. They removed him to the grass verge, and within ten minutes he was placed in a passing car and brought to hospital, but died just approaching Enniskillen.

Dr. T. J.’ O’Hagan, house surgeon, Co. Hospital, said deceased was dead on admission. There was an abrasion on the right cheek and one on the left side of the chin. There was considerable haemorrhage from the nose and right ear. Some brain tissue was mixed with the blood. Death was due to shock and haemorrhage following fracture of the base of the skull and laceration of the brain. Sister Monaghan saw deceased on admission and he was then dead.

Deceased’s squadron leader said deceased was aged 38 and married. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence, and Head Constable Thornton and the Coroner expressed sympathy with the relatives of the deceased and to the driver of the truck, whom, the Coroner said was not in any way to blame.

 

APRIL 11, 1942.

DE-CONTAMINATION OFFICER’S INSTRUCTION. MR. BEATTY REFUSES TO CO

When Enniskillen R.D.C., on Tuesday, was requested to send its Decontamination of Food Officer to a course of instruction in Belfast, Mr. J. Brown, Clerk, said Mr. John Beatty, ,J.P., a member of the Council, had been appointed to this post and he supposed it was Mr. Beatty’s duty to attend.

Mr. Beatty—I am not going. I am telling you straight. (Laughter).

Mr. E. Callaghan said no member of the Council had more time at his disposal for attending than Mr. Beatty.

Mr. Beatty said he refused to go.

The Clerk said that in that case he thought the best thing would be for Mr. Beatty to resign. (Laughter).

Mr. J. J. Coalter, J. P., said that supposing gas was used and food was contaminated, he felt the responsibility for any serious consequences arising out of Mr. Beatty’s inability to deal with the situation would rest upon Mr. Beatty. (Laughter)

Mr. Beatty—Don’t think you will frighten me—I am not that green. (Laughter). If there was any £ s d for it I wouldn’t be asked to go. (Laughter).

Chairman (Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P.)— Will you appoint anybody?

Earl of Belmore, D.L.:—No.

Mr, Burns asked if Enniskillen Urban Council had appointed a representative.

The Clerk said it had; so also had Irvinestown and Lisnaskea Rural Council. Mr. Callaghan—Where are the lectures? Clerk—In Belfast. /

Lord Belmore—Oh! hell. (Laughter).

The Council decided to get one of the Sanitary Sub-Officers to attend.

 

LORRY AND P.O. VAN COLLIDE. SEQUEL AT LISBELLAW COURT

Details of the collision between an army, vehicle driven by Private North and a G.P.O. van driven, by Wm. Norman Kerr, Lisnarick, Irvinestown, which occurred at Gola Cross on 11th February, were given at Lisbellaw Petty Sessions on Friday, when both drivers were before the. Court charged on the usual counts with careless driving. The evidence was that the military van was coming across the road at Gola, proceeding from Lisbellaw down the Belleisle road when it struck the G. P.O. van travelling from Lisnaskea to Enniskillen.

Evidence for the prosecution was given by Bernard McCaughey, a passenger in the G..P.O. van, and Const. Wilkinson. Kerr said he was practically stopped when the impact took place. He had slowed down approaching, the cross.

North admitted in evidence that he did not obey the “halt” sign on his road at the approach to the cross. The summons against Kerr was dismissed and North, who had a previous conviction, was fined 40/- and 2/- costs.

 

LABOURERS TO RECEIVE 1/- PER HOUR. URBAN COUNCIL DECISION

Enniskillen Urban. Council have decided to pay their labouring men at the rate of 1/- per hour, instead of on the present basis of £2 5s and £2 2s 6d weekly.

Senator Whaley presided at the Council meeting on Tuesday evening, when the Finance Committee reported that they had under consideration the following applications from employees of  the Council for increases in wages and make the following recommendations thereon:—

From 13 labourers— their applications being for an increase of the present rates of £ 2 5s per week for men on the permanent staff and £2 2s 6d for men casually employed. It was stated in their applications that the rate of wages payable to general labourers in the district is at present 1/0½ per hour. It was recommended that an increase of 2/6 per week be granted to both the permanent and casual labourers.

The Committee also recommended that an increase of 2/6 per week be granted to Andrew Bell, lorry driver, on his present rate of £2 12s 6d per week, and that the wages of William Hynes, mason, be increased from £3 15s to £4 per week.

Mr. P. Kelly said the wages of labourers employed by the E.B.N.I. and builders in the district was 1/1 per hour. Why should Urban Council labourers be paid only £2 5s or £2 2s 6d weekly when all other labourers in. the district were paid £2 12s. Could the Council do nothing better for its labourers than that?

Mr. Donnelly said he wrote to the Ministry of Labour on the matter, and read the reply to the Finance Committee. The reply stated that only builders’ labourers were paid 1/1 per hour.

Mr. T. Algeo said the Council were paying the best wages in the Six Counties with the exception of two or three others.

1942 Fermanagh Herald – Local News.

21st February 1942. OBITUARY. MRS. THOMPSON, IRVINESTOWN. Amongst her numerous friends in Fermanagh and Tyrone the news of the death- of Mrs. Mary Thompson, Main Street, Irvinestown, has caused deep regret. Deceased was widow of Mr. Wm. Thompson, who predeceased her 23 years ago. Typical of genuine Irish womanhood—a good wife and mother and a kind and helpful neighbour—her admirable traits of character won for herself the highest esteem amongst all classes of the community. The sad end came on Tuesday, the 10th inst., after a short illness, during which she had the best medical attendance and tender nursing. Mrs. Thompson was deeply devout in the practice of her religious obligations and gave a shining example in this respect. During her illness she was frequently visited by the Rev. J. Trainor, P.P., and Rev. B. Lappin, C.C., and in her last moments Father Trainor was at her bedside. Fortified by the consoling rites of the Church, her death was a holy and a happy one. May her soul rest in peace.

There was a large and representative attendance at the funeral on Thursday the 12th inst., those present including the professional and commercial classes of a wide area. Requiem Mass was celebrated in the Sacred Heart Church, Irvinestown, by the Rev. B. Lappin, after which Father Trainor, P.P. in the course of a touching panegyric, referred to the exemplary Christian qualities, of the deceased. Her whole life, he said, was in accord with Divine precept; for very many years she was a daily Communicant, and as well as attending daily Mass, paid visits to the Blessed Sacrament in the Church every evening. She was foremost in every local work connected with religious associations, and was a devout member of the Sacred Heart Sodality for years. By her death, the parish had lost a member of the Catholic flock which by word and deed had given an edifying example to all. On behalf of priests and people he sympathised with the members of deceased’s family, and exhorted the faithful of the parish to be mindful of her in their prayers.

Father Trainor, assisted by Father Lappin, officiated at the graveside.

The chief mourners were William and James (sons), Mrs. G. Thompson, Dromore (daughter-in-law}Joseph and James Eves, Edemey (brothers) ; Mrs. McElrone, Clonelly; Mrs. McCartney, Philadelphia (sisters); James McElrone, Clonelly (brother-in-law.); Mrs. O’Kane, Pettigo; Mrs. Jas. Eves, Irvinestown; Mrs. Jos. Eves, Edemey; Mrs. Patrick Thompson, Portstewart (sisters-in-law). Clergy present, were:—Very Rev. J. Trainor, P.P.; Rev. John Eves, Ederney; Rev. B. Lappin, C.C., Whitehill; Rev. H. O’Hanlon, C.C., Newtownbutler, Rev. E. Flanagan, C.C., Ederney; Rev. C. McCormack, C.C., Pettigo.

21st February 1942. PETTIGO NEWS. A popular wedding took place in St. Patrick’s Church, Aghyaran, the contracting parties being Mr. Bernard McGrath, Carn, Pettigo, and Miss Nan McHugh, Cloghore. Mr, W. M. McKenna, Slavin, a cousin of the bride, was best man, and Miss Maggie McHugh, Magheramena, Belleek, also a cousin of the bride, was bridesmaid. The ceremony with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev. C. Byrne, P.P.

The death took place at her residence “Gortnaree” Pettigo of Miss Isabella Brandon. Deceased was one of the most respected ladies in the district

A very successful whist drive was held in Pettigo Courthouse, on Sunday night week which was organised by Pettigo branch of the Legion of Mary. The prize winners were:—Mrs. J. P. Griffin. Pettigo, 1: Mrs. P. J. Toomey, Pettigo, 2; Miss Maisie Britton, ‘Fincashel’ 3; Mrs. B. Breslin, Pettigo, 4; Gents prize, Mr. Charles Friel, Customs officer. After distributing of the prizes, Rev. P. McCormack, C.C., spiritual director, thanked all who attended.

The marriage took place in St. Brigid’s (sic) St. Joseph’s) Church, Belleek, of Mr. Michael Monaghan, Tamar, Pettigo, and Miss Annie Donnelly, Belalt, Pettigo. Mr. Peter Monaghan, brother of the bridegroom, was best man, and Miss Lizzie Monaghan, sister of the bridegroom, was bridesmaid. The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev. Father MacCloskey, C.C., Belleek.

Pettigo customs officials recently seized a quantity of butter, sugar and other articles from persons who were attempting to export them to the six-counties.

 

The death took place in Donegal Hospital, after a lingering illness, of Mr, Hugh McGee. Deceased who was only 25 years of age, leaves a sorrowing father and brothers.

A very-enjoyable dance was held in Letter Hall on Wednesday night of last week. The proceeds wore in aid of the local Band. The music was supplied by the Kentucky Trio Dance Band. Mr. Wm. H. Marshall, Skea, was M.C.

 

A pretty wedding took place in St. Mary’s Parish Church., Pettigo, the contracting parties being Mr. Frank Monaghan. Brookhill, Pettigo, and Miss Evylin McGrath, Carntressy, Pettigo. Mr. Michael. McGrath, brother of the bride, was best man, and Miss Tessie McGrath was bridesmaid. The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev P. McCormick, C.C., Pettigo.

21st February 1942. KINLOUGH MAN’S EXPERIENCE. A DAY IN BUNDORAN. At Ballyshannon District Court, Brian McGowan, Kinlough, was charged with being drunk on 27th December and with unlawfully damaging a car. Supt. T. Noonan, prosecuted and Mr. E. P. Condon defended.

Evidence was given that a man from Tullaghan left his motor van on the street in Bundoran. As he was not capable of driving the van that night, the Sergeant took away the ignition key and the man stayed in Bundoran. The van was left on the street all night. On that day Brian McGowan came into Bundoran with a load of potatoes in a donkey cart. He sold the potatoes, and some hours later converted the donkey and cart into cash. He got “gloriously’’ drunk and fell asleep somewhere in the vicinity of the East End. Some boys playing a prank took off his boots and put him in the van. When McGowan awoke he thought he was imprisoned in the van, and not knowing anything of the mechanism of a car—never being in a car in his life—he did not know how to get out. He lifted the starting handle ‘ of the car and smashed the windows. Then he found he could open the van at the back and succeeded in getting out that way. He could not find one of his boots and went home in his bare feet. The defendant, it was stated, paid £2 19s 6d compensation to the owner of the car. Justice O‘Hanrahan remarking that the defendant had paid dearly for his day applied the Probation, Act.

 

21st February 1942. BLACKLION DISTRICT NEWS. The death has occurred in England of Miss Kathleen Murray, formerly of Roo, Blacklion.

There was an equipment inspection on Wednesday and Thursday, nights at meetings of the local Security Force in Barran and Blacklion.

Mrs. Chas. Dolan presided at a meeting of the local Red Cross Branch in Blacklion on Friday evening. Arrangements were in progress for first-aid lectures.

The death of Miss Rose Quinn, which took place at her residence, Dernaseer, Blacklion, at an advanced age, has caused deep regret. Deceased belonged to an old and esteemed family. . The funeral was largely attended. Rev. Francis Shiels officiated in the church and at the graveside.

New concrete streets are replacing the old pavements in Blacklion. The work is a relief scheme in charge of the County Council.

 

21st February 1942. MR. DE VALERA IN CAVAN. PROFITEERING CONDEMNED. Speaking at a Fianna Fail Convention in Cavan on Sunday, Mr. de Valera said —The Fianna Fail Organisation being responsible for the election of the present Government had a special duty to be in the forefront of every national endeavour —in building up the defence forces, and in the production of food and fuel. He recalled that it had been founded as a national organisation, and said he thought it would be admitted that their main political objective had been achieved as far as the 26 Counties were concerned.

“We are a completely sovereign State, but, unfortunately, a portion of our country has been cut off, and until it is reunited to the rest no Nationalist can say that the national objective has been achieved. I think the whole nation is united in that, because the other major party and the Labour Party also agreed.’’ There were those who said that this, that and the other thing would happen when war came, but nothing took place which would not have happened to a completely sovereign State.

In making an appeal for good citizenship in the matter of reporting profiteering to the authorities, Mr. de Valera said he knew that people did not like to report their neighbours, but they must make up their minds to report profiteering. If your neighbour is a decent fellow you should act decently by him, but if your neighbour is profiteering on the community he is not a decent fellow and he does not deserve decent treatment.

One of the things we want most is the assistance of each individual in the community. We can’t have a policeman in every house or an inspector on every doorstep. Already there are far more inspectors than we would like to have. If we want to diminish the number of police or inspectors the quickest and best way is for each individual citizen to be an inspector for the community.

We should see that if there are people who are not decent in the neighbourhood they will not get away with making wealth at the expense of the poor, for that is what it often is.

“NO LEADER BUT DE VALERA.” Rev. T. Maguire, P. P., Newtownbutler, Co. Fermanagh, said, that they across the Border placed their full trust and confidence in the Government in Dublin for their deliverance. They had no leader but Mr. de Valera. The resolutions passed included one asking the Government to use all necessary compulsion short of conscription to ensure that all available young men would be brought into the Defence Forces.

21st February 1942. EXPORTING CHARGE. TWO LEITRIM MEN FINED AT BELLEEK. At Belleek Petty Sessions before Major Dickie, R. M., Bernard Brady and Francis Ferguson, both of Townalick, Rossinver, Co. Leitrim, were charged on remand with being knowingly concerned in the illegal, exportation of 90 21b. loaves, 1 cwt carbide, 61bs. cocoa and l lb. tea at Garrison on January 3 and were each fined £10 and £2 2s costs.

 

21st February 1942. £40 FINE TO REMAIN. NEWTOWNBUTLER MAN S APPEAL. COAL INTENDED FOR EXPORT. A farmer whose house is said to be situated on the very border, appealed at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions against a fine of £40 imposed on him at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions for having, as alleged, harboured 16½ tons of coal which was intended for export to the 26-Counties. In addition to the fine the Resident Magistrate had ordered the confiscation of the coal.

The appellant was William Coffey, Clonmacken, Newtownbutler, and he was represented by Mr. J. B. Murphy, solicitor. After a re-hearing of the evidence (already published in this newspaper) Deputy Judge Ellison, K. C., said that taking appellant’s circumstances into consideration (it had been stated his farm was 26 acres in extent) and the close proximity of his place to the border, he was constrained to take the view that appellant had the coal for an improper purpose. Accordingly he (the Judge), affirmed (the lower court ruling.

Mr. Murphy asked his Honour to consider the amount of the penalty. The forfeiture of the coal was in itself a loss of £64 and this with the £40 fine made the total penalty £104. Did his Honour not consider that justice could be met by the imposition of a smaller penalty. When the fine was imposed, said Mr. Murphy, he R.M. had in his mind decided that the penalty must be such as would deter other people from attempting to export coal. The loss of 16½ tons of coal alone would be a tremendous and sufficient deterrent in a case of the sort, he submitted. He suggested that, a £104 penalty on a 20-acre farmer was really too large in a case of the sort even though, the R.M. wanted, and very properly so, to make an example of him. The loss of 16½ tons of coal to appellant was appalling.

Mr .J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, who represented the Customs Authorities, “very strongly” opposed the application for a reduced fine. He suggested that the coal never at any time belonged to appellant but to a Clones resident. People who did this sort of thing took the risk with their eyes open. At the present time, he understood tea was being sold for 16s a pound in Eire and coal was a very high price there too. His Honour had another case in which the appellant had been fined £40. People who got away with fines were prepared to carry on the racket owing to the high profits realised. It was nothing to some of them to lose now and again.

Mr. Murphy said he was able to inform Mr. Cooper that if he went through the town of Clones he would not find a single ton of British coal. In the other case referred to the appellant had a farm of nearly one hundred acres, he did not lose the coal, and he was fined £20. He (Mr. Murphy) thought it no harm, to tell his Honour that in Co. Tyrone, the Judge was rather more lenient and he (the solicitor) thought all the penalties should of a certain sameness.

Mr. Cooper—He could have been fined £500 under -the Act.

His Honour said he could not think that a 26-acre farmer was doing this transaction on his own. It seemed as if he was a catspaw for somebody else and he (the Judge) supposed that somebody else would pay for it. Consequently he could not see his way to grant the reduction asked for.

 

28th February 1942. AMERICAN TOOLS STOLEN. TWO TYRONE MEN RECEIVE JAIL SENTENCE. Magistrate’s Strong Comments at Kesh.

Kesh Courthouse on Tuesday resembled a hardware shop, when a large number of tools were exhibited in a larceny case. The defendants were James E. Maguire, Fivemiletown, and Michael McGinn, Ballynagowan, Clogher, charged with, the larceny of tools from a camp where they were employed on work of national importance. Mr. Smith, for the defendants, entered a plea of guilty. District Inspector Walshe referred in strong terms to the extensive larceny of tools at the camp. The tools had been brought from overseas for use on work of national importance. Sailors’ lives had been risked in bringing them over—and in some cases lives had been lost. He referred to the difficulty of getting replacements, and said that defendants had been employed at good wages and took advantage of their position to steal the tools given them to work with. It amounted to sabotage. Mr. Smith said that as he had entered a plea of guilty he thought it was unnecessary for the District Inspector to go into details,. He said Maguire was a married man with two, children aged 10 and 8½ years. He made a strong appeal for leniency in these cases.

Major Dickie, R. M. said he had been issuing stern warnings in these cases and he had his mind made up. It was .shocking treatment for these people coming to help them. His Worship sentenced each defendant to three months’ imprisonment and to one of the camp officers commented: “I am sorry to apologise for the conduct of my fellow-countrymen.”

 

28th February 1942. PETTIGO NOTES.  The death took .place in Enniskillen Hospital on Friday of Mrs. J. McClelland, Glenagarn, Pettigo. Deceased who was in the prime of life, leaves a husband and four children. The funeral to Tubrid cemetery was one of the largest ever seen in the district. The chief mourners were J. McClelland (husband); John, Edward, James and Robert McClelland (sons). The Rev. J. G. Sandford (rector),  officiated  at the graveside.

On Monday night an enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Hall, Lettercran proceeds being, in aid of repairs. The music was supplied by Mr. Wm. Baird and Mr. James McGrath, Mr. B. Cunningham being M.C.

Pettigo monthly fair on Friday was one of the briskest held in the village for three years. Prices for good quality animals were enticing. Springing cows and heifers, £20 10s 0d to £35 each; three year old heifers £19 to £21 each; two year olds, £14 to £15 10s 0d; small calves from £4 to £7 10s 0d; young pigs 35/- each.

28th February 1942. NOVELTY FOR FERMANAGH. As will be seen in our advertisement columns a silage mowing film is to be shown in Brookeborough Courthouse on Tuesday night of next week. This film has been made in the Six Counties and includes County Fermanagh farmers making silage. This should be interesting to all farmers as in addition to being the first appearance of this film in the county, silage making is the all-important operation on the farm, in a county with abundance of grass, wet climate and where, milk provides the largest proportion of the farmer’s income, .

 

BLACKLION DISTRICT NEWS. At a bull show for premiums at Brockagh, only two animals were exhibited.

There was a large attendance at a concert on Sunday night under the auspices of the Blacklion G.F.C. A report will appear in our next issue.

Most of the officers and committee were present at a Red Cross branch meeting in Blacklion on Friday evening. A number of members were enrolled.

Despite the difficulty of procuring building material, two new houses have been erected in the district, one for Mr. John McGinley, Belcoo, and the other for Mr. J. Armstrong, Blacklion.

During, the week Messrs. O’Connor and O’Keeffe attended at four centres in the district and distributed tons of seed oats and potatoes to farmers. The prices are 14/- per cwt. for oats, and 4/- per cwt. for potatoes.

There is at present a great demand for horses in the district. Some prices paid by buyers range from £30 to £45, and one animal, the property of Mr. J. McGovern, Loughan, was purchased at £66.

There was a large supply of cattle at Blacklion fair on Monday. Prices were in excess of the quotations of the previous fair, and many sales were effected.

The death of Mr. Patk, McGoldrick, merchant, which took place at his residence, Bealbally, Glangevlin, has caused deep regret over a wide area. Deceased, a prosperous young business man, was very popular in the district. He was a son of the late Mr. Patk. McGoldrick, who was a member of the old District Council and a member of the old Enniskillen Board of Guardians for many years. Deep sympathy is extended to deceased’s young wife, family, brother and sisters, The funeral to St. Patrick’s, Glangevlin, on Wednesday, was the largest seen in the district for many years. Rev. J. McCabe, P.P., who celebrated Requiem Mass, officiated at the graveside.

 

28th February 1942. ROOSTER FOR THE AIR FORCE. IRVINESTOWN MAN IN KESH CASE. Thomas Curley, Irvinestown, was charged at Kesh Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., that being a collector of eggs he obtained eggs from a person other than a producer registered with him for that purpose. He was also charged with obtaining the eggs at a price other than that permitted.

District Inspector Walshe, said that defendant was a licensed collector of eggs and had done wrong to purchase eggs from persons residing in the 26-Counties.

Defendant said that he had obtained the eggs for members of .the King’s forces who were going to England to see their wives.

His Worship — You must not do it.

Defendant—I would not have done it had I known it was any offence. I had them for the troops. 1 came to a very big loss at the same time.

The District Inspector said that defendant had 112 eggs, 8 lbs creamery butter, 11 lbs sugar, 55 hens, three geese, one duck, one rooster, and lost the whole lot.

Defendant said he thought he was doing a good turn purchasing the eggs at a cheaper rate than in the Six Counties.

His Worship—What would an air force man be wanting with a rooster? (laughter).

A fine of 20s was imposed on each summons.

 

DANCING CLASS IN COLLEGIATE SCHOOL. At the January meeting of the County Fermanagh Regional Education Committee Mr. C. McKeown complained of the admission of unauthorised persons to a dancing class held in the Enniskillen Collegiate School. By way of explanation the following letter was received from the Headmistress (Mrs. M. C. Smith M.A.) at the Committee’s monthly meeting on Friday. “In reply to your letter Miss Dobbin did carry on a dancing class at the School under the following circumstances. She was running a class for adults, chiefly former pupils of the School in the Minor Town Hall, but it was so much occupied that she found herself without a room and so asked me if she could carry on here. I have absolute confidence in Miss Dobbin and know that she would not abuse the privilege. It is naturally, important that her classes should pay as travelling from Dublin is expensive. It is to our School’s interest that they should pay otherwise we should lose Miss Dobbin’s services. The class, which was never advertised is not now functioning nor has it done so this term. The class was attended during last term by one or two people from Portora and one or two officers who came for a few lessons. I hope no objection can be taken to this under present circumstances. Miss Catt (proprietor) made herself responsible for the lighting and I have not sent in the bill for this and I shall have to find out the cost.” The explanation was accepted.

 

The Erne Packet 1844.

The Erne Packet Thursday January 4th 1844.

Tea Meeting – In Inishmore School-house the Wesleyan Methodist Society held a soiree on Friday night last, the intention of which was to add to the missionary fund, that the lamp of life might be sent to shine through the dark regions of the earth, to dispel the clouds which satanic influence had, cast around that they might see the futility of the Gods of India, and the Idols of Africa, with the imaginary virtues of the water rivers in which mothers plunge their living infants into the open jaws of the crocodile to appease the wroth of a supposed Deity, and to substitute in their place the simplicity of the gospel and the worship of the one living and true God. Merry hearts and glad  faces were the characteristic features which the meeting wore and the ladies heightened the pleasures of the evening by their beverage being of the best quality, and their attention in suiting it to the different palates of each. Nothing can be more delightful than these, meetings — first, while it unites friends in affection and love to each other, it again serves the all-important purpose assisting in sending the everlastings gospel to the benighted heathens of all parts of the world. After tea the Rev. Mr. Pratt was called to the chair, and when he had expatiated on the honours done to him by calling him to fill such an elevated position which he felt himself so incapable of occupying, he then spoke of the importance of missionary exertions from the circumstances of the case being of an all-important nature, as their eternal interests are concerned and the redemption of souls. When he had resumed his seat the Rev. Mr. Burn was called on to speak—the warmth and zeal of his manner, and the anecdotes, which he told being so appropriate added greatly to the good feeling which prevailed throughout the meeting. The speakers following were the Rev. Mr. Derby and the Rev. Mr Mulloy Wesleyan Ministers. We refrain from saying anything of what they said as description would fail to give any idea of the abilities and talent which they displayed on the occasion. At 10 o’clock the meeting separated all well pleated with the pleasures of the evening and the information they received—(Communicated)

MASONIC FESTIVAL. Yesterday week being St. John’s day, the members of the Enniskillen Masonic Lodge No. 891, dined together, the Worshipful Master in the chair. After the cloth was removed the usual constitutional and masonic toasts were drank, and the evening was passed in the most happy and respectable manner.

MILITARY. Friday last, a party of the 60th Rifles stationed at Cavan, escorted a large quantity of ammunition into this garrison, which left Dublin five or six days previous. This and Charlemont’s magazines are, we believe, the only two in the northern district  from which the Constabulary and Military stations are supplied.

FIRMANAGH FARMING  SOCIETY;—We are sorry to learn that five or six gentlemen of the county have ceased membership with this most useful society. Although most of them; if not all, are we, are aware, connected with branch societies in their respective baronies or districts, we regret they have not seen the necessity of supporting the Parent institution from which evidently so much good has emanated.

THE WEATHER. — The almost unprecedented soft weather we have had during the Christmas changed to a smart frost on Monday, which continued to yesterday evening, when thaw and rain set in.

CHARITY. The Hon. and Rev. J. C. Maude; has received £1 0s 6d in fines levied at Petit Sessions, viz: — 14s. 6d for the poor of Enniskillen, and 6s for the county Infirmary.

The Famine 1846. Ballyshannon Herald.

1846 January 2nd 1846:— Mr. W.H. Brown was in Ballyshannon on Wednesday last, having made all arrangements for a bill in Parliament to improve Ballyshannon Harbour and provide a rail link to Belleek. This was announced at a big dinner given in Mr. Brown’s honour by the local merchants and traders. In an affray with Molly Maguires at Ballinacarrig, Co. Leitrim, two are reported dead.

January 9th:— Two brothers, Fitzpatrick, in Enniskillen Jail on suspicion of shooting Mr. Barton J.P. One of them, James Fitzpatrick, was now dead of fever in jail and the other still protesting their innocence. They had always been thought to be loyal Protestants, according to the paper, and they were claiming that they just happened to be on the road at the time of the shooting.

January 16th:— The rival railway companies were in contention and Mr. Brown, the promoter of the Ballyshannon and Lough Erne Railway and Steamboat Company, was being disowned by the Marquis of Ely and Dr. John Shiel of Ballyshannon, who declared that they only supported the Dublin and Enniskillen Railway Co. From Belleek came the melancholy story of a man called McLaughlin, a long time servant of Mr. Christy Johnston of Belleek. (This paper has a fine disregard for Christian names and invariably they miss those of the “lower orders”.) McLaughlin had been discharged by Johnston for dishonesty, said the paper, and been re-employed and sent to the local mill in Belleek with oats to be ground. He was ordered to stay overnight for the security of the oats. During the night Johnston caught McLaughlin carrying away a sack of grain and arrested him and the police conveyed him to Enniskillen. When the prisoner arrived in Enniskillen he excused himself (presumably to go to the toilet) and his handcuffs were removed and the poor man promptly jumped into the lake and was drowned. This item was followed up the next week with a letter signed by Porteus Johnston and his brothers, Christopher and James. (I believe these to be the Johnstons who owned the Hotel Carlton in Belleek — which was already in existence.) They wrote of the suicide of Terence McLaughlin, their servant, and objected to the previous newspaper report (raising interesting speculations as well). Their letter says that Terence McLaughlin had been their servant for eight years and was always honest and they don’t believe that he could have been stealing a 28 stone bag of oats when he was only eight stone in weight himself. They say that they had taken him back after he had been accused of stealing oats and he was working as usual when he was arrested on a warrant issued against him without summons or hearing. McLaughlin had resided less than two miles from Belleek and Christy Johnston had warned the Keenans not to proceed against McLaughlin in law. Thus the letter enigmatically ended. In relation to the Barton shooting two men called Burnside and a man, Irvine, and his wife were in jail in connection with the crime.

The January 30th issue refers to the expected arrival soon of the first ever steamship in Ballyshannon and that there will be public demonstrations to mark this event and the issue of 27th February 1846 commemorates this. The steamer Unity recently visited Ballyshannon, it said, with a cargo of barley for the local distillery and on its second visit brought pigs to Messrs O’Brien of the town, saving an entire week driving the pigs and the consequent injury to the animals. It is hoped to have steamers from Liverpool shortly.

  1. It is March 6th before the famine is mentioned and only to say that people were flocking to a certain priest in Co. Cavan to fill bottles of water at a holy well in order to sprinkle their potatoes to stop rot.

On April 3rd recipes appear in the paper for using with Indian corn (maize imported as a substitute for the potato and detested by the Irish). April 17th announces the first emigrant ship of the season leaving Sligo. It is the ship Drumahair, owned by Mr. Kernaghan (Enniskillen) and from its name obviously a local vessel.

Horse racing was recently held at Magheramena, the home of the Johnston family near Belleek. (Magheramena Castle was not yet built). A large crowd attended and “spolleen, poiteen, jug of the joke and lemonade were much in demand.” There was a dinner afterwards for invited guests. A horserace was also reported on Tullan (or Finner) Strand near Bundoran.

It is now getting round the summer bathing scene at Bundoran and the latest arrivals at Gallagher’s Hotel, Bundoran, on last Saturday (before 22nd May) were the Dowager Marchioness of Ely, Lord Henry Loftus, Lady Anne and Lady Catherine Loftus and the Rev. Loftus Reed and Miss Reed.

On May 28th a big disturbance is reported in Enniskillen because of a “forestaller” who was buying loads of potatoes to take them to Co. Monaghan. (A forestaller was a type of profiteer who bought up potatoes). The people objected to the potatoes being sold out of the area and potato sacks were slashed. This account was being carried from an article in the Erne Packet (Enniskillen paper), and that newspaper was in sympathy with the “anti-forestallers.”

19th of June reports the death of Charles French, second mate of the American Brig Camilla which was anchored in Ballyshannon Harbour at “the Pool”. He jumped out of the ship for a swim and was drowned and later interred in Ballyshannon. July 3rd saw a report of a near drowning when one Henry Connolly drove his horse and cart into the sea at Bundoran to refresh the horse and quench his thirst. A wave swept all away, except that with a struggle Connolly saved himself. His horse and cart are described as his only possessions.

July 24th reports the trial of those accused of the attempted murder of Folliott W. Barton, the Pettigo J.P. Accused of the shooting was Robert Burnside and accused of harbouring him were James and Margaret Irvine. Barton had been coming on horseback from his relations’ house, Barton’s of the Waterfront, also near Pettigo, through the village to his own home at Clonelly on the Kesh side of Pettigo. After coming through Pettigo Barton had been shot at Crummer’s Gate at Aghalaan. He was wounded in the right breast but rode on to the house of John Chute, a mile and a half from his residence. A James Armstrong gave evidence of seeing Burnside with a gun and following him to Irvine’s house and listening at a window while Burnside told of the shooting. Despite this impressive-sounding evidence the jury retired and brought in a not guilty verdict after one and a half hours.

As we shall see later there is obviously much misery and hunger abroad in the land but escaping the notice of the class for which the Ballyshannon Herald is produced. August 14th chronicles the arrival of Colonel Conolly, M.P. and his suite at Cliff House near Belleek and that Lord and Lady Longford are soon due to arrive. (Conolly was the principal landowner in the Belleek/Ballyshannon/Bundoran area). This social chit-chat continues with the readers of August 21st being told that Coburn’s Hotel, Ballyshannon, was doing very well this season and that Bundoran and Donegal Town were packed with visitors. But there were many outrages reported and many people were being beaten up and robbed especially on the road between Ballyshannon and Donegal.

The 92nd Highlanders were moving out from Ballyshannon and Belleek and causing much regret since the area would be deprived of the amateur theater which they had set up. They were replaced by detachments of the 26th Cameronians. An incident in Ballymagroarty near Ballyshannon is reported, in which a man, Johnston Corduct, had vitriol thrown in his face by a woman called Gallagher who had since fled the country. He had seduced her, but would not marry her, even though she had given him thirty shillings. He had spent this on other girls.

August 28th hears the first complaints of “a very scarce season” and many disturbances in the locality. Employees of Messrs Bradshaw and Co. of Donegal were beaten up near Pettigo after delivering coal to Barton’s of the Waterfoot Estate. Their assailants rushed out of the bog with blackened faces.

James Credan, a local merchant, advertises the landing of timber, etc. at Ballyshannon from the Charlotte of Warmouth, Nova Scotia, and from the Margaret. A few passengers can be accommodated on the Charlotte to St. John’s, when it sails on September 10th. September 4th catalogues more outrages and men beaten up on the Pettigo-Laghey road. One man, Jenkins, only saved his life by leaving his horse and cart and running away.

It has taken a long, long time for the reality of the poor and starving to force its way into the columns of this local paper, but by late 1846, even a paper with as much sensory handicap as this one has to acknowledge the existence of the famine. September 11th reports for two and a half columns on a meeting in Donegal courthouse on the subject of the relief of the poor. Loans and grants are craved from the Government to employ the poor of the Baronies of Tyrhugh and Bannagh and Boylagh. All these baronies report great distress of the poor. The paper carries an advertisement for the Ballyshannon Destitute Sick Society which is going to make its own local contribution to help alleviate the situation. By September 25th the paper, which has carried little or no reports of a situation which has obviously been building up for a long time, suddenly discovers “the poor in this town and vicinity are in a wretched state of destitution.” “Potatoes are too dear at 6d or 3d per stone and not a plateful sound”. Indian meal is now one shilling five pence a peck. “How are they to live?” “People are not able to raise enough money from working as the price of food is so high.” A family (obviously not an ordinary family) bought a ton of Indian meal in Sligo last week for £12 and could now make £5 profit on it if they wished. A poor, honest tradesman with 12 children is applying for aid. No one in his house has eaten for forty eight hours. “Something must be done.”

Sir Thomas Hort is reducing his rents in Magheraboy (West Fermanagh) after a personal visit to the area. This issue ends with a report of a pathetic procession of the poor through the streets of Ballyshannon — following a man carrying a loaf speared on a pole.

October 2nd carries the news of a presentment of £20,000 for the Barony of Tyrhugh to be spent on roads to give work for the poor. On the road from Ballyshannon to Bundoran £1,000 is to be spent, £800 on the road from Belleek to Ballyshannon, £500 to be spent on the streets of Ballyshannon and on leveling the Fair Green, £100 to be spent on the new road from Pettigo to Ballintra and £100 on the old road between the same places and there is an extensive list of further schemes in the paper.

  1. October 30th carries the story of the breaking into the Abbey Mill and two tons of meal being stolen from the owners, Donaldson and Connolly, two hard working, struggling men. The stolen meal was conveyed by boats across the Erne estuary and no one has been caught. Ballyshannon Committee for the relief of the poor of the town and vicinity have raised a large sum to purchase wheaten meal and will soon be able to sell it at a reduced price. Sir James Stewart, Bart., is now visiting with the Col. Connolly at Cliff and the Colonel is to reduce his rents on his Donegal Estate by 25%.
  1. November 13th publishes a further list of subscribers to the Ballyshannon Poor Relief Committee and the list is headed by Colonel Connolly with £600 (a very substantial sum in 1846). The Committee’s meal store in College Lane is now open from November 13th and each subscriber of money to the fund will be able to give tickets to the needy for reduced price meal in proportion to the sum they subscribed. Every subscriber of £1 will be able to give three tickets for a half stone of whole meal each twice a week. Each lender of £18 to the fund will be able to give three tickets as above and so on in proportion for each £6 lent.

November 27th gives news of the arrival of the ship Colonist at Richebucto, New Brunswick, on November 17th. Under its Captain Charles Dorning the Colonist had sailed from Ballyshannon and endured terrible storms, but all the ship’s passengers from Ballyshannon and Killybegs were landed in good health. An attack was reported on a local man called Stephenson, a farmer who had formerly belonged to the Donegal Regiment. His gun and his money were demanded, but with his servant, McCann, (all these unchristened people) they drove off their attackers and one man was stabbed by McCann with a pitchfork. This man has since died and been privately buried. Colonel Conolly’s rents are now reduced by 50% for those paying less than £5 p.a., reduced by 40% for those paying under £10 p.a., 25% for those whose rent is less than £15 and reduced by 20% for those paying over £15.

December 18th reports that Edward Allingham has had five bullocks killed and carried away during the night. (This seems a common crime to surround, kill and dismember an animal and carry it away). A pig had been stolen from a poor man in Belleek (a more serious crime, since the pig usually paid the rent for the Irish poor). Some meal had been stolen from the store of the local Poor Relief Committee and the town was full of “strange mendicants” (Beggars). It is impossible to feed them all”. A bleak outlook as we leave 1846 but as the next delightful tale has it for some people, the year had a brighter ending.

 

1950 May to August.

6-5-1950. Advertisement – For Springtime – Rabbit dishes. Delicately appetising for warmer days, rabbit is really nourishing too. Easy to get now, inexpensive, and one rabbit gives big helpings for four to six people. Here is an easy to do suggestion. Rabbit stew: With a little bacon, a touch of onion, seasoning to taste, and cooked, dried or canned peas added before serving.

6-5-1950. Advertisement. Have you got your new Ration Book? Some people haven’t got their new Ration Books yet! Are you one of these? If so don’t leave it any longer. Get your new book right away please – you will need it from 21st May.

6-5-1950. Devenish girl, Miss Bridget Agnes Feely of Glen West, Garrison, receives the holy habit at Franciscan Hope Castle, Castleblayney, County Monaghan. Her sister is a member of the Little Sisters of the Poor in France.

6-5-1950. Widespread sympathy has been evoked in Dromore, County Tyrone and Mulleek, County Fermanagh by the sudden demise due to a railway accident at an early age of Patrick O’Connor, Garvary, Leggs, County Fermanagh. He was secretary and playing member of Mulleek and a member of the Mulleek branch of the Anti-Partition League. His loss to the community is a great one but greatest of all to his sorrowing mother, brothers and sister.

13-5-1950.  Cashel and Ederney draw. Ederney travelled to Cashel on Sunday last to fulfil their Junior League fixture. This was Ederney’s first appearance in Fermanagh fixtures from 1947. Considering that this is practically a new look team Ederney gave a grand display to hold Cashel to a draw. The final score was Cashel 3-3, Ederney 2-6. The scorers for Cashel were Tracey, Leonard, Gallagher and Mc Laughlin and for Ederney, Monaghan, Mc Hugh, Murphy, Maguire and Lunny.

13-5-1950. Fermanagh Woman’s tragic fate at Bundoran. Inquest verdict of accidental death. The body of Mrs Ellen Hennessy sister of Charles Reilly of Drumbinnis, Kinawley was found on the rocks of Rogey, Bundoran.

13-5-1950. Harnessing the Erne for Hydro-Electrification. Dublin and Belfast agree on joint plan to drain Lough Erne Area. The total cost of both schemes will be £1,090,000 of which the government of the Republic will pay £750,000 and the Six Counties £350,000. The river will be deepened from Roscor to Belleek where a new bridge will be built. The new river channel will have a capacity of 660,000 cubic feet per minute. The prospect of hydro-electrification of Donegal are now very bright. This may mean that not a single area in the scattered county will be omitted from the benefits of rural electrification.

20-5-1950. The change over from hand passing to boxing the ball has caused some players a lot of difficulty. At one match on the first Sunday in May, it was amusing to watch the despairing gestures of one player who realised that little bit too late that flicked passes were banned. He was not so resourceful as his colleague who erred against the new rule, but carried on as if everything were normal and scored a goal. He was lucky the referee (who shall be nameless) had forgotten also.

20-5-1950. Until recently only one Fermanagh referee has been entrusted with a whistle outside the county, Jimmy Kelly, Farnamullan, Lisbellaw. Lately Ederney’s popular Johnny Monaghan’s worth has been recognised and his name is down several times in this year’s inter-county fixture list.

27-5-1950. Green is definitely first choice with Fermanagh teams when choosing jerseys. All four teams in Division A of the Junior League favoured the National colour, Cashel’s jersey having a white stripe added, while Derrygonnelly, Ederney and Devenish sported green and orange. The similarity of the jerseys caused great confusion in all the matches in this division. Derrygonnelly have now secured a new outfit which, as far as it can be ascertained will clash with no other club’s colours.

10-6-1950. Fatal Ballyshannon Shooting Accident. Seamus Gordon, a 25 year old fitter’s helper of the Abbey, Ballyshannon was the victim of a tragic shooting affair when the rifle he was carrying on a fox hunting expedition went off, apparently as he was crossing a stone ditch and the bullet entered his head.

1-7-1950. Early on Sunday morning the Russian sponsored North Korean Government invaded South Korea following a declaration of war. On Tuesday President Truman ordered US air and naval forces into action into Korea and instructed the Seventh Fleet to prevent any attack on Formosa.

8-7-1950. Belleek Young Emmetts per Mr. T. Campbell have subscribed £35 to the County Minor Training. Contingents of players arrived in Irvinestown on Monday and Tuesday to begin training under the famous Cavan footballer, Tony Tighe. On Monday night the boys were provided with a cinema entertainment in Irvinestown.

1-7-1950. Fermanagh Minors for the next round of the Championship defeating Tyrone by 1-1 to 3 points. Throne had appealed the match on the grounds that Billy Charlton of Fermanagh had taken a penalty which struck the crossbar and he had collected the rebound and scored a goal. Tyrone appealed to the Ulster Council and quoted the rule that another player had to touch the ball before the taker could play it again. The appeal was turned down. This was the only part of the meeting conducted in English the rest being in Irish.

15-7-1950. Cashel Annual Sports held were attended by almost 1,000 people. In the match between Cashelnadrea and Kiltyclogher the ball was thrown in by the newly ordained Fr. Sean McKeaney, OMI.

15-7-1950. Fermanagh Minors train for Ulster Minor Championship v Armagh. Under Tony Tighe, trainer and Malachy Mahon assistant the boys are going through a thorough training programme which fills their days and which is having many obviously good effects. Accommodated on 22 beds in St. Molaise Hall they have a portable wireless set and a gramophone and at their disposal two billiard tables. Rising daily at 7.30 am the boys have a cup of tea and a couple of miles walk before breakfast at 9.00. They have physical exercises, ball practice and tactics before having a light lunch at 1.30. Between then and 4.30 when they have a cup of tea they have more ball practice, tactics, and a football match between fifteen of the players and the remainder strengthened by local St. Molaise players. Finally they have after tea, physical training, long distance running and sprinting, followed by a mile walk and then before 10 o’clock to bed.

15-7-1950. Newly ordained Garrison priest at Oblate College, Piltown, County Kilkenny, Rev John J McKeaney. Son of Michael McKeaney, Scribbagh, Garrison and the late Mrs McKeaney. He has two sisters nuns.

22-7-1950. Death of Mrs Mary Quinn, Teebunion, Cashel on June 30th, 1950.

22-7-1950. Fermanagh heavily defeated by Armagh 5-5 to 4 points in the Ulster Minor Championship. Sean Gonnigle of Belleek on the team, John Maguire of Ederney and Pat Casey of Garrison.

22-7-1950. Kesh Bank cashier gets four years. Samuel H. Henderson of the Belfast Banking Company, Kesh, aged 47 married with one child pleaded guilty to stealing c £9000. He had been a faultless employee for 30 years and will lose a pension of £500 p.a. He had been asked to reduce his overdraft by the bank and turned to moneylenders to do this and then to gambling money from accounts in sums of £40 and £50 on football pools. His local stature was such that when he was bailed his bailsmen were people from whose accounts he had taken money.

29-7-1950. Armagh wins first Ulster Senior GAA title for 47 years to record their third victory. They beat Cavan.

12-8-1950. Belleek Man Sells a Rat – Mr. Bill Thornton, Belleek, who lives alone in a house with about 30 rats, sold one a few days ago to an Omagh publican for 8/6. So enamoured was the customer with his bargain that he paid a second visit to Mr. Thornton to make a second purchase, but Mr. Thornton refused to part with another of his pets. Mr. Thornton feeds the rats and looks after them as people do of more normal pets. They swarm around him at feeding time and he can fondle them and handle them without the slightest danger of being bitten.

12-8-1950. The new teams of 1950, Ederney, Cashel and Kinawley are engaged in a special competition for new teams. The trophy for this competition will be the old Championship cup which is being replaced as Senior Championship trophy for the county by the beautiful Gold Cup presented to the Fermanagh GAA by the Fermanagh Men’s Association in New York.

12-8-1950. Tommy Gallagher, Belleek, who emigrated last week, was one of the best men of the New York team that conquered Cavan recently at Croke Park and won the National League. At centre full he had the measure of O’Donoghue and Mick Higgins and completely subdued both. This played a big part in the victory.

12-8-1950. Trout fishing on Lough Melvin. Trout fishing has vastly improved on Lough Melvin as a result of the recent heavy rains and consequent flooding of rivers. Professor Marshall of Derry caught 21 trout in a few hours fishing during the weekend and had catches of 16 and 17 trout last week. Other anglers had catches of a dozen each.

 

September 1915.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  MILITARY NOTES.  TWO V. C.s FOR INNISKILLINGS.  Last Wednesday night shortly before going to Press we received the following brief gratifying message: – Captain Gerald Robert O’Sullivan, 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers has been awarded the V.C. for conspicuous gallantry at Gallipoli.  Captain O’Sullivan joined the 1st Inniskillings on 7th of March, 1912.  This is the second Victoria Cross won by the Inniskilling Fusiliers, the other V. C. being awarded to Sergeant Somers, a native of Belturbet, particulars of which are published in another column of this paper.  The regiment has got several Distinguished Conduct Medals and other coveted decorations.  Further particulars regarding Captain O’Sullivan’s gallant feat for which HE has thus been honoured are not yet to hand.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  THE NATIONAL PERIL OF A COAL STRIKE.  10,000 MEN OUT IN SOUTH WALES.  More than 10,000 men have struck in the Abertillery district off Monmouthshire, and they are endeavouring to persuade other districts to follow their example.  Mr. Tom Richards, M. P., the Secretary of the miners’ federation, affirms that a strike is inevitable unless the decision of Mr. Runciman, the President of the Board of Trade, that certain classes of men are to be excluded from the “bonus turn” is reversed.  There was general satisfaction on Saturday when it became known that Mr. Lloyd George was again in conference with the miners’ leaders.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  THINGS PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW.  SOME PERTINENT QUESTIONS.  Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  Is poor Tempo ever going to get a doctor to take up his permanent residence there again?  And what is wrong with the district that no doctor will remain in it?

Are the people of Maguiresbridge once more happy and content since they have got their former medical officer again appointed to look after their health?

What is the price of hay likely to be in Fermanagh in another month’s time after so much was destroyed by the recent rains?

How can a number of people who object strongly to football matches and other games on Sundays at home can reconcile their attitude in this matter with their own habit of bathing, swimming and diving in the sea on Sundays at Bundoran during the summer?

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  ROLL OF HONOUR.  THE TOLL OF THE BRAVE.  LORD ERNE’S FAMILY.  ANOTHER TRAGIC LOSS.  Few families in the Northern peerage have suffered more through the war than that of which the Earl of Erne, of Crom Castle, County Fermanagh, is the head.  A further bereavement has fallen on the family through the death of Lieutenant-Colonel, Sir John Milbanke, Bart., V. C., commanding the  Notts Yeomanry, who has been killed in action at the Dardanelles.  Sir John, who succeeded to the baronetcy in 1899, was married in the following year to Amelia, daughter of the Hon.  Charles Frederick Crichton, eldest surviving brother of the late Earl of Erne. Lady Milbanke’s only brother, Major H. F. Crichton, of the Irish Guards, was killed early in the war.

Sir John was born in 1872, and served in the 10th Hussars, retiring with the rank of major in 1911.  He rejoined last October, and was posted to the command of the Notts Yeomanry.  During the Boer War he was A.D.C. to Sir John French, and was seriously wounded.  It was in that campaign that he won the V. C. for gallantry, rescuing a wounded trooper after he himself had been seriously injured.  The baronetcy dates back to 1661, and the daughter of a previous holder of the title was the wife of Lord Byron the celebrated port.  There is, we may add, still no news of the present Earl of Erne (Royal Horse Guards), who has now been missing for the greater part of a year.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  IRVINESTOWN COUNCIL.  KILLADEAS POST OFFICE AND THE KESH WATER SUPPLY.  Mr. Robert Phillips, J.P. presided and Mr. Clarke moved that the Council renew their guarantee of the Killadeas Money Order Post Office.  Although, he said, the office had a deficit of 14 shillings on last year’s working it was a great benefit to the poor, and that if there would be a deficit in the future he would not come again before them with a similar request.  Mr. Duncan said it was a matter of 30 years since the old Board had given the guarantee for the purpose of establishing that office.  The deficit was so paltry that the people there should have paid it themselves and not asked the council to pay it.  The application was unanimously granted and Mr. Clarke returned thanks on behalf of the people of Killadeas to which the Chairman replied, “Don’t come back again.”  (Laughter.)

Dr. Patten wrote calling attention to the defective condition of the Kesh water supply and mentioned that the water from the river got into the well.  Mr. Duncan said – We spent about £20.00 on the Kesh water supply a short time ago.  Mr. May – The well is too near the river and it cannot be changed, but something must be done for there is no drinking water in Kesh at all.  It was decided to refer the matter to two local Guardians and the sub–sanitary officer W.  H.  Simpson.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  THE IRISH CREAMERIES MANAGERS’ CONFERENCE AT BUNDORAN.  The annual conference of Ulster and Connaught members of the Irish Creamery Managers Association was held on Saturday with Mr. J.  Timoney, J. P., Belleek presiding.  The Chairman said that the past year had been an eventful one.  The war overshadowed everything else, but it had not adversely affected the industry in which they were engaged.  What the result would be when hostilities had concluded it would be difficult to say, but there seemed no reason to doubt that they were likely to have a great trade depression and heavy taxation.  Hence the present opportunity should be availed off to strengthen their resources, to clear off bank overdrafts and machinery debts, and put by a reserve for bad debts, which were certain to be more numerous in the future.  While the industry was in a prosperous condition, he was sorry he could not say the same of the position of the managers themselves.  It was true that some creamery committees had recognised the greatly increased cost of living and given their managers substantial advances.  Others, however, had not done so, though their own income as farmers had been greatly increased, and though the managers, owing to greater experience, and taking advantage of all opportunities placed at their disposal, were producing better and better results year by year.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  “BILLY” SUNDAY.  Here is an example of the picturesque diction of the baseball evangelist “Billy” Sunday who some say has founded a party of buffoonery and blasphemy.  “Cleopatra was a flat-nosed wench who sailed up the Nile clothed only in sunshine and climate.”

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  A SON OF SIR CHARLES CAMERON IS DEAD.  On Friday morning Lieutenant Ewan Cameron, 7th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, son of Sir Charles Cameron, C. B., was found dead in the lavatory of the train which left Dublin for Wexford at 10.15.  There was a revolver bullet wound in his head.  The keenest sympathy is felt for Sir Charles.

(Ed. Sir Charles presided at the first experiments in the manufacture of Belleek Pottery in the kitchen of Castle Caldwell, Belleek using the local china clay and feldspar. Journal of the Association of Public Analysts (Online) 2009 37 14-39 by D Thorburn Burns.

Sir Charles Alexander Cameron (1830-1921) Dublin’s Medical Superintendent, Executive Officer of Health, Public Analyst and Inspector of Explosives. Although Charles Cameron is not particularly well known these days, he was in his time, very well known in chemical, medical and social circles in Dublin and in London. A deal of information about him is available via his Reminiscences and Autobiography. His importance at the time

can be judged from the report in The Irish Times, March 3, 1921, giving details of the funeral

service and procession “whose proportions bore testimony to the esteem in which Sir Charles

Cameron was held”, and listed the chief mourners, the representatives of the Royal College of

Surgeons of Ireland, the Royal Dublin Society, the Masonic Order, members of the general

public, the floral tributes and the messages attached, and finally the contents of the telegrams

of sympathy received.

Charles Cameron was born in Dublin on 16 July 1830, son of a Scottish British Army

Officer, his mother Belinda Smith was from Co. Cavan. He was schooled first in Dublin and

then Guernsey. After his father’s death in 1846 the family returned to Dublin and Cameron

obtained employment in the laboratory of the Apothecaries, Bewley & Evans. The

Superintendent of Bewley & Evans laboratory, John Aldridge, was Professor of Chemistry at

the Apothecaries Hall Medical School and Cameron received from him a good knowledge of

pharmaceutical chemistry. Cameron studied medicine in the School of Medicine of

Apothecaries Hall, the Dublin School of Medicine, the Ledwich School, the Meath and the

Coombe Hospitals, and studied in 1854 in Germany. During his long career he collected

numerous degrees and memberships and high office in many professional bodies, most of

which were recorded on the title pages of the various annual editions of Report upon the State

of Public Health (see for example that for 1914.).

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  THE 6TH INNISKILLINGS AT SUVLA.  ABSOLUTE HELL.  The following are extracts from a letter which has been received in Ireland from an officer in the 6th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.

August 10, 1915.  Here we are back on the beach “resting” though shells are bursting all around after three days of absolute hell.  How any of us got through alive God only knows; but a few of us did, though the poor old Division is cut to ribbons.  However, it has made a name for itself that will live.  I suppose you have read by this that we made a new landing on August 7, and in one day won4 miles after desperate fighting.  If dispatches have been published by the time you get this, you will see that the regiment was specially complimented for their brilliant attack.  Our General said he had never seen better work by infantry.

Well, we landed at dawn on Saturday morning in lighters, and as we got to the shore shrapnel began to burst about us.  It is the most absolutely terrifying sensation you could imagine.  The thing comes with a vicious whizz, bursts with a bang, and all round you the air seems full of flying lead.  We had not many casualties landing as we advanced for a mile or so under cover.  We were then told we had to take a hill about 2 miles away, and as we advanced across a stretch of sand the high explosive shells began to come.  It was ghastly: they blew whole groups to pieces, and we had lost pretty heavily by the time we got to the first cover.  While we were getting a breather here and getting the battalion sorted out, against shrapnel found us, and on we had to go.  It was worse now, as both shrapnell and high explosives were coming.  One hit the ground about 10 yards from me, but luckily did not burst, although it buried me in sand.  Another bit of shrapnel carried away my ration bag from my side.  At the next ridge where we halted I found a Brigadier–General with his leg blown off, and I left him my water bottle.  The sights here were absolutely sickening – far too horrible to describe.  On we went again, but were getting more cover now from our own artillery and naval guns were beginning to quiet the enemy.  Things were better till we got within about 800 yards of the position, and then all hell broke loose, and we began to know what rifle and machine gun fire was like.  Rushes were now very short, and when you got down you had to lie in the open, face flat to the ground, and bullets …………..

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  A CHILD IS DROWNED IN LOUGH ERNE AT BALLYSHANNON.  Since Wednesday last the 25th ult., nothing was heard of a little boy named Thomas Sheridan, aged four years.  The child is a son of Sergeant Sheridan, Connaught Rangers, who was wounded in the present war, and is at present in hospital in Dublin.  His wife, who is staying with her parents at Ballyshannon, missed the child some time on Wednesday evening, but it was thought it might have strayed into the country.  Though search parties scoured the country no information as to the child’s whereabouts was ascertained.  It was feared the little fellow fell into the Erne which flows past Mrs. Sheridan’s residence and was drowned.  The river below Ballyshannon Bridge was dragged several times but for days no trace of the body was discovered.  During the dragging operations a man named James Daly, and ex-soldier of the Irish Guards, had a narrow escape.  A strong current carried the boat which was being used over the smaller of the two Assaroe Falls, and only he was a very strong swimmer he would have lost his life.  The body of the boy was eventually discovered on Monday evening floating in the Erne below Ballyshannon Bridge.  The remains were removed to the residence of the child’s grandfather, Mr. Charles Gallogly, jeweller, West Port, Ballyshannon.

Impartial Reporter.  September 2nd 1915.  SECOND LIEUTENANT R.  TRIMBLE’S ESCAPE.  HOW CAPTAIN JOHNSTON WAS KILLED.  A letter from Mr. Reginald S.  Trimble6th Royal Irish Fusiliers, tells how he was knocked down at Gallipoli.  He had been three days on the firing line; and on the fourth day he was standing between his colonel and adjutant in conversation under a hot fire so that the high explosives were making fireworks where they were.  A shell came along and tore the colonel’s harm to pulp and passing Mr. Trimble who was slightly behind the line of fire dashed the unfortunate adjutant, Captain Johnston of Magheramena to pieces.  It was a wonderful escape, he adds, but then everyone has wonderful escapes at times.  He was dazed and fell and when he was lifted his head was sore from the concussion.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  DISTINCTLY AND INEXCUSABLY LIBELLOUS.  We devote a good deal of space this week to dealing with the malicious vagaries of Mr. William Copeland Trimble regarding the family of the Editor of this paper.  We have had sound legal advice that the articles and letters that have appeared in the  Reporter are distinctly and inexcusably libellous.  We detest law proceedings.  We have never been afraid of the Impartial Reporter.  Where ability and honour are involved we have never felt in confronting the Editor it was a case of Greek meeting Greek, or that he was a foeman worthy of a steel.  He has always been a poor sort of antagonists.  We cannot recall an instance where in an encounter with us he has not been ignominiously countered and shut up.  The public will pardon, we know, the implied vanity of the statement, but it is an absolute truth, and is a necessary declaration in surveying the past relationship of the two papers.  Instead of flying to lawyers for help we will continue to fight our own corner.  With some sections of the inexperienced public Mr. Trimble may pose as a luminary; with as he is a light of a very poor magnitude indeed – and he knows it.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  TREMENDOUS FIGHTING AT GALLIPOLI.  Mr. Ashmead Bartlett, says the Daily Mail, closes a thrilling narrative of the great battle in Gallipoli for the crest of Sari Bair with the following vivid passage, which epitomises a glorious failure in which Generals and Colonels fought with rifles and bayonets alongside their troops in the firing line.  It was a fierce hand to hand struggle among the scrub, through broken ground, in which no man knew how his comrade was faring.  Many commanding officers were killed, including General Baldwin, who had throughout these four days set a splendid example to his men. Gradually the enemy was driven back and the ground we had been obliged to abandon regained.  Thus closed for the time being, amid these blood-stained hills, the most ferocious and sustained soldiers battle since Inkerman.  But Inkerman was over in a few hours, whereas Englishmen, Australians, New Zealanders, Ghurkhas, Sikhs and Maoris kept up this terrible combat with the Turks for four consecutive days and nights, amid the hills, dongas and ravines 900 feet above the sea, to which point all water, rations had to be borne along paths which do not exist except on the map, and down which every man who fell wounded had to be borne in the almost tropical heat of August in the Mediterranean.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  ENNISKILLEN GUARDIANS, THE FERRYMAN AND THE TEMPO DISPENSARY.  Mr. Patrick Crumley, M.  P.  Presided over the weekly meeting of Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday.  Some laughter was created by the Clerk reading a letter from Dr. G. F. Luke, who wrote enquiring if Tempo Dispensary District was again vacant and asking to be informed when the appointment of a medical officer to that dispensary would be made.  Dr. Luke is the gentlemen who, in or about July, 1914 was appointed to Tempo Dispensary.  At the meeting of the Board on August 4, 1914, the Clerk mentioned that in connection with the appointment he had received 11 letters and eight telegrams from Dr. Luke, and a couple of days after his appointment Dr. Luke wired asking could he resign.  It was then decided to re-advertise for another doctor.  When his letter was read on Tuesday a member suggested that it be marked read.  The Chairman –Why should I initial a letter from a fellow who is humbugging the old country round.  He was at Cookstown and then he joined the army, and now he is on the loose again.  The letter was thrown to one side

Joseph Feely, the ferryman, wrote applying for five guineas for extra work which had fallen upon him through having to bring the medical officer over to the infirmary after 7.00 p.m.  He had to bring the doctor over 42 times and he asked that he be allowed two shillings and sixpence for each journey.  The Clarke explained that this was unusual and was accounted for by the fact that the doctor had frequently to attend a serious case in the hospital.  It was decided to adjourn the matter till the patient got better.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  BELTURBET’S VICTORIA CROSS.  In view of the fact that Sergeant J.  Somers, of the Inniskillings, who has won the V. C., is being claimed as a Tipperary man, the following particulars of his career show that he is an Ulsterman.  He was born in Church Street, Belturbet, 21 years ago, his father being Robert Somers, then sexton of the parish church, a position which his grandfather also held.  His mother was Charlotte Boyce, a native of Wexford, who previous to her marriage was the parlour-maid at the residence of Mr. Fane Vernon, D. L., Erne Hill, Belturbet.  His grandmother, Mrs. Somers, and his aunt, Miss Anna Somers still reside in Belturbet, another sister being Mrs. McLean, wife of Mr. A. McLean, USA, formerly town surveyor of Belturbet.  His parents left Belturbet when he was a boy.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  WAR NEWS.  The war is making heavy demands upon the life assurance companies, particularly those of the industrial type.  About £860,530 has been paid out in respect of 46,200 sailors and soldiers killed during the war, while in the past four weeks £90,530 has been paid to settle 4,200 claims.  With regard to officers the claims now amount to over £2,800,000 and in many of the cases the insurances are very heavy.

Hundreds of women are now engaged in the rural districts of Lancashire in lifting the potato crop and assisting in dairying and other farm work in order to release men for the colours.

About 100 troopers have arrived at Plymouth from South Africa to enlist.  They have paid their own expenses.

An officer just back from the front has had a German bullet, which penetrated his shoulder and came out by his wrist, mounted in gold and made into a charm, but not altered.  Others have had rough pieces of shrapnel which have struck them mounted in gold wire; for tiny fragments a little gold cage had been made.  German shells have been mounted to serve as dinner gongs, and the base of a shrapnel case turned into an ash tray; a cigar box too, has been constructed from a German helmet, with the Prussian eagle on the lid.

The death of M. Pegoud, the well-known aviator, has caused deep sorrow among the French public, whose affection he had gained no less by his personal modesty and by his wonderful skill, and the Matin suggests that as a mark of popular esteem a Paris Street should be named after him. (Ed. Adolphe Célestin Pégoud (13 June 1889 – 31 August 1915) was a French aviator and flight instructor, who became the first fighter ace during World War I. Pégoud served in the French Army from 1907 to 1913. Immediately thereafter he began flying, earned his pilot’s certificate, and in a few months, on 21 September 1913, as a test pilot for Louis Blériot, in a Blériot model XI monoplane and in a series of test flights exploring the limits of airplane manoeuvres, he flew a loop, believing it to be the world’s first. Pégoud’s feat was consequently widely publicized and believed by many to be the first loop, although Pyotr Nesterov, a Russian army pilot, had flown the first one on 9 September 1913, just 12 days earlier, in a Nieuport IV monoplane at an army airfield near Kiev. Pégoud also was the first pilot to make a parachute jump from an airplane. He also became a popular instructor of French and other European fledgling pilots.

At the start of World War I, Pégoud volunteered for flying duty and was immediately accepted as an observation pilot. On 5 February 1915, he and his gunner were credited with shooting down two German aircraft and forcing another to land. Soon he was flying single-seat aircraft and in April claimed two further victories. His sixth success came in July. It is not known how many of Pégoud’s victories involved destruction of enemy aircraft, as early air combat was rare enough to warrant credit for a forced landing. However, it is certain that Pégoud, rather than Roland Garros (four documented victories), was the first pilot to achieve ace status of any sort.

On 31 August 1915, Pégoud was shot down by one of his prewar German students, Unteroffizier Kandulski, while intercepting a German reconnaissance aircraft. He was 26 years old. The same German crew later dropped a funeral wreath above the French lines.)

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  THE SINKING OF THE HESPERIAN.  The splendid Alan Line twin screw steamer Hesperian in command of Captain N.  S.  Main, F.R.G.S., bound from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal with upwards of 600 passengers and crew on board was torpedoed at 8.30 on Saturday night by a German submarine about 135 miles west of Queenstown.  No warning whatever was given by the submarine of her intention to attack, and although neither the submarine nor the torpedo was seen there is a consensus of opinion among officers, passengers and crew that the liner was torpedoed.  The fact that the attack was made upon the ship just as darkness had set in made the work of the lowering of the boats more difficult than it would have been had the same task to be carried out in daylight, and, under all the circumstances there is room for congratulation that the loss of life was not appalling.  A few of the passengers and crew expressed the opinion that the German submarine follow the liner for some hours in daylight, but was afraid to venture an attack as the liner carried a gun for protection purposes.  This gun was quite visible, and the feeling is that the enemy watched until darkness came down on the Hesperian before making the attack.

A remarkable thing occurred in connection with the attack on the ship which deserves mention.  Along the passengers on the ship was a Canadian soldier, named Chambers, of Truro, Nova Scotia.  He was returning to his home owing to having completely lost the sight of both eyes, but, strange to say, when the ship was torpedoed, and he felt the great shock caused by the impact, his sight was suddenly restored to him.  His first act on landing was to telegraph the good news to his parents in Nova Scotia.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  LIVE AND LET LIVE.  A curiosity of trench life is noted in Blackwood’s Magazine, by an officer.  It is that while the night work behind and between the trenches is going on, there exists an informal truce, founded on the principle of live and let live so long as each side confines itself to purely defensive and recuperative work, there is little or no interference.  After all, if you prevent your enemy from drawing his rations, his remedy is simple – he would prevent you from drawing yours.  Then both parties will have to fight on empty stomachs, and neither of them, tactically; will be a penny the better.  So, unless some elaborate scheme of attack is brewing the early hours of the night are comparatively peaceful.

Impartial Reporter.  September 9th 1915.  THE NEW SCHEME UTILISING THE FALLS OF BELLEEK FOR MUNITIONS OF WAR.  FACTORIES TO BE CONNECTED BY CABLE.  It reads like a chapter from the Arabian Nights.  The immense water power of Lough Erne and that of the Shannon is to be utilised to produce Electric Power to run factories for producing munitions of war.  When the Impartial Reporter last April gave the exclusive information that the company was being formed to obtain Parliamentary powers to acquire the water power of the falls of Lough Erne at Belleek and the Shannon at Killaloe to generate enough Electric Power to light a large area of country, people rubbed their eyes in wonder, and asked had the Impartial Reporter been deceived or could the hope of many minds be so near fulfilment!  Some newspapers even sneered at it.  The dream of the engineers is now to be realised.

It was noticed that a party of men under Government supervision were at work in the Belleek district last week along the line of the proposed works and we are now in a position to acquaint the public with some of the details.  The company, which was registered last year has been permitted by the Cabinet to be formed when all or nearly all others have been forbidden, and that this company has been allowed to consider fresh issues of capital is a sufficient guarantee of the Bona Fides of the undertaking which has now assumed a new phase.  The consulting engineer is Mr. Theodore Stevens, a well-known expert; and Mr. P. J. McAndrew, now of Sheen Lodge, Bundoran is the superintending engineer.  Mr. B.  L.  Winslow is the solicitor for the company.

Impartial Reporter.  September 9th 1915.  SIR ROBERT S.  LOWRY, K.C.B.  A DISTINGUISHED ULSTER ADMIRAL.  Admiral Sir Robert Swinburne Lowry, K.C.B. commanding the coast of Scotland is a distinguished Ulsterman, being the eldest son of the late Lieutenant-General Robert William Lowry, C. B., of Aghnablaney, County Fermanagh, by his marriage with Helena MacGregor, daughter of the late Mr. Thomas Greer of Sea Park, County Antrim, who represented Carrickfergus in Parliament from 1880 to 1884.  He is a relative of Lieutenant-Colonel R. P. G.  Lowry, D.L., of Pomeroy House, Dungannon, the senior representative of a branch of the Earl of Belmore’s family.

Impartial Reporter.  September 9th 1915.  VOLUNTARY RECRUITING AND COMPULSORY SERVICE.  REPORT OF THE CABINET COMMITTEE.  The Cabinet Committee presided over by Lord Crewe which has been engaged in drawing up a report on the measures that may be required for maintaining and increasing the strength of our armies has agreed upon its report.  It will recommend the system of recruiting by public appeals for battalions, district by district.  But it has finally decided that if the quota required for the depot for replacing the casualties and increasing the numbers is not forthcoming the men should be taken from the districts compulsorily.  That is to say the recruiting officers should have the power to conscript men to fill the gaps if these are not filled by the voluntary enlistment resulting on the public appeal by the leading men of the district.  It is understood that the national register is to be used for the purpose of discrimination, and no doubt the much discussed “pink form” would provide the recruiting officers with the data for their selection of conscripts.  Lord Crewe’s committee consists of the following members: – Lord Crewe (Chairman), Lord Curzon, Mr. Churchill, Mr. Austen Chamberlain and Sir Arthur Henderson.

Impartial Reporter.  September 9th 1915.  CLOGHER VALLEY RAILWAY FATALITY.  An inquiry was held at Augher on Monday evening relative to the death of John McKenna a Farmer of Altnaveagh, Augher who was knocked down and killed by the 7.30 train on the Clogher Valley Railway near Clogher on Saturday evening last.  Deceased jumped out of the way of an approaching bicycle when he was struck on the head by the engine and death took place 20 minutes later.  The train at the spot runs along the county road, and the deceased was evidently unaware of its approach. A verdict of accidental death was returned.

Impartial Reporter.  September 9th 1915.  PROMOTIONS. LIEUTENANT COLONEL G.  H.  C.  MADDEN.  Major Gerard Hugh Charles Madden, Irish Guards promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel, is the second surviving son of the late Mr. John Madden, D. L., of Hilton Park, County Monaghan, and brother of Lieutenant Colonel G. C. W.  Madden, commanding the 4th Battalion Princess Victoria Royal Irish Fusiliers at Victoria Barracks, Belfast.  Lieutenant Colonel G.  H.  C.  Madden is 43 years of age.  He served with the 16th Lancers in the South African war and took part in the relief of Kimberley and the operations at Paardeberg where Cronje surrendered, obtaining the Queen’s medal with two clasps.  He also served for a time in the 3rd King’s Own Hussars.

Lieutenant Colonel G.  H.  C.  Madden married in 1901 Mabel Lucy, daughter of Sir George Macpherson Grant, Bart., of Ballindalloch.  The Madden family settled in this country in the 17th century, Thomas Madden of Baggotsrath, near Dublin, Comptroller to the Earl of Stafford, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, being M.P. for Dungannon in 1639.  One of his descendants, Rev Samuel Madden, D. D., a great benefactor to the country, was known as ‘Premium’ Madden, having founded the system of giving premiums in 1731 for the encouragement of learning at Trinity College, Dublin and in 1739 for the encouragement of Arts &Industries in connection with the Dublin Society, to which objects he personally contributed considerable sums.  ‘His was,’ says Dr. Johnson, ‘a name Ireland ought to honour.’  ‘Premium’ Madden was a great grandfather of the Right Hon.  Mr. Justice Madden, who was succeeded in the parliamentary representation of Trinity College by the Right Hon. Sir Edward Carson, K. C., M. P., the Attorney-General for England.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  CAVAN’S VICTORIA CROSS HERO.  Sergeant Somers, V. C., 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, of Belturbet, County Cavan, in the course of a statement regarding his experiences, said that the Turks had advanced to the trenches and compelled the Ghurkhas and the Inniskillings to retire.  He alone had stopped in the trench refusing to leave.  He shot many Turks with his revolver, killed about 50 with bombs, and forced them to retire.  The enemy, however, rushed into a sap trench, and he commenced to bombard them out of it; but failed.  Then he ran back for the purpose of getting MEN up to the trench to occupy it.  Some of the officers said that it was impossible to put the Turks out, but the gallant sergeant held the position.  He got some bombs and got up in the trench, under rifle and Maxim gun fire, and eventually succeeded in bombing the Turks had of the sap trench.  When he had finished his officers clapped him heartily on the back and Sir Ian Hamilton send for him and told him that he had done his duty like a man.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  Sergeant James Carney, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, whose name appeared in the list of Russian decorations published last week, is a son of Mr. Edward Carney,

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  A PATRIOTIC ENNISKILLEN FAMILY HAS SIX SONS WITH THE FORCES AND RECEIVES CONGRATULATIONS FROM THE KING.  At present much efforts are being made in certain quarters to belittle the efforts of Nationalists in the part they are playing in the European conflict.  In the Unionist Press photographs and names of fathers who have sent three or four sons to the front are held up before Nationalists in a somewhat sarcastic manner.  We, therefore, extend our congratulations to Mr. Patrick Keenan, Enniskillen who has given six sons to the forces while another brother of Mr. Keenan has enlisted in the Irish Brigade.  Mr. Patrick Keenan is a brother of Mr. Thomas Keenan, a member of the Enniskillen Urban Council and a lifelong worker in the cause of Irish Emancipation.  Mrs. Keenan has been the recipient of a letter from the King.  It says that his majesty has heard with the deepest satisfaction that Mrs. Keenan has six sons serving with his Majesty’s Forces.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  Every village needs a “village fool” or in Enniskillen’s case the “town oracle” who’s ludicrous effusions are to be found in the columns of the Impartial Reporter.

The leading articles, paragraphs of self-adulation, hypercritical bosh, and brazen bunkum to be found embodied in the writings in this paper afford to the hardworking townspeople a tonic after their day’s labour.  The paper was, is, and always will be, the enemy of Catholicity and Nationality, written by individuals who are absolutely devoid of friendly feelings towards their fellow countrymen and who have no desire to hold out the olive branch for better understanding of all creeds and classes.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  “D.  C.,” writing to the Press with reference to the losses of the 1st Inniskillings said that of the 23 officers who left Rugby on the 17th of March with the 1st Battalion and landed on their Gallipoli Peninsula with the “immortal 29th division” on that forever memorable 25th of April, only one officer – namely, the Quarter-master, Captain Morris – is now with the battalion.  One has been invalided after gaining the D.S.O., and the remainder have all been either killed or wounded.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  FOR 30 HOURS AFTER BEING STRUCK BY A GERMAN TORPEDO the liner Hesperian made a gallant fight for life, and were it not for the adverse circumstances of wind and weather might have been safely landed in the harbour of Queenstown.  Over 60 miles from land at 6.45 AM on Monday, the liner which was in tow of two steamers, began to settle down in the ocean.  There was a strong wind and sea running and Captain Maine who stuck to a ship to the last, with portion of the crew, had to abandon her.  In a few minutes she began to sink rapidly and disappear beneath the waves head foremost, shortly before 7.00.  3,700 sacks of mail went down with her, as well as all the luggage and most of the personal possessions of the passengers who had abandoned her in the darkness of Saturday night.  It has been ascertained at the offices of the Alan Line that 13 of the passengers are missing and four of the crew.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  IN ADDITION TO THE HESPERIAN THREE OTHER VESSELS WERE ATTACKED by submarines during the week off the southern Irish Coast. The Norwegian barque Glimt was torpedoed early on Saturday morning off County Cork.  Eight minutes were given the crew had to leave.  The German commander ticking of the minutes and at the eight shouted time up.  “I’m going to shoot when the boat is clear,” and then stated to the captain, “I am very sorry but I must blow up your ship.”  On landing and the crew expressed great indignation, declaring the ship to be Norwegian and carrying a neutral crew.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  AN AMAZING STATEMENT CONCERNING THE 10TH IRISH DIVISION.  One of the new divisions sent out to the Dardanelles was the new 10th Division under General Mahon – the first to go out of the distinctly Irish divisions.  Admittedly it was a very fine unit, and Ireland took a great deal of legitimate pride in it.  On its arrival it is said to have been broken up, and all but three battalions dispersed among other divisions.  Now we would merely ask whether it is conceivable that, say a Canadian, an Australian, or a New Zealand division should have been handled in this way and how long what will it be, before the military authorities are made to realise, as they should be, that the local and national feeling of Ireland is as worth treating considerately as that of the Dominions. After all the War Office’s blunders in connection with the other Irish divisions – the 16th – the course had taken seems, on the face of it, a really grave matter, which the Cabinet ought not to overlook. Widespread attention and, needless to say, strong indignation has been excited by this information.  As a prominent Liberal said it in commenting upon the matter, “these War Office people are beyond hope.  Such a thing makes one a truly despair of ever getting British officials to understand Ireland.”

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  A BALLYSHANNON SOLDIER’S GRAPHIC STORY ABOUT THE FIRST LANDINGS AT THE DARDANELLES.  Lance-Corporal W. Doyle, 1st Battalion Inniskillings, who has returned from the Dardanelles, is at present at his home in Bishop Street, Derry.  He is a native of Ballyshannon, and is a fine type of Irish soldier – comparatively young in years, but old in the art of warfare.  He gave a Derry pressman some interesting details of his life in the Army.  He was through the South African campaign, for which he has two medals.  Afterwards he rejoined the army.  He has had over 11 year’s foreign service, during which time he took part in the suppression of the Chinese Revolt.  Lance-Corporal Doyle is of the opinion that every man who participated in the landing at Cape Helles was deserving of the V.C.  The first party to attempt to get ashore were completely wiped out.  There was a dash for life to get under the cover of the cliffs, but those who were fortunate enough to reach this position of security had to come cut a way through barbed wire entanglements and scramble over their dead and dying comrades.  No language, says Lance-Corporal Doyle, can adequately describe the scene or do justice to the bravery of the troops who first got a footing on the stronghold of the Turks.

When the survivors got formed up they had four days hard fighting, after the end of which they had pushed the enemy inland a considerable distance.  Both sides were then so fagged out that for practically a whole day there was not a shot exchanged.  According to Lance-Corporal Doyle the British units were so disorganised at this period, and different regiments so mixed that had the Turks driven home a counterattack they might have succeeded in hurling that portion of the Expeditionary Force back to the sea.  But the Turks were either so reduced in numbers and fatigued, or had learned to respect the British for their daring, courage, and endurance that no such attack was attempted.  Except for this lull fighting has been continuous.

Lance-Corporal Doyle who was twice wounded received the congratulations of the commanding officer for a gallant act performed by him.  Like all soldiers who have been in Gallipoli he pays a generous tribute to the Turks, who are stubborn yet fair fighters, and he concurs in the view that they have not their heart in the work.

The Turkish snipers are very daring, and a constant source of worry to the British.  How Lance-Corporal Doyle who is a crack shot, dispatch three of them is worth relating.  For some days they had been giving a great deal of annoyance, and it was impossible to discover where they were located.  At night Lance-Corporal Doyle and some comrades went out a distance in front of the British line and constructed a trench shaped like a “T.”  When this was completed they crawled back.  Having procured a days’ rations, and taking with him a telephone, Doyle returned and ensconced himself in this trench.  He was not there long until he heard a report away to the left.  Looking in that direction, he saw, almost in a line with the trench he occupied, three Turkish snipers or two Turks and one German.  He waited his opportunity, and before evening had succeeded in “popping off” the three of them.  This was probably the act for which he received the congratulations of the commandant of the division, but when the note was passed along the trench to him he first thought that someone was having a joke at his expense.

The strain on the troops in Gallipoli is much more severe than it is in Flanders, for wherever they go they are under shellfire.  They cannot escape from it.  Even when hearing Mass they had to crouch in under the cliff to avoid injury from bursting shell.  When the Turks not shelling them from Gallipoli, they were from the Asiatic side.  Lance-Corporal Doyle returns to his battalion in a few days.

Fermanagh Times September 16th, 1915.  THE SOLE SURVIVOR.  A CIGARETTE AMONG THE DEAD.  A private in the 2nd Durham Light  Infantry gives us a remarkable description of his experiences in the assault for the recovery of the lost trenches at Hooge.  He writes home to a friend as follows: – At 2.30 a.m. of the ninth we were led into a wood and got orders to lie down, and then hell opened.  Our artillery opened fire and they replied.  It was simply awful, but we lay there waiting for the orders to charge.  They came and we lost all control of senses and went like mad, fighting hand to hand and bayonetting the hounds.  I did not like to kill, but it was sports like, so I did it and wanted more.  We got into the first line and went straight on to the fourth and passed it and then dug ourselves in under hell’s flames.  Nothing better.

I found my section, and there were nine of us digging in the trench I turned my back one second and when I looked again water a sight!  I will remember it till I die.  Every man in the trenches blown to atoms; arms, legs, and heads staring you in the face.  You will hardly credit what I did under the circumstances.  I sat down and lit a Wild Woodbine, for the simple reason I was not in my right senses.  I was stuck there by myself for 16 hours and all the time a heavy bombardment of our trenches.  I was expecting every moment to go to Glory, but I still kept on smoking.  When night came on I got out and went back.  When we were all formed up the survivors answered their names.  The old commanding officer, who is nearly 70 years of age and a trump, was crying.  I can tell you we got anything we wanted.  I know I got a gill of rum and went to sleep.  When we woke up we were marched back to rest where we are now.  It was well earned.  We are nearly ready to go back again.

Fermanagh Times September 16th, 1915.  BELLEEK DISTRICT COUNCIL.  MR. P.  SCOTT, J.  P., PRESIDING.  A letter was received from Mr. J. Campbell, contractor, asking the Council to relieve him of his contract owing to the scarcity of men in the neighbourhood who have joined the Army and the increase in the cost of building materials.  After a protracted discussion the council decided to relieve him of his contract for the erection of three cottages in the townlands of Tonagh and Churchhill, subject to the sanction of the Local Government Board.  Owing to the abandonment of one cottage to be built with the loan from the Local Government Board the sum of £170 was deducted from the loan. The tender of the Belleek Pottery Company was accepted for the lighting of Belleek with electricity.

Impartial Reporter.  September 16th 1915.  STUPENDOUS COST OF WAR.  In the House of Commons yesterday Mr. Asquith rose to move the new vote of credit for £250,000,000.  He said this was the fourth vote of credit for the present financial year, making a total for the year of £9 million.  If the present vote was accepted the total sum included in the several votes of credit since the 6th of August of last year would be £1,262,000,000.  Last July when the last vote was passed the daily expenditure was three million, and the gross expenditure from the 17th of July to September 11 was an average of £4,200,000 each day.  The general tendency of expenditure was still upwards.  The present vote would last till the third week in November.  These figures afforded some evidence of what we were doing in the war.  He did not say if we were doing all we might or even ought to do.  The number of men serving was not short of three million.  Recruiting had been kept up fairly well to the last few weeks when there was a slight falling off.  The advances to other countries amounted to £250,000,000.

Impartial Reporter.  September 16th 1915.  HUNTING SUBMARINES.  ADMIRAL JELLICOE’S CHART.  The anonymous writer who signs himself ‘Polybe’ publishes in the Paris Figaro an article on Britain’s great war fleet.  After describing the magnificent spectacle at which he was present on the occasion of his visit to the British Fleet he says –England has never had finer crews nor a more homogenous fleet, nor one so well armed there nor one which was at the same time so solid and so rapid.  Every unit has improved after a year of war.  All the imperfections have been corrected.

An Englishman makes it a point of honour to be just.  He regards the work of the German submarines, which torpedoed liners, merchant vessels, and fishing smacks, as infamous, but he is not ashamed to admire their crews of the fifth.  Admiral Jellicoe showed me the chart on which was marked with pinpoints where German submarines have been sunk, burnt or captured.  There are many pins on this chart.  There have been more submarines sunk than captured.  Submarine hunting is organized in the most methodical way, and is considered very fine sport.  Several methods of dealing with submarines have been invented. They are hunted with nets, with guns, with explosive bombs, and in other ways.  At first submarines thought they could act with impunity, but they now know that when they leave port they have far less chance of returning than of being put to sleep in the eternal depths of the sea.

Impartial Reporter.  September 16th 1915.  DISSATISFIED THE TYRONE DOCTORS.  At the meeting of the Dungannon Guardians on Thursday a letter was read from the County Tyrone Medical Association intimating that the county doctors had resolved to dispense with the old scale of fees for consultation with the Poor Law medical officers, and that in future the fee would be agreed upon prior to the consultation.  The six medical officers of the union also intimated that medical officers when applying in future for vacation would request four weeks leave of absence with payment to their local tentes of £4 4 shillings per week for 4 weeks’ leave with payment of £3 3 shillings per week.

Fermanagh Herald September 18th. 1915.  MANORHAMILTON RECRUITING MEETING.  A TRIBUTE TO CAPTAIN O’DONNELL.  From a correspondent.  I cannot let the occasion pass without offering a few words of congratulations to Captain John O’Donnell, DL, Larkfield on the unprecedented success of the recruiting meeting held in Manorhamilton on last Monday.  Although a fair day – and a very large fair to – almost all the leading merchants of the town attended, thereby showing their sympathy with the object of the meeting, and at the same time paying a special tribute to the popularity of Captain O’Donnell.  It was indeed in a great day and I have no doubt but Captain O’Donnell will be kept busy enrolling recruits for some time to come.

Fermanagh Herald September 18th. 1915.   THE ANTI – VACCINATION CAMPAIGN IN DUNGANNON; PUBLIC MEETING.  On Tuesday night last a public meeting was held in their Square, Dungannon, organized by the National Anti-Vaccination League, London. Mr. R.  Brown, Donaghmore, who occupied the chair, said that he protested against vaccination because he thought that the people of Ireland should not be treated differently in the matter from any of the other British Colonies.  He instanced a number of cities in England where the death rate from smallpox was less than in other parts, were vaccination was compulsory.  In this country if they did not get their children vaccinated they might be fined in £1 and they could beat their wives four times for that.  (Laughter.)

Fermanagh Herald September 18th. 1915.  BELLEEK PETTY SESSIONS.  SERVANT SUED.  Patrick Melly, of Fossa, a farm servant was sued for the sum of £5 damages for leaving his employment without giving notice to his employer.  Mr. Thomas Orr, solicitor, who appeared for the plaintiff, asked the bench to inflict the full penalty as the defendant was well treated by his employer and had no complaints to make for his action in leaving.  The magistrates assessed the damages at a sum of £2 10 shillings with 10 shillings and sixpence cost of court.

The Whealt Creamery Society charged by two men named Thomas and John Campbell, with the larceny of a creamery can which was stated to be value for a sum of £1 17 shillings and sixpence.  The Manager of the Society stated in his evidence that the defendants had no authority to interfere with the property of the Society as they were not milk suppliers to the creamery.  A witness named William Teevan, was examined and stated that he saw the defendants take away the can and put it in their cart.  The defendants said that they took the can in mistake for their old can.  The bench discharged the defendants on their own recognances to come up for judgment when called upon.

Fermanagh Herald September 18th. 1915.  A WOMAN POSTMAN. The Belleek postal officials have appointed Mr. Bridget Gonigle to deliver letters and other postal packets in the Belleek Rural District.

Fermanagh Times September 23rd, 1915.  A SHOCKING FATALITY NEAR ENNISKILLEN.  A YOUNG LADIES SAD DEATH AS A CYCLIST AND A MOTORIST COLLIDE.  A distressing fatality occurred at Drumawill, 1½ mile from Enniskillen on Wednesday morning when a prepossessing young lady named Margaret Hodgins, whose parents reside at Arney, lost her life.  Being employed by Mr. McLean, Draper, High Street, she was cycling from home to business and near the bend in the road at Drumawill, opposite Maria Smith’s licensed premises, she collided with a motor car, driven by Dr. M.  Betty, Enniskillen.  As result of the impact death was almost instantaneous.  The deceased was well known in Enniskillen and was very popular with all who knew her.

Fermanagh Times September 23rd, 1915.  THE WAR.  BRITISH TROOPS TERRIBLE EXPERIENCES AT THE DARDANELLES.  A GREAT ARMY IN A WILDERNESS.  THE 8TH INNISKILLINGS AT SUVLA BAY.

Rhyme From The Trenches.

PILLS FOR FUNKERS.

Air-—Inniskilling Dragoon.

Come all you lazy slackers,

And read this little song;

Think of the boys who’s gone to join

The British fighting throng.

Twelve months ago yon got the chance To shoulder up the gun,

Conscription day is on the way,

And says that—you must come.

There’s lots of funkers yet at home

That’s if they only like

From Drumawill and fair Lisgoole

And on through Belnaleck

Arney, Moybrone, Letterbreen

And Moybane, just the same,

On a Sunday at Rudden’s cross

It is a crying shame.

(Chorus.)

Fare ye well lazy slackers,

We would not with you stay

We have all come to France’s plains,

To join the fighting fray:

And when the war is over,

Sweethearts we’ll have galore,

We’ll take them for a pleasure trip,

Down by old Erne’s shore.

My Second verse I’ve started

As strong as with the first,

And when you’ve read it though and

Through,

You’ll find it not the worst,

Lord Kitchener and Lord Derby,

You know what they require;

But still you, like old women,

Sit round the kitchen fire;

You sit and smoke as happy

As if no war at all.

If all the boys were just like you

Old England’s crown would fall:

Come forward now like soldiers

And let the Kaiser see,

There’s fighting men in thousands

Across the Irish Sea.

Come, rouse ye lazy slackers

And join our manly throng

And if you’ll only do your bit

The war it won’t last long.

And when we’ve beat the Kaiser

How happy we shall be,

We’ll all return to Erin’s shore

And visit old Drummee.

So now my third and last verse

With a puzzle in my mind,

As to why you’re not in khaki?

And stopping yet behind;

Some say the army is too hard,

But I say that is a lie;

When you are one month in it,

For the Union Jack you’d die.

I know you don’t like soldiering

You hate the very name,

You’d take a trip to Yankee land,

If it wasn’t just for shame.

Just one request I may repeat

Before I lay down my pen-

That’s, Come and join the army,

And for goodness sake be men.

So good-bye to every one of you,

I hope you’ll change your mind,

If this makes you scratch your brow,

It shows that you’re inclined,

So now my poem I must conclude,

My point I have made clear.

And Wishing a happy Christmas

And a glorious New Year.

From one of the Service Squadron of the Inniskilling Dragoons.

Fermanagh Times September 23rd, 1915.  MARS OUSTS CUPID ON WEDDING CAKES.  The very latest war fashion is of the military wedding cake.  So largely has this become a feature of weddings associated with military and naval men that the wholesale manufacturers’ are specializing in toy ornaments of a war like character to decorate the cakes.  They are mostly ornamental cannons, guns and rifles, with battleships for naval men, and very well executed models of aeroplanes for bridegrooms connected with the Flying Corps.  Armoured cars and flags of all nations also figure in the lists supplied to the retail trade.  Sugar Cupids and harps are at a discount.  The little ornaments on the cake are distributed as souvenirs to the wedding guests.

Fermanagh Times September 23rd, 1915.  THE TROUBLE AT CAMMELL LAIRD’S.  STARTLING FIGURES AS TO THE LOSS OF TIME. DISGRACEFUL SCENES IN COURT.  A number of platers, drillers, smiths, and apprentice platers appeared before the Munitions Tribunal at Liverpool on Saturday charged by Messrs. Cammell Laird Co., with persistently losing time.  Mr. J. W. P.  Laird said that in 20 weeks 15 per cent of the men employed lost a quarter and 10 per cent did not work at all.  On every day of that period the loss of working hours on ordinary working days was a million and a half and represented a full week’s work for 30,000 men or alternatively the time lost practically represents a complete shutting down of the whole establishment for three working weeks.  Apparently the trade unions concerned were enabled to influence their members in the matter.  Fines varying from five shillings to 50 shillings were imposed, and the decision was followed by disgraceful scenes, both outside and inside Saint George’s Hall.

Fermanagh Times September 23rd, 1915.  ENNISKILLEN’S NEW BOROUGH SURVEYOR.  Mr. James Donnelly, Enniskillen, has been unanimously selected out of 11 applicants for the post of Borough Surveyor of this urban district.  A number of first class men with exceptional credentials applied for the position, but the Council, after hearing the splendid testimonial Mr. Donnelly had received from the County Surveyor of Fermanagh, under whom he has worked for the past two years, had no hesitation in entrusting him with the responsible duties attached to the Surveyorship of the Borough.  Mr. Donnelly as a young man full of energy, and in the various public positions he has held in this County, in Monaghan, and in Dublin has, by his integrity and devotion to duty gained the goodwill and respect not only of his employers in those different places but also of the public.

Impartial Reporter.  September 23rd 1915.  INNISKILLING V.C. KILLED.  Information has been received from the Dardanelles which leaves little doubt that Captain Gerald Robert O’Sullivan, V.C. 1st Batt., Royal Inniskillings previously reported missing, was killed in action on the 21st during the attack on Hill 70 or Burnt Hill at Suvla Bay.  Captain O’Sullivan was seen to advance at the head of his men to the second line of Turkish trenches, where he fell, and it is believed that he was killed, but his body has not been recovered.

Impartial Reporter.  September 23rd 1915. 7830. Sergeant James Carney, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskillings received the Cross of the Order of Saint Georges, 4th class for gallantry on 28 October, 1914 when he brought in a wounded comrade under heavy machine gun fire, thereby suffering his own wounds.  He served through the South African war, and at the battle of Coenso brought a wounded comrade from the firing line to the field hospital amid a hail of bullets, and was complemented by his commanding officer.  He was specially promoted to Corporal in the Mounted Infantry on which he served two years, first scouting with ability.  He has the Queen’s Medals with five clasps and the King’s Medal with two clasps.  He served three years in Egypt under Major Hessey.  Sergeant Carney, who has a younger brother a sergeant in the Inniskillings, is a son of Edward Carney, Abbey Street Enniskillen.

Fermanagh Herald September 25th. 1915.  THE BUDGET.  SWEEPING NEW TAXATION.  No half penny post.  Duties on sugar, tea and tobacco increased and there is a 40 per cent increase on the income tax.  Substantial additions are made it to the super tax now charged on incomes over £3,000 with the following results: – an income of £5,000 pays £1,029 tax; £10,000 pays £2,529 tax and an income of £100,000 pays   £34,029 tax.  Mr. McKenna imposes the following altogether new taxes: – 50% of all War profits over £100 pounds; a 33⅓% of the value on imported luxuries namely, Motor Cars, Motor Parts, Hats, Watches, Motor Cycles, Kinema (sic) Films, Plate glass, Clocks..  An American car now priced at £150 will cost £200 pounds of which £50 goes to the Exchequer. A Paris hat costing £12 will cost £16, of which £4 goes to the Exchequer.  Tea is increased from 8d to 1s a pound; coffee (roasted) and from 2d to 3d a pound; telegrams 9d for 12 words, and a halfpenny for every extra word; sugar, to the public ½ penny a pound dearer; tobacco from 4s 8d to 7s per pound; cigarettes from 5s 8d to 8s 6d a pound and had no additional beer or whisky duty.  Fifth for

Fermanagh Herald September 25th. 1915.  IN AND AROUND BALLYSHANNON.  Ballyshannon is an old-time place with a past.  It has, for the most part, steep and crooked streets, with houses built over them and along them.  If you tumbled over the door step into the streets it would be something like falling over a precipice.  In more modern times Ballyshannon acquired a sort of local notoriety as being the headquarters of the travelling tinkers of the North-West, no more important section of the community 100 years ago.  The tinker in those days was part and parcel of our National Life, and his periodical visit to the various localities in their turn for the mending of various domestic utensils, was considered absolutely essential for the wellbeing of the community.  His stock of ancient lore and country gossip was inexhaustible, and his prowess in a fight proverbial.  The Harvest Fair in the town was his annual field day, and no tinker with any reputation to save, hesitated engaging in the fight which was an absolutely friendly and fair one, the whole forces first pairing of into two even sections.  It was indeed one of the tinkers many beliefs that if he had not a little of his blood drawn by fists, or more commonly by blackthorn, on the Harvest Fair day, his health during the next twelve months, would suffer greatly as a consequence.  With the passing of the tinker a great deal of the local glory that surrounded Ballyshannon has fled, and the Harvest Fair has been shorn of its greatest charm.

Fermanagh Herald September 25th. 1915.  AT ENNISKILLEN PETTY SESSIONS ON MONDAY, Mary Love, Enniskillen, the wife of a military sergeant, was prosecuted by the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children for neglecting her three children, aged 11 years, 9 years, and 11 months, respectively.  For a total of four offences she was sentenced to six months hard labour.  It was stated defendant was entitled to a separation allowance of 25 shillings and six pence per week and that there had been 20 previous convictions against her.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  AT CLONELLY.  INVALIDED FROM THE DARDANELLES.  Major Fuller and Captain Fitzpatrick are at present enjoying the hospitality of Mr. Ffolliott Barton, J.P., Clonelly.  Both officers were wounded at the Dardanelles and both belong to the Australian contingent, which during the war have covered with renown both themselves and their great Colony.  We can well believe their statement that no written report could give any adequate the idea of the horrors of the Suvla Bay attack.  It was terrific, indescribable.  On the top of obstacles that, in other circumstances, might have been regarded as impregnable thundered the big guns, burst highly explosive shells, rattled the deadly bullets of the enemies’ rifles.  Not a foot of ground was out of range of some form or other of Turkish and German striking power.  The extraordinary thing is that where the enemy had now gathered in tens of thousands, fortified with all the ingenuity and might of modern armaments not a hostile weapon or individual was in evidence two or three days before.  Where both these gallant gentleman were struck down was a spot they had visited with absolute safely a couple of days before.  The very places which it cost our brave men so much to capture, could have been taken “for the taking” without the loss of a single life any time prior to those couple of days.  These invalided gentlemen specified no grievance, attributed no fault anywhere, but to the lay mind it is inevitable that there was blundering somewhere.  They are both now, we are glad to record, almost fit again for duty.  They laughingly explained that recuperation under Mr. Barton’s roof amid his picturesque grounds is one of the simplest things possible.  Major Fuller returns to the Dardanelles on Monday rejoiced to yet another “rush at the Huns.”  Captain Fitzpatrick will not be able to satisfy his yearnings so soon.  By the way his father was in Enniskillen years ago with the Kents, and it was a matter of pleasure and interest to him to visit the island town about which he had heard personally and a read so much.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  PRESBYTERIAN DIFFERENCES IN ENNISKILLEN.  A SERIOUS SITUATION IS CREATED.  Differences of a very serious and unfortunate character have arisen amongst the members of the Enniskillen Presbyterian Church in connection with the appointment of a successor to the Rev.  S. C. Mitchell.  So bitter, indeed, has become the feeling between the two sections that if extreme diplomacy and care are not exercised, lasting, even permanent, injury may be done to the congregation.

The situation is a delicate and awkward one, and as it is an accepted truism that onlookers see most of the game we may be pardoned for expressing the popular opinion of outsiders in Enniskillen, when we state that more careful handling and less violent attempts by one or two members at the outset to force their particular views on all and sundry would have resulted in a more amicable feeling and in practically unanimous settlement of the difficulty.  However, that may be, the harm has now been done and during the past few days serious developments have taken place.

In the first place those who are dissatisfied with the choice of the majority have now definitely engaged the Protestant Hall for the purpose of holding a separate Sunday school there, which they claim will be attended by practically two thirds of all the Presbyterian children in the town.  This in itself is a serious step to take and shows clearly the intensity of feeling that prevails.  But a step of even greater magnitude has been taken in the form of a petition to the Clogher Presbytery, which sets out that the petitioners do not intend to worship again at the Church under present circumstances and requesting the Assembly to make an arrangement for having the gospel preached to them.  The petition is signed by three of the Church’s Committee men and by 25 communicants and, it is alleged, has the support of many adherents in the Church who have not been asked to sign such a request. On the other hand to the majority of the congregation who have succeeded in having a call issued to the man of their choice professed to look upon the defection of the minority as only a passing display of temper, and asserts that in a very short time they will resume their former places in the congregation.

From the very beginning of this regrettable controversy the Fermanagh Times has studiously refrained from taking sides in the matter or expressing any views that might be construed as showing a leaning towards one party or the other.  We think that this is essentially a matter to be settled by the congregation itself, or by the authorities of the church, without outside interference, and this opinion has moulded our action throughout.  Of course as a public newspaper we had to mention the matter, as it was, and is, a matter of considerable local public interest but we did so without bias our favour.

In last Thursday’s edition of the Impartial Reporter, however, there appeared a report of the proceedings in the Presbyterian Church on the preceding Monday evening when a meeting was held for the purpose of appointing a successor to the Rev. S. C. Mitchell.  In the course of this report Mr. George Whaley the ruling Elder of the Church, is stated to have made an outburst against the “untruthful and exaggerated” reports which had appeared in the Fermanagh Times.  Upon seeing this, our representative, at once went and interviewed Mr. Whaley on the subject as we considered we were entitled to some explanation.  Consider our astonishment when Mr. Whaley solemnly assured us so THAT HE HAD NEVER MADE ANY REFERENCE DIRECT OR INDIRECT TO THE FERMANAGH TIMES, but on the other hand he did referred to gossip about the town and statements made by gossipers from which one would think that there were far more serious differences in the Church than really existed, but that the Fermanagh Times was not mentioned by him or in his thoughts at the time.  We have also interviewed a number of gentlemen belonging both to the minority and majority on this point, and they unanimously agree with Mr. Whaley’s version.  Now either the Impartial Reporter or Mr. Whaley in stating what are not facts.  They cannot both be right and our readers must judge for themselves which is wrong.

If, as we fully believe, Mr. Whaley made no reference to us either by direct statement or by innuendo, then another startling proof is afforded the public of the dangerous lengths to which the Reporter is prepared to go in its campaign of virulence and misrepresentation against this journal.  We leave the matter at that for the present.  Further developments in the crisis which has arisen in our local Presbyterian Church will be watched with considerable interest by the public.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  THE ISLANDERS WHO DEFY MR. MCKENNA.  About the only people in this country who would view with indifference the war budget of Mr. McKenna will be the inhabitants of Innishmurray, an island off the coast of Sligo.  They have defied rate and tax collectors for a number of years.  There is no direct communication with the mainland, and in a report recently to the Local Government Board it was stated that the rate collector could not get a boatman brave enough to row him across.  Some years ago two collectors tried the experiment, but they were met with a perfect shower of stones.  One of the islanders, an old man, acts as ruler, and all disputes are settled by him, but these are rare.  Every summer a priest visits the island, and remains there for a few weeks to perform marriages.  During the rest of the year says the Glasgow Herald the islanders hold a service among themselves every Sunday.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  BRILLIANT ANGLO-FRENCH VICTORY AND SUBSTANTIAL ADVANCE OVER A WIDE FRONT.  OVER 20,000 PRISONERS CAPTURED AND 33 LARGE GUNS TAKEN.  The Anglo-French Army is on Saturday achieved most substantial successes at two important points on the Western front.  Sir John French reports that he attacked the enemy and captured his trenches on a front of over 5 miles penetrating in some places to a distance of 4,000 yards. This accurred south of the La Bassee Canal.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  NINE MEN DEAD IN ONE FAMILY.  Private William Clarke, of the East Lancashires, now undergoing treatment in a military hospital at Ormskirk, comes of a Lancashire family from which the war has exacted a terribly heavy toll.  He is one of nine brothers who were mobilised at the outbreak of war, all in the same regiment.  Six have been killed, another is without his right arm as the result of wounds and the youngest is still in the trenches.  Three of Private Clark’s brothers in law, his sister’s husbands have also been killed, making a total of nine killed out of 12.  Seven were killed in France and Flanders and two in the Dardanelles, where Private Clarke was wounded.  The family belonged to Rawtenstall, and the mother is a widow.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  FLYING OVER THE WESTERN FRONT. ….  charred bricks, which had once been a French village.  The corn fields were barren except for a heavy crop of wooden crosses marking the last resting place of French and British soldiers fallen on the battlefield of the Marne.  As far as the eye could see to the right and left the ground was torn as if a giant plough had made furrows across the fair land of France.  The trenches meander across the country in an irregular line. Sometimes the line appears to go straight through a village; now and again an isolated farmhouse stands in the middle of a trench. Suddenly and artillery duel began.  A French field-battery began to hurl death into the German trenches.  I could see the sudden spurts of fire and the explosion of the shells but not a sound reached my ears; the roar of our engine shut out the sounds of war.  The only human beings visible during the bombardment were some French peasants, who went on with their work unconcerned as the shells flew over their heads.  Looking to my left I saw what looked like a swarm of grey ants appear in hundreds out of the earth and rush towards the French trenches, and as the sunlight flashed on their bayonets it became manifest that a German infantry attack was in progress.  Sports of flame splattered all along the French line for a distance of a mile or more, and through the field glasses I could see the grey mass plainly.  But as the mitrailleuses did their deadly work the ants fell in little heaps and the attack faded away.

Impartial Reporter.  September 30th 1915.  THE BUDGET AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE HOME AND ON TEA, SUGAR AND TOBACCO.  Income tax on all incomes over £130  with abatement of £120.  The rate is raised from 9d in 1913 to 1 s 9 ½d this year and two shillings and 1d next year.  Super tax has been raised so the rich man pays 1/3 his income.  Farmers are to pay on rent or on clear profits.  Employees with £2 10 shillings a week and more to pay quarterly.  New taxes include a 50 per cent on all war profits and 33⅓% on imported motor cars, films, hats, watches and clocks, plate glass and musical instruments.  Tea is raised one Shilling per pound, cocoa 1 ½ d per pound, petrol 6d per gallon, sugar ½d per pound, tobacco six shillings and a penny halfpenny per pound,.  The half-penny post has been abolished, telegrams will be 9d and there will be dearer telephones and parcels.

Impartial Reporter.  September 30th 1915.  Some examples of the war profits tax.  The tax is ½ war profits.  Some examples – Spillers and the Bakers, Millers last profit £367,000; previous average £140,000: War Profits£ 227,000.  Tredegar Iron and Coal Company £157,000; previous average £113,000; War Profit £44,000.

Impartial Reporter.  September 30th 1915.  THE BRITISH AND FRENCH ACCOMPLISH GREAT ADVANCES.  The British take 5 miles, 3,000 prisoners and 61 guns while the French win 15 miles and captured 20,000 prisoners on a front of 21 miles.