The Famine 1847. Ballyshannon Herald.

1847. The issue of January 1st records a classic tale that ought to be filmed for it has all the ingredients of high drama or perhaps more accurately melodrama. On Christmas Eve a schooner lay just inside the Bar at Ballyshannon. The Bar is a high sandy ridge four miles down river from Ballyshannon that constantly threatens to block the exit of the Erne to the sea and the schooner was sheltering here waiting on a favourable wind. The ship was bound for Liverpool later with bacon and lard and had been charted by Mr. Edward Chism of Ballyshannon (Food was constantly being exported from Ireland during the famine). After a time a boat owned by Mr. Wade pulled alongside the vessel and men who claimed that they were from the saltworks at Ballyshannon asked to come aboard to light their pipes. (The real salt workers would have had to row outside the bar (sandbar) of Ballyshannon estuary) to the open sea to get saltwater which was then evaporated at Portnason, Ballyshannon, to get the salt for preserving the fish and meat exports from the area). Several men came on board and then produced guns, overcame the captain and crew and took a large quantity of bacon and lard from the ship. This is the Irish famine equivalent of Bob Cratchet’s Christmas turkey, especially when (as it turned out later that) it was hogsheads of ham and bacon that were on board. Many a starving household must have had an unexpectedly happy Christmas as a result of this piece of local piracy. By Christmas day the police recovered some of the booty buried in the nearby sand dunes and the soldiers were out combing the area. Three were arrested. Scarce a night passes by without a robbery in town or the vicinity, the paper reports.

1847.January 8th. There is great distress in the area. One man died after just being admitted to the Ballyshannon Workhouse. People won’t come in for aid until the last moment. The dead from the famine are not being buried properly in the Abbey graveyard in Ballyshannon as the graveyard has not deep enough soil. A man on his way from Ballyshannon to Donegal heard the sound of lamentation from a house along the way. Going into the house he found a girl of about sixteen dying and her parents trying to keep her warm. He gave money for food, etc., in the tradition of the good Samaritan, but the girl died in a short time.

January 22nd reported that Colonel Conolly and his family were staying at Cliff for the winter in order to give aid to their tenantry and a terrible increase of poverty, sickness and death was recorded by the paper. Unfortunately and damningly for the paper the above words were all they reported. It says volumes for their social attitude and incomprehension of the situation that they could write: “The details are too horrid to be published.” From Fermanagh the paper reports the action of the Rev. Grey Porter, whose principal estate was at Lisbellaw and who had brought in 150 tons of Indian meal at Derry per the ship Peru. He had bought in the grain at £10-10s-6d per ton and was going to sell it to his tenants at cost price which he hoped would be less than £12 per ton. This compared with £24-10-0 for Indian meal or £30 for oaten meal at market prices. Robberies for money, cattle or arms are a nightly occurrence.

On February 19th the Ballyshannon Herald published a very long letter from John Hamilton of St. Ernan’s near Donegal Town. This man was estate agent for the Conolly Estate around Ballyshannon and possibly for the Leslie Estate of Pettigo and other estates as well. In his own way he seems a man sensitive to the situation and practical for the future, although badly lacking in short term solutions. He seeks to combat apathy and fatalism in the tenantry which is admirable, if the person has the energy to look some distance ahead, but useless if starvation is a matter of days away.

John Hamilton begins by asking everyone to work hard in order to hold on to their tenancies. “Stir yourself and be doing. Drain a rood of ground and dig it eighteen inches deep and you will be paid for it if it done right and get many years to repay this money” (not a generous bargain and in the same vein) “seed will be provided and can be paid for later. Sow corn and not potatoes in rows nine inches apart and the seed two inches apart. This requires two stone of seed and repays 200 stone if the !and is well dug or well ploughed and is dry”. Tenants will be allowed to burn as much as they like and he (John Hamilton) will say nothing for this season (burning the dried sods of the land gave a short term fertility but was ultimately ruinous and absolutely forbidden normally). Tenants were urged to burn as much as they liked on black land i.e., bog land and to cart it to other ground to grow turnips. Sow “pease” (sic) and barley and field and garden beans (and mangle wozzels. Come to him for help. Uncommon work is required and he will not help anyone who holds land but will not work it. He, Hamilton, works hard himself and expects others to do likewise.

In the same issue Colonel Conolly has imported 500 tons of rice and one ton has been sent to the Bundoran schools and two to the Ballyshannon Relief Committee. The columns were illuminated by a row between the Vicar of Drumholm Mr. M. G. Fenwick and a local land agent. Alexander Hamilton, on the question of who should be allowed to get a place on the Relief Works. Should a man who has paid his rent get on the Relief? — if he is able to pay his rent does he need relief work? (as long as you managed the rent you could do what you liked afterwards and if you hadn’t the rent you could work until you could pay the rent — either way the rent was sacrosanct and Catch 22 was born long before Joseph Heller).

From now until April the Famine cannot squeeze into the Ballyshannon Herald and on March 12th we are informed that Fermanagh is improving and that petty thefts and slaughter of cattle had completely ceased, according to the Erne Packet. The reporting of the Donegal Assizes on March 12th at Lifford hints at what the newspaper doesn’t report. Bartley Loughlin, a former bailiff to Mr. H. Coane of Waterloo Cottage, Higginstown, Ballyshannon was alleged to have sent a threatening letter to Mrs. H. Coane saying that their family would be blown up with gunpowder for their oppression of the tenantry. Laughlin had been bailiff for Coane for fifteen years and his handwriting was familiar to his former master. In his capacity as bailiff Laughlin had been ordered to serve notice to quit on thirty tenants and ordered to distrain those persons who had not paid — as far as the landlord was concerned it would not be hard to seize fodder in lieu of rent. For inability or unwillingness to carry this out Bartley Loughlin was sacked. Councillor Doherty defended the ex-­bailiff and demolished the case by asking if Laughlin’s handwriting was so well known to Coane then why would he be so stupid as to write the letter in his own hand? A not-guilty verdict was returned. In the next case a John Donald got seven years’ transportation for stealing sheep from Michael Ward, but a woman, Rebecca Brack, (Brock?) was found not guilty of exposing a child to die at Finner, near Ballyshannon.

1847.In an echo of the Christmas Eve piracy in the Erne Estuary, James Currie, was accused of receiving a ham knowing it to be stolen. The ship’s name is now given as The Confidence and its Master as Joseph Davidson. The ship had been boarded by two boat’s crews and nine bales of bacon and hogsheads of ham had been stolen. Sub-Constable Davis arrested Currie walking through Ballyshannon on Christmas day carrying a ham. Currie said that he had found it in a hole in the ground among the sand dunes. He was found guilty with a recommendation for mercy and got nine months hard labour.

At Fermanagh Assizes at this time Daniel Nealy was convicted of stealing valuable property, plate, etc., from J. C. Bloomfield at Castle Caldwell. He was sentenced to seven years’ transportation. For a similar crime in the same area, the breaking into the house of Launcelot Corcoran near Castle Caldwell on the previous December 27th the following were tried:- James Mulrean, Maurice Connor, Peter Gallagher, Francis Gallagher, Maurice Lannon, William Lannon, George W. O’Connor and Edward Muldoon. All were found guilty and sentenced to fourteen years’ transportation except the last four, who got seven years’ transportation.

The March 26th issue details a brutal occurrence in the Pettigo area which happened on March 23rd. George Allingham with one Patterson and “the notorious Melanefy, the bailiff” came to the house of John McCrea of Clonaweel. Their purpose seemed to be to execute on order upon the person of John McCrea who wasn’t present. Only his two sons were there and after some persuasion they managed to get the three intruders out of the house. They seemed rather inebriated and threatened the sons and finally Melanefy fired at young Edward McCrea “wounding him dreadfully” in the head. Melanefy has run off and the countryside is now in pursuit!

By 2nd April, 1847 things have got so bad in the area as to force its attention upon this blinkered newspaper. It reports that the poor house is crowded to excess and fever and dysentery are spreading alarmingly. “Deaths are frightfully numerous. A fever hospital is urgently needed and its building would give employment to the poor.”

  1. April 23rd:- Captain Fortescue has arrived to take charge of the Commissariat Department, i.e., to give out food for the starving. A vessel with breadstuffs for this town and Enniskillen is waiting for a fair wind to get into port. It is hoped that she will get in today as the people discharged from the workhouse are in great distress. There is plenty of food coming in from America, but it is still at famine prices. Captain Lang is to superintend the public charities. Arrangements are in hand to setup a public soup kitchen to the plan of Mr. Sayer (but the paper notes with unaccustomed concern). “We fear it will not answer the purpose.”

Between Garrison, Derrygonnelly and Holywell many hundreds of acres wilt be left without crops because of the utter poverty of the people. Farmers and graziers cattle are being stolen nightly.

April 30th: There is a great fever sweeping Fermanagh especially in the country districts and arising largely from those who have left (or been sent out) of the workhouse and had now gone home and infected their friends who had generously but fatally taken them in.

  1. May 7th: Reports the hanging of Samuel Crumrner at Lifford. He was hanged for the murder of his father. His wife had also been sentenced for the same crime, but the sentence was commuted to transportation for life. It was the first hanging in Donegal for fourteen or fifteen years and about a thousand people came to watch. On the scaffold Crummer said (the name was not printed) swore his life away for small money in these times. He was a big man of 6’-2” and he said goodbye to his wife and children from the scaffold, although they were not present, before he was launched into eternity.

The steamship Albert under Commander Geary arrived in Ballyshannon with breadstuffs. It also towed in two ships which had been waiting outside the Bar for a favourable wind. The Albert is 147ft long, 42 feet wide, can carry 600 tons and has a capacity of 200 horse power. Many people have been shown over this ship.

On May 14th it is reported that the deaths around Clones, Co. Monaghan, are “inconceivably great”. In Enniskillen the poor and starving rushed the Board of Guardians meeting and all had to be admitted. Colonel Conolly has given his tenants eight tons of rice this week free plus free turnip seed. John and William Tredennick (local landowners between Ballyshannon and Belleek) are reducing their rents by 40% to 50%.

1847.May 21st reports the melancholy death of Captain Drake of the 92nd Regiment and a young local man, Henry Lipsett of Ballyshannon, who were drowned when their sailing boat was upset in the estuary.

Hundreds of the poor are being provided for by the Johnstons of Magheramena Castle near Belleek and their rents are reduced also.

There is great fever in Fermanagh and the well known Dr. Collum has recently succumbed. “God knows who will be next sacrificed on the altar of pestilence and death”. This last item is reprinted taken from the pages of the Erne Packet.

  1. May 28th: reports great fever in the locality of Ballyshannon and all classes were affected. People are warned not to feed beggars at their own door, especially strange ones. Heaps of manure must be removed from thoroughfares, lanes and alleyways as otherwise the Committee of the Ballyshannon Board of Guardians will cause them to be removed and prosecute the offenders. This is signed by M. Davis J.P., chairman.

In the June 11th issue the fever has greatly moderated and not a single death has been reported last week. There is a huge plague of snails affecting crops and people are advised to gather them as they are very suitable for feeding pigs.

June 18th: issue contains a very indignant letter protesting about a pauper with fever lying on Ballyshannon Bridge since Sunday last. The Board of Health should have put him in a lodging house and had a doctor visit him. Only one death has been reported in the past three weeks and that was of Matthew Donohue, an inoffensive, industrious man who kept a public house in Main St., Ballyshannon. There are very good prospects for the harvest. Enniskillen jail is said to be the most crowded in the kingdom.

At the Donegal Petty sessions reported on June 25th a little boy pleaded guilty to stealing a few ship’s biscuits from Messrs Bradshaw of Donegal Town. He was given six months’ jail. He cried as he was led away. Mary Ward got two months jail for stealing two hens.

Sept. 17th: reports that no rot can be seen in the potatoes and that a great fever rages about Enniskillen. The news from Fermanagh continues in the Oct 1st newspaper as it reports on the dissolution of Lowtherstown (Irvinestown) Poor Law Union. The immediate cause was the raising of the salary of the R.C. Chaplain to the Workhouse. In the row that followed the Protestant Chaplain’s salary was raised. Further rows caused the dismissal of the master of the workhouse and finally the Board of Guardians themselves were dismissed! This is the newspaper version of the dissolution of Lowtherstown P.L.U., but in fact there were much more grievous reasons why this

Union was taken over by a Government appointed Commissioner. The Guardians failed to levy anywhere near sufficient funds to support the poor and starving of the locality, thus causing the effects of the Famine to be even worse than need have been and the Workhouse which they were in charge of was very badly run. An inspector who visited Lowtherstown Workhouse wrote that he found people half naked dying in their own vomit and excrement, lying on the floor. He said that Lowtherstown was the worst workhouse that he ever visited. (See Parliamentary Papers: Irish Famine).

October 15th: reported the dissolution of Ballyshannon P.L.U. Commissioners and the appointment of a new government inspector. November 19th sees a letter saying that the people of the country are living on turnips and nothing else. The Gentlemen of the country must unite to stave off famine as they did last year.

The final note of 1847 reports the death of Mr. William Hassard of Garden Hill near Belcoo in Fermanagh. He was shot in the leg and died later. Suspicion pointed to one Creagh, (probably a Mc Grath from the Irish rendering of the name Mc Creigh) but there was insufficient evidence. Creagh’s father had been jailed by Hassard for non-payment of arrears of rent and had died in jail. (This is the type of indirect evidence of the Famine and its effects which makes one wish that this paper had made any decent attempt to write about the momentous events it was living through).

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The Famine 1846. Ballyshannon Herald.

1846 January 2nd 1846:— Mr. W.H. Brown was in Ballyshannon on Wednesday last, having made all arrangements for a bill in Parliament to improve Ballyshannon Harbour and provide a rail link to Belleek. This was announced at a big dinner given in Mr. Brown’s honour by the local merchants and traders. In an affray with Molly Maguires at Ballinacarrig, Co. Leitrim, two are reported dead.

January 9th:— Two brothers, Fitzpatrick, in Enniskillen Jail on suspicion of shooting Mr. Barton J.P. One of them, James Fitzpatrick, was now dead of fever in jail and the other still protesting their innocence. They had always been thought to be loyal Protestants, according to the paper, and they were claiming that they just happened to be on the road at the time of the shooting.

January 16th:— The rival railway companies were in contention and Mr. Brown, the promoter of the Ballyshannon and Lough Erne Railway and Steamboat Company, was being disowned by the Marquis of Ely and Dr. John Shiel of Ballyshannon, who declared that they only supported the Dublin and Enniskillen Railway Co. From Belleek came the melancholy story of a man called McLaughlin, a long time servant of Mr. Christy Johnston of Belleek. (This paper has a fine disregard for Christian names and invariably they miss those of the “lower orders”.) McLaughlin had been discharged by Johnston for dishonesty, said the paper, and been re-employed and sent to the local mill in Belleek with oats to be ground. He was ordered to stay overnight for the security of the oats. During the night Johnston caught McLaughlin carrying away a sack of grain and arrested him and the police conveyed him to Enniskillen. When the prisoner arrived in Enniskillen he excused himself (presumably to go to the toilet) and his handcuffs were removed and the poor man promptly jumped into the lake and was drowned. This item was followed up the next week with a letter signed by Porteus Johnston and his brothers, Christopher and James. (I believe these to be the Johnstons who owned the Hotel Carlton in Belleek — which was already in existence.) They wrote of the suicide of Terence McLaughlin, their servant, and objected to the previous newspaper report (raising interesting speculations as well). Their letter says that Terence McLaughlin had been their servant for eight years and was always honest and they don’t believe that he could have been stealing a 28 stone bag of oats when he was only eight stone in weight himself. They say that they had taken him back after he had been accused of stealing oats and he was working as usual when he was arrested on a warrant issued against him without summons or hearing. McLaughlin had resided less than two miles from Belleek and Christy Johnston had warned the Keenans not to proceed against McLaughlin in law. Thus the letter enigmatically ended. In relation to the Barton shooting two men called Burnside and a man, Irvine, and his wife were in jail in connection with the crime.

The January 30th issue refers to the expected arrival soon of the first ever steamship in Ballyshannon and that there will be public demonstrations to mark this event and the issue of 27th February 1846 commemorates this. The steamer Unity recently visited Ballyshannon, it said, with a cargo of barley for the local distillery and on its second visit brought pigs to Messrs O’Brien of the town, saving an entire week driving the pigs and the consequent injury to the animals. It is hoped to have steamers from Liverpool shortly.

  1. It is March 6th before the famine is mentioned and only to say that people were flocking to a certain priest in Co. Cavan to fill bottles of water at a holy well in order to sprinkle their potatoes to stop rot.

On April 3rd recipes appear in the paper for using with Indian corn (maize imported as a substitute for the potato and detested by the Irish). April 17th announces the first emigrant ship of the season leaving Sligo. It is the ship Drumahair, owned by Mr. Kernaghan (Enniskillen) and from its name obviously a local vessel.

Horse racing was recently held at Magheramena, the home of the Johnston family near Belleek. (Magheramena Castle was not yet built). A large crowd attended and “spolleen, poiteen, jug of the joke and lemonade were much in demand.” There was a dinner afterwards for invited guests. A horserace was also reported on Tullan (or Finner) Strand near Bundoran.

It is now getting round the summer bathing scene at Bundoran and the latest arrivals at Gallagher’s Hotel, Bundoran, on last Saturday (before 22nd May) were the Dowager Marchioness of Ely, Lord Henry Loftus, Lady Anne and Lady Catherine Loftus and the Rev. Loftus Reed and Miss Reed.

On May 28th a big disturbance is reported in Enniskillen because of a “forestaller” who was buying loads of potatoes to take them to Co. Monaghan. (A forestaller was a type of profiteer who bought up potatoes). The people objected to the potatoes being sold out of the area and potato sacks were slashed. This account was being carried from an article in the Erne Packet (Enniskillen paper), and that newspaper was in sympathy with the “anti-forestallers.”

19th of June reports the death of Charles French, second mate of the American Brig Camilla which was anchored in Ballyshannon Harbour at “the Pool”. He jumped out of the ship for a swim and was drowned and later interred in Ballyshannon. July 3rd saw a report of a near drowning when one Henry Connolly drove his horse and cart into the sea at Bundoran to refresh the horse and quench his thirst. A wave swept all away, except that with a struggle Connolly saved himself. His horse and cart are described as his only possessions.

July 24th reports the trial of those accused of the attempted murder of Folliott W. Barton, the Pettigo J.P. Accused of the shooting was Robert Burnside and accused of harbouring him were James and Margaret Irvine. Barton had been coming on horseback from his relations’ house, Barton’s of the Waterfront, also near Pettigo, through the village to his own home at Clonelly on the Kesh side of Pettigo. After coming through Pettigo Barton had been shot at Crummer’s Gate at Aghalaan. He was wounded in the right breast but rode on to the house of John Chute, a mile and a half from his residence. A James Armstrong gave evidence of seeing Burnside with a gun and following him to Irvine’s house and listening at a window while Burnside told of the shooting. Despite this impressive-sounding evidence the jury retired and brought in a not guilty verdict after one and a half hours.

As we shall see later there is obviously much misery and hunger abroad in the land but escaping the notice of the class for which the Ballyshannon Herald is produced. August 14th chronicles the arrival of Colonel Conolly, M.P. and his suite at Cliff House near Belleek and that Lord and Lady Longford are soon due to arrive. (Conolly was the principal landowner in the Belleek/Ballyshannon/Bundoran area). This social chit-chat continues with the readers of August 21st being told that Coburn’s Hotel, Ballyshannon, was doing very well this season and that Bundoran and Donegal Town were packed with visitors. But there were many outrages reported and many people were being beaten up and robbed especially on the road between Ballyshannon and Donegal.

The 92nd Highlanders were moving out from Ballyshannon and Belleek and causing much regret since the area would be deprived of the amateur theater which they had set up. They were replaced by detachments of the 26th Cameronians. An incident in Ballymagroarty near Ballyshannon is reported, in which a man, Johnston Corduct, had vitriol thrown in his face by a woman called Gallagher who had since fled the country. He had seduced her, but would not marry her, even though she had given him thirty shillings. He had spent this on other girls.

August 28th hears the first complaints of “a very scarce season” and many disturbances in the locality. Employees of Messrs Bradshaw and Co. of Donegal were beaten up near Pettigo after delivering coal to Barton’s of the Waterfoot Estate. Their assailants rushed out of the bog with blackened faces.

James Credan, a local merchant, advertises the landing of timber, etc. at Ballyshannon from the Charlotte of Warmouth, Nova Scotia, and from the Margaret. A few passengers can be accommodated on the Charlotte to St. John’s, when it sails on September 10th. September 4th catalogues more outrages and men beaten up on the Pettigo-Laghey road. One man, Jenkins, only saved his life by leaving his horse and cart and running away.

It has taken a long, long time for the reality of the poor and starving to force its way into the columns of this local paper, but by late 1846, even a paper with as much sensory handicap as this one has to acknowledge the existence of the famine. September 11th reports for two and a half columns on a meeting in Donegal courthouse on the subject of the relief of the poor. Loans and grants are craved from the Government to employ the poor of the Baronies of Tyrhugh and Bannagh and Boylagh. All these baronies report great distress of the poor. The paper carries an advertisement for the Ballyshannon Destitute Sick Society which is going to make its own local contribution to help alleviate the situation. By September 25th the paper, which has carried little or no reports of a situation which has obviously been building up for a long time, suddenly discovers “the poor in this town and vicinity are in a wretched state of destitution.” “Potatoes are too dear at 6d or 3d per stone and not a plateful sound”. Indian meal is now one shilling five pence a peck. “How are they to live?” “People are not able to raise enough money from working as the price of food is so high.” A family (obviously not an ordinary family) bought a ton of Indian meal in Sligo last week for £12 and could now make £5 profit on it if they wished. A poor, honest tradesman with 12 children is applying for aid. No one in his house has eaten for forty eight hours. “Something must be done.”

Sir Thomas Hort is reducing his rents in Magheraboy (West Fermanagh) after a personal visit to the area. This issue ends with a report of a pathetic procession of the poor through the streets of Ballyshannon — following a man carrying a loaf speared on a pole.

October 2nd carries the news of a presentment of £20,000 for the Barony of Tyrhugh to be spent on roads to give work for the poor. On the road from Ballyshannon to Bundoran £1,000 is to be spent, £800 on the road from Belleek to Ballyshannon, £500 to be spent on the streets of Ballyshannon and on leveling the Fair Green, £100 to be spent on the new road from Pettigo to Ballintra and £100 on the old road between the same places and there is an extensive list of further schemes in the paper.

  1. October 30th carries the story of the breaking into the Abbey Mill and two tons of meal being stolen from the owners, Donaldson and Connolly, two hard working, struggling men. The stolen meal was conveyed by boats across the Erne estuary and no one has been caught. Ballyshannon Committee for the relief of the poor of the town and vicinity have raised a large sum to purchase wheaten meal and will soon be able to sell it at a reduced price. Sir James Stewart, Bart., is now visiting with the Col. Connolly at Cliff and the Colonel is to reduce his rents on his Donegal Estate by 25%.
  1. November 13th publishes a further list of subscribers to the Ballyshannon Poor Relief Committee and the list is headed by Colonel Connolly with £600 (a very substantial sum in 1846). The Committee’s meal store in College Lane is now open from November 13th and each subscriber of money to the fund will be able to give tickets to the needy for reduced price meal in proportion to the sum they subscribed. Every subscriber of £1 will be able to give three tickets for a half stone of whole meal each twice a week. Each lender of £18 to the fund will be able to give three tickets as above and so on in proportion for each £6 lent.

November 27th gives news of the arrival of the ship Colonist at Richebucto, New Brunswick, on November 17th. Under its Captain Charles Dorning the Colonist had sailed from Ballyshannon and endured terrible storms, but all the ship’s passengers from Ballyshannon and Killybegs were landed in good health. An attack was reported on a local man called Stephenson, a farmer who had formerly belonged to the Donegal Regiment. His gun and his money were demanded, but with his servant, McCann, (all these unchristened people) they drove off their attackers and one man was stabbed by McCann with a pitchfork. This man has since died and been privately buried. Colonel Conolly’s rents are now reduced by 50% for those paying less than £5 p.a., reduced by 40% for those paying under £10 p.a., 25% for those whose rent is less than £15 and reduced by 20% for those paying over £15.

December 18th reports that Edward Allingham has had five bullocks killed and carried away during the night. (This seems a common crime to surround, kill and dismember an animal and carry it away). A pig had been stolen from a poor man in Belleek (a more serious crime, since the pig usually paid the rent for the Irish poor). Some meal had been stolen from the store of the local Poor Relief Committee and the town was full of “strange mendicants” (Beggars). It is impossible to feed them all”. A bleak outlook as we leave 1846 but as the next delightful tale has it for some people, the year had a brighter ending.

 

1916

Fermanagh Herald February 5th 1916.  THRESHING IN COUNTY LEITRIM.  During the week Messrs. W. E. Pye and William Johnston, Kinlough, attended at Messrs.  T. J. Rooney’s, Foxfield, E Thompson, Cherrybrook, with a steam thresher, for the purpose of giving demonstrations on the threshing of oats etc..  The thresher is one of powerful capabilities, having thrashed, cleaned and gathered 120 stone of oats per hour.  The ease and comfort with which work can now be done by the use of up-to-date machinery should be a great encouragement to the farmers of the county to increase the cultivation of crops during the coming season.

Fermanagh Herald February 5th 1916.  WOULD NOT LEAVE THE WORKHOUSE.  An interesting discussion arose over an inmate from Killybuggy.  It would appear that this woman was in the habit of living with her married daughter and was in receipt of the old age pension.  She went away from her daughter’s house and sought refuge in the Manorhamilton Union.  Her daughter appeared before their Guardians asking that our mother be requested to leave the workhouse and go back to live with her as heretofore.  The Guardians could not persuade the woman to leave the house so they allowed her to stay for the present.

February 10th 1916.  THE FAITHFUL HORSE.  A remarkable story of a horse’s faithfulness is related in the monthly magazine of the Claremont Mission Pentonville N.,  by one of the Coldstream Guards Regiment.  After the fierce fighting at Loos he writes it was noticed that there was a horse standing between the firing lines.  For two days he remained there.  Then some of our men crawled out and found that he was standing by the dead body of his rider and would not leave the spot.  Later on some of our men bravely arranged to get out to the horse again, blindfolded him and brought them back to our lines.  By no other means could the faithful beast be persuaded to leave its dead master.  F.T.

February 10th 1916.  NOTES.  Certain areas in the United Kingdom have now been forbidden to aliens.  In Ireland these included the counties of Dublin, Cork and Kerry.

The Compulsory Service Order of England comes into force today.  Unmarried men from 19 years to 30 are being called up, the last of them to report by March 3.

An old Crimean veteran named Matthew Johnston, has died as a pay patient in Enniskillen Workhouse hospital on Tuesday.  He had served under the late Col. Johnston of Snowhill and told how he used to carry biscuits from Balaclava to Sebastopol sometimes in his bare feet in the snow.  He received a special service pension about 15 years ago.  He will be buried today. I.R.

February 10th 1916.  SERGEANT J.  FYFFE 18TH ROYAL IRISH, rushed home from his regiment in France to see his father in Eden Street, Enniskillen, but before he could reach home his father had passed away.  Sergeant Fyffe is a smart young soldier and instructor of athletics in his battalion.  He met James and Willie Quinn of the Diamond, Enniskillen of the 5th Royal Irish Rifles near his own battalion in France and says that the Ulster division with the local battalion lay not far off from where his own battalion was located.  The Ulster division and other Divisions are on the best of terms.  All are comrades out there, no matter from the south or north and all are much superior in physique and in condition to the German soldiers.  The German soldiers would desert in numbers but that their own officers tell them that they would be shot at once if taken by the British.  One of the prisoners taken by the 18th on Christmas night was so frightened and he begged his captors to leave him his German head: he was led to believe that his head would be cut off.  The well-known action at the Brickfields reduced the 18th from 1,100 to about 43 men, they were so decimated.  The Germans, Sergeant Fyffe says, no longer advance in solid masses as they used to do, but in open formation.  They had suffered so much by the former that they were taught a lesson. I.R.

February 10th 1916.  THE 12TH INNISKILLINGS.  A draft of the 12th Inniskillings stationed at Enniskillen, has gone to the front and received a hearty send off, the whole of the battalion lining up and heartily cheering their departing comrades.  The officers of the battalion bade the men farewell at the Railway Station.  With the drafts leaving were the following officers – Second Lieutenants Allen, McKinley, Baker, Shannon and Reid.  The fine corps of drums played the men off to the tunes of “The girl I left behind me”, and to “Keep the home fires burning”, while at intervals “Auld Lang Syne” was played.  Among the men of the draft are some old soldiers who saw service in South Africa.  The order for departure was received only one hour before train time and so the townspeople had not an opportunity of knowing of the departure of the men, and of giving them a fitting send off. I.R.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  OBITER DICTA.  THE CONVENT BELL.  There is apparently no limit to the appalling pomposity of a certain set of Protestants, who are unfortunately in Enniskillen.  But happily their influence is nil.  Nevertheless that little bird  known as rumour has just hopped on my table and told me a surprising story concerning the Convent bell.  The hint is quite sufficient for this sect.  I write the above just to let them know that I am fully conversant with all of the leading facts, and I’m seriously thinking of pulling back the veil in a short time and exposing the bigoted scheme.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  DROMORE BISHOPRIC.  APPOINTMENT OF THE VERY REV. EDWARD CANON MULHERN, D. D., P.  P., INISHMACSAINT.  A Reuter’s cable from Rome of Monday’s date intimates that, on the recommendation of the Consistorial Congregation, his Holiness the Pope has appointed the very Rev. Edward Canon Mulhern of Inishmacsaint to be Lord Bishop of Dromore in succession to the late most Rev. Dr. O’Neill.  The new Bishop-elect is a native of Ederney, County Fermanagh and received his early education at St. Macartan’s seminary Monaghan where he ranked among the most successful students of his time.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  IT WILL BE LEARNED WITH REGRET that Private S.  H.  Young, of the 8th Highland Light Infantry, and brother of Mr. D.  Young, Omagh, was killed by shrapnel in France on the 21st of January.  Private Young was a native of Belleek, County Fermanagh and was employed for some time in Messrs.  White Bros.’ hardware establishment in Omagh.  After the outbreak of the war he joined the colours and went on active service about October last.  The news of his death was conveyed in a letter from the chaplain of the regiment, who states that he was buried with his Scottish comrades.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  CAPTAIN D’ARCY IRVINE KILLED.  Captain Charles William D’Arcy Irvine 6th Service Battalion, Leinster Regiment, who is reported in Monday’s casualty list to have been killed in action at the Dardanelles, was reported wounded and missing, believed killed, in September last.  He was the eldest son of Major Charles Cockburn D’Arcy Irvine, J.P. of Castle Irvine, Irvinestown, and of Fannie Kathleen, daughter of the late Lt. Colonel Jesse Lloyd, of Ballyleck, County Monaghan.  He was a grandson of the late Captain W. D’Arcy Irvine, D. L. of the 67th Regiment now the 2nd Battalion Hampshire Regiment, and his great grandfather, the late Mr. W. D’Arcy Irvine of Castle Irvine served at Waterloo with the 1st Dragoon Guards.  Captain C. W. D’Arcy Irvine who was 31 years of age, served for a time in the 3rd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles.  He afterwards transferred to the Leinster Regiment, and accompanied the 6th Battalion to the Dardanelles last year, taking part in the Suvla Bay operations.  His services were mentioned in dispatches by General Sir Ian Hamilton.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  AGAINST FEMALE LABOUR AT PIT HEAD.  The Executive, Committee of the Northumberland Miners have resolved to oppose the introduction of female labour at the pit head, and recommended instead a rearrangement of male labour.  Their contention is there are many strong men at the bank who might be better employed underground, and many discarded old men who could be re-employed.  There are no pit head woman workers in Northumberland.

August 1915.

Fermanagh Times August 5th, 1915.  WAR NEWS.  Nearly half a million sterling is said to represent the loss of wages in Wales on account of the strike, and the other losses would also amount to a considerable sum, to say nothing of the loss of the output of a million tons of coal.  It would take a long period of increased wages to compensate the men for their immediate loss.  But they never seem to think of that.

It is wonderful how this old country manages to boggle and blunder through.  Its authorities seldom prepare for any eventuality or exhibit much foresight, so that we begin wars and other things under great disadvantages.  It transpired at a meeting of the Marconi Company that in 1910 the company proposed to the Government a chain of wireless stations throughout the British possessions, but it was rejected.  The Germans took up the idea and carried it out, with the result that some days before the war they were able to warn their ships to make for neutral ports.

As for the stoppage of cotton imports into Germany, the facts are now notorious.  After 12 months of war and a change of Government our Ministers have not yet proclaimed the chief ingredient of the German and Austrian powers contraband (or subject to seizure by the Allies cruisers).  They have proclaimed wool, oil, machine tools and large scale maps contraband, but not this stuff with which Germany kills our men and their comrades among the Allies.  Nothing in the whole history of this war is so inexplicable.

Fermanagh Times August 5th, 1915.  THE MAN WHO SANK THE LUSITANIA.  CONFESSION BY THE U21’S COMMANDER. “The order to sink the Lusitania arrived on May 2 at Heligoland and, and aroused the indignation of all the officers.  More than one was beside himself.  The order was nevertheless carried out by the U21, which left under the command of Lieutenant von Hersing.  The writer of the letter was on board his ship when Von Hersing returned from his expedition and was able to take note of the contempt which all the officers manifested towards him.  Without daring to lift his head he muttered: – “It went against me to act as I did, but I could not do otherwise. “ He was weeping.  He then told how none of his men knew the object of his voyage, and has several times he was on the point of letting them into the secret in the hope of seeing the crew mutiny.  On its arrival at the spot where it was to surprise the Lusitania, the submarine had a long wait.  At one moment the idea of making off enter the commander’s head, but he found that another submarine had stopped a short distance away.  The Lusitania meanwhile was approaching.  She could not escape her doom.  “I saw people gathered on deck” continued Von Hersing, “the ship was crammed with human beings.  I caused the submarine to plunge and the torpedo was discharged.  I do not know whether it was this torpedo or the one discharged by the other submarine that struck the liner, but the latter’s hull was ripped open.  I had tried to avoid witnessing the ghastly scene which followed, and made away from the torpedoed liner at full speed.  Then I came to the surface.  The sea was crowded with struggling wretches, and even at that distance I could hear the shouts of the drowning.  I had become a man of stone, incapable of moving or giving an order.”

Fermanagh Times August 5th, 1915.  BALLYSHANNON VICTIM IN THE LUSITANIA.  A PROBATE APPLICATION.  In the matter of the goods of Michael Ward, deceased an application was made in the Probate Court, Dublin on behalf of Mrs. Margaret Ward, Greenhall, Ballyshannon, mother of the deceased, for liberty to state death on belief and to obtain letters of administration.  It appeared that Michael Ward had emigrated to America many years ago, and up to April last had resided in Pittsburgh.  Having amassed a small fortune there, he decided to return to Ireland.  He had purchased a farm near Ballyshannon last year.  He sailed from New York in the Lusitania, and when the vessel was torpedoed he was seen helping women and children into the boats, and he undoubtedly sacrificed his life in saving others.  Mr. Justice Madden said it was clear beyond doubt that the deceased was another victim of the outrage.  It was, indeed, a sad case.  He would grant the application.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  A WOUNDED INNISKILLING BACK FROM THE FRONT.  Private Maguire of the 2nd Inniskillings who was wounded on the retreat from Mons has reached the military hospital at Enniskillen for care.  His brother Francis, also in the 2nd Inniskillings was killed in the war and the wounded soldier at the old Redoubt had a narrow escape as a shrapnel bullet tore one shoulder while another bullet tore the other shoulder, as he lay with his comrades in a turnip field on the defence.  He tells how he became unconscious and was found by the stretcher parties and conveyed for first aid before he was sent to the base.  The bullets were probed for and extracted; the parts were burned to guard against blood poisoning and gradually consciousness returned to the parts affected.  Maguire was for some time at Rouen in the hospital in which Miss Stuart of Enniskillen was the sister in the operating theatre; he was subsequently transferred to Brighton where local ladies took convalescent soldiers out in their cars for an airing and he liked the place well.  He has nothing but praise for the care he received at the Redoubt.  He says he is not in want of anything.

Maguire is confined to bed with pains perhaps from rheumatism contracted during some nights of exposure; but he is near Lisnaskea, and hopes to have friends from home as visitors on the fair and other days.  He had a year’s boy service in the old militia in which he served for six years and then entered the line battalions and served abroad for 11 years in both the 1st and 2nd battalion.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  COMFORTS FOR INNISKILLINGS.  I had several gross of fly papers dispatched to the 1st, 5th and 6th battalions of the Inniskillings last week to the Dardanelles where the fly nuisance is described as unbearable.  Severe as the strain is for myriad of flies to light on one’s food and ones face, so that even much desired sleep became a time for torture, it is worse for the wounded.  Many years ago when I was at Montreal I had a very mild experience of what our men have to endure at the Dardanelles in this respect so that I had to leave my food almost untasted.  The flies were in droves on the dinner plate, on the knife and fork, on my face, and the only way to obtain relief was to flee.  But our men cannot fly; they must endure.  (W. C. Trimble)

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  YOUTHS OF 19 CALLED UP.  ABOUT 1,200,000 MORE RUSSIANS FOR THE COLOURS.  An imperial ukase has been issued calling to the colours all men born in 1896 i.e. youths of 19 of whom there are about 1,200,000.  The lowest age at which Russians have been called up hitherto is 20.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  NEXT SUNDAY A DAY OF INTERSESSION.  The Archbishops and Bishops of the Church of Ireland have appointed Sunday, August 8 to be observed throughout our church as a day of prayer and supplication for our church and country.  The cruel war forced on the world by German perfidy and greed will have lasted for 12 months during which time blood and treasure have been freely poured forth that the nation may live.  Our own Church is the poorer for the loss of hundreds of our most gallant sons and is the richer for their noble faithfulness and for the example of their unselfish sacrifice.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  AN INNISKILLING RECOMMENDED FOR THE VICTORIA CROSS.  We are unofficially informed that Sergeant Somers of the 1st Inniskillings, at the Dardanelles has been recommended for the Victoria Cross.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  THE DEATH OF LIEUTENANT COLONEL JONES AT GALLIPOLI.  He was severely wounded by a shrapnel shell while sitting writing out orders.  It struck him in the thigh and part of the abdomen.  An immediate operation was found necessary and he survived the ordeal.  He was sent to Alexandria but while on the journey complications arose which necessitated a second operation from which he never regained consciousness and he passed away before the boat arrived at Alexandria.  His body was buried at sea.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  ARIGNA MINING. PAST AND FUTURE.  A question and reply was recently given in the House of Commons relative to the Arigna Mining Company.  The district abounds in coal of good quality and is rich in ore, fireclay and other valuable minerals.  Some 80 years ago a large Company was formed to work the coal and iron and extensive smelting works where the most excellent iron ware including rails grates, mantle registers, pots etc. were manufactured.  After working with a fair measure of success for some years in those days in which rail communication was entirely absent, the company, owing to intrigue and fraud in which one gentleman lost £80,000 and culminated in the shooting of the manager, the iron works closed down, and  today the great and extensive ironworks are a heap of ruins.  From time to time small companies were established to work to coal which was so much needed in the locality but each company failed after a short existence.

Fermanagh Herald August 7th 1915.  JOTTINGS.  The 8th Inniskillings 10th Irish Division arrived in Enniskillen on Monday night by special train.

Mrs. Bussell, of Tooliss, Lisnaskea he, has been notified by the Canadian Record Office that her son, Private Frank Bussell (27778), F.  Company 15th Battalion, 48th Highlanders, 1st Canadian Contingent, has been missing since the battle of Ypres.

Fermanagh Herald August 7th 1915.  A LIQUID FIRE FIGHT IS DESCRIBED BY MR. PHILIP GIBBS, the special correspondent of the Daily Chronicle in a telegram dated July 31.  For the first time, he says the British troops have had to face the ordeal of liquid fire squirted upon them by an enemy which has adopted every diabolical means to gain a temporary success.

They have gained something, it is true – 500 yards of trenches which we had previously held at Hooge –but they lose still more by a further slur upon their name as fighting men.  It will be remembered that we destroyed a German redoubt of considerable size and strength to the North of the Menin road by a successful mine explosion.  Infuriated by this, the enemy has been furiously shelling our trenches, and using every form of bomb and shell.  He began with a heavy cannonade against our trenches, and hurled large numbers of bombs from trench mortars, damaging part of our trenches, but not dislodging the men.  During a lull however, says Mr. Gibbs, the new horror made its appearance.  A flame – either of gas or liquid fire – was projected upon our advanced trenches.

Our men were taken by surprise at this new means of destruction; but in spite of the shock many leapt to their feet firing repeatedly at the flames.  Finally the trenches reached by the burning jets became untenable and the men were compelled to fall back.

Fermanagh Times August 12th, 1915.  BOOTS FOR WINTER WARFARE.  The Army Clothing Department is said to be engaged in the production of a new boot designed to meet the special necessities of winter wear.  The terrible ordeal of our men in the trenches last winter has set the experts thinking out designs of boots which will afford an altogether better protection to the leg than puttees gave under war conditions.  It must be remembered that the puttee was intended more especially for wear in tropical countries, where it was, indeed, found to give excellent protection against the bites of snakes and insects, but in the trenches puttees held the damp and contributed to frostbite.  Hence our soldiers demand for leggings to replace the puttees, the comfort and support of which they had appreciated so much before going into the flooded trenches.

But what became of that eager young chemist, Fritz Haber, whose table-top experiment first solved the world’s nitrogen crisis? A fervent German nationalist, he not only helped, as we have seen, supply Germany with explosives during World War One- he went on to develop chemical weapons. This was too much for his wife, Clara, herself a chemist. Just after his new poison gases were first put to work in the trenches, she took his service revolver and shot herself. Fritz left the very next morning to oversee the gas’s use on the Eastern Front. The Nobel Prize judges weren’t as critical of his wartime work as his wife. In 1918 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his work on nitrogen. And after the war, he used his know-how to develop pesticides – including that notorious group of nitrogen-based toxins, the cyanides. His work then came to an abrupt end in 1933. Although he had converted to Lutheranism, Fritz Haber had been born Jewish, and as far as the Nazis were concerned he had no place in the new Reich. He fled to England, only to be rejected by his fellow chemists because of his wartime record. A year later he headed for Israel, but died of a heart attack en route. And perhaps it was for the best. Had he lived, Fritz Haber would have seen most of his extended family in Germany wiped out by Zyklon B, a poison gas whose development he had overseen, and whose manufacture depended on the process of nitrogen fixation that he had pioneered.

Fermanagh Times August 12th, 1915.  A RECRUITING MEETING IN LISNASKEA.  A recruiting party composed of a number of officers and men accompanied by the band of the eighth Inniskilling Fusiliers now stationed in Enniskillen visited Lisnaskea on Saturday, the fair day when an open air meeting was held in the centre of the town and was attended by a fairly large crowd.  Rev. R. C. Lapham presided and delivered a brief but incisive address in an appeal for men to join the colours.  Rev. Father Benedict, who is on a visit to the district, and who described himself as a London Irish Catholic priest, also made a strong appeal “so that Fermanagh should take its rightful place in the Irish Brigade”.  Major Johnston also spoke and mentioned that they had obtained 40 recruits in Enniskillen last week.

Impartial Reporter.  August 12th 1915.  ANOTHER PERSON KEPT THE FLEET TOGETHER.  The well-known naval expert Mr. F. T. Jane, disputes the claim that has been put forward on behalf of Mr. Winston Churchill that before the outbreak of war he did a great service to the nation by keeping the Fleet together ready for action instead of allowing its demobilisation after the manoeuvres and that he achieved this bold stroke of policy on his own responsibility.  Mr. Jane says no one expected war, and Mr. Churchill was he believes week ending with his wife at Cromer on the East Coast – Cromer which years ago give birth to “The Garden of Sleep”.  It was all “The garden of sleep.”  No one, adds Mr. Jane’, worried except one man and that man was the First Sea Lord of those days – Admiral Prince Louis of Battenberg.  He is the one who kept the fleet together and saved them from the horrors of Belgium.  Prince Louis of Battenberg it may be recalled was driven into retirement from the post of First Sea Lord in response to clamour from the sensational press on the ostensible grounds of his family association with Germany.  Mr. Jane asserts that Prince Louis is half Russian and the other half just exactly as much French as he is German.  In well informed circles however it may be added that it has been asserted that the reasons why Prince Louis continuance at the Admiralty was objectionable to certain influential wire-pullers behind the scenes was concerned with acute political developments shortly before the war.

(From Norfolkcoast.co.uk) THE GARDEN OF SLEEP. The drama critic of the Daily Telegraph and the Morning Post Clement Scott arrived in Norfolk in August 1883. Unable to find himself accommodation he was put up in the Miller’s House in Sidestrand. He was so taken with the area that he wrote a number of articles in the newspapers expounding the virtues of Norfolk, which eventually resulted in Cromer and the surrounding area becoming a fashionable place for holidays for the rich and famous. He named his articles and, subsequent book Poppy-land. The book was dedicated to the Miller’s daughter.

The term Poppy-Land was due to the vast quantities of poppies which grew in, and around, the area which he so loved. One of his favourite places and for which he wrote a poem entitled ‘The Garden of Sleep’, was the church tower of St. Michael and All Angels at Sidestrand.

The church and churchyard stood right on the cliffs and as the land around it was gradually eroded the locals decided to re-locate their community church further inland. They dismantled the church stone by stone and rebuilt it on its current site. However, they left the church tower on the cliffs and also the old graveyard. Every New Year’s Eve for 15 years Scott walked along Tower Lane to the old church tower and churchyard and spent the last few moments of the old year on the cliffs in the place he called his Garden of Sleep.

As the sea continued to claim the land, the locals had the disconcerting sight of seeing the coffins and the remains of those who had been buried in the church since the 15th Century, tumbling one by one, piece by piece into the crashing waves below. Clement Scott died in 1904 and some say that in later life he regretted that he had made Norfolk famous and that he commented that it was no longer the lovely rural landscape he had first visited in 1883.

The Church tower eventually fell over the cliffs in 1915/16, though its image continued to be used on postcards right up to the 1930’s.The new church St. Michael and All Angels at Sidestrand used the headstones from the old churchyard to line the wall by the road.

The Garden of Sleep by Clement Scott

On the grass of the cliff, at the edge of the steep,

God planted a garden – a garden of sleep!

‘Neath the blue of the sky, in the green of the corn,

It is there that the regal red poppies are born!

Brief days of desire, and long dreams of delight,

They are mine when my Poppy-Land cometh in sight.

In music of distance, with eyes that are wet,

it is there I remember, and there I forget!

0! heart of my heart! Where the poppies are born,

I am waiting for thee, in the hush of the corn.

Sleep! Sleep!

From the Cliff to the Deep!

Sleep, my Poppy-Land,

Sleep!

In my garden of sleep, where red poppies are spread,

I wait for the living, along with the dead!

For a tower in ruins stands guard o’er the deep,

At whose feet are green graves of dear women asleep!

Did they love as I love, when they lived by the sea?

Did they wait, as I wait, for the days that may be?

Was it hope or fulfilling that entered each breast,

Ere death gave release, and the poppies gave rest?

0! Life of my life! On the cliffs by the sea,

By the graves in the grass, I am waiting for thee! Sleep! Sleep!

In the dews by the deep!

Sleep, my Poppy-Land,

Sleep!

Fermanagh Herald August 14th 1915.  NEWS HAS JUST BEEN RECEIVED from the War Office by ex-Sergeant Wilkinson, R.I.C., that his younger son, Bernard Joseph has been killed in action in France on the 22nd of July when serving with his regiment the 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  Deceased was only 20 years of age, and had only been at the front a few months.  He was one of three sons serving with the colours.  One of them fought under General Botha in German South West Africa.  We deeply sympathise with his parents in their sad bereavement.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  SMITH EXECUTED.  MURDERER PROTESTS HIS INNOCENCE TO THE LAST.  George Joseph Smith, the murderer in the Brides in the Baths case, paid the penalty of his crime with his life on Friday morning.  Up to the very last he protested his innocence.  He wrote several letters from Pentonville and Maidstone Prisons, and, robbed of their very extensive verbiage, his cry off “I am an innocent man his repeated through every epistle.” His last letter was written to Miss Pegler, “the woman to whom he always returned.”  He left his property to her.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  ESCAPED GERMAN PRISONERS CAUGHT STAYING IN A HOTEL IN CAVAN.  Two German officers who made their escape from the Oldcastle Internment Camp on Wednesday night were arrested at Cavan on Friday.  They engaged rooms in the Farnham Hotel, where they stopped for the night.  One of the officers, Carol Morlang, who was disguises a clergyman, was arrested by Constable Goldrick in the hotel, the other, Alfans Griem, being detained on the Railway Road while on his way, presumably to the station.  Immediately after their escape being discovered their description was circulated all over the countryside, and the police and military authorities were on the lookout for anyone answering their description. It is stated that they affected their escape about 12.00 on Wednesday night through the wire around the camp, and having previously obtained the clothing which they wore as a disguise, threw their own attire away on escaping.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  OBSTRUCTING RECRUITING.  A CASE AT MANORHAMILTON.  At a special court of petty sessions James Kerrigan of Drummonds was brought up in custody charged that he obstructed, molested and hindered Captain John O’Donnell, D. L., His Majesties recruiting officer, in the discharge of his duty.  Constable John Rogers deposed that the accused was present at a recruiting meeting, and endeavoured to interrupt Captain O’Donnell.  Accused said – “We have nothing to thank England for, remember O’Donovan Rossa, you are an idiot, a blithering idiot.”  Accused on cross examination said that he did not use the words charged against him.  Captain O’Donnell deposed that when he was speaking there were shouts of “shut up you idiot.”  Witness denied he was an idiot, and said if he was, God help the rest of them.  He found the crowd very hostile.  As a matter of fact he did not get a single recruit until 8.30 that evening.  The court imposed a fine of one guinea and two shillings and six pence costs or in default of payment five weeks in prison with hard labour.  The accused intimated his intention of appealing, but subsequently paid the fine.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  BELLEEK DISTRICT COUNCIL.  A meeting of the above council held on Saturday, at which the chairman, Mr. P. Scott, J. P. presided.  The Council decided, after some discussion, the rent of the labourers’ cottages under the new scheme in the Belleek rural district, at the sum of six shillings a month.  Applications for cottages being considered, which was the principal business, the meeting concluded.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  SMITH’S WIDOW WEDS.  ECHO OF BRIDES IN BATH CASE.  The marriage took place on Saturday afternoon of Caroline Beatrice Love, nee Thornhill, a native of Leicester and of Thomas John Davies, of New Westminster, British Columbia, who came from Canada to enlist in the Army, and is a sapper in the Royal Engineers.  The bride was the widow of George Smith who is executed on Friday and the special licence for the marriage was actually taken out on that day.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  THE ROYAL EDWARD.  According to information at present available the transport sunk by an enemy submarine in the Aegean Sea last Saturday morning had on board 32 military officers and 1350 troops in addition to the ship’s crew of 220 officers and men.  The troops consisted mainly of reinforcements for the 29th Division and details of the Royal Army Medical Corps.  It is known that about 600 have been saved.  The 29th Division contains at least three Irish regiments – 1st Royal Dublin Fusiliers, 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers, and 1st Munster Fusiliers.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  THE LOSS OF THE ROYAL EDWARD.  It is with very special sorrow we learn of the sinking of the British transport in the Aegean Sea, and the loss of presumably of 1,000 lives.  It is the first disaster in the magnificent transport service of which we have all been so proud since the start of the war.  The loss of so many fine fellows is most deplorable.  In the finest health, after a long spell of training and discipline, and eager to try themselves against the enemy and strike a blow for their country it is distressingly painful to think of them sinking hopelessly and helplessly in the deep waters just as their anticipation of landing and usefulness were on the point of culmination.  Very many of them were loyal Irishmen.  We do not get know yet what homes near to us here may be plunged into sorrow and mourning, but too many families, no matter where located must suffer irreparable grief from the grim tragedy.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  THE WONDERS OF THE TELEGRAPH SYSTEM.  No doubt it is a war at time of war.  Many of our public arrangements are out of gear.  The needs of the country must have priority over private ones.  But why should these affect us locally so that a telegram requires three hours to travel a distance of four miles from Ballyshannon Post Office to Rossnowlagh.  The fault lies in the thorough backwardness and crass stupidity of the telegraphic authorities.  The message in question, will it be credited, instead of being dispatched directly over the four mile wire that connects Ballyshannon and Rossnowlagh had to be sent away to Derry where it was reconveyed back to Donegal, we understand, and thence to Rossnowlagh.  Any private firm adopting a similar way of carrying on its business would find itself very shortly in the bankruptcy court, if not in a lunatic asylum.  Every divergence from medieval methods, every alteration towards up-to-date ness must have its origin in pressure from outside.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  MILITARY NOTES.  The recreation room opened in the Minor Hall of the Townhall on Wednesday week has proved a very popular resort for the men of the Battalion.  Evening after evening men have taken advantage of the facilities offered to them there for writing, reading, games and social intercourse.  The fact that tea and refreshments may be obtained at almost a nominal price no doubt has added immensely to the attractiveness of the rendezvous.  A large number of local ladies have very willingly given their services each evening and the place is conducted on the most economical lines possible.  A good supply of magazines and papers has been given to the room by people in both town and country.  There is a piano, too, and on this instrument many of the soldiers have shown themselves to be capable musicians and songs and choruses help to pass the time very pleasantly.

A telegram has been received from the War Office intimating that Captain John Cecil Parke, of Clones, 6th Leicester Regiment, the well-known international footballer, was wounded at the Dardanelles on the 10th Inst.  Captain Parke is the well-known Irish rugby football and lawn tennis International.  He represented Ireland in the three-quarter line in all her internationals for many seasons, frequently captaining the fifteen.  As a tennis player he was perhaps the most brilliant player in the three Kingdoms.  He was a member of the British team that won the few who of the Davies Cup in Australia, and subsequently captained the British team, that went to America.  He is a brother of Mr. W. A. Parke, solicitor, Clones.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  WHY WE GAINED AT HOOGE.  FOR THE FIRST TIME THE GERMANS MET THEIR MATCH IN ARTILLERY.  The Daily Mail special correspondent with the British Army in the field, Mr. G.  A Valentine Williams states that our men were successful east of Ypres last week because “for the first time the Germans met their match in artillery.  Our guns had the ammunition required.” “Our artillery was magnificent.  As our men saw our shells crashing in a never ending roar into the German positions and wreathing all the German lines in the mist and smoke they were related to think that at length the Germans were getting what our fellows have so often had to endure.  We all realized that this time at any rate, our guns had the ammunition required to deal with the immense battery which is what the German army really is.  Our advance resulted in the capture of 1,200 yards of trenches and 164 prisoners, including three officers, two machine guns, and a trench mortar as well as a large stock of German ammunition, notably bombs.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  DONEGAL LABOURERS’ FLEEING SCOTLAND.  There was a falling off in the number of Nationalist labourers’ arriving at Londonderry from Scotland on Saturday to escape registration.  Between200 and 300 came.  On Saturday there were almost 600 arrivals by boat and 200 by a train.  Practically all are Donegal men.  They were objects of derision, and soldiers could be seen ironically saluting them.  Half a dozen of Sunday’s arrivals were breakfasting in a lodging house, when the proprietor presented an alien registration form, and the party took fright and left the house without finishing the breakfast.

In Mayo two trains with very nearly 200 able bodied men arrived in the island of Achill from England and Scotland and were fine strong men all heading out to the west from England.  They admit they have left good jobs with good pay and that there is no work for them at home.  The hay is saved and the potatoes would not be fit to dig for a long time yet.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  AMERICANS AEROPLANES FOR FRANCE.  A PROPOSED GIFT OF 1000 MACHINES.  One thousand American aeroplanes, purchased with American money and officered by American aviators, are to be offered by an American organisation to France for the use of the French Army in the present war, according to a cable dispatch from the Paris correspondent of the New York World.  Circulars are to be issued to the graduates of Yale, Harvard, and Princeton, inviting them on patriotic grounds to aid in the defence of their country.  They will be asked to join the French Aviation Corps for the duration of the war, after which their military experience we’ll qualify them to become reserve aviators in the United States.  They will be formed into a special corps in France, under their own officers, and will receive an additional £10 a month over and above the regular French flying man’s pay.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915. THE GERMAN’S NEW AIRCRAFT.  The Germans super warplane or battle aeroplane has been designed to carry out the same tactics which the cruisers of the notorious Emden type were built to pursue on the ocean.  These aerial craft are essentially raiders, and they be launched against towns, villages, cities, strategic military centres, artillery fortresses or other defences.  Their outstanding features are an extensive carrying capacity of both men and ammunition in the form of bombs, while they are also powerfully armed with machine guns. The Germans have solved one or two perplexing problems in connection with the arming of aeroplanes in their new aerial machine gun. A new system allows the gun to be moved through the requisite firing arches and the gun can be swung from side to side and brought into the firing position with a minimum of effort and so the fire may be directed from either broadside as desired.  The new warplane is able to carry a larger crew in order to protect the aeroplane.  This is achieved by means of what has already become known as the aerial sniper.  Like his colleagues working in the trenches he is a crack quick shot and adept with the automatic arm.  His specific duty is to pick off the marksmen in any enemy machines.  These aerial snipers are selected men who have passed through a special course of aeronautical training.  When not engaged in sniping duties the rifleman is free to pursue bomb throwing activities.  Owing to the comparatively slow speed at which these large battle aeroplanes can travel the task of bomb throwing is appreciably facilitated, and great accuracy of aim is assured.  The steady platform which the aeroplane offers enables the machine gun fire to be concentrated far more effectively than is the case with the average aeroplane.  Steadiness and low velocity in flight are a decided assistance to the sniper because he is an able to take his aim with greater deliberation.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  BELLEEK.  A man named James William Elliott, belonging to the town land of Killymore, was admitted on Wednesday to the workhouse infirmary, Ballyshannon, suffering from concussion of the brain and other injuries, the result of accidentally falling off a horse near Belleek.

When two men were working in a bog in the townland of Corry, near Belleek, they discovered a firkin of butter, weighing about 56 lbs, buried to a depth of 8 feet, and in a good state of preservation.  It is supposed to have been deposited in the bog for a considerable time.

Impartial Reporter.  August 19th 1915.  DISPUTE ABOUT A PRIEST’S BURIAL.  The remains of the Rev. J.  O’Toole, P.  P., which were interned in the church grounds of Kilmeena, West Mayo, were taken up and reinterred during the night, it is presumed by some parishioners in a grave dug within the church itself.  The ecclesiastical authorities having given direction as to the place of burial within a few feet of the church, which is a small one, a deputation to the Most Rev. Dr. Higgins auxiliary Bishop of Tuam, requested that the dead priests should be buried in a spot which the deceased had indicated within the sacred edifice. Dr. Higgins said he could not depart from the directions of the Archbishop. Accordingly after Office and High Mass the internment took place outside the church. Although there were murmurs of dissatisfaction the people separated quietly. It is said about 35 men took part in the retransfer but none of the relatives of the deceased participated in it.

Impartial Reporter.  August 19th 1915.  A SERIOUS FRACAS IN ENNISKILLEN BARRACKS AND TWO MEN IN HOSPITAL.  On Tuesday night last a serious affray took place in the main barracks Enniskillen. A detachment numbering about 50 men arrived from the Dublin fusiliers and this party since they arrived do not seem to have been particularly happy in their new surroundings. It is a well-known fact that the north cannot get on very well with the south and vice versa and the Dublin men since their arrival in the north have shown their antipathy to the transfer. It seems that the party of Dublin men had some trouble among themselves and eventually a section barricaded a room against all comers.  The men on duty battered at the door and eventually succeeded in breaking an open.  So fierce was the opposition that the fire hose had to be turned upon the recalcitrant who seeing the position was hopeless surrendered.  Some 20 panes of glass were broken and two men had to be removed to hospital suffering from bayonet wounds and two others had minor wounds, principally cuts.  Seven men were arrested and put in the guardroom to await a court martial.  After their arrest the Dublin men cursed the Inniskillings and acted in rowdy manner while  being conveyed to the cells.

Impartial Reporter.  August 19th 1915.  CAN ENNISKILLEN HELP?  While Enniskillen has already nobly responded to the call for recruits and has given over 600 of its inhabitants to the fighting forces might it not also be the site for a proposed munitions factory.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  MORE GERMAN MURDERS.  The White Star liner Arabic outward bound for New York from Liverpool was torpedoed and sunk off the Cork Coast on Thursday morning.  The pirates gave no warning of the outrage and the vessel disappeared in 11 minutes, her side being torn out.  There were about to 426 persons aboard and of these 50 are missing, including six passengers and 44 of the crew.  This latest submarine outrage took place close to the scene of that which resulted in the sinking of the Lusitania with its awful death toll.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  PERSONAL.  The death of Captain James C.  Johnston, adjutant of the 6th Royal Irish Fusiliers was announced on Saturday and received with all the more regret as the last male in the direct line of the Johnston family of Magheramena Castle.  Captain Johnston was High Sheriff for the county in 1910 and during the last three years of the Aberdeen regime in the Irish Viceroyalty was Private Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant.  He was a fine soldier, and had served through the Boer campaign with the 14th Hussars.  The late Captain Johnston who was educated at Charterhouse and Sandhurst was a Resident Magistrate for County Meath. The deceased was a cousin to Major Johnston, Recruiting Officer, Enniskillen.

Rev. W. H. Massy recently Methodist Minister in Enniskillen, while riding a motor cycle was severely injured in a collision with a large motor car driven by a Belfast lad, and has been conveyed to the Cottage Hospital, Coleraine.

Second lieutenant Reg.  S.  Trimble, 6th Royal Irish Fusiliers, wounded and suffering from shock at the Dardanelles has been removed to the Military Hospital, the Citadel, Cairo.  Second lieutenant L.  Falls is in the same hospital suffering from wounds in the leg.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  SINN FEINERS IN TYRONE.  PRIEST ON THE PLATFORM.  On Sunday afternoon a mobilisation of several companies of the Irish Volunteers (the Sinn Fein section) took place at Carrickmore, County Tyrone when some 200 members, about 1/3 of who carried rifles, paraded under the command of Mr. McCrory, Clogher, the county instructor. A crowd of about 700-800 also assembled.  A police note taker was present, and a considerable force of constabulary drawn from a number of stations in the county was in attendance under the command of District Inspector Barrington, Dungannon and Head Constable Fallon.  At a public meeting, Rev. C Shortt, CC, Carrickmore presided.  The chairman said Mr. Redmond had slippery English politicians to deal with who would try to make them swallow the exclusion of Ulster but if he had control of the Volunteers he could say, I can’t oblige you for I have obstinate fellows behind me who are driving me on.  (Cheers.)

Fermanagh Herald August 21st 1915.  A telegram has been received from the War Office intimating that captain John Cecil Parke, of Clones, 6th Leinster Regiment, the well-known International footballer, was wounded at the Dardanelles on the 10th Inst..  Captain Parke is the well-known Irish rugby football and lawn tennis International.  He represented Ireland in the three-quarter line in all her Internationals for many seasons, frequently captaining the 15.  As a tennis player, he was perhaps the most brilliant player in the Three Kingdoms.  He was a member of the British team that won the Davis Cup in Australia, and subsequently captained the British team that went to America.

The relatives of Private Alex Armstrong, of Maguiresbridge, have learned from the War Office that he died of wounds in France.  He belonged to the 2nd Inniskillings.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  IN MEMORY OF GALLANT INNISKILLING S.  DROWNED AT PORT ELIZABETH 60 YEARS AGO.  We are indebted to Mr. Arthur Rice, brother of our townsman, Mr. Edward Rice, for the following very interesting account of the unveiling of a memorial tablet recalling a pathetically tragic event in the career of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers so far back as three score years ago.  On the 11th of July in St. Mary’s Church, Port Elizabeth, the tablet erected by the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in memory of the members of the regiment who were lost in the wreck of the troopship, Charlotte, in 1854, was unveiled.  The prayer of dedication was recited by the Venerable Archdeacon Wirgman, after which the tablet was uncovered by Mrs. Dowsett, as the oldest parishioner of Saint Mary’s who remembers the wreck.  The tablet is erected close to the door and its inscription is as follows: In memory of 62 rank and file, 11 women and 26 children of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers who perished in the wreck of the Troopship Charlotte on the rocks at the end of Jesse Street, on September 20th, 1854.  This Tablet was placed here by the regiment, A.D. 1914.  R. I. P.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  CATTLE DRIVING IN IRELAND.  Violent outbreaks of cattle driving have taken place in various northern parts of King’s County the occasion being the annual grass lettings.  The drivers wanted the lands let to them, which the owners refused.  200 extra police have been drafted into the affected districts.  58 of the drivers were yesterday returned for trial to the county assizes.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  THE VALUE OF HORSES.  Owing to the stoppage of buying horses for the army, prices have fallen of greatly during the past month.  In many fairs recently, though the show of animals of all kinds on offer was considerable, very few business transactions took place.  Owners holding out for the high rates of three months ago when army purchasers were active failed to realise that the demand has slackened off.  Buyers in the trade are as anxious as ever to take horses at the normal prices.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  THE EVIL OF SEPARATION ALLOWANCE.  Alice Harren, Head street, had three summonses, one for disorderly conduct and two for simple drunkenness, Acting–Sergeant McGowan and Constable Cryan were complainants.  Defendant said two of her sons had been killed and another son had come home wounded last week.  The R.M.  Are you in receipt of separation allowance?  Defendant – Yes18 shillings and four pence a week.  My two sons have been killed.  The R.M. – Is that the manner in which you pay respect to their memory by getting drunk.  A months imprisonment in the first case was ordered, and a fine of 40 shillings and costs in each of the other cases, the  Chairman remarking that defendant had been repeatedly warned.  Mary Love, Enniskillen was fined 20 shillings for drunkenness.  She was also in receipt of separation allowance and she was warned that if she came back there a recommendation would be made by the Bench to have the separation allowance stopped.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  ANOTHER ATLANTIC LINER TORPEDOED.  THE WHITE STAR “ARABIC” SUNK WITH NO WARNING GIVEN.  The White Star Liner Arabic fell a victim to a German submarine on Thursday morning of the Fastnet.  She was torpedoed without warning, and foundered in 10 minutes.  The liner was on her way from Liverpool to New York, with a crew of 243 and 180 passengers.  Eleven of the ship’s boats were launched, and the occupants were picked up by another vessel.  Three hundred and ninety one persons are known to have been saved, leaving only 32 to be accounted for.  The Arabic is the first White Star Liner to have been sunk by a submarine.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  ROLL OF HONOUR.  A FERMANAGH OFFICER KILLED.  CAPTAIN J. C. JOHNSTON, MAGHERAMENA.  A telegram has been received from the War Office to say that Captain J. C. Johnston, adjutant of the6th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, has been killed in action in the he Dardanelles.  Captain Johnston served through their Boer War with the 14thHussars, and was Private Secretary to the Earl of Aberdeen during the last three years of his Viceroyalty.  He was educated at Charterhouse and Sandhurst, and was recently appointed Resident Magistrates for the County of Meath.  His family residence was Magheramena Castle, County Fermanagh, of which county he was High Sheriff in the year 1910.

Second–Lieutenant R. S. Trimble, 6th Irish Fusiliers, wounded at the Dardanelles, is a son of Mr. W. C. Trimble, Enniskillen.  He was engaged with Messrs. Guinness, and was a member of the Wanderers Football Club.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  THE HIDDEN DEATH.  HOW I SANK THE MAJESTIC AND TRIUMPH.  The New York Globe publishes the following description of the sinking of the British warships Triumph and Majestic off the Dardanelles given to its correspondent by Captain Otto Herzing, the commander of the German submarine, whom the correspondent describes as “a maker of world history.”

“In the early morning light we saw the Triumph and Majestic lying off the coast constantly encircled by destroyers.  Through the periscope I saw a destroyer coming directly for us.  We dived and the destroyer passed immediately over us with a sound like that of a motor car.  We came up immediately.  I took aim through the periscope at the Triumph, pressed the button automatically firing the torpedo, and the projectiles slipped noiselessly into the water.  We dived again.  The explosion which followed was as terrific as though it had been in the forepart of the submarine itself.

Then we lay hidden for two days and a half after which we came up again in the midst of the British ships.  Just before noon looking through the periscope, I saw the Majestic surrounded by 10 ships steaming around her in a constant circle for her protection.  I could see the Majestic Sailors on the deck taking their noonday nap.  Shall I disturb them?  I thought.  Then seeing a welcome space between the circling ships I pressed the electric button and the torpedo was going.  It caught the Majestic a little to the rear of amidships.  We dived again in silence.  It is remarkably quiet in a submarine when underwater, and we hear sounds, being able to distinguish various propellers by the different rumblings.  We noticed that the bombardment from the ships had ceased, for they had been shelling the Turkish land positions.  We remain submerged for several hours and then came to the surface to find that the British had disappeared, and all search for them was in vain.  We came to Constantinople, arriving yesterday morning having spent 42 days in the submarine without rest or let up. Captain Herzing’s record, declares the Globe correspondent is unique.  Aside from firing the first torpedo sinking a ship and sinking two more warships in the Dardanelles, he sank five English and French freighter ships which were in Havre last November.  The torpedo tube from which was fired the torpedo which sank the Pathfinder has been engraved with that name. Now the name Triumph has been added, while the name Majestic is engraved on the second tube.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.

THE HARVEST MEN OF DONEGAL.

The war has brought its humours; it has brought its horrors too,

Its horrors which have held the world in thrall;

But there is nothing more distressing to the Irishman who’s true,

Than the Harvestmen’s return to Donegal.

They were only asked to Register upon a certain date,

Their age and occupation – that was all;

Perhaps they might consent to earn good wages from the State,

These sturdy Harvestmen of Donegal.

Sure, the form wasn’t binding; it was well within their choice –

They were told – to still ignore the trumpets call;

But they were perverse to reason, they listened to no voice –

But the impulse to return to Donegal.

From Scotland’s fertile Lothians, from Ayrshire’s grainlands bright,

From Lancashire to Southern Cornwall;

They cleared off like silent Arabs, some in the dead of night,

Back to their little homes in Donegal.

Reviled and jeered and scorned by all who saw their flight,

At Greenock little kiddies tried to maul

These gallant Irish “Exiles” rushing on with all their might

To catch the boat en route for Donegal.

Their homes they reached in safely, though they gained ignoble fame;

Meanwhile they are free from any prying Paul,

For liberty’s a jewel oft known by another name

From the Police point of view – in Donegal.

The Huns may strangled Belgium, they made devastate fair France,

Our great empire may either stand or fall;

Such wrongs inspire no Harvestmen to take up gun or lance,

He’ll squat behind the hills of Donegal.

At Demonstrations he’ll be out arrayed in war paint green,

For freedoms glorious cause he’ll loudly bawl;

But Britain in the future should ignore his petty spleen,

For serfdom’s good enough for Donegal.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  LISNASKEA CHILD’S DEATH.  The inquest was resumed by Mr. James Mulligan, J.P., coroner, on Monday night touching the death of the nine days old male child of Martha Burnes, a domestic servant.  The child, it seems, was left by the mother with a Mrs. Donaghy, at Derryadd, and on Mrs. Donaghy, junior, putting it into the cradle she found it was dead.  Medical evidence of the post-mortem examination showed that the body was emaciated and 2lb lighter than the average baby.  There was an extravasation of blood on the outside of the skull and a corresponding effusion on the brain, probably the result of a fall or a blow.  The viscera and other organs were forwarded to Mr. Patten, public analyst, Belfast, and he reported that he found no poisonous substance.  The Coroner commented on the action of the Lisnaskea Workhouse officials in refusing admission to the mother and child five days before its death.  The foreman Mr. McMahon said that if the mother and child had been admitted to the workhouse the child might have been alive yet.  The jury found that the deceased died from the effect of a blow or a fall on the skull, but how or by whom this was inflicted they had no evidence.  Private P.  McCormick, who at the outbreak of the war was porter in Lisnaskea Workhouse, has been wounded in the foot at the Dardanelles and now lies in hospital in Cairo.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  DARDANELLES.  THE LANDING AT SUVLA BAY.  The landing at Suvla Bay was a complete and staggering surprise for the Turks who had been expecting a new attack on the Asiatic side.  Never in military operations have any enemy been so hoodwinked.  On the appointed night warships, transports, destroyers and trawlers arrived at Suvla Bay and disembarked the troops when the Turks were all waiting feverishly for an attack on the Asiatic side of the Dardanelles.  Every soldier carried three days’ rations as well as trenching tools.  As the men landed they advanced 6 miles inland.  Daylight came and still the work was proceeding with the greatest possible speed.  Artillery and supplies and vast quantities were put on shore and still no opposition was experienced.  The warships were silent and for 24 hours the operation was carried out without a single shot from big gun or rifle being fired. The Turks rushed forces to the spot and on the second night both sides dug themselves in, fought for position in groups with bayonets and even with entrenching tools.  It is estimated that 700,000 were brought up by the enemy.  In the morning light a terrific battle began.  Strong bodies of troops thrown against several points of the British lines were hurled back.  All day long the lines of the fighting men turned and twisted turned and twisted again but never broke.

(From Wikipedia) The landing at Suvla Bay was an amphibious landing made at Suvla on the Aegean coast of Gallipoli peninsula in the Ottoman Empire as part of the August Offensive, the final British attempt to break the deadlock of the Battle of Gallipoli. The landing, which commenced on the night of 6 August 1915, was intended to support a breakout from the Anzac sector, five miles (8 km) to the south. Despite facing light opposition, the landing at Suvla was mismanaged from the outset and quickly reached the same stalemate conditions that prevailed on the Anzac and Helles fronts. On 15 August, after a week of indecision and inactivity, the British commander at Suvla, Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Stopford was dismissed. His performance in command was one of the most incompetent feats of generalship of the First World War.

The Suvla landing was to be made by the newly formed British IX Corps, initially comprising two brigades of the 10th (Irish) Division and the entire 11th (Northern) Division. Command of IX Corps was given to Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Stopford. British military historian J.F.C. Fuller said of Stopford that he had “no conception of what generalship meant” and indeed he was appointed not on his experience (he had seen little combat and had never commanded men in battle) or his energy and enthusiasm (he was aged 61 and had retired in 1909) but because of his position on the list of seniority. Hamilton had requested either Lieutenant-General Julian Byng or Lieutenant-General Henry Rawlinson, both experienced Western Front corps commanders, but both were junior to Lieutenant-General Sir Bryan Mahon, commander of the 10th Division and so, by a process of elimination, Stopford was selected.