End of WW1. Impartial Reporter November 7th 1918.

End of WW1. Impartial Reporter November 7th 1918.

The Sinn Fein in Convention are as insane as their members individually. They have asked by resolution for the complete evacuation of Ireland of the British military forces, the release of all ‘Political’ prisoners, and the absolute independence of Ireland. Imagine any body of sane men being so idiotic as to gravely prefer such a request expecting it to be granted. How truly they have been termed ‘dreamers.’ How thoroughly impractical! If it could be possible that such a request could be granted we would have Bolshevism in Ireland, massacre and robbery. Men who cannot control themselves cannot control anyone else; and Ireland under them would be a veritable hell—far worse than Dublin under the bloody gang of Easter week. Happily, Ireland will never, under any circumstances, be under men who have turned the whole world against a disgraceful set of scheming fanatics.

DISPATCHES.BY AEROPLANES.
We mention as an historical fact, so that readers of the Impartial Reporter generations hence, when perusing its files, may want to know when mails went locally first by aeroplane, that military dispatches have been sent by military aeroplane to Enniskillen, and been received in the Enniskillen fairgreen by an orderly in a spot appointed
for the purpose. In Ballinamallard, at Mr. Archdale’s function for the Red Cross, on Thursday, two aeroplanes circled about and dropped recruiting literature.

THE INNISKILLINGS.
The Inniskillings have been again engaged in action and have suffered many casualties. We deeply regret the death of Colonel H. N. Young, D.S.O., a very brave soldier, in Italy. He recently received a bar to the D.S.O. His command of the 7th Inniskillings produced a model battalion, ‘the Fighting Seventh;’ and one of the smartest in the Army.

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.
The epidemic of influenza has prostrated people from town and country, and has caused a few deaths. On the whole it has been less fatal in this district than in others. Our Royal School was badly crippled, owing to the number of cases, but Major Bruce, Army Medical Corps, very kindly sent nine of his Army nurses to Portora, and the very sight of the men in uniform cheered the boys, as they ministered to them. A household of 112 people was not an easy one to grapple with. Yet School was kept going all the time for those who were free from the disease. All the other schools in the town had to be closed, as in other places, but the worst of the plague is now over. (My Granny died in it)

KESH.
A social meeting of the Kesh C.A.S. was recently, held. In the absence of the chairman, Mr. Phillips, Mr. Hall of Lack presided, and Shareholders, with members of their families, were strongly represented. Messrs. Lowry and M‘Gee of I.A.O.S. gave addresses on co-operation, and urged the members to subscribe more capital to meet the developments and increasing trade of the society, Two hundred pounds .have already been deposited in the society; and as a result of the meeting £300 more have been promised. It was decided to canvass the district. The co-operators who sympathised with this society in its struggles will be gratified to hear the loss of £800 caused by the fire has now been reduced to £400, and the management feels that if the members supply them with sufficient capital to save all discounts and buy in larger quantities that this latter sum can be very soon wiped out.

Owing to pressure on our space we are unable to publish an article received from. Mr. H. E. Watkin, Enniskillen, on “The Art of Dancing Well.” Mr. Watkin deals at considerable length with the “Waltz. He says that “during the present year attempts were made to introduce Rag Time in Enniskillen, but the good sense of the public gave it an inglorious quietus.’’

A severe wind and rain storm passed over Enniskillen and district on Thursday night, when some damage was done to house property. A portion of the roof on premises at the rere of Messrs. Plunkett’s establishment in High Street was blown off.

The news of the conclusion of the war was announced in Enniskillen by the
ringing of joybells, the booming of guns and the blowing of factory horns. Flags were displayed from a number of houses, and the Union Jack and Irish and American flags were flown from the Townhall.

Capt. Rev. Father J. Nolan, son of Mr. J. Nolan, Aghabog, Co. Monaghan, has arrived home from Germany. He was an army chaplain for two years, and last May was reported missing. Subsequently his relatives were informed he was taken prisoner. Father Nolan was formerly a curate at Arney, parish of Cleenish, and later Dromore, Co. Tyrone.

‘Mr. H. Walker, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, said it had been suggested that the Court should be adjourned in view of the very joyful tidings received that morning but as there were only two small cases they had decided to dispose of them. A man charged with drunkenness was allowed off “owing to the day being one of rejoicing.”

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1916

Fermanagh Herald February 5th 1916.  THRESHING IN COUNTY LEITRIM.  During the week Messrs. W. E. Pye and William Johnston, Kinlough, attended at Messrs.  T. J. Rooney’s, Foxfield, E Thompson, Cherrybrook, with a steam thresher, for the purpose of giving demonstrations on the threshing of oats etc..  The thresher is one of powerful capabilities, having thrashed, cleaned and gathered 120 stone of oats per hour.  The ease and comfort with which work can now be done by the use of up-to-date machinery should be a great encouragement to the farmers of the county to increase the cultivation of crops during the coming season.

Fermanagh Herald February 5th 1916.  WOULD NOT LEAVE THE WORKHOUSE.  An interesting discussion arose over an inmate from Killybuggy.  It would appear that this woman was in the habit of living with her married daughter and was in receipt of the old age pension.  She went away from her daughter’s house and sought refuge in the Manorhamilton Union.  Her daughter appeared before their Guardians asking that our mother be requested to leave the workhouse and go back to live with her as heretofore.  The Guardians could not persuade the woman to leave the house so they allowed her to stay for the present.

February 10th 1916.  THE FAITHFUL HORSE.  A remarkable story of a horse’s faithfulness is related in the monthly magazine of the Claremont Mission Pentonville N.,  by one of the Coldstream Guards Regiment.  After the fierce fighting at Loos he writes it was noticed that there was a horse standing between the firing lines.  For two days he remained there.  Then some of our men crawled out and found that he was standing by the dead body of his rider and would not leave the spot.  Later on some of our men bravely arranged to get out to the horse again, blindfolded him and brought them back to our lines.  By no other means could the faithful beast be persuaded to leave its dead master.  F.T.

February 10th 1916.  NOTES.  Certain areas in the United Kingdom have now been forbidden to aliens.  In Ireland these included the counties of Dublin, Cork and Kerry.

The Compulsory Service Order of England comes into force today.  Unmarried men from 19 years to 30 are being called up, the last of them to report by March 3.

An old Crimean veteran named Matthew Johnston, has died as a pay patient in Enniskillen Workhouse hospital on Tuesday.  He had served under the late Col. Johnston of Snowhill and told how he used to carry biscuits from Balaclava to Sebastopol sometimes in his bare feet in the snow.  He received a special service pension about 15 years ago.  He will be buried today. I.R.

February 10th 1916.  SERGEANT J.  FYFFE 18TH ROYAL IRISH, rushed home from his regiment in France to see his father in Eden Street, Enniskillen, but before he could reach home his father had passed away.  Sergeant Fyffe is a smart young soldier and instructor of athletics in his battalion.  He met James and Willie Quinn of the Diamond, Enniskillen of the 5th Royal Irish Rifles near his own battalion in France and says that the Ulster division with the local battalion lay not far off from where his own battalion was located.  The Ulster division and other Divisions are on the best of terms.  All are comrades out there, no matter from the south or north and all are much superior in physique and in condition to the German soldiers.  The German soldiers would desert in numbers but that their own officers tell them that they would be shot at once if taken by the British.  One of the prisoners taken by the 18th on Christmas night was so frightened and he begged his captors to leave him his German head: he was led to believe that his head would be cut off.  The well-known action at the Brickfields reduced the 18th from 1,100 to about 43 men, they were so decimated.  The Germans, Sergeant Fyffe says, no longer advance in solid masses as they used to do, but in open formation.  They had suffered so much by the former that they were taught a lesson. I.R.

February 10th 1916.  THE 12TH INNISKILLINGS.  A draft of the 12th Inniskillings stationed at Enniskillen, has gone to the front and received a hearty send off, the whole of the battalion lining up and heartily cheering their departing comrades.  The officers of the battalion bade the men farewell at the Railway Station.  With the drafts leaving were the following officers – Second Lieutenants Allen, McKinley, Baker, Shannon and Reid.  The fine corps of drums played the men off to the tunes of “The girl I left behind me”, and to “Keep the home fires burning”, while at intervals “Auld Lang Syne” was played.  Among the men of the draft are some old soldiers who saw service in South Africa.  The order for departure was received only one hour before train time and so the townspeople had not an opportunity of knowing of the departure of the men, and of giving them a fitting send off. I.R.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  OBITER DICTA.  THE CONVENT BELL.  There is apparently no limit to the appalling pomposity of a certain set of Protestants, who are unfortunately in Enniskillen.  But happily their influence is nil.  Nevertheless that little bird  known as rumour has just hopped on my table and told me a surprising story concerning the Convent bell.  The hint is quite sufficient for this sect.  I write the above just to let them know that I am fully conversant with all of the leading facts, and I’m seriously thinking of pulling back the veil in a short time and exposing the bigoted scheme.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  DROMORE BISHOPRIC.  APPOINTMENT OF THE VERY REV. EDWARD CANON MULHERN, D. D., P.  P., INISHMACSAINT.  A Reuter’s cable from Rome of Monday’s date intimates that, on the recommendation of the Consistorial Congregation, his Holiness the Pope has appointed the very Rev. Edward Canon Mulhern of Inishmacsaint to be Lord Bishop of Dromore in succession to the late most Rev. Dr. O’Neill.  The new Bishop-elect is a native of Ederney, County Fermanagh and received his early education at St. Macartan’s seminary Monaghan where he ranked among the most successful students of his time.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  IT WILL BE LEARNED WITH REGRET that Private S.  H.  Young, of the 8th Highland Light Infantry, and brother of Mr. D.  Young, Omagh, was killed by shrapnel in France on the 21st of January.  Private Young was a native of Belleek, County Fermanagh and was employed for some time in Messrs.  White Bros.’ hardware establishment in Omagh.  After the outbreak of the war he joined the colours and went on active service about October last.  The news of his death was conveyed in a letter from the chaplain of the regiment, who states that he was buried with his Scottish comrades.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  CAPTAIN D’ARCY IRVINE KILLED.  Captain Charles William D’Arcy Irvine 6th Service Battalion, Leinster Regiment, who is reported in Monday’s casualty list to have been killed in action at the Dardanelles, was reported wounded and missing, believed killed, in September last.  He was the eldest son of Major Charles Cockburn D’Arcy Irvine, J.P. of Castle Irvine, Irvinestown, and of Fannie Kathleen, daughter of the late Lt. Colonel Jesse Lloyd, of Ballyleck, County Monaghan.  He was a grandson of the late Captain W. D’Arcy Irvine, D. L. of the 67th Regiment now the 2nd Battalion Hampshire Regiment, and his great grandfather, the late Mr. W. D’Arcy Irvine of Castle Irvine served at Waterloo with the 1st Dragoon Guards.  Captain C. W. D’Arcy Irvine who was 31 years of age, served for a time in the 3rd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles.  He afterwards transferred to the Leinster Regiment, and accompanied the 6th Battalion to the Dardanelles last year, taking part in the Suvla Bay operations.  His services were mentioned in dispatches by General Sir Ian Hamilton.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  AGAINST FEMALE LABOUR AT PIT HEAD.  The Executive, Committee of the Northumberland Miners have resolved to oppose the introduction of female labour at the pit head, and recommended instead a rearrangement of male labour.  Their contention is there are many strong men at the bank who might be better employed underground, and many discarded old men who could be re-employed.  There are no pit head woman workers in Northumberland.

More 1916 Gazing Into Eternity.

MunitionsFermanagh Herald January 1st 1916. The wages earned on munitions by many women and girls without any previous knowledge or experience are surprisingly large, says the Daily News.  It would be very interesting to know what is the biggest average weekly earnings of a female “hand” who can be legitimately classed as an amateur.  The managing director of a munitions factory told the writer recently that he had several girls who, without any training before they came to him, were each receiving nearly £4 a week after a month at his works.  “They beat heaps of men hollow,” he added “naturally there are men who don’t like it.  But that’s their lookout.  The labourer is worthy of his or her higher in war time or in peace.”

January 6th 1916.  HOW OUR MEN SAVED THE DAY.  THE RETREAT FROM SERBIA.  THE ROYAL INNISKILLINGS.  In a vivid and thrilling story of the heroism of the Irish troops in the retreat from Serbia, ‘F’ in the Weekly dispatch says:-  Nothing finer can be imagined than the heroic stand of the depleted 10th division who rallied under the attacks of overwhelming forces to the cry of – ‘Stick it, jolly boys; give ‘em hell, Connaughts.’  A few thousand Irishman and a few hundred Englishmen turned what might have been a disaster into a successful retreat just as surely as the artillery of the Second Corps at daybreak on August 26, 1914, ‘the most critical date of all,’ turned what might have been an annihilating attack into a successful retirement.  In the first trenches were the Connaughts, the Munsters, the Dublin Fusiliers, the Hampshires and the Inniskillings, the latter – to a large extent Ulsterman – holding the extreme right wing.  Dawn had scarcely broken when the enemy made his expected attack.  The conditions wholly favoured him for a fairly dense fog prevailed and under its cover the Bulgars were able to get within 300 yards of parts of our line without being observed. I.R.

The Inniskillings were the first to be attacked; about 5.00 a.m. their outposts were driven in, and then a great mass of the enemy swooped down on the trenches, but were driven back by the fire of our Maxim guns and by the steady magazine fire which came from the trenches.  Scarcely had the attack on the extreme right of the line had time to develop the main body of Bulgarians were seen running down a defile leading to the centre of our front.  As they reached the end of the defile and the spread out as from a bottleneck and with wild cheers flung themselves on our line.  But before they had got so far our guns smashed and battered the procession of men leaping out of the narrow gorge.  It was impossible to miss them.  British artillery have never had such a target since the first battle of Ypres, when the guns literally mowed down the half trained German soldiers who attacked on the Yser.

The brave Irish regiments were pouring led into them as fast as they could load their rifles.  The poured into the oncoming masses as much as 175 rounds at point blank range.  This will give an idea of the slaughter that went on this December morning as the dawn slowly beat the mist away.  Mingling with the roar of the artillery and the clatter-clatter of the machine guns and the sharp snap of the rifles were the hoarse cries of the half-maddened volunteers whose officers ever drove them on to the death that came quick and hot from the British trenches.  Men of splendid physique they were who faced the hail of lead, cheering in a sort of wild enthusiasm of battle with bugles and trumpets blowing defiant challenges, as in their knightly days of the tourney.  They did not know many of them whether they were attacking French, British or Turks, but unquestioning, unthinking he came on with the fearlessness of life deserving of a better cause, leaping into a trenches and falling dead with a bullet in their throat of bayonet wound in their breast, or with head blown off by one of our shells.

But it was, for all our grim resistance, a hopeless kind of struggle.  Sooner or later that unceasing stream of men issuing out of the narrow defile must sweep us back.  Always the enemy returned to the charge, undeterred by heavy losses, undismayed by our deadly gun and magazine fire.  The line held and to their cheers we gave back answer and to their cries we gave answer with our own cries and if sometimes the line faltered the shouts of officers and men: “Stick it, jolly boys, give them hell, Connaughts brought new life and new strength.  They outnumbered the 10th division in the proportion of at least 8 to 1 and they were obstinately bent on its destruction at whatever cost to themselves.  Their artillery far exceeded ours in weight of metal but in effectiveness there was not a comparison.  Almost all of our shells told when many of theirs did no more than splinter rocks yards away.  The division never lost its cohesion and it gave ground only at the rate of 2 miles a day, which is a proof, if any were needed, of the splendid rearguard action that this so much outnumbered force fought.

In the two days battle the 10th Division inflicted on the enemy at least four times their own number of casualties and what is possibly equally important they taught him the temper and moral of British infantry.  The 10th division saved the situation by a display of courage and dogged heroism that cannot be too highly praised. It is hard to explain how the 10th division encompassed as it was, won through, and perhaps the most satisfactory thing to do is to fall back on the explanation of the Connaught Ranger whose only grumble is that he was kept 12 hours fighting without food; “They beat us with numbers.  We couldn’t hope to hold up against the crowd they sent against us, a daft, clumsy gang of men.  We gave them hell but their numbers beat us.”

January 6th 1916.  THE DARDANELLES.  THE WITHDRAWAL.  THE TURKS OUTWITTED IN A BRILLIANT OPERATION.  The withdrawal in the Dardanelles was the most difficult and dangerous work that has yet been undertaken in this campaign.  It was completed in the small hours of the 28th Inst…  The entire reserve of ammunition and nearly all the stores were removed from the beaches under the eyes and guns of a powerful Turkish army which had never realized that the operation had begun until some hours after the last officers of the naval beach parties had shipped us to their packet boats and steamed away.  Lord Kitchener in November brought the fact home to most of us that the whole position here was under review by the highest authorities.  That the withdrawal could be done without a loss at all entered into no one’s calculation.

The problem was to withdraw divisions and  their gear occupying a front of roughly 20,000 yards in length, which was hardly anywhere more than 500 yards, and at some places not more than 50 yards from the enemies trenches, and embark them from beaches which were nowhere beyond field gun range of the enemy positions, and in places actually not more than 50 yards from the enemies trenches and embark them from beaches which were nowhere beyond field gun range of the enemy positions and in places actually within rifle range of them..  The Turks occupied higher ground and nearly all of the Suvla Bay area was visible to them.  The suffering of the men from cold, wet and exposure had been so severe that thousands had to be sent away to recover and frostbite became for a while as bad as it had been last year in Flanders.  The sufferings of the Turks were at least as bad. I.R.

Fermanagh Herald January 15th 1916.  THE TURKISH VERSION.  A Constantinople telegram of today states that during the night, as the result of a violent battle the British completely evacuated Sedd-El-Bahr, with great losses.  Not a single soldier remained behind.  The Gallipoli Peninsula is now clear of the enemy.  All Constantinople is bedecked with flags to celebrate this victory.  Everywhere demonstrations of joy are evident.  In the mosques and churches thanksgiving services are being held.  During the evening the city was illuminated.

Fermanagh Herald January 15th 1916.  THE OPERATIONS.  The Dardanelles operations began on February 19, 1915 when a general attack by the Allied squadrons was delivered.  The combined land and sea operation as did not begin until April, 25th, following the failure of the naval operations to force their Dardanelles.  The memorable landing of troops took place in the early morning when the Irish regiments suffered such terrible losses on what was known as “V” beach.

January 20th 1916.  ON A DEAD MAN’S LAP. AIRMAN’S EXPLOIT AT A HEIGHT OF 10,000 FEET.  This story is related in the Daily News in a letter just received from a young officer attached to the Royal Flying Corps now a prisoner in Germany.  Poor B! I was so sorry he was killed, he writes.  He was such a nice boy and only 19.  I had a fight with two German aeroplanes and then a shell burst very close to us and I heard a large piece whizzing past my head.  Then the aeroplane started to come down headfirst spinning all the time.  We must have dropped to about 5,000 feet in about 20 seconds.  I looked around at once and saw  poor B with a terrible wound in his head quite dead.  I then realized that the only chance of saving my life was to step over into his seat and sit on his lap where I could reach the controls.  I managed to get the machine out of that terrible death plunge, switched off the engine and made a good landing on terra firma.  We were 10,000 feet up when B was killed and luckily it was this tremendous height that gave me time to think and act.  I met one of the pilots of the German machines which attacked me.  He could speak English quite well and we shook hands after a most thrilling fight.  I brought down his aeroplane with my machine gun and he had to land close to where I landed.  There was a bullet through his radiator and petrol tank but neither he nor his observer was touched. Fermanagh Times.

January 27th 1916.  INNISKILLING PRISONERS INTERNED IN GERMANY RENDER THANKS FOR THE GIFTS.  Our donations towards the prisoners of war have been greatly increased by the generous donations of Irvinestown per Mrs. D’Arcy Irvine of Castle Irvine and we are sending it out to those for whom it is intended.  It is 48 lbs of sugar, 10 lbs of tea, 10 tins of Oxo, 12 packets of cocoa, 2 lbs of candles and 16 tins of sardines.  I understand that some tins of condensed milk are on their way also, for all of which we are deeply indebted to our loyal friends in Irvinestown. Impartial Reporter.

January 27th 1916.   OUTLOOK FOR FARMERS – ARE THEY MAKING BIG PROFITS?  Never since the war began has the industrial community in Ireland reached a graver crisis.  Foodstuffs are rising rapidly, Meal is almost at a prohibitive price, and unless the farmers bestir themselves ruin may affect many of them before the war be out.  We do not wish to be alarmist, but facts must be faced as they are found.  About last October the present crisis really began.  There was a serious shortage of shipping to Ireland, and the consequence was that freight rose, with the result that the condition of affairs has steadily being getting worse, and if it continue much longer business will be paralysed and the price of all articles of food be at famine rates.

Farmers, no doubt, have made large sums of money through the war.  Cattle have been sold at enhanced prices; milk and butter produced at almost the same cost as before the war, have maintained a steady advance of about 50 per cent; and pork reached the record figure of 82s per cwt in Enniskillen market on Tuesday and on yesterday at Irvinestown 83s per cwt.  Against all this, feeding stuffs, through the present shortage of shipping and not through traders inflated profits, as some allege have advanced enormously.  Meal, the staple fattening food for pigs and fowl, which a short time ago could have been purchased for 13s a cwt, is now at 28s.  This price has frightened small farmers, and many have disposed of their pigs and ceased keeping them as they feared a loss.  Prices are alarming, but more a

September 1915.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  MILITARY NOTES.  TWO V. C.s FOR INNISKILLINGS.  Last Wednesday night shortly before going to Press we received the following brief gratifying message: – Captain Gerald Robert O’Sullivan, 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers has been awarded the V.C. for conspicuous gallantry at Gallipoli.  Captain O’Sullivan joined the 1st Inniskillings on 7th of March, 1912.  This is the second Victoria Cross won by the Inniskilling Fusiliers, the other V. C. being awarded to Sergeant Somers, a native of Belturbet, particulars of which are published in another column of this paper.  The regiment has got several Distinguished Conduct Medals and other coveted decorations.  Further particulars regarding Captain O’Sullivan’s gallant feat for which HE has thus been honoured are not yet to hand.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  THE NATIONAL PERIL OF A COAL STRIKE.  10,000 MEN OUT IN SOUTH WALES.  More than 10,000 men have struck in the Abertillery district off Monmouthshire, and they are endeavouring to persuade other districts to follow their example.  Mr. Tom Richards, M. P., the Secretary of the miners’ federation, affirms that a strike is inevitable unless the decision of Mr. Runciman, the President of the Board of Trade, that certain classes of men are to be excluded from the “bonus turn” is reversed.  There was general satisfaction on Saturday when it became known that Mr. Lloyd George was again in conference with the miners’ leaders.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  THINGS PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW.  SOME PERTINENT QUESTIONS.  Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  Is poor Tempo ever going to get a doctor to take up his permanent residence there again?  And what is wrong with the district that no doctor will remain in it?

Are the people of Maguiresbridge once more happy and content since they have got their former medical officer again appointed to look after their health?

What is the price of hay likely to be in Fermanagh in another month’s time after so much was destroyed by the recent rains?

How can a number of people who object strongly to football matches and other games on Sundays at home can reconcile their attitude in this matter with their own habit of bathing, swimming and diving in the sea on Sundays at Bundoran during the summer?

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  ROLL OF HONOUR.  THE TOLL OF THE BRAVE.  LORD ERNE’S FAMILY.  ANOTHER TRAGIC LOSS.  Few families in the Northern peerage have suffered more through the war than that of which the Earl of Erne, of Crom Castle, County Fermanagh, is the head.  A further bereavement has fallen on the family through the death of Lieutenant-Colonel, Sir John Milbanke, Bart., V. C., commanding the  Notts Yeomanry, who has been killed in action at the Dardanelles.  Sir John, who succeeded to the baronetcy in 1899, was married in the following year to Amelia, daughter of the Hon.  Charles Frederick Crichton, eldest surviving brother of the late Earl of Erne. Lady Milbanke’s only brother, Major H. F. Crichton, of the Irish Guards, was killed early in the war.

Sir John was born in 1872, and served in the 10th Hussars, retiring with the rank of major in 1911.  He rejoined last October, and was posted to the command of the Notts Yeomanry.  During the Boer War he was A.D.C. to Sir John French, and was seriously wounded.  It was in that campaign that he won the V. C. for gallantry, rescuing a wounded trooper after he himself had been seriously injured.  The baronetcy dates back to 1661, and the daughter of a previous holder of the title was the wife of Lord Byron the celebrated port.  There is, we may add, still no news of the present Earl of Erne (Royal Horse Guards), who has now been missing for the greater part of a year.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  IRVINESTOWN COUNCIL.  KILLADEAS POST OFFICE AND THE KESH WATER SUPPLY.  Mr. Robert Phillips, J.P. presided and Mr. Clarke moved that the Council renew their guarantee of the Killadeas Money Order Post Office.  Although, he said, the office had a deficit of 14 shillings on last year’s working it was a great benefit to the poor, and that if there would be a deficit in the future he would not come again before them with a similar request.  Mr. Duncan said it was a matter of 30 years since the old Board had given the guarantee for the purpose of establishing that office.  The deficit was so paltry that the people there should have paid it themselves and not asked the council to pay it.  The application was unanimously granted and Mr. Clarke returned thanks on behalf of the people of Killadeas to which the Chairman replied, “Don’t come back again.”  (Laughter.)

Dr. Patten wrote calling attention to the defective condition of the Kesh water supply and mentioned that the water from the river got into the well.  Mr. Duncan said – We spent about £20.00 on the Kesh water supply a short time ago.  Mr. May – The well is too near the river and it cannot be changed, but something must be done for there is no drinking water in Kesh at all.  It was decided to refer the matter to two local Guardians and the sub–sanitary officer W.  H.  Simpson.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  THE IRISH CREAMERIES MANAGERS’ CONFERENCE AT BUNDORAN.  The annual conference of Ulster and Connaught members of the Irish Creamery Managers Association was held on Saturday with Mr. J.  Timoney, J. P., Belleek presiding.  The Chairman said that the past year had been an eventful one.  The war overshadowed everything else, but it had not adversely affected the industry in which they were engaged.  What the result would be when hostilities had concluded it would be difficult to say, but there seemed no reason to doubt that they were likely to have a great trade depression and heavy taxation.  Hence the present opportunity should be availed off to strengthen their resources, to clear off bank overdrafts and machinery debts, and put by a reserve for bad debts, which were certain to be more numerous in the future.  While the industry was in a prosperous condition, he was sorry he could not say the same of the position of the managers themselves.  It was true that some creamery committees had recognised the greatly increased cost of living and given their managers substantial advances.  Others, however, had not done so, though their own income as farmers had been greatly increased, and though the managers, owing to greater experience, and taking advantage of all opportunities placed at their disposal, were producing better and better results year by year.

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  “BILLY” SUNDAY.  Here is an example of the picturesque diction of the baseball evangelist “Billy” Sunday who some say has founded a party of buffoonery and blasphemy.  “Cleopatra was a flat-nosed wench who sailed up the Nile clothed only in sunshine and climate.”

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  A SON OF SIR CHARLES CAMERON IS DEAD.  On Friday morning Lieutenant Ewan Cameron, 7th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, son of Sir Charles Cameron, C. B., was found dead in the lavatory of the train which left Dublin for Wexford at 10.15.  There was a revolver bullet wound in his head.  The keenest sympathy is felt for Sir Charles.

(Ed. Sir Charles presided at the first experiments in the manufacture of Belleek Pottery in the kitchen of Castle Caldwell, Belleek using the local china clay and feldspar. Journal of the Association of Public Analysts (Online) 2009 37 14-39 by D Thorburn Burns.

Sir Charles Alexander Cameron (1830-1921) Dublin’s Medical Superintendent, Executive Officer of Health, Public Analyst and Inspector of Explosives. Although Charles Cameron is not particularly well known these days, he was in his time, very well known in chemical, medical and social circles in Dublin and in London. A deal of information about him is available via his Reminiscences and Autobiography. His importance at the time

can be judged from the report in The Irish Times, March 3, 1921, giving details of the funeral

service and procession “whose proportions bore testimony to the esteem in which Sir Charles

Cameron was held”, and listed the chief mourners, the representatives of the Royal College of

Surgeons of Ireland, the Royal Dublin Society, the Masonic Order, members of the general

public, the floral tributes and the messages attached, and finally the contents of the telegrams

of sympathy received.

Charles Cameron was born in Dublin on 16 July 1830, son of a Scottish British Army

Officer, his mother Belinda Smith was from Co. Cavan. He was schooled first in Dublin and

then Guernsey. After his father’s death in 1846 the family returned to Dublin and Cameron

obtained employment in the laboratory of the Apothecaries, Bewley & Evans. The

Superintendent of Bewley & Evans laboratory, John Aldridge, was Professor of Chemistry at

the Apothecaries Hall Medical School and Cameron received from him a good knowledge of

pharmaceutical chemistry. Cameron studied medicine in the School of Medicine of

Apothecaries Hall, the Dublin School of Medicine, the Ledwich School, the Meath and the

Coombe Hospitals, and studied in 1854 in Germany. During his long career he collected

numerous degrees and memberships and high office in many professional bodies, most of

which were recorded on the title pages of the various annual editions of Report upon the State

of Public Health (see for example that for 1914.).

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  THE 6TH INNISKILLINGS AT SUVLA.  ABSOLUTE HELL.  The following are extracts from a letter which has been received in Ireland from an officer in the 6th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.

August 10, 1915.  Here we are back on the beach “resting” though shells are bursting all around after three days of absolute hell.  How any of us got through alive God only knows; but a few of us did, though the poor old Division is cut to ribbons.  However, it has made a name for itself that will live.  I suppose you have read by this that we made a new landing on August 7, and in one day won4 miles after desperate fighting.  If dispatches have been published by the time you get this, you will see that the regiment was specially complimented for their brilliant attack.  Our General said he had never seen better work by infantry.

Well, we landed at dawn on Saturday morning in lighters, and as we got to the shore shrapnel began to burst about us.  It is the most absolutely terrifying sensation you could imagine.  The thing comes with a vicious whizz, bursts with a bang, and all round you the air seems full of flying lead.  We had not many casualties landing as we advanced for a mile or so under cover.  We were then told we had to take a hill about 2 miles away, and as we advanced across a stretch of sand the high explosive shells began to come.  It was ghastly: they blew whole groups to pieces, and we had lost pretty heavily by the time we got to the first cover.  While we were getting a breather here and getting the battalion sorted out, against shrapnel found us, and on we had to go.  It was worse now, as both shrapnell and high explosives were coming.  One hit the ground about 10 yards from me, but luckily did not burst, although it buried me in sand.  Another bit of shrapnel carried away my ration bag from my side.  At the next ridge where we halted I found a Brigadier–General with his leg blown off, and I left him my water bottle.  The sights here were absolutely sickening – far too horrible to describe.  On we went again, but were getting more cover now from our own artillery and naval guns were beginning to quiet the enemy.  Things were better till we got within about 800 yards of the position, and then all hell broke loose, and we began to know what rifle and machine gun fire was like.  Rushes were now very short, and when you got down you had to lie in the open, face flat to the ground, and bullets …………..

Fermanagh Times September 2nd, 1915.  A CHILD IS DROWNED IN LOUGH ERNE AT BALLYSHANNON.  Since Wednesday last the 25th ult., nothing was heard of a little boy named Thomas Sheridan, aged four years.  The child is a son of Sergeant Sheridan, Connaught Rangers, who was wounded in the present war, and is at present in hospital in Dublin.  His wife, who is staying with her parents at Ballyshannon, missed the child some time on Wednesday evening, but it was thought it might have strayed into the country.  Though search parties scoured the country no information as to the child’s whereabouts was ascertained.  It was feared the little fellow fell into the Erne which flows past Mrs. Sheridan’s residence and was drowned.  The river below Ballyshannon Bridge was dragged several times but for days no trace of the body was discovered.  During the dragging operations a man named James Daly, and ex-soldier of the Irish Guards, had a narrow escape.  A strong current carried the boat which was being used over the smaller of the two Assaroe Falls, and only he was a very strong swimmer he would have lost his life.  The body of the boy was eventually discovered on Monday evening floating in the Erne below Ballyshannon Bridge.  The remains were removed to the residence of the child’s grandfather, Mr. Charles Gallogly, jeweller, West Port, Ballyshannon.

Impartial Reporter.  September 2nd 1915.  SECOND LIEUTENANT R.  TRIMBLE’S ESCAPE.  HOW CAPTAIN JOHNSTON WAS KILLED.  A letter from Mr. Reginald S.  Trimble6th Royal Irish Fusiliers, tells how he was knocked down at Gallipoli.  He had been three days on the firing line; and on the fourth day he was standing between his colonel and adjutant in conversation under a hot fire so that the high explosives were making fireworks where they were.  A shell came along and tore the colonel’s harm to pulp and passing Mr. Trimble who was slightly behind the line of fire dashed the unfortunate adjutant, Captain Johnston of Magheramena to pieces.  It was a wonderful escape, he adds, but then everyone has wonderful escapes at times.  He was dazed and fell and when he was lifted his head was sore from the concussion.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  DISTINCTLY AND INEXCUSABLY LIBELLOUS.  We devote a good deal of space this week to dealing with the malicious vagaries of Mr. William Copeland Trimble regarding the family of the Editor of this paper.  We have had sound legal advice that the articles and letters that have appeared in the  Reporter are distinctly and inexcusably libellous.  We detest law proceedings.  We have never been afraid of the Impartial Reporter.  Where ability and honour are involved we have never felt in confronting the Editor it was a case of Greek meeting Greek, or that he was a foeman worthy of a steel.  He has always been a poor sort of antagonists.  We cannot recall an instance where in an encounter with us he has not been ignominiously countered and shut up.  The public will pardon, we know, the implied vanity of the statement, but it is an absolute truth, and is a necessary declaration in surveying the past relationship of the two papers.  Instead of flying to lawyers for help we will continue to fight our own corner.  With some sections of the inexperienced public Mr. Trimble may pose as a luminary; with as he is a light of a very poor magnitude indeed – and he knows it.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  TREMENDOUS FIGHTING AT GALLIPOLI.  Mr. Ashmead Bartlett, says the Daily Mail, closes a thrilling narrative of the great battle in Gallipoli for the crest of Sari Bair with the following vivid passage, which epitomises a glorious failure in which Generals and Colonels fought with rifles and bayonets alongside their troops in the firing line.  It was a fierce hand to hand struggle among the scrub, through broken ground, in which no man knew how his comrade was faring.  Many commanding officers were killed, including General Baldwin, who had throughout these four days set a splendid example to his men. Gradually the enemy was driven back and the ground we had been obliged to abandon regained.  Thus closed for the time being, amid these blood-stained hills, the most ferocious and sustained soldiers battle since Inkerman.  But Inkerman was over in a few hours, whereas Englishmen, Australians, New Zealanders, Ghurkhas, Sikhs and Maoris kept up this terrible combat with the Turks for four consecutive days and nights, amid the hills, dongas and ravines 900 feet above the sea, to which point all water, rations had to be borne along paths which do not exist except on the map, and down which every man who fell wounded had to be borne in the almost tropical heat of August in the Mediterranean.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  ENNISKILLEN GUARDIANS, THE FERRYMAN AND THE TEMPO DISPENSARY.  Mr. Patrick Crumley, M.  P.  Presided over the weekly meeting of Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday.  Some laughter was created by the Clerk reading a letter from Dr. G. F. Luke, who wrote enquiring if Tempo Dispensary District was again vacant and asking to be informed when the appointment of a medical officer to that dispensary would be made.  Dr. Luke is the gentlemen who, in or about July, 1914 was appointed to Tempo Dispensary.  At the meeting of the Board on August 4, 1914, the Clerk mentioned that in connection with the appointment he had received 11 letters and eight telegrams from Dr. Luke, and a couple of days after his appointment Dr. Luke wired asking could he resign.  It was then decided to re-advertise for another doctor.  When his letter was read on Tuesday a member suggested that it be marked read.  The Chairman –Why should I initial a letter from a fellow who is humbugging the old country round.  He was at Cookstown and then he joined the army, and now he is on the loose again.  The letter was thrown to one side

Joseph Feely, the ferryman, wrote applying for five guineas for extra work which had fallen upon him through having to bring the medical officer over to the infirmary after 7.00 p.m.  He had to bring the doctor over 42 times and he asked that he be allowed two shillings and sixpence for each journey.  The Clarke explained that this was unusual and was accounted for by the fact that the doctor had frequently to attend a serious case in the hospital.  It was decided to adjourn the matter till the patient got better.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  BELTURBET’S VICTORIA CROSS.  In view of the fact that Sergeant J.  Somers, of the Inniskillings, who has won the V. C., is being claimed as a Tipperary man, the following particulars of his career show that he is an Ulsterman.  He was born in Church Street, Belturbet, 21 years ago, his father being Robert Somers, then sexton of the parish church, a position which his grandfather also held.  His mother was Charlotte Boyce, a native of Wexford, who previous to her marriage was the parlour-maid at the residence of Mr. Fane Vernon, D. L., Erne Hill, Belturbet.  His grandmother, Mrs. Somers, and his aunt, Miss Anna Somers still reside in Belturbet, another sister being Mrs. McLean, wife of Mr. A. McLean, USA, formerly town surveyor of Belturbet.  His parents left Belturbet when he was a boy.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  WAR NEWS.  The war is making heavy demands upon the life assurance companies, particularly those of the industrial type.  About £860,530 has been paid out in respect of 46,200 sailors and soldiers killed during the war, while in the past four weeks £90,530 has been paid to settle 4,200 claims.  With regard to officers the claims now amount to over £2,800,000 and in many of the cases the insurances are very heavy.

Hundreds of women are now engaged in the rural districts of Lancashire in lifting the potato crop and assisting in dairying and other farm work in order to release men for the colours.

About 100 troopers have arrived at Plymouth from South Africa to enlist.  They have paid their own expenses.

An officer just back from the front has had a German bullet, which penetrated his shoulder and came out by his wrist, mounted in gold and made into a charm, but not altered.  Others have had rough pieces of shrapnel which have struck them mounted in gold wire; for tiny fragments a little gold cage had been made.  German shells have been mounted to serve as dinner gongs, and the base of a shrapnel case turned into an ash tray; a cigar box too, has been constructed from a German helmet, with the Prussian eagle on the lid.

The death of M. Pegoud, the well-known aviator, has caused deep sorrow among the French public, whose affection he had gained no less by his personal modesty and by his wonderful skill, and the Matin suggests that as a mark of popular esteem a Paris Street should be named after him. (Ed. Adolphe Célestin Pégoud (13 June 1889 – 31 August 1915) was a French aviator and flight instructor, who became the first fighter ace during World War I. Pégoud served in the French Army from 1907 to 1913. Immediately thereafter he began flying, earned his pilot’s certificate, and in a few months, on 21 September 1913, as a test pilot for Louis Blériot, in a Blériot model XI monoplane and in a series of test flights exploring the limits of airplane manoeuvres, he flew a loop, believing it to be the world’s first. Pégoud’s feat was consequently widely publicized and believed by many to be the first loop, although Pyotr Nesterov, a Russian army pilot, had flown the first one on 9 September 1913, just 12 days earlier, in a Nieuport IV monoplane at an army airfield near Kiev. Pégoud also was the first pilot to make a parachute jump from an airplane. He also became a popular instructor of French and other European fledgling pilots.

At the start of World War I, Pégoud volunteered for flying duty and was immediately accepted as an observation pilot. On 5 February 1915, he and his gunner were credited with shooting down two German aircraft and forcing another to land. Soon he was flying single-seat aircraft and in April claimed two further victories. His sixth success came in July. It is not known how many of Pégoud’s victories involved destruction of enemy aircraft, as early air combat was rare enough to warrant credit for a forced landing. However, it is certain that Pégoud, rather than Roland Garros (four documented victories), was the first pilot to achieve ace status of any sort.

On 31 August 1915, Pégoud was shot down by one of his prewar German students, Unteroffizier Kandulski, while intercepting a German reconnaissance aircraft. He was 26 years old. The same German crew later dropped a funeral wreath above the French lines.)

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  THE SINKING OF THE HESPERIAN.  The splendid Alan Line twin screw steamer Hesperian in command of Captain N.  S.  Main, F.R.G.S., bound from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal with upwards of 600 passengers and crew on board was torpedoed at 8.30 on Saturday night by a German submarine about 135 miles west of Queenstown.  No warning whatever was given by the submarine of her intention to attack, and although neither the submarine nor the torpedo was seen there is a consensus of opinion among officers, passengers and crew that the liner was torpedoed.  The fact that the attack was made upon the ship just as darkness had set in made the work of the lowering of the boats more difficult than it would have been had the same task to be carried out in daylight, and, under all the circumstances there is room for congratulation that the loss of life was not appalling.  A few of the passengers and crew expressed the opinion that the German submarine follow the liner for some hours in daylight, but was afraid to venture an attack as the liner carried a gun for protection purposes.  This gun was quite visible, and the feeling is that the enemy watched until darkness came down on the Hesperian before making the attack.

A remarkable thing occurred in connection with the attack on the ship which deserves mention.  Along the passengers on the ship was a Canadian soldier, named Chambers, of Truro, Nova Scotia.  He was returning to his home owing to having completely lost the sight of both eyes, but, strange to say, when the ship was torpedoed, and he felt the great shock caused by the impact, his sight was suddenly restored to him.  His first act on landing was to telegraph the good news to his parents in Nova Scotia.

Fermanagh Times September 9th, 1915.  LIVE AND LET LIVE.  A curiosity of trench life is noted in Blackwood’s Magazine, by an officer.  It is that while the night work behind and between the trenches is going on, there exists an informal truce, founded on the principle of live and let live so long as each side confines itself to purely defensive and recuperative work, there is little or no interference.  After all, if you prevent your enemy from drawing his rations, his remedy is simple – he would prevent you from drawing yours.  Then both parties will have to fight on empty stomachs, and neither of them, tactically; will be a penny the better.  So, unless some elaborate scheme of attack is brewing the early hours of the night are comparatively peaceful.

Impartial Reporter.  September 9th 1915.  THE NEW SCHEME UTILISING THE FALLS OF BELLEEK FOR MUNITIONS OF WAR.  FACTORIES TO BE CONNECTED BY CABLE.  It reads like a chapter from the Arabian Nights.  The immense water power of Lough Erne and that of the Shannon is to be utilised to produce Electric Power to run factories for producing munitions of war.  When the Impartial Reporter last April gave the exclusive information that the company was being formed to obtain Parliamentary powers to acquire the water power of the falls of Lough Erne at Belleek and the Shannon at Killaloe to generate enough Electric Power to light a large area of country, people rubbed their eyes in wonder, and asked had the Impartial Reporter been deceived or could the hope of many minds be so near fulfilment!  Some newspapers even sneered at it.  The dream of the engineers is now to be realised.

It was noticed that a party of men under Government supervision were at work in the Belleek district last week along the line of the proposed works and we are now in a position to acquaint the public with some of the details.  The company, which was registered last year has been permitted by the Cabinet to be formed when all or nearly all others have been forbidden, and that this company has been allowed to consider fresh issues of capital is a sufficient guarantee of the Bona Fides of the undertaking which has now assumed a new phase.  The consulting engineer is Mr. Theodore Stevens, a well-known expert; and Mr. P. J. McAndrew, now of Sheen Lodge, Bundoran is the superintending engineer.  Mr. B.  L.  Winslow is the solicitor for the company.

Impartial Reporter.  September 9th 1915.  SIR ROBERT S.  LOWRY, K.C.B.  A DISTINGUISHED ULSTER ADMIRAL.  Admiral Sir Robert Swinburne Lowry, K.C.B. commanding the coast of Scotland is a distinguished Ulsterman, being the eldest son of the late Lieutenant-General Robert William Lowry, C. B., of Aghnablaney, County Fermanagh, by his marriage with Helena MacGregor, daughter of the late Mr. Thomas Greer of Sea Park, County Antrim, who represented Carrickfergus in Parliament from 1880 to 1884.  He is a relative of Lieutenant-Colonel R. P. G.  Lowry, D.L., of Pomeroy House, Dungannon, the senior representative of a branch of the Earl of Belmore’s family.

Impartial Reporter.  September 9th 1915.  VOLUNTARY RECRUITING AND COMPULSORY SERVICE.  REPORT OF THE CABINET COMMITTEE.  The Cabinet Committee presided over by Lord Crewe which has been engaged in drawing up a report on the measures that may be required for maintaining and increasing the strength of our armies has agreed upon its report.  It will recommend the system of recruiting by public appeals for battalions, district by district.  But it has finally decided that if the quota required for the depot for replacing the casualties and increasing the numbers is not forthcoming the men should be taken from the districts compulsorily.  That is to say the recruiting officers should have the power to conscript men to fill the gaps if these are not filled by the voluntary enlistment resulting on the public appeal by the leading men of the district.  It is understood that the national register is to be used for the purpose of discrimination, and no doubt the much discussed “pink form” would provide the recruiting officers with the data for their selection of conscripts.  Lord Crewe’s committee consists of the following members: – Lord Crewe (Chairman), Lord Curzon, Mr. Churchill, Mr. Austen Chamberlain and Sir Arthur Henderson.

Impartial Reporter.  September 9th 1915.  CLOGHER VALLEY RAILWAY FATALITY.  An inquiry was held at Augher on Monday evening relative to the death of John McKenna a Farmer of Altnaveagh, Augher who was knocked down and killed by the 7.30 train on the Clogher Valley Railway near Clogher on Saturday evening last.  Deceased jumped out of the way of an approaching bicycle when he was struck on the head by the engine and death took place 20 minutes later.  The train at the spot runs along the county road, and the deceased was evidently unaware of its approach. A verdict of accidental death was returned.

Impartial Reporter.  September 9th 1915.  PROMOTIONS. LIEUTENANT COLONEL G.  H.  C.  MADDEN.  Major Gerard Hugh Charles Madden, Irish Guards promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel, is the second surviving son of the late Mr. John Madden, D. L., of Hilton Park, County Monaghan, and brother of Lieutenant Colonel G. C. W.  Madden, commanding the 4th Battalion Princess Victoria Royal Irish Fusiliers at Victoria Barracks, Belfast.  Lieutenant Colonel G.  H.  C.  Madden is 43 years of age.  He served with the 16th Lancers in the South African war and took part in the relief of Kimberley and the operations at Paardeberg where Cronje surrendered, obtaining the Queen’s medal with two clasps.  He also served for a time in the 3rd King’s Own Hussars.

Lieutenant Colonel G.  H.  C.  Madden married in 1901 Mabel Lucy, daughter of Sir George Macpherson Grant, Bart., of Ballindalloch.  The Madden family settled in this country in the 17th century, Thomas Madden of Baggotsrath, near Dublin, Comptroller to the Earl of Stafford, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, being M.P. for Dungannon in 1639.  One of his descendants, Rev Samuel Madden, D. D., a great benefactor to the country, was known as ‘Premium’ Madden, having founded the system of giving premiums in 1731 for the encouragement of learning at Trinity College, Dublin and in 1739 for the encouragement of Arts &Industries in connection with the Dublin Society, to which objects he personally contributed considerable sums.  ‘His was,’ says Dr. Johnson, ‘a name Ireland ought to honour.’  ‘Premium’ Madden was a great grandfather of the Right Hon.  Mr. Justice Madden, who was succeeded in the parliamentary representation of Trinity College by the Right Hon. Sir Edward Carson, K. C., M. P., the Attorney-General for England.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  CAVAN’S VICTORIA CROSS HERO.  Sergeant Somers, V. C., 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, of Belturbet, County Cavan, in the course of a statement regarding his experiences, said that the Turks had advanced to the trenches and compelled the Ghurkhas and the Inniskillings to retire.  He alone had stopped in the trench refusing to leave.  He shot many Turks with his revolver, killed about 50 with bombs, and forced them to retire.  The enemy, however, rushed into a sap trench, and he commenced to bombard them out of it; but failed.  Then he ran back for the purpose of getting MEN up to the trench to occupy it.  Some of the officers said that it was impossible to put the Turks out, but the gallant sergeant held the position.  He got some bombs and got up in the trench, under rifle and Maxim gun fire, and eventually succeeded in bombing the Turks had of the sap trench.  When he had finished his officers clapped him heartily on the back and Sir Ian Hamilton send for him and told him that he had done his duty like a man.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  Sergeant James Carney, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, whose name appeared in the list of Russian decorations published last week, is a son of Mr. Edward Carney,

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  A PATRIOTIC ENNISKILLEN FAMILY HAS SIX SONS WITH THE FORCES AND RECEIVES CONGRATULATIONS FROM THE KING.  At present much efforts are being made in certain quarters to belittle the efforts of Nationalists in the part they are playing in the European conflict.  In the Unionist Press photographs and names of fathers who have sent three or four sons to the front are held up before Nationalists in a somewhat sarcastic manner.  We, therefore, extend our congratulations to Mr. Patrick Keenan, Enniskillen who has given six sons to the forces while another brother of Mr. Keenan has enlisted in the Irish Brigade.  Mr. Patrick Keenan is a brother of Mr. Thomas Keenan, a member of the Enniskillen Urban Council and a lifelong worker in the cause of Irish Emancipation.  Mrs. Keenan has been the recipient of a letter from the King.  It says that his majesty has heard with the deepest satisfaction that Mrs. Keenan has six sons serving with his Majesty’s Forces.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  Every village needs a “village fool” or in Enniskillen’s case the “town oracle” who’s ludicrous effusions are to be found in the columns of the Impartial Reporter.

The leading articles, paragraphs of self-adulation, hypercritical bosh, and brazen bunkum to be found embodied in the writings in this paper afford to the hardworking townspeople a tonic after their day’s labour.  The paper was, is, and always will be, the enemy of Catholicity and Nationality, written by individuals who are absolutely devoid of friendly feelings towards their fellow countrymen and who have no desire to hold out the olive branch for better understanding of all creeds and classes.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  “D.  C.,” writing to the Press with reference to the losses of the 1st Inniskillings said that of the 23 officers who left Rugby on the 17th of March with the 1st Battalion and landed on their Gallipoli Peninsula with the “immortal 29th division” on that forever memorable 25th of April, only one officer – namely, the Quarter-master, Captain Morris – is now with the battalion.  One has been invalided after gaining the D.S.O., and the remainder have all been either killed or wounded.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  FOR 30 HOURS AFTER BEING STRUCK BY A GERMAN TORPEDO the liner Hesperian made a gallant fight for life, and were it not for the adverse circumstances of wind and weather might have been safely landed in the harbour of Queenstown.  Over 60 miles from land at 6.45 AM on Monday, the liner which was in tow of two steamers, began to settle down in the ocean.  There was a strong wind and sea running and Captain Maine who stuck to a ship to the last, with portion of the crew, had to abandon her.  In a few minutes she began to sink rapidly and disappear beneath the waves head foremost, shortly before 7.00.  3,700 sacks of mail went down with her, as well as all the luggage and most of the personal possessions of the passengers who had abandoned her in the darkness of Saturday night.  It has been ascertained at the offices of the Alan Line that 13 of the passengers are missing and four of the crew.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  IN ADDITION TO THE HESPERIAN THREE OTHER VESSELS WERE ATTACKED by submarines during the week off the southern Irish Coast. The Norwegian barque Glimt was torpedoed early on Saturday morning off County Cork.  Eight minutes were given the crew had to leave.  The German commander ticking of the minutes and at the eight shouted time up.  “I’m going to shoot when the boat is clear,” and then stated to the captain, “I am very sorry but I must blow up your ship.”  On landing and the crew expressed great indignation, declaring the ship to be Norwegian and carrying a neutral crew.

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  AN AMAZING STATEMENT CONCERNING THE 10TH IRISH DIVISION.  One of the new divisions sent out to the Dardanelles was the new 10th Division under General Mahon – the first to go out of the distinctly Irish divisions.  Admittedly it was a very fine unit, and Ireland took a great deal of legitimate pride in it.  On its arrival it is said to have been broken up, and all but three battalions dispersed among other divisions.  Now we would merely ask whether it is conceivable that, say a Canadian, an Australian, or a New Zealand division should have been handled in this way and how long what will it be, before the military authorities are made to realise, as they should be, that the local and national feeling of Ireland is as worth treating considerately as that of the Dominions. After all the War Office’s blunders in connection with the other Irish divisions – the 16th – the course had taken seems, on the face of it, a really grave matter, which the Cabinet ought not to overlook. Widespread attention and, needless to say, strong indignation has been excited by this information.  As a prominent Liberal said it in commenting upon the matter, “these War Office people are beyond hope.  Such a thing makes one a truly despair of ever getting British officials to understand Ireland.”

Fermanagh Herald September 11th. 1915.  A BALLYSHANNON SOLDIER’S GRAPHIC STORY ABOUT THE FIRST LANDINGS AT THE DARDANELLES.  Lance-Corporal W. Doyle, 1st Battalion Inniskillings, who has returned from the Dardanelles, is at present at his home in Bishop Street, Derry.  He is a native of Ballyshannon, and is a fine type of Irish soldier – comparatively young in years, but old in the art of warfare.  He gave a Derry pressman some interesting details of his life in the Army.  He was through the South African campaign, for which he has two medals.  Afterwards he rejoined the army.  He has had over 11 year’s foreign service, during which time he took part in the suppression of the Chinese Revolt.  Lance-Corporal Doyle is of the opinion that every man who participated in the landing at Cape Helles was deserving of the V.C.  The first party to attempt to get ashore were completely wiped out.  There was a dash for life to get under the cover of the cliffs, but those who were fortunate enough to reach this position of security had to come cut a way through barbed wire entanglements and scramble over their dead and dying comrades.  No language, says Lance-Corporal Doyle, can adequately describe the scene or do justice to the bravery of the troops who first got a footing on the stronghold of the Turks.

When the survivors got formed up they had four days hard fighting, after the end of which they had pushed the enemy inland a considerable distance.  Both sides were then so fagged out that for practically a whole day there was not a shot exchanged.  According to Lance-Corporal Doyle the British units were so disorganised at this period, and different regiments so mixed that had the Turks driven home a counterattack they might have succeeded in hurling that portion of the Expeditionary Force back to the sea.  But the Turks were either so reduced in numbers and fatigued, or had learned to respect the British for their daring, courage, and endurance that no such attack was attempted.  Except for this lull fighting has been continuous.

Lance-Corporal Doyle who was twice wounded received the congratulations of the commanding officer for a gallant act performed by him.  Like all soldiers who have been in Gallipoli he pays a generous tribute to the Turks, who are stubborn yet fair fighters, and he concurs in the view that they have not their heart in the work.

The Turkish snipers are very daring, and a constant source of worry to the British.  How Lance-Corporal Doyle who is a crack shot, dispatch three of them is worth relating.  For some days they had been giving a great deal of annoyance, and it was impossible to discover where they were located.  At night Lance-Corporal Doyle and some comrades went out a distance in front of the British line and constructed a trench shaped like a “T.”  When this was completed they crawled back.  Having procured a days’ rations, and taking with him a telephone, Doyle returned and ensconced himself in this trench.  He was not there long until he heard a report away to the left.  Looking in that direction, he saw, almost in a line with the trench he occupied, three Turkish snipers or two Turks and one German.  He waited his opportunity, and before evening had succeeded in “popping off” the three of them.  This was probably the act for which he received the congratulations of the commandant of the division, but when the note was passed along the trench to him he first thought that someone was having a joke at his expense.

The strain on the troops in Gallipoli is much more severe than it is in Flanders, for wherever they go they are under shellfire.  They cannot escape from it.  Even when hearing Mass they had to crouch in under the cliff to avoid injury from bursting shell.  When the Turks not shelling them from Gallipoli, they were from the Asiatic side.  Lance-Corporal Doyle returns to his battalion in a few days.

Fermanagh Times September 16th, 1915.  THE SOLE SURVIVOR.  A CIGARETTE AMONG THE DEAD.  A private in the 2nd Durham Light  Infantry gives us a remarkable description of his experiences in the assault for the recovery of the lost trenches at Hooge.  He writes home to a friend as follows: – At 2.30 a.m. of the ninth we were led into a wood and got orders to lie down, and then hell opened.  Our artillery opened fire and they replied.  It was simply awful, but we lay there waiting for the orders to charge.  They came and we lost all control of senses and went like mad, fighting hand to hand and bayonetting the hounds.  I did not like to kill, but it was sports like, so I did it and wanted more.  We got into the first line and went straight on to the fourth and passed it and then dug ourselves in under hell’s flames.  Nothing better.

I found my section, and there were nine of us digging in the trench I turned my back one second and when I looked again water a sight!  I will remember it till I die.  Every man in the trenches blown to atoms; arms, legs, and heads staring you in the face.  You will hardly credit what I did under the circumstances.  I sat down and lit a Wild Woodbine, for the simple reason I was not in my right senses.  I was stuck there by myself for 16 hours and all the time a heavy bombardment of our trenches.  I was expecting every moment to go to Glory, but I still kept on smoking.  When night came on I got out and went back.  When we were all formed up the survivors answered their names.  The old commanding officer, who is nearly 70 years of age and a trump, was crying.  I can tell you we got anything we wanted.  I know I got a gill of rum and went to sleep.  When we woke up we were marched back to rest where we are now.  It was well earned.  We are nearly ready to go back again.

Fermanagh Times September 16th, 1915.  BELLEEK DISTRICT COUNCIL.  MR. P.  SCOTT, J.  P., PRESIDING.  A letter was received from Mr. J. Campbell, contractor, asking the Council to relieve him of his contract owing to the scarcity of men in the neighbourhood who have joined the Army and the increase in the cost of building materials.  After a protracted discussion the council decided to relieve him of his contract for the erection of three cottages in the townlands of Tonagh and Churchhill, subject to the sanction of the Local Government Board.  Owing to the abandonment of one cottage to be built with the loan from the Local Government Board the sum of £170 was deducted from the loan. The tender of the Belleek Pottery Company was accepted for the lighting of Belleek with electricity.

Impartial Reporter.  September 16th 1915.  STUPENDOUS COST OF WAR.  In the House of Commons yesterday Mr. Asquith rose to move the new vote of credit for £250,000,000.  He said this was the fourth vote of credit for the present financial year, making a total for the year of £9 million.  If the present vote was accepted the total sum included in the several votes of credit since the 6th of August of last year would be £1,262,000,000.  Last July when the last vote was passed the daily expenditure was three million, and the gross expenditure from the 17th of July to September 11 was an average of £4,200,000 each day.  The general tendency of expenditure was still upwards.  The present vote would last till the third week in November.  These figures afforded some evidence of what we were doing in the war.  He did not say if we were doing all we might or even ought to do.  The number of men serving was not short of three million.  Recruiting had been kept up fairly well to the last few weeks when there was a slight falling off.  The advances to other countries amounted to £250,000,000.

Impartial Reporter.  September 16th 1915.  HUNTING SUBMARINES.  ADMIRAL JELLICOE’S CHART.  The anonymous writer who signs himself ‘Polybe’ publishes in the Paris Figaro an article on Britain’s great war fleet.  After describing the magnificent spectacle at which he was present on the occasion of his visit to the British Fleet he says –England has never had finer crews nor a more homogenous fleet, nor one so well armed there nor one which was at the same time so solid and so rapid.  Every unit has improved after a year of war.  All the imperfections have been corrected.

An Englishman makes it a point of honour to be just.  He regards the work of the German submarines, which torpedoed liners, merchant vessels, and fishing smacks, as infamous, but he is not ashamed to admire their crews of the fifth.  Admiral Jellicoe showed me the chart on which was marked with pinpoints where German submarines have been sunk, burnt or captured.  There are many pins on this chart.  There have been more submarines sunk than captured.  Submarine hunting is organized in the most methodical way, and is considered very fine sport.  Several methods of dealing with submarines have been invented. They are hunted with nets, with guns, with explosive bombs, and in other ways.  At first submarines thought they could act with impunity, but they now know that when they leave port they have far less chance of returning than of being put to sleep in the eternal depths of the sea.

Impartial Reporter.  September 16th 1915.  DISSATISFIED THE TYRONE DOCTORS.  At the meeting of the Dungannon Guardians on Thursday a letter was read from the County Tyrone Medical Association intimating that the county doctors had resolved to dispense with the old scale of fees for consultation with the Poor Law medical officers, and that in future the fee would be agreed upon prior to the consultation.  The six medical officers of the union also intimated that medical officers when applying in future for vacation would request four weeks leave of absence with payment to their local tentes of £4 4 shillings per week for 4 weeks’ leave with payment of £3 3 shillings per week.

Fermanagh Herald September 18th. 1915.  MANORHAMILTON RECRUITING MEETING.  A TRIBUTE TO CAPTAIN O’DONNELL.  From a correspondent.  I cannot let the occasion pass without offering a few words of congratulations to Captain John O’Donnell, DL, Larkfield on the unprecedented success of the recruiting meeting held in Manorhamilton on last Monday.  Although a fair day – and a very large fair to – almost all the leading merchants of the town attended, thereby showing their sympathy with the object of the meeting, and at the same time paying a special tribute to the popularity of Captain O’Donnell.  It was indeed in a great day and I have no doubt but Captain O’Donnell will be kept busy enrolling recruits for some time to come.

Fermanagh Herald September 18th. 1915.   THE ANTI – VACCINATION CAMPAIGN IN DUNGANNON; PUBLIC MEETING.  On Tuesday night last a public meeting was held in their Square, Dungannon, organized by the National Anti-Vaccination League, London. Mr. R.  Brown, Donaghmore, who occupied the chair, said that he protested against vaccination because he thought that the people of Ireland should not be treated differently in the matter from any of the other British Colonies.  He instanced a number of cities in England where the death rate from smallpox was less than in other parts, were vaccination was compulsory.  In this country if they did not get their children vaccinated they might be fined in £1 and they could beat their wives four times for that.  (Laughter.)

Fermanagh Herald September 18th. 1915.  BELLEEK PETTY SESSIONS.  SERVANT SUED.  Patrick Melly, of Fossa, a farm servant was sued for the sum of £5 damages for leaving his employment without giving notice to his employer.  Mr. Thomas Orr, solicitor, who appeared for the plaintiff, asked the bench to inflict the full penalty as the defendant was well treated by his employer and had no complaints to make for his action in leaving.  The magistrates assessed the damages at a sum of £2 10 shillings with 10 shillings and sixpence cost of court.

The Whealt Creamery Society charged by two men named Thomas and John Campbell, with the larceny of a creamery can which was stated to be value for a sum of £1 17 shillings and sixpence.  The Manager of the Society stated in his evidence that the defendants had no authority to interfere with the property of the Society as they were not milk suppliers to the creamery.  A witness named William Teevan, was examined and stated that he saw the defendants take away the can and put it in their cart.  The defendants said that they took the can in mistake for their old can.  The bench discharged the defendants on their own recognances to come up for judgment when called upon.

Fermanagh Herald September 18th. 1915.  A WOMAN POSTMAN. The Belleek postal officials have appointed Mr. Bridget Gonigle to deliver letters and other postal packets in the Belleek Rural District.

Fermanagh Times September 23rd, 1915.  A SHOCKING FATALITY NEAR ENNISKILLEN.  A YOUNG LADIES SAD DEATH AS A CYCLIST AND A MOTORIST COLLIDE.  A distressing fatality occurred at Drumawill, 1½ mile from Enniskillen on Wednesday morning when a prepossessing young lady named Margaret Hodgins, whose parents reside at Arney, lost her life.  Being employed by Mr. McLean, Draper, High Street, she was cycling from home to business and near the bend in the road at Drumawill, opposite Maria Smith’s licensed premises, she collided with a motor car, driven by Dr. M.  Betty, Enniskillen.  As result of the impact death was almost instantaneous.  The deceased was well known in Enniskillen and was very popular with all who knew her.

Fermanagh Times September 23rd, 1915.  THE WAR.  BRITISH TROOPS TERRIBLE EXPERIENCES AT THE DARDANELLES.  A GREAT ARMY IN A WILDERNESS.  THE 8TH INNISKILLINGS AT SUVLA BAY.

Rhyme From The Trenches.

PILLS FOR FUNKERS.

Air-—Inniskilling Dragoon.

Come all you lazy slackers,

And read this little song;

Think of the boys who’s gone to join

The British fighting throng.

Twelve months ago yon got the chance To shoulder up the gun,

Conscription day is on the way,

And says that—you must come.

There’s lots of funkers yet at home

That’s if they only like

From Drumawill and fair Lisgoole

And on through Belnaleck

Arney, Moybrone, Letterbreen

And Moybane, just the same,

On a Sunday at Rudden’s cross

It is a crying shame.

(Chorus.)

Fare ye well lazy slackers,

We would not with you stay

We have all come to France’s plains,

To join the fighting fray:

And when the war is over,

Sweethearts we’ll have galore,

We’ll take them for a pleasure trip,

Down by old Erne’s shore.

My Second verse I’ve started

As strong as with the first,

And when you’ve read it though and

Through,

You’ll find it not the worst,

Lord Kitchener and Lord Derby,

You know what they require;

But still you, like old women,

Sit round the kitchen fire;

You sit and smoke as happy

As if no war at all.

If all the boys were just like you

Old England’s crown would fall:

Come forward now like soldiers

And let the Kaiser see,

There’s fighting men in thousands

Across the Irish Sea.

Come, rouse ye lazy slackers

And join our manly throng

And if you’ll only do your bit

The war it won’t last long.

And when we’ve beat the Kaiser

How happy we shall be,

We’ll all return to Erin’s shore

And visit old Drummee.

So now my third and last verse

With a puzzle in my mind,

As to why you’re not in khaki?

And stopping yet behind;

Some say the army is too hard,

But I say that is a lie;

When you are one month in it,

For the Union Jack you’d die.

I know you don’t like soldiering

You hate the very name,

You’d take a trip to Yankee land,

If it wasn’t just for shame.

Just one request I may repeat

Before I lay down my pen-

That’s, Come and join the army,

And for goodness sake be men.

So good-bye to every one of you,

I hope you’ll change your mind,

If this makes you scratch your brow,

It shows that you’re inclined,

So now my poem I must conclude,

My point I have made clear.

And Wishing a happy Christmas

And a glorious New Year.

From one of the Service Squadron of the Inniskilling Dragoons.

Fermanagh Times September 23rd, 1915.  MARS OUSTS CUPID ON WEDDING CAKES.  The very latest war fashion is of the military wedding cake.  So largely has this become a feature of weddings associated with military and naval men that the wholesale manufacturers’ are specializing in toy ornaments of a war like character to decorate the cakes.  They are mostly ornamental cannons, guns and rifles, with battleships for naval men, and very well executed models of aeroplanes for bridegrooms connected with the Flying Corps.  Armoured cars and flags of all nations also figure in the lists supplied to the retail trade.  Sugar Cupids and harps are at a discount.  The little ornaments on the cake are distributed as souvenirs to the wedding guests.

Fermanagh Times September 23rd, 1915.  THE TROUBLE AT CAMMELL LAIRD’S.  STARTLING FIGURES AS TO THE LOSS OF TIME. DISGRACEFUL SCENES IN COURT.  A number of platers, drillers, smiths, and apprentice platers appeared before the Munitions Tribunal at Liverpool on Saturday charged by Messrs. Cammell Laird Co., with persistently losing time.  Mr. J. W. P.  Laird said that in 20 weeks 15 per cent of the men employed lost a quarter and 10 per cent did not work at all.  On every day of that period the loss of working hours on ordinary working days was a million and a half and represented a full week’s work for 30,000 men or alternatively the time lost practically represents a complete shutting down of the whole establishment for three working weeks.  Apparently the trade unions concerned were enabled to influence their members in the matter.  Fines varying from five shillings to 50 shillings were imposed, and the decision was followed by disgraceful scenes, both outside and inside Saint George’s Hall.

Fermanagh Times September 23rd, 1915.  ENNISKILLEN’S NEW BOROUGH SURVEYOR.  Mr. James Donnelly, Enniskillen, has been unanimously selected out of 11 applicants for the post of Borough Surveyor of this urban district.  A number of first class men with exceptional credentials applied for the position, but the Council, after hearing the splendid testimonial Mr. Donnelly had received from the County Surveyor of Fermanagh, under whom he has worked for the past two years, had no hesitation in entrusting him with the responsible duties attached to the Surveyorship of the Borough.  Mr. Donnelly as a young man full of energy, and in the various public positions he has held in this County, in Monaghan, and in Dublin has, by his integrity and devotion to duty gained the goodwill and respect not only of his employers in those different places but also of the public.

Impartial Reporter.  September 23rd 1915.  INNISKILLING V.C. KILLED.  Information has been received from the Dardanelles which leaves little doubt that Captain Gerald Robert O’Sullivan, V.C. 1st Batt., Royal Inniskillings previously reported missing, was killed in action on the 21st during the attack on Hill 70 or Burnt Hill at Suvla Bay.  Captain O’Sullivan was seen to advance at the head of his men to the second line of Turkish trenches, where he fell, and it is believed that he was killed, but his body has not been recovered.

Impartial Reporter.  September 23rd 1915. 7830. Sergeant James Carney, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskillings received the Cross of the Order of Saint Georges, 4th class for gallantry on 28 October, 1914 when he brought in a wounded comrade under heavy machine gun fire, thereby suffering his own wounds.  He served through the South African war, and at the battle of Coenso brought a wounded comrade from the firing line to the field hospital amid a hail of bullets, and was complemented by his commanding officer.  He was specially promoted to Corporal in the Mounted Infantry on which he served two years, first scouting with ability.  He has the Queen’s Medals with five clasps and the King’s Medal with two clasps.  He served three years in Egypt under Major Hessey.  Sergeant Carney, who has a younger brother a sergeant in the Inniskillings, is a son of Edward Carney, Abbey Street Enniskillen.

Fermanagh Herald September 25th. 1915.  THE BUDGET.  SWEEPING NEW TAXATION.  No half penny post.  Duties on sugar, tea and tobacco increased and there is a 40 per cent increase on the income tax.  Substantial additions are made it to the super tax now charged on incomes over £3,000 with the following results: – an income of £5,000 pays £1,029 tax; £10,000 pays £2,529 tax and an income of £100,000 pays   £34,029 tax.  Mr. McKenna imposes the following altogether new taxes: – 50% of all War profits over £100 pounds; a 33⅓% of the value on imported luxuries namely, Motor Cars, Motor Parts, Hats, Watches, Motor Cycles, Kinema (sic) Films, Plate glass, Clocks..  An American car now priced at £150 will cost £200 pounds of which £50 goes to the Exchequer. A Paris hat costing £12 will cost £16, of which £4 goes to the Exchequer.  Tea is increased from 8d to 1s a pound; coffee (roasted) and from 2d to 3d a pound; telegrams 9d for 12 words, and a halfpenny for every extra word; sugar, to the public ½ penny a pound dearer; tobacco from 4s 8d to 7s per pound; cigarettes from 5s 8d to 8s 6d a pound and had no additional beer or whisky duty.  Fifth for

Fermanagh Herald September 25th. 1915.  IN AND AROUND BALLYSHANNON.  Ballyshannon is an old-time place with a past.  It has, for the most part, steep and crooked streets, with houses built over them and along them.  If you tumbled over the door step into the streets it would be something like falling over a precipice.  In more modern times Ballyshannon acquired a sort of local notoriety as being the headquarters of the travelling tinkers of the North-West, no more important section of the community 100 years ago.  The tinker in those days was part and parcel of our National Life, and his periodical visit to the various localities in their turn for the mending of various domestic utensils, was considered absolutely essential for the wellbeing of the community.  His stock of ancient lore and country gossip was inexhaustible, and his prowess in a fight proverbial.  The Harvest Fair in the town was his annual field day, and no tinker with any reputation to save, hesitated engaging in the fight which was an absolutely friendly and fair one, the whole forces first pairing of into two even sections.  It was indeed one of the tinkers many beliefs that if he had not a little of his blood drawn by fists, or more commonly by blackthorn, on the Harvest Fair day, his health during the next twelve months, would suffer greatly as a consequence.  With the passing of the tinker a great deal of the local glory that surrounded Ballyshannon has fled, and the Harvest Fair has been shorn of its greatest charm.

Fermanagh Herald September 25th. 1915.  AT ENNISKILLEN PETTY SESSIONS ON MONDAY, Mary Love, Enniskillen, the wife of a military sergeant, was prosecuted by the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children for neglecting her three children, aged 11 years, 9 years, and 11 months, respectively.  For a total of four offences she was sentenced to six months hard labour.  It was stated defendant was entitled to a separation allowance of 25 shillings and six pence per week and that there had been 20 previous convictions against her.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  AT CLONELLY.  INVALIDED FROM THE DARDANELLES.  Major Fuller and Captain Fitzpatrick are at present enjoying the hospitality of Mr. Ffolliott Barton, J.P., Clonelly.  Both officers were wounded at the Dardanelles and both belong to the Australian contingent, which during the war have covered with renown both themselves and their great Colony.  We can well believe their statement that no written report could give any adequate the idea of the horrors of the Suvla Bay attack.  It was terrific, indescribable.  On the top of obstacles that, in other circumstances, might have been regarded as impregnable thundered the big guns, burst highly explosive shells, rattled the deadly bullets of the enemies’ rifles.  Not a foot of ground was out of range of some form or other of Turkish and German striking power.  The extraordinary thing is that where the enemy had now gathered in tens of thousands, fortified with all the ingenuity and might of modern armaments not a hostile weapon or individual was in evidence two or three days before.  Where both these gallant gentleman were struck down was a spot they had visited with absolute safely a couple of days before.  The very places which it cost our brave men so much to capture, could have been taken “for the taking” without the loss of a single life any time prior to those couple of days.  These invalided gentlemen specified no grievance, attributed no fault anywhere, but to the lay mind it is inevitable that there was blundering somewhere.  They are both now, we are glad to record, almost fit again for duty.  They laughingly explained that recuperation under Mr. Barton’s roof amid his picturesque grounds is one of the simplest things possible.  Major Fuller returns to the Dardanelles on Monday rejoiced to yet another “rush at the Huns.”  Captain Fitzpatrick will not be able to satisfy his yearnings so soon.  By the way his father was in Enniskillen years ago with the Kents, and it was a matter of pleasure and interest to him to visit the island town about which he had heard personally and a read so much.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  PRESBYTERIAN DIFFERENCES IN ENNISKILLEN.  A SERIOUS SITUATION IS CREATED.  Differences of a very serious and unfortunate character have arisen amongst the members of the Enniskillen Presbyterian Church in connection with the appointment of a successor to the Rev.  S. C. Mitchell.  So bitter, indeed, has become the feeling between the two sections that if extreme diplomacy and care are not exercised, lasting, even permanent, injury may be done to the congregation.

The situation is a delicate and awkward one, and as it is an accepted truism that onlookers see most of the game we may be pardoned for expressing the popular opinion of outsiders in Enniskillen, when we state that more careful handling and less violent attempts by one or two members at the outset to force their particular views on all and sundry would have resulted in a more amicable feeling and in practically unanimous settlement of the difficulty.  However, that may be, the harm has now been done and during the past few days serious developments have taken place.

In the first place those who are dissatisfied with the choice of the majority have now definitely engaged the Protestant Hall for the purpose of holding a separate Sunday school there, which they claim will be attended by practically two thirds of all the Presbyterian children in the town.  This in itself is a serious step to take and shows clearly the intensity of feeling that prevails.  But a step of even greater magnitude has been taken in the form of a petition to the Clogher Presbytery, which sets out that the petitioners do not intend to worship again at the Church under present circumstances and requesting the Assembly to make an arrangement for having the gospel preached to them.  The petition is signed by three of the Church’s Committee men and by 25 communicants and, it is alleged, has the support of many adherents in the Church who have not been asked to sign such a request. On the other hand to the majority of the congregation who have succeeded in having a call issued to the man of their choice professed to look upon the defection of the minority as only a passing display of temper, and asserts that in a very short time they will resume their former places in the congregation.

From the very beginning of this regrettable controversy the Fermanagh Times has studiously refrained from taking sides in the matter or expressing any views that might be construed as showing a leaning towards one party or the other.  We think that this is essentially a matter to be settled by the congregation itself, or by the authorities of the church, without outside interference, and this opinion has moulded our action throughout.  Of course as a public newspaper we had to mention the matter, as it was, and is, a matter of considerable local public interest but we did so without bias our favour.

In last Thursday’s edition of the Impartial Reporter, however, there appeared a report of the proceedings in the Presbyterian Church on the preceding Monday evening when a meeting was held for the purpose of appointing a successor to the Rev. S. C. Mitchell.  In the course of this report Mr. George Whaley the ruling Elder of the Church, is stated to have made an outburst against the “untruthful and exaggerated” reports which had appeared in the Fermanagh Times.  Upon seeing this, our representative, at once went and interviewed Mr. Whaley on the subject as we considered we were entitled to some explanation.  Consider our astonishment when Mr. Whaley solemnly assured us so THAT HE HAD NEVER MADE ANY REFERENCE DIRECT OR INDIRECT TO THE FERMANAGH TIMES, but on the other hand he did referred to gossip about the town and statements made by gossipers from which one would think that there were far more serious differences in the Church than really existed, but that the Fermanagh Times was not mentioned by him or in his thoughts at the time.  We have also interviewed a number of gentlemen belonging both to the minority and majority on this point, and they unanimously agree with Mr. Whaley’s version.  Now either the Impartial Reporter or Mr. Whaley in stating what are not facts.  They cannot both be right and our readers must judge for themselves which is wrong.

If, as we fully believe, Mr. Whaley made no reference to us either by direct statement or by innuendo, then another startling proof is afforded the public of the dangerous lengths to which the Reporter is prepared to go in its campaign of virulence and misrepresentation against this journal.  We leave the matter at that for the present.  Further developments in the crisis which has arisen in our local Presbyterian Church will be watched with considerable interest by the public.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  THE ISLANDERS WHO DEFY MR. MCKENNA.  About the only people in this country who would view with indifference the war budget of Mr. McKenna will be the inhabitants of Innishmurray, an island off the coast of Sligo.  They have defied rate and tax collectors for a number of years.  There is no direct communication with the mainland, and in a report recently to the Local Government Board it was stated that the rate collector could not get a boatman brave enough to row him across.  Some years ago two collectors tried the experiment, but they were met with a perfect shower of stones.  One of the islanders, an old man, acts as ruler, and all disputes are settled by him, but these are rare.  Every summer a priest visits the island, and remains there for a few weeks to perform marriages.  During the rest of the year says the Glasgow Herald the islanders hold a service among themselves every Sunday.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  BRILLIANT ANGLO-FRENCH VICTORY AND SUBSTANTIAL ADVANCE OVER A WIDE FRONT.  OVER 20,000 PRISONERS CAPTURED AND 33 LARGE GUNS TAKEN.  The Anglo-French Army is on Saturday achieved most substantial successes at two important points on the Western front.  Sir John French reports that he attacked the enemy and captured his trenches on a front of over 5 miles penetrating in some places to a distance of 4,000 yards. This accurred south of the La Bassee Canal.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  NINE MEN DEAD IN ONE FAMILY.  Private William Clarke, of the East Lancashires, now undergoing treatment in a military hospital at Ormskirk, comes of a Lancashire family from which the war has exacted a terribly heavy toll.  He is one of nine brothers who were mobilised at the outbreak of war, all in the same regiment.  Six have been killed, another is without his right arm as the result of wounds and the youngest is still in the trenches.  Three of Private Clark’s brothers in law, his sister’s husbands have also been killed, making a total of nine killed out of 12.  Seven were killed in France and Flanders and two in the Dardanelles, where Private Clarke was wounded.  The family belonged to Rawtenstall, and the mother is a widow.

Fermanagh Times September 30th, 1915.  FLYING OVER THE WESTERN FRONT. ….  charred bricks, which had once been a French village.  The corn fields were barren except for a heavy crop of wooden crosses marking the last resting place of French and British soldiers fallen on the battlefield of the Marne.  As far as the eye could see to the right and left the ground was torn as if a giant plough had made furrows across the fair land of France.  The trenches meander across the country in an irregular line. Sometimes the line appears to go straight through a village; now and again an isolated farmhouse stands in the middle of a trench. Suddenly and artillery duel began.  A French field-battery began to hurl death into the German trenches.  I could see the sudden spurts of fire and the explosion of the shells but not a sound reached my ears; the roar of our engine shut out the sounds of war.  The only human beings visible during the bombardment were some French peasants, who went on with their work unconcerned as the shells flew over their heads.  Looking to my left I saw what looked like a swarm of grey ants appear in hundreds out of the earth and rush towards the French trenches, and as the sunlight flashed on their bayonets it became manifest that a German infantry attack was in progress.  Sports of flame splattered all along the French line for a distance of a mile or more, and through the field glasses I could see the grey mass plainly.  But as the mitrailleuses did their deadly work the ants fell in little heaps and the attack faded away.

Impartial Reporter.  September 30th 1915.  THE BUDGET AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE HOME AND ON TEA, SUGAR AND TOBACCO.  Income tax on all incomes over £130  with abatement of £120.  The rate is raised from 9d in 1913 to 1 s 9 ½d this year and two shillings and 1d next year.  Super tax has been raised so the rich man pays 1/3 his income.  Farmers are to pay on rent or on clear profits.  Employees with £2 10 shillings a week and more to pay quarterly.  New taxes include a 50 per cent on all war profits and 33⅓% on imported motor cars, films, hats, watches and clocks, plate glass and musical instruments.  Tea is raised one Shilling per pound, cocoa 1 ½ d per pound, petrol 6d per gallon, sugar ½d per pound, tobacco six shillings and a penny halfpenny per pound,.  The half-penny post has been abolished, telegrams will be 9d and there will be dearer telephones and parcels.

Impartial Reporter.  September 30th 1915.  Some examples of the war profits tax.  The tax is ½ war profits.  Some examples – Spillers and the Bakers, Millers last profit £367,000; previous average £140,000: War Profits£ 227,000.  Tredegar Iron and Coal Company £157,000; previous average £113,000; War Profit £44,000.

Impartial Reporter.  September 30th 1915.  THE BRITISH AND FRENCH ACCOMPLISH GREAT ADVANCES.  The British take 5 miles, 3,000 prisoners and 61 guns while the French win 15 miles and captured 20,000 prisoners on a front of 21 miles.

Poison Gas and Poor Finnegan of Enniskillen and the Inniskillings.

Poison Gas, The Inniskillings and Poor Finnegan in World War I

by John B. Cunningham

The headline in the Fermanagh Herald of May 13th read INNISKILLINGS GASSED. ULSTER JOURNALIST’S DEATH. SERGEANT P.P. FINNEGAN.  Finnegan was well known in Enniskillen and a popular journalist as testified below by his colleagues. The following is a copy of a letter from Lieutenant E. Gallagher, 7th Inniskillings to his brother Mr Henry T. Gallagher, Crown Solicitor, Strabane.

Gas

John Singer Sargent was commissioned as a war artist in 1918.

30-4-16

Dear Harry, – Just on my way somewhere; we are in a hospital train, and it’s like our own officers mess, so many of the old hands are here, gassed.  As for the Irish, they easily carried the day, men and officers.  I was gassed in the second attack (gas) after having a good half hour bowling over Bosches and looking forward to another good time.  My platoon sergeant, poor Finnegan – was with me and he did buck us up; he kept shouting on the Bosches ‘Come on Fritz; we have some lovely presents for you,’ and they got them.  Then when the Bosche saw he had failed he sent us more gas and it was terrible seeing poor fellows dropping on all sides.  Then I felt my own time coming; words could not describe it.  I had my helmet on, but it must have had some defect.  However, I began to feel the gas: first it made me gasp; and then it turned me blue; my chest weighed a ton and my head was ready to crack and I coughed until I thought I would cough my insides up.  I thought I would try and find the dressing station.  On my way I came across poor Finnegan and he was as bad; we got on about 100 yards when we both collapsed.  We just clung to one another and Finnegan said ‘Sir, we have no chance.’  I agreed as I was exhausted.  Finnegan shouted out: ‘By God, Sir isn’t it terrible to die like this! If we had only got a sporting chance; but no one could beat this.’  After half lying, half standing, clinging to one another for about 10 minutes and going through terrible agony, I said to Finnegan, come on let us make one last effort, and we did.  I helped poor Finnegan along.  At last he said, ‘Go on sir, I am done.’  However we plodded along creeping and walking in a trench with two feet of mud.  I found myself at the dressing station about done up. I sent out a party for Finnegan, but he could not be found.  He was found that night dead.  A plucky soldier – he had no fear.

Our boys did well.  Harry, if you could have seen them it would have delighted you.  There was no pause, every man went at it, and after the first attack they actually fought as to which company had the best ‘bag’ outside their parapet and to hear them bragging ‘that fellows helmet beside your big shell hole is on our side of the wire.  It was glorious and I was just thinking how pleased the people at home will be when this will be told in full.  Then in a day’s time I got a paper and what do I see?  This terrible rebel rising in Ireland.  Poor old Ireland!  Betrayed again!  I am getting along as well as can be expected.  It takes time to get the gas out of one’s system.  However a few weeks will make me fairly up to the knocker. Best love to all in Dunwiley. Harry. May be home sooner than I expected.  I.R.

gas1Poison gas was probably the most feared of all weapons in World War One. It was indiscriminate and could be used on the trenches even when no attack was going on. Whereas the machine gun killed more soldiers overall during the war, a death that was frequently instant or not drawn out and soldiers could find some shelter in bomb/shell craters from gunfire, a poison gas attack meant soldiers having to put on crude gas masks and if these were unsuccessful, an attack could leave a victim in agony for days and weeks before he finally succumbed to his injuries. It is generally assumed that gas was first used by the Germans in World War One. This is not accurate. The first recorded gas attack was by the French. In August 1914, the French used tear gas grenades containing xylyl bromide on the Germans. This was more an irritant rather than a gas that would kill. It was used by the French to stop the seemingly unstoppable German army advancing throughout Belgium and north-eastern France. In one sense, it was an act of desperation as opposed to a premeditated act that all but went against the ‘rules’ of war. However, while the French were the first to use a gas against an enemy, the Germans had been giving a great deal of thought to the use of poison gas as a way of inflicting a major defeat on an enemy. In October 1914, the Germans attacked Neuve Chapelle. Here they fired gas shells at the French that contained a chemical that caused violent sneezing fits. Once again, the gas was not designed to kill but rather to incapacitate an enemy so that they were incapable of defending their positions.

This took place against a background of a war in the west that was still mobile. Once trench warfare had literally dug in all sides involved in the conflict looked for any way possible to bring movement back into their campaigns. One of the more obvious was to develop a weapon that was so appalling that it would destroy not only an enemy frontline but also the will to maintain troops on that frontline. Poison gas might even provoke a mass mutiny along a frontline thus causing it to collapse. In other words, poison gas was the answer for the war’s lack of mobility. Poison gas (chlorine) was used for the first time at the Second Battle of Ypres in April 1915. At around 17.00 hours on the 22nd April, French sentries in Ypres noticed a yellow-green cloud moving towards them – a gas delivered from pressurised cylinders dug into the German front line between Steenstraat and Langemarck. They thought that it was a smokescreen to disguise the forward movement of German troops. As such, all troops in the area were ordered to the firing line of their trench – right in the path of the chlorine. Its impact was immediate and devastating. The French and their Algerian comrades fled in terror. Their understandable reaction created an opportunity for the Germans to advance unhindered into the strategically important Ypres salient. But even the Germans were unprepared and surprised by the impact of the gas and they failed to follow up the success of the chlorine attack. What did occur at Ypres was a deliberate use of a poison gas and now, other nations with the ability to manufacture poison gas could use it and blame it on the Germans as they had been the first to use it in this fashion.

gas2

British soldiers – victims of a poison gas attack

The first nation to respond to the Ypres gas attack was Britain in September 1915. The newly formed Special Gas Companies attacked German lines at Loos. In the Ypres attack, the Germans had delivered their chlorine by using pressurised cylinders. For the attack at Loos, the British also used gas cylinders. When the wind was in a favourable direction, chlorine gas was released from the British front line so that it could drift over to the German front line. This was then to be followed by an infantry attack. However, along parts of the British front line, the wind changed direction and the chlorine was blown back onto the British causing over 2,000 casualties with seven fatalities. The Special Gas Companies were not allowed to call their new weapon gas – it was referred to as an “accessory”. However, the risk of the wind blowing gas back onto you also affected the Germans and French in some of their gas attacks during late 1915.

gas3 Two German soldiers and their mule.

The development in the use of poison gases led to both phosgene and mustard gas being used. Phosgene was especially potent as its impact was frequently felt only 48 hours after it had been inhaled and by then it had already bedded itself in the respiratory organs of the body and little could be done to eradicate it. Also it was much less apparent that someone had inhaled phosgene as it did not cause as much violent coughing. By the time that phosgene had got into a person’s bodily system, it was too late. Mustard gas was first used by the Germans against the Russians at Riga in September 1917. This gas caused both internal and external blisters on the victim within hours of being exposed to it. Such damage to the lungs and other internal organs were very painful and occasionally fatal. Many who did survive were blinded by the gas.

By the time the war ended, the main user of poison gas was Germany, followed by France and then Britain. Though poison gas was a terrifying weapon, its actual impact, rather like the tank, is open to debate. The number of fatalities was relatively few – even if the terror impact did not diminish for the duration of the war.

The British army (including the British Empire) had 188,000 gas casualties but only 8,100 fatalities amongst them. It is believed that the nation that suffered the most fatalities was Russia (over 50,000 men) while France had 8,000 fatalities. In total there were about 1,250,000 gas casualties in the war but only 91,000 fatalities (less than 10%) with over 50% of these fatalities being Russian. However, these figures do not take into account the number of men who died from poison gas related injuries years after the end of the war; nor do they take into account the number of men who survived but were so badly incapacitated by poison gas that they could hold down no job once they had been released by the army.

Armies quickly produced gas masks that gave protection as long as sufficient warning was given of a gas attack. Soldiers also used make-shift gas masks if they were caught in the open without a gas mask during a gas attack – cloth soaked in their own urine and placed over the mouth was said to give protection against a chlorine attack. By the end of the war, relatively sophisticated gas masks were available to soldiers in the trenches on the Western Front.

“Poison Gas and World War One”. HistoryLearningSite.co.uk. 2014. Web.

The Fermanagh Herald paid tribute to their former reporter as follows: – Sergeant Finnegan was, prior to joining the Inniskillings, a member of the reporting staff of the Fermanagh Herald and was well known all over the North West.  He was an able and reliable journalist and was held on the highest esteem by his colleagues and by everyone who came in contact with him in the discharge of his duties.  He was a prominent member of the National Volunteers and as Lieutenant Gallagher says was a plucky and fearless soldier.  He was the typical Celt, genial, kindly, and good natured, and a sparkling wit, his gifts as a raconteur and his mellow brogue gave him a warm reception in social circles.  He was a splendid Gaelic scholar, and was able to report the most fluent Gaelic speakers, an accomplishment which few Pressmen possess.  His remains now rest in France – far from Kilkenny and the banks of the silvery Nore where his childhood days were spent.  That his soul may rest in peace is the earnest prayer of his former colleagues.  We tender our sincere sympathy to his relatives in their bereavement.

August 1915.

Fermanagh Times August 5th, 1915.  WAR NEWS.  Nearly half a million sterling is said to represent the loss of wages in Wales on account of the strike, and the other losses would also amount to a considerable sum, to say nothing of the loss of the output of a million tons of coal.  It would take a long period of increased wages to compensate the men for their immediate loss.  But they never seem to think of that.

It is wonderful how this old country manages to boggle and blunder through.  Its authorities seldom prepare for any eventuality or exhibit much foresight, so that we begin wars and other things under great disadvantages.  It transpired at a meeting of the Marconi Company that in 1910 the company proposed to the Government a chain of wireless stations throughout the British possessions, but it was rejected.  The Germans took up the idea and carried it out, with the result that some days before the war they were able to warn their ships to make for neutral ports.

As for the stoppage of cotton imports into Germany, the facts are now notorious.  After 12 months of war and a change of Government our Ministers have not yet proclaimed the chief ingredient of the German and Austrian powers contraband (or subject to seizure by the Allies cruisers).  They have proclaimed wool, oil, machine tools and large scale maps contraband, but not this stuff with which Germany kills our men and their comrades among the Allies.  Nothing in the whole history of this war is so inexplicable.

Fermanagh Times August 5th, 1915.  THE MAN WHO SANK THE LUSITANIA.  CONFESSION BY THE U21’S COMMANDER. “The order to sink the Lusitania arrived on May 2 at Heligoland and, and aroused the indignation of all the officers.  More than one was beside himself.  The order was nevertheless carried out by the U21, which left under the command of Lieutenant von Hersing.  The writer of the letter was on board his ship when Von Hersing returned from his expedition and was able to take note of the contempt which all the officers manifested towards him.  Without daring to lift his head he muttered: – “It went against me to act as I did, but I could not do otherwise. “ He was weeping.  He then told how none of his men knew the object of his voyage, and has several times he was on the point of letting them into the secret in the hope of seeing the crew mutiny.  On its arrival at the spot where it was to surprise the Lusitania, the submarine had a long wait.  At one moment the idea of making off enter the commander’s head, but he found that another submarine had stopped a short distance away.  The Lusitania meanwhile was approaching.  She could not escape her doom.  “I saw people gathered on deck” continued Von Hersing, “the ship was crammed with human beings.  I caused the submarine to plunge and the torpedo was discharged.  I do not know whether it was this torpedo or the one discharged by the other submarine that struck the liner, but the latter’s hull was ripped open.  I had tried to avoid witnessing the ghastly scene which followed, and made away from the torpedoed liner at full speed.  Then I came to the surface.  The sea was crowded with struggling wretches, and even at that distance I could hear the shouts of the drowning.  I had become a man of stone, incapable of moving or giving an order.”

Fermanagh Times August 5th, 1915.  BALLYSHANNON VICTIM IN THE LUSITANIA.  A PROBATE APPLICATION.  In the matter of the goods of Michael Ward, deceased an application was made in the Probate Court, Dublin on behalf of Mrs. Margaret Ward, Greenhall, Ballyshannon, mother of the deceased, for liberty to state death on belief and to obtain letters of administration.  It appeared that Michael Ward had emigrated to America many years ago, and up to April last had resided in Pittsburgh.  Having amassed a small fortune there, he decided to return to Ireland.  He had purchased a farm near Ballyshannon last year.  He sailed from New York in the Lusitania, and when the vessel was torpedoed he was seen helping women and children into the boats, and he undoubtedly sacrificed his life in saving others.  Mr. Justice Madden said it was clear beyond doubt that the deceased was another victim of the outrage.  It was, indeed, a sad case.  He would grant the application.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  A WOUNDED INNISKILLING BACK FROM THE FRONT.  Private Maguire of the 2nd Inniskillings who was wounded on the retreat from Mons has reached the military hospital at Enniskillen for care.  His brother Francis, also in the 2nd Inniskillings was killed in the war and the wounded soldier at the old Redoubt had a narrow escape as a shrapnel bullet tore one shoulder while another bullet tore the other shoulder, as he lay with his comrades in a turnip field on the defence.  He tells how he became unconscious and was found by the stretcher parties and conveyed for first aid before he was sent to the base.  The bullets were probed for and extracted; the parts were burned to guard against blood poisoning and gradually consciousness returned to the parts affected.  Maguire was for some time at Rouen in the hospital in which Miss Stuart of Enniskillen was the sister in the operating theatre; he was subsequently transferred to Brighton where local ladies took convalescent soldiers out in their cars for an airing and he liked the place well.  He has nothing but praise for the care he received at the Redoubt.  He says he is not in want of anything.

Maguire is confined to bed with pains perhaps from rheumatism contracted during some nights of exposure; but he is near Lisnaskea, and hopes to have friends from home as visitors on the fair and other days.  He had a year’s boy service in the old militia in which he served for six years and then entered the line battalions and served abroad for 11 years in both the 1st and 2nd battalion.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  COMFORTS FOR INNISKILLINGS.  I had several gross of fly papers dispatched to the 1st, 5th and 6th battalions of the Inniskillings last week to the Dardanelles where the fly nuisance is described as unbearable.  Severe as the strain is for myriad of flies to light on one’s food and ones face, so that even much desired sleep became a time for torture, it is worse for the wounded.  Many years ago when I was at Montreal I had a very mild experience of what our men have to endure at the Dardanelles in this respect so that I had to leave my food almost untasted.  The flies were in droves on the dinner plate, on the knife and fork, on my face, and the only way to obtain relief was to flee.  But our men cannot fly; they must endure.  (W. C. Trimble)

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  YOUTHS OF 19 CALLED UP.  ABOUT 1,200,000 MORE RUSSIANS FOR THE COLOURS.  An imperial ukase has been issued calling to the colours all men born in 1896 i.e. youths of 19 of whom there are about 1,200,000.  The lowest age at which Russians have been called up hitherto is 20.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  NEXT SUNDAY A DAY OF INTERSESSION.  The Archbishops and Bishops of the Church of Ireland have appointed Sunday, August 8 to be observed throughout our church as a day of prayer and supplication for our church and country.  The cruel war forced on the world by German perfidy and greed will have lasted for 12 months during which time blood and treasure have been freely poured forth that the nation may live.  Our own Church is the poorer for the loss of hundreds of our most gallant sons and is the richer for their noble faithfulness and for the example of their unselfish sacrifice.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  AN INNISKILLING RECOMMENDED FOR THE VICTORIA CROSS.  We are unofficially informed that Sergeant Somers of the 1st Inniskillings, at the Dardanelles has been recommended for the Victoria Cross.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  THE DEATH OF LIEUTENANT COLONEL JONES AT GALLIPOLI.  He was severely wounded by a shrapnel shell while sitting writing out orders.  It struck him in the thigh and part of the abdomen.  An immediate operation was found necessary and he survived the ordeal.  He was sent to Alexandria but while on the journey complications arose which necessitated a second operation from which he never regained consciousness and he passed away before the boat arrived at Alexandria.  His body was buried at sea.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  ARIGNA MINING. PAST AND FUTURE.  A question and reply was recently given in the House of Commons relative to the Arigna Mining Company.  The district abounds in coal of good quality and is rich in ore, fireclay and other valuable minerals.  Some 80 years ago a large Company was formed to work the coal and iron and extensive smelting works where the most excellent iron ware including rails grates, mantle registers, pots etc. were manufactured.  After working with a fair measure of success for some years in those days in which rail communication was entirely absent, the company, owing to intrigue and fraud in which one gentleman lost £80,000 and culminated in the shooting of the manager, the iron works closed down, and  today the great and extensive ironworks are a heap of ruins.  From time to time small companies were established to work to coal which was so much needed in the locality but each company failed after a short existence.

Fermanagh Herald August 7th 1915.  JOTTINGS.  The 8th Inniskillings 10th Irish Division arrived in Enniskillen on Monday night by special train.

Mrs. Bussell, of Tooliss, Lisnaskea he, has been notified by the Canadian Record Office that her son, Private Frank Bussell (27778), F.  Company 15th Battalion, 48th Highlanders, 1st Canadian Contingent, has been missing since the battle of Ypres.

Fermanagh Herald August 7th 1915.  A LIQUID FIRE FIGHT IS DESCRIBED BY MR. PHILIP GIBBS, the special correspondent of the Daily Chronicle in a telegram dated July 31.  For the first time, he says the British troops have had to face the ordeal of liquid fire squirted upon them by an enemy which has adopted every diabolical means to gain a temporary success.

They have gained something, it is true – 500 yards of trenches which we had previously held at Hooge –but they lose still more by a further slur upon their name as fighting men.  It will be remembered that we destroyed a German redoubt of considerable size and strength to the North of the Menin road by a successful mine explosion.  Infuriated by this, the enemy has been furiously shelling our trenches, and using every form of bomb and shell.  He began with a heavy cannonade against our trenches, and hurled large numbers of bombs from trench mortars, damaging part of our trenches, but not dislodging the men.  During a lull however, says Mr. Gibbs, the new horror made its appearance.  A flame – either of gas or liquid fire – was projected upon our advanced trenches.

Our men were taken by surprise at this new means of destruction; but in spite of the shock many leapt to their feet firing repeatedly at the flames.  Finally the trenches reached by the burning jets became untenable and the men were compelled to fall back.

Fermanagh Times August 12th, 1915.  BOOTS FOR WINTER WARFARE.  The Army Clothing Department is said to be engaged in the production of a new boot designed to meet the special necessities of winter wear.  The terrible ordeal of our men in the trenches last winter has set the experts thinking out designs of boots which will afford an altogether better protection to the leg than puttees gave under war conditions.  It must be remembered that the puttee was intended more especially for wear in tropical countries, where it was, indeed, found to give excellent protection against the bites of snakes and insects, but in the trenches puttees held the damp and contributed to frostbite.  Hence our soldiers demand for leggings to replace the puttees, the comfort and support of which they had appreciated so much before going into the flooded trenches.

But what became of that eager young chemist, Fritz Haber, whose table-top experiment first solved the world’s nitrogen crisis? A fervent German nationalist, he not only helped, as we have seen, supply Germany with explosives during World War One- he went on to develop chemical weapons. This was too much for his wife, Clara, herself a chemist. Just after his new poison gases were first put to work in the trenches, she took his service revolver and shot herself. Fritz left the very next morning to oversee the gas’s use on the Eastern Front. The Nobel Prize judges weren’t as critical of his wartime work as his wife. In 1918 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his work on nitrogen. And after the war, he used his know-how to develop pesticides – including that notorious group of nitrogen-based toxins, the cyanides. His work then came to an abrupt end in 1933. Although he had converted to Lutheranism, Fritz Haber had been born Jewish, and as far as the Nazis were concerned he had no place in the new Reich. He fled to England, only to be rejected by his fellow chemists because of his wartime record. A year later he headed for Israel, but died of a heart attack en route. And perhaps it was for the best. Had he lived, Fritz Haber would have seen most of his extended family in Germany wiped out by Zyklon B, a poison gas whose development he had overseen, and whose manufacture depended on the process of nitrogen fixation that he had pioneered.

Fermanagh Times August 12th, 1915.  A RECRUITING MEETING IN LISNASKEA.  A recruiting party composed of a number of officers and men accompanied by the band of the eighth Inniskilling Fusiliers now stationed in Enniskillen visited Lisnaskea on Saturday, the fair day when an open air meeting was held in the centre of the town and was attended by a fairly large crowd.  Rev. R. C. Lapham presided and delivered a brief but incisive address in an appeal for men to join the colours.  Rev. Father Benedict, who is on a visit to the district, and who described himself as a London Irish Catholic priest, also made a strong appeal “so that Fermanagh should take its rightful place in the Irish Brigade”.  Major Johnston also spoke and mentioned that they had obtained 40 recruits in Enniskillen last week.

Impartial Reporter.  August 12th 1915.  ANOTHER PERSON KEPT THE FLEET TOGETHER.  The well-known naval expert Mr. F. T. Jane, disputes the claim that has been put forward on behalf of Mr. Winston Churchill that before the outbreak of war he did a great service to the nation by keeping the Fleet together ready for action instead of allowing its demobilisation after the manoeuvres and that he achieved this bold stroke of policy on his own responsibility.  Mr. Jane says no one expected war, and Mr. Churchill was he believes week ending with his wife at Cromer on the East Coast – Cromer which years ago give birth to “The Garden of Sleep”.  It was all “The garden of sleep.”  No one, adds Mr. Jane’, worried except one man and that man was the First Sea Lord of those days – Admiral Prince Louis of Battenberg.  He is the one who kept the fleet together and saved them from the horrors of Belgium.  Prince Louis of Battenberg it may be recalled was driven into retirement from the post of First Sea Lord in response to clamour from the sensational press on the ostensible grounds of his family association with Germany.  Mr. Jane asserts that Prince Louis is half Russian and the other half just exactly as much French as he is German.  In well informed circles however it may be added that it has been asserted that the reasons why Prince Louis continuance at the Admiralty was objectionable to certain influential wire-pullers behind the scenes was concerned with acute political developments shortly before the war.

(From Norfolkcoast.co.uk) THE GARDEN OF SLEEP. The drama critic of the Daily Telegraph and the Morning Post Clement Scott arrived in Norfolk in August 1883. Unable to find himself accommodation he was put up in the Miller’s House in Sidestrand. He was so taken with the area that he wrote a number of articles in the newspapers expounding the virtues of Norfolk, which eventually resulted in Cromer and the surrounding area becoming a fashionable place for holidays for the rich and famous. He named his articles and, subsequent book Poppy-land. The book was dedicated to the Miller’s daughter.

The term Poppy-Land was due to the vast quantities of poppies which grew in, and around, the area which he so loved. One of his favourite places and for which he wrote a poem entitled ‘The Garden of Sleep’, was the church tower of St. Michael and All Angels at Sidestrand.

The church and churchyard stood right on the cliffs and as the land around it was gradually eroded the locals decided to re-locate their community church further inland. They dismantled the church stone by stone and rebuilt it on its current site. However, they left the church tower on the cliffs and also the old graveyard. Every New Year’s Eve for 15 years Scott walked along Tower Lane to the old church tower and churchyard and spent the last few moments of the old year on the cliffs in the place he called his Garden of Sleep.

As the sea continued to claim the land, the locals had the disconcerting sight of seeing the coffins and the remains of those who had been buried in the church since the 15th Century, tumbling one by one, piece by piece into the crashing waves below. Clement Scott died in 1904 and some say that in later life he regretted that he had made Norfolk famous and that he commented that it was no longer the lovely rural landscape he had first visited in 1883.

The Church tower eventually fell over the cliffs in 1915/16, though its image continued to be used on postcards right up to the 1930’s.The new church St. Michael and All Angels at Sidestrand used the headstones from the old churchyard to line the wall by the road.

The Garden of Sleep by Clement Scott

On the grass of the cliff, at the edge of the steep,

God planted a garden – a garden of sleep!

‘Neath the blue of the sky, in the green of the corn,

It is there that the regal red poppies are born!

Brief days of desire, and long dreams of delight,

They are mine when my Poppy-Land cometh in sight.

In music of distance, with eyes that are wet,

it is there I remember, and there I forget!

0! heart of my heart! Where the poppies are born,

I am waiting for thee, in the hush of the corn.

Sleep! Sleep!

From the Cliff to the Deep!

Sleep, my Poppy-Land,

Sleep!

In my garden of sleep, where red poppies are spread,

I wait for the living, along with the dead!

For a tower in ruins stands guard o’er the deep,

At whose feet are green graves of dear women asleep!

Did they love as I love, when they lived by the sea?

Did they wait, as I wait, for the days that may be?

Was it hope or fulfilling that entered each breast,

Ere death gave release, and the poppies gave rest?

0! Life of my life! On the cliffs by the sea,

By the graves in the grass, I am waiting for thee! Sleep! Sleep!

In the dews by the deep!

Sleep, my Poppy-Land,

Sleep!

Fermanagh Herald August 14th 1915.  NEWS HAS JUST BEEN RECEIVED from the War Office by ex-Sergeant Wilkinson, R.I.C., that his younger son, Bernard Joseph has been killed in action in France on the 22nd of July when serving with his regiment the 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  Deceased was only 20 years of age, and had only been at the front a few months.  He was one of three sons serving with the colours.  One of them fought under General Botha in German South West Africa.  We deeply sympathise with his parents in their sad bereavement.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  SMITH EXECUTED.  MURDERER PROTESTS HIS INNOCENCE TO THE LAST.  George Joseph Smith, the murderer in the Brides in the Baths case, paid the penalty of his crime with his life on Friday morning.  Up to the very last he protested his innocence.  He wrote several letters from Pentonville and Maidstone Prisons, and, robbed of their very extensive verbiage, his cry off “I am an innocent man his repeated through every epistle.” His last letter was written to Miss Pegler, “the woman to whom he always returned.”  He left his property to her.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  ESCAPED GERMAN PRISONERS CAUGHT STAYING IN A HOTEL IN CAVAN.  Two German officers who made their escape from the Oldcastle Internment Camp on Wednesday night were arrested at Cavan on Friday.  They engaged rooms in the Farnham Hotel, where they stopped for the night.  One of the officers, Carol Morlang, who was disguises a clergyman, was arrested by Constable Goldrick in the hotel, the other, Alfans Griem, being detained on the Railway Road while on his way, presumably to the station.  Immediately after their escape being discovered their description was circulated all over the countryside, and the police and military authorities were on the lookout for anyone answering their description. It is stated that they affected their escape about 12.00 on Wednesday night through the wire around the camp, and having previously obtained the clothing which they wore as a disguise, threw their own attire away on escaping.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  OBSTRUCTING RECRUITING.  A CASE AT MANORHAMILTON.  At a special court of petty sessions James Kerrigan of Drummonds was brought up in custody charged that he obstructed, molested and hindered Captain John O’Donnell, D. L., His Majesties recruiting officer, in the discharge of his duty.  Constable John Rogers deposed that the accused was present at a recruiting meeting, and endeavoured to interrupt Captain O’Donnell.  Accused said – “We have nothing to thank England for, remember O’Donovan Rossa, you are an idiot, a blithering idiot.”  Accused on cross examination said that he did not use the words charged against him.  Captain O’Donnell deposed that when he was speaking there were shouts of “shut up you idiot.”  Witness denied he was an idiot, and said if he was, God help the rest of them.  He found the crowd very hostile.  As a matter of fact he did not get a single recruit until 8.30 that evening.  The court imposed a fine of one guinea and two shillings and six pence costs or in default of payment five weeks in prison with hard labour.  The accused intimated his intention of appealing, but subsequently paid the fine.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  BELLEEK DISTRICT COUNCIL.  A meeting of the above council held on Saturday, at which the chairman, Mr. P. Scott, J. P. presided.  The Council decided, after some discussion, the rent of the labourers’ cottages under the new scheme in the Belleek rural district, at the sum of six shillings a month.  Applications for cottages being considered, which was the principal business, the meeting concluded.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  SMITH’S WIDOW WEDS.  ECHO OF BRIDES IN BATH CASE.  The marriage took place on Saturday afternoon of Caroline Beatrice Love, nee Thornhill, a native of Leicester and of Thomas John Davies, of New Westminster, British Columbia, who came from Canada to enlist in the Army, and is a sapper in the Royal Engineers.  The bride was the widow of George Smith who is executed on Friday and the special licence for the marriage was actually taken out on that day.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  THE ROYAL EDWARD.  According to information at present available the transport sunk by an enemy submarine in the Aegean Sea last Saturday morning had on board 32 military officers and 1350 troops in addition to the ship’s crew of 220 officers and men.  The troops consisted mainly of reinforcements for the 29th Division and details of the Royal Army Medical Corps.  It is known that about 600 have been saved.  The 29th Division contains at least three Irish regiments – 1st Royal Dublin Fusiliers, 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers, and 1st Munster Fusiliers.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  THE LOSS OF THE ROYAL EDWARD.  It is with very special sorrow we learn of the sinking of the British transport in the Aegean Sea, and the loss of presumably of 1,000 lives.  It is the first disaster in the magnificent transport service of which we have all been so proud since the start of the war.  The loss of so many fine fellows is most deplorable.  In the finest health, after a long spell of training and discipline, and eager to try themselves against the enemy and strike a blow for their country it is distressingly painful to think of them sinking hopelessly and helplessly in the deep waters just as their anticipation of landing and usefulness were on the point of culmination.  Very many of them were loyal Irishmen.  We do not get know yet what homes near to us here may be plunged into sorrow and mourning, but too many families, no matter where located must suffer irreparable grief from the grim tragedy.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  THE WONDERS OF THE TELEGRAPH SYSTEM.  No doubt it is a war at time of war.  Many of our public arrangements are out of gear.  The needs of the country must have priority over private ones.  But why should these affect us locally so that a telegram requires three hours to travel a distance of four miles from Ballyshannon Post Office to Rossnowlagh.  The fault lies in the thorough backwardness and crass stupidity of the telegraphic authorities.  The message in question, will it be credited, instead of being dispatched directly over the four mile wire that connects Ballyshannon and Rossnowlagh had to be sent away to Derry where it was reconveyed back to Donegal, we understand, and thence to Rossnowlagh.  Any private firm adopting a similar way of carrying on its business would find itself very shortly in the bankruptcy court, if not in a lunatic asylum.  Every divergence from medieval methods, every alteration towards up-to-date ness must have its origin in pressure from outside.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  MILITARY NOTES.  The recreation room opened in the Minor Hall of the Townhall on Wednesday week has proved a very popular resort for the men of the Battalion.  Evening after evening men have taken advantage of the facilities offered to them there for writing, reading, games and social intercourse.  The fact that tea and refreshments may be obtained at almost a nominal price no doubt has added immensely to the attractiveness of the rendezvous.  A large number of local ladies have very willingly given their services each evening and the place is conducted on the most economical lines possible.  A good supply of magazines and papers has been given to the room by people in both town and country.  There is a piano, too, and on this instrument many of the soldiers have shown themselves to be capable musicians and songs and choruses help to pass the time very pleasantly.

A telegram has been received from the War Office intimating that Captain John Cecil Parke, of Clones, 6th Leicester Regiment, the well-known international footballer, was wounded at the Dardanelles on the 10th Inst.  Captain Parke is the well-known Irish rugby football and lawn tennis International.  He represented Ireland in the three-quarter line in all her internationals for many seasons, frequently captaining the fifteen.  As a tennis player he was perhaps the most brilliant player in the three Kingdoms.  He was a member of the British team that won the few who of the Davies Cup in Australia, and subsequently captained the British team, that went to America.  He is a brother of Mr. W. A. Parke, solicitor, Clones.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  WHY WE GAINED AT HOOGE.  FOR THE FIRST TIME THE GERMANS MET THEIR MATCH IN ARTILLERY.  The Daily Mail special correspondent with the British Army in the field, Mr. G.  A Valentine Williams states that our men were successful east of Ypres last week because “for the first time the Germans met their match in artillery.  Our guns had the ammunition required.” “Our artillery was magnificent.  As our men saw our shells crashing in a never ending roar into the German positions and wreathing all the German lines in the mist and smoke they were related to think that at length the Germans were getting what our fellows have so often had to endure.  We all realized that this time at any rate, our guns had the ammunition required to deal with the immense battery which is what the German army really is.  Our advance resulted in the capture of 1,200 yards of trenches and 164 prisoners, including three officers, two machine guns, and a trench mortar as well as a large stock of German ammunition, notably bombs.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  DONEGAL LABOURERS’ FLEEING SCOTLAND.  There was a falling off in the number of Nationalist labourers’ arriving at Londonderry from Scotland on Saturday to escape registration.  Between200 and 300 came.  On Saturday there were almost 600 arrivals by boat and 200 by a train.  Practically all are Donegal men.  They were objects of derision, and soldiers could be seen ironically saluting them.  Half a dozen of Sunday’s arrivals were breakfasting in a lodging house, when the proprietor presented an alien registration form, and the party took fright and left the house without finishing the breakfast.

In Mayo two trains with very nearly 200 able bodied men arrived in the island of Achill from England and Scotland and were fine strong men all heading out to the west from England.  They admit they have left good jobs with good pay and that there is no work for them at home.  The hay is saved and the potatoes would not be fit to dig for a long time yet.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  AMERICANS AEROPLANES FOR FRANCE.  A PROPOSED GIFT OF 1000 MACHINES.  One thousand American aeroplanes, purchased with American money and officered by American aviators, are to be offered by an American organisation to France for the use of the French Army in the present war, according to a cable dispatch from the Paris correspondent of the New York World.  Circulars are to be issued to the graduates of Yale, Harvard, and Princeton, inviting them on patriotic grounds to aid in the defence of their country.  They will be asked to join the French Aviation Corps for the duration of the war, after which their military experience we’ll qualify them to become reserve aviators in the United States.  They will be formed into a special corps in France, under their own officers, and will receive an additional £10 a month over and above the regular French flying man’s pay.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915. THE GERMAN’S NEW AIRCRAFT.  The Germans super warplane or battle aeroplane has been designed to carry out the same tactics which the cruisers of the notorious Emden type were built to pursue on the ocean.  These aerial craft are essentially raiders, and they be launched against towns, villages, cities, strategic military centres, artillery fortresses or other defences.  Their outstanding features are an extensive carrying capacity of both men and ammunition in the form of bombs, while they are also powerfully armed with machine guns. The Germans have solved one or two perplexing problems in connection with the arming of aeroplanes in their new aerial machine gun. A new system allows the gun to be moved through the requisite firing arches and the gun can be swung from side to side and brought into the firing position with a minimum of effort and so the fire may be directed from either broadside as desired.  The new warplane is able to carry a larger crew in order to protect the aeroplane.  This is achieved by means of what has already become known as the aerial sniper.  Like his colleagues working in the trenches he is a crack quick shot and adept with the automatic arm.  His specific duty is to pick off the marksmen in any enemy machines.  These aerial snipers are selected men who have passed through a special course of aeronautical training.  When not engaged in sniping duties the rifleman is free to pursue bomb throwing activities.  Owing to the comparatively slow speed at which these large battle aeroplanes can travel the task of bomb throwing is appreciably facilitated, and great accuracy of aim is assured.  The steady platform which the aeroplane offers enables the machine gun fire to be concentrated far more effectively than is the case with the average aeroplane.  Steadiness and low velocity in flight are a decided assistance to the sniper because he is an able to take his aim with greater deliberation.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  BELLEEK.  A man named James William Elliott, belonging to the town land of Killymore, was admitted on Wednesday to the workhouse infirmary, Ballyshannon, suffering from concussion of the brain and other injuries, the result of accidentally falling off a horse near Belleek.

When two men were working in a bog in the townland of Corry, near Belleek, they discovered a firkin of butter, weighing about 56 lbs, buried to a depth of 8 feet, and in a good state of preservation.  It is supposed to have been deposited in the bog for a considerable time.

Impartial Reporter.  August 19th 1915.  DISPUTE ABOUT A PRIEST’S BURIAL.  The remains of the Rev. J.  O’Toole, P.  P., which were interned in the church grounds of Kilmeena, West Mayo, were taken up and reinterred during the night, it is presumed by some parishioners in a grave dug within the church itself.  The ecclesiastical authorities having given direction as to the place of burial within a few feet of the church, which is a small one, a deputation to the Most Rev. Dr. Higgins auxiliary Bishop of Tuam, requested that the dead priests should be buried in a spot which the deceased had indicated within the sacred edifice. Dr. Higgins said he could not depart from the directions of the Archbishop. Accordingly after Office and High Mass the internment took place outside the church. Although there were murmurs of dissatisfaction the people separated quietly. It is said about 35 men took part in the retransfer but none of the relatives of the deceased participated in it.

Impartial Reporter.  August 19th 1915.  A SERIOUS FRACAS IN ENNISKILLEN BARRACKS AND TWO MEN IN HOSPITAL.  On Tuesday night last a serious affray took place in the main barracks Enniskillen. A detachment numbering about 50 men arrived from the Dublin fusiliers and this party since they arrived do not seem to have been particularly happy in their new surroundings. It is a well-known fact that the north cannot get on very well with the south and vice versa and the Dublin men since their arrival in the north have shown their antipathy to the transfer. It seems that the party of Dublin men had some trouble among themselves and eventually a section barricaded a room against all comers.  The men on duty battered at the door and eventually succeeded in breaking an open.  So fierce was the opposition that the fire hose had to be turned upon the recalcitrant who seeing the position was hopeless surrendered.  Some 20 panes of glass were broken and two men had to be removed to hospital suffering from bayonet wounds and two others had minor wounds, principally cuts.  Seven men were arrested and put in the guardroom to await a court martial.  After their arrest the Dublin men cursed the Inniskillings and acted in rowdy manner while  being conveyed to the cells.

Impartial Reporter.  August 19th 1915.  CAN ENNISKILLEN HELP?  While Enniskillen has already nobly responded to the call for recruits and has given over 600 of its inhabitants to the fighting forces might it not also be the site for a proposed munitions factory.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  MORE GERMAN MURDERS.  The White Star liner Arabic outward bound for New York from Liverpool was torpedoed and sunk off the Cork Coast on Thursday morning.  The pirates gave no warning of the outrage and the vessel disappeared in 11 minutes, her side being torn out.  There were about to 426 persons aboard and of these 50 are missing, including six passengers and 44 of the crew.  This latest submarine outrage took place close to the scene of that which resulted in the sinking of the Lusitania with its awful death toll.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  PERSONAL.  The death of Captain James C.  Johnston, adjutant of the 6th Royal Irish Fusiliers was announced on Saturday and received with all the more regret as the last male in the direct line of the Johnston family of Magheramena Castle.  Captain Johnston was High Sheriff for the county in 1910 and during the last three years of the Aberdeen regime in the Irish Viceroyalty was Private Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant.  He was a fine soldier, and had served through the Boer campaign with the 14th Hussars.  The late Captain Johnston who was educated at Charterhouse and Sandhurst was a Resident Magistrate for County Meath. The deceased was a cousin to Major Johnston, Recruiting Officer, Enniskillen.

Rev. W. H. Massy recently Methodist Minister in Enniskillen, while riding a motor cycle was severely injured in a collision with a large motor car driven by a Belfast lad, and has been conveyed to the Cottage Hospital, Coleraine.

Second lieutenant Reg.  S.  Trimble, 6th Royal Irish Fusiliers, wounded and suffering from shock at the Dardanelles has been removed to the Military Hospital, the Citadel, Cairo.  Second lieutenant L.  Falls is in the same hospital suffering from wounds in the leg.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  SINN FEINERS IN TYRONE.  PRIEST ON THE PLATFORM.  On Sunday afternoon a mobilisation of several companies of the Irish Volunteers (the Sinn Fein section) took place at Carrickmore, County Tyrone when some 200 members, about 1/3 of who carried rifles, paraded under the command of Mr. McCrory, Clogher, the county instructor. A crowd of about 700-800 also assembled.  A police note taker was present, and a considerable force of constabulary drawn from a number of stations in the county was in attendance under the command of District Inspector Barrington, Dungannon and Head Constable Fallon.  At a public meeting, Rev. C Shortt, CC, Carrickmore presided.  The chairman said Mr. Redmond had slippery English politicians to deal with who would try to make them swallow the exclusion of Ulster but if he had control of the Volunteers he could say, I can’t oblige you for I have obstinate fellows behind me who are driving me on.  (Cheers.)

Fermanagh Herald August 21st 1915.  A telegram has been received from the War Office intimating that captain John Cecil Parke, of Clones, 6th Leinster Regiment, the well-known International footballer, was wounded at the Dardanelles on the 10th Inst..  Captain Parke is the well-known Irish rugby football and lawn tennis International.  He represented Ireland in the three-quarter line in all her Internationals for many seasons, frequently captaining the 15.  As a tennis player, he was perhaps the most brilliant player in the Three Kingdoms.  He was a member of the British team that won the Davis Cup in Australia, and subsequently captained the British team that went to America.

The relatives of Private Alex Armstrong, of Maguiresbridge, have learned from the War Office that he died of wounds in France.  He belonged to the 2nd Inniskillings.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  IN MEMORY OF GALLANT INNISKILLING S.  DROWNED AT PORT ELIZABETH 60 YEARS AGO.  We are indebted to Mr. Arthur Rice, brother of our townsman, Mr. Edward Rice, for the following very interesting account of the unveiling of a memorial tablet recalling a pathetically tragic event in the career of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers so far back as three score years ago.  On the 11th of July in St. Mary’s Church, Port Elizabeth, the tablet erected by the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in memory of the members of the regiment who were lost in the wreck of the troopship, Charlotte, in 1854, was unveiled.  The prayer of dedication was recited by the Venerable Archdeacon Wirgman, after which the tablet was uncovered by Mrs. Dowsett, as the oldest parishioner of Saint Mary’s who remembers the wreck.  The tablet is erected close to the door and its inscription is as follows: In memory of 62 rank and file, 11 women and 26 children of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers who perished in the wreck of the Troopship Charlotte on the rocks at the end of Jesse Street, on September 20th, 1854.  This Tablet was placed here by the regiment, A.D. 1914.  R. I. P.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  CATTLE DRIVING IN IRELAND.  Violent outbreaks of cattle driving have taken place in various northern parts of King’s County the occasion being the annual grass lettings.  The drivers wanted the lands let to them, which the owners refused.  200 extra police have been drafted into the affected districts.  58 of the drivers were yesterday returned for trial to the county assizes.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  THE VALUE OF HORSES.  Owing to the stoppage of buying horses for the army, prices have fallen of greatly during the past month.  In many fairs recently, though the show of animals of all kinds on offer was considerable, very few business transactions took place.  Owners holding out for the high rates of three months ago when army purchasers were active failed to realise that the demand has slackened off.  Buyers in the trade are as anxious as ever to take horses at the normal prices.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  THE EVIL OF SEPARATION ALLOWANCE.  Alice Harren, Head street, had three summonses, one for disorderly conduct and two for simple drunkenness, Acting–Sergeant McGowan and Constable Cryan were complainants.  Defendant said two of her sons had been killed and another son had come home wounded last week.  The R.M.  Are you in receipt of separation allowance?  Defendant – Yes18 shillings and four pence a week.  My two sons have been killed.  The R.M. – Is that the manner in which you pay respect to their memory by getting drunk.  A months imprisonment in the first case was ordered, and a fine of 40 shillings and costs in each of the other cases, the  Chairman remarking that defendant had been repeatedly warned.  Mary Love, Enniskillen was fined 20 shillings for drunkenness.  She was also in receipt of separation allowance and she was warned that if she came back there a recommendation would be made by the Bench to have the separation allowance stopped.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  ANOTHER ATLANTIC LINER TORPEDOED.  THE WHITE STAR “ARABIC” SUNK WITH NO WARNING GIVEN.  The White Star Liner Arabic fell a victim to a German submarine on Thursday morning of the Fastnet.  She was torpedoed without warning, and foundered in 10 minutes.  The liner was on her way from Liverpool to New York, with a crew of 243 and 180 passengers.  Eleven of the ship’s boats were launched, and the occupants were picked up by another vessel.  Three hundred and ninety one persons are known to have been saved, leaving only 32 to be accounted for.  The Arabic is the first White Star Liner to have been sunk by a submarine.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  ROLL OF HONOUR.  A FERMANAGH OFFICER KILLED.  CAPTAIN J. C. JOHNSTON, MAGHERAMENA.  A telegram has been received from the War Office to say that Captain J. C. Johnston, adjutant of the6th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, has been killed in action in the he Dardanelles.  Captain Johnston served through their Boer War with the 14thHussars, and was Private Secretary to the Earl of Aberdeen during the last three years of his Viceroyalty.  He was educated at Charterhouse and Sandhurst, and was recently appointed Resident Magistrates for the County of Meath.  His family residence was Magheramena Castle, County Fermanagh, of which county he was High Sheriff in the year 1910.

Second–Lieutenant R. S. Trimble, 6th Irish Fusiliers, wounded at the Dardanelles, is a son of Mr. W. C. Trimble, Enniskillen.  He was engaged with Messrs. Guinness, and was a member of the Wanderers Football Club.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  THE HIDDEN DEATH.  HOW I SANK THE MAJESTIC AND TRIUMPH.  The New York Globe publishes the following description of the sinking of the British warships Triumph and Majestic off the Dardanelles given to its correspondent by Captain Otto Herzing, the commander of the German submarine, whom the correspondent describes as “a maker of world history.”

“In the early morning light we saw the Triumph and Majestic lying off the coast constantly encircled by destroyers.  Through the periscope I saw a destroyer coming directly for us.  We dived and the destroyer passed immediately over us with a sound like that of a motor car.  We came up immediately.  I took aim through the periscope at the Triumph, pressed the button automatically firing the torpedo, and the projectiles slipped noiselessly into the water.  We dived again.  The explosion which followed was as terrific as though it had been in the forepart of the submarine itself.

Then we lay hidden for two days and a half after which we came up again in the midst of the British ships.  Just before noon looking through the periscope, I saw the Majestic surrounded by 10 ships steaming around her in a constant circle for her protection.  I could see the Majestic Sailors on the deck taking their noonday nap.  Shall I disturb them?  I thought.  Then seeing a welcome space between the circling ships I pressed the electric button and the torpedo was going.  It caught the Majestic a little to the rear of amidships.  We dived again in silence.  It is remarkably quiet in a submarine when underwater, and we hear sounds, being able to distinguish various propellers by the different rumblings.  We noticed that the bombardment from the ships had ceased, for they had been shelling the Turkish land positions.  We remain submerged for several hours and then came to the surface to find that the British had disappeared, and all search for them was in vain.  We came to Constantinople, arriving yesterday morning having spent 42 days in the submarine without rest or let up. Captain Herzing’s record, declares the Globe correspondent is unique.  Aside from firing the first torpedo sinking a ship and sinking two more warships in the Dardanelles, he sank five English and French freighter ships which were in Havre last November.  The torpedo tube from which was fired the torpedo which sank the Pathfinder has been engraved with that name. Now the name Triumph has been added, while the name Majestic is engraved on the second tube.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.

THE HARVEST MEN OF DONEGAL.

The war has brought its humours; it has brought its horrors too,

Its horrors which have held the world in thrall;

But there is nothing more distressing to the Irishman who’s true,

Than the Harvestmen’s return to Donegal.

They were only asked to Register upon a certain date,

Their age and occupation – that was all;

Perhaps they might consent to earn good wages from the State,

These sturdy Harvestmen of Donegal.

Sure, the form wasn’t binding; it was well within their choice –

They were told – to still ignore the trumpets call;

But they were perverse to reason, they listened to no voice –

But the impulse to return to Donegal.

From Scotland’s fertile Lothians, from Ayrshire’s grainlands bright,

From Lancashire to Southern Cornwall;

They cleared off like silent Arabs, some in the dead of night,

Back to their little homes in Donegal.

Reviled and jeered and scorned by all who saw their flight,

At Greenock little kiddies tried to maul

These gallant Irish “Exiles” rushing on with all their might

To catch the boat en route for Donegal.

Their homes they reached in safely, though they gained ignoble fame;

Meanwhile they are free from any prying Paul,

For liberty’s a jewel oft known by another name

From the Police point of view – in Donegal.

The Huns may strangled Belgium, they made devastate fair France,

Our great empire may either stand or fall;

Such wrongs inspire no Harvestmen to take up gun or lance,

He’ll squat behind the hills of Donegal.

At Demonstrations he’ll be out arrayed in war paint green,

For freedoms glorious cause he’ll loudly bawl;

But Britain in the future should ignore his petty spleen,

For serfdom’s good enough for Donegal.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  LISNASKEA CHILD’S DEATH.  The inquest was resumed by Mr. James Mulligan, J.P., coroner, on Monday night touching the death of the nine days old male child of Martha Burnes, a domestic servant.  The child, it seems, was left by the mother with a Mrs. Donaghy, at Derryadd, and on Mrs. Donaghy, junior, putting it into the cradle she found it was dead.  Medical evidence of the post-mortem examination showed that the body was emaciated and 2lb lighter than the average baby.  There was an extravasation of blood on the outside of the skull and a corresponding effusion on the brain, probably the result of a fall or a blow.  The viscera and other organs were forwarded to Mr. Patten, public analyst, Belfast, and he reported that he found no poisonous substance.  The Coroner commented on the action of the Lisnaskea Workhouse officials in refusing admission to the mother and child five days before its death.  The foreman Mr. McMahon said that if the mother and child had been admitted to the workhouse the child might have been alive yet.  The jury found that the deceased died from the effect of a blow or a fall on the skull, but how or by whom this was inflicted they had no evidence.  Private P.  McCormick, who at the outbreak of the war was porter in Lisnaskea Workhouse, has been wounded in the foot at the Dardanelles and now lies in hospital in Cairo.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  DARDANELLES.  THE LANDING AT SUVLA BAY.  The landing at Suvla Bay was a complete and staggering surprise for the Turks who had been expecting a new attack on the Asiatic side.  Never in military operations have any enemy been so hoodwinked.  On the appointed night warships, transports, destroyers and trawlers arrived at Suvla Bay and disembarked the troops when the Turks were all waiting feverishly for an attack on the Asiatic side of the Dardanelles.  Every soldier carried three days’ rations as well as trenching tools.  As the men landed they advanced 6 miles inland.  Daylight came and still the work was proceeding with the greatest possible speed.  Artillery and supplies and vast quantities were put on shore and still no opposition was experienced.  The warships were silent and for 24 hours the operation was carried out without a single shot from big gun or rifle being fired. The Turks rushed forces to the spot and on the second night both sides dug themselves in, fought for position in groups with bayonets and even with entrenching tools.  It is estimated that 700,000 were brought up by the enemy.  In the morning light a terrific battle began.  Strong bodies of troops thrown against several points of the British lines were hurled back.  All day long the lines of the fighting men turned and twisted turned and twisted again but never broke.

(From Wikipedia) The landing at Suvla Bay was an amphibious landing made at Suvla on the Aegean coast of Gallipoli peninsula in the Ottoman Empire as part of the August Offensive, the final British attempt to break the deadlock of the Battle of Gallipoli. The landing, which commenced on the night of 6 August 1915, was intended to support a breakout from the Anzac sector, five miles (8 km) to the south. Despite facing light opposition, the landing at Suvla was mismanaged from the outset and quickly reached the same stalemate conditions that prevailed on the Anzac and Helles fronts. On 15 August, after a week of indecision and inactivity, the British commander at Suvla, Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Stopford was dismissed. His performance in command was one of the most incompetent feats of generalship of the First World War.

The Suvla landing was to be made by the newly formed British IX Corps, initially comprising two brigades of the 10th (Irish) Division and the entire 11th (Northern) Division. Command of IX Corps was given to Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Stopford. British military historian J.F.C. Fuller said of Stopford that he had “no conception of what generalship meant” and indeed he was appointed not on his experience (he had seen little combat and had never commanded men in battle) or his energy and enthusiasm (he was aged 61 and had retired in 1909) but because of his position on the list of seniority. Hamilton had requested either Lieutenant-General Julian Byng or Lieutenant-General Henry Rawlinson, both experienced Western Front corps commanders, but both were junior to Lieutenant-General Sir Bryan Mahon, commander of the 10th Division and so, by a process of elimination, Stopford was selected.

July 1915.

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  CROM CASTLE.  Owing to recent events the Crom Demesne with the exception of the Old Castle and the direct road thereto, which is indicated by notices, is closed to the public until further notice.  The public may visit the Old Castle on Fridays, but special permission must be obtained for large parties and pic– nics.  Horse drawn vehicles and carriages must, after depositing visitors at the Old Castle, leave the Demesne and only return when required by the visitors.  Motors, motor cycles, and bicycles can remain outside the Old Castle.  All grounds including the Old Castle and Gad Island are as usual closed to the public on Sundays.

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  THE SCENIC BEAUTIES OF FERMANAGH.  A large party of Southern Pressman are just now journeying through our Northern Provence with the view of describing its scenic attractions to the further development of the tourist traffic.  Northern Journalists are after making a like pleasant pilgrimage to Southern picturesque resorts.  Why has Fermanagh not been included in the Ulster Districts?  Who was responsible for the itinerary?  We notice that the arrangements have been made under influential auspices including those of the Lord Mayors of Belfast and Cork.  The reception and gatherings have shown that the movement is a solid one, practical, and really devised to do good to the country.  Why, then, was one of the most charming lake and mountain counties altogether omitted from the visiting programme?  Very possibly Fermanagh has only itself to blame for being out of most of the enriching and distinguishing activities that mark more enterprising and pushy communities.  Our people want to waken up to a better knowledge of their own possessions.  We want first to get a knowledge of them ourselves, to learn how to appreciate and value them and then to extend that knowledge and appreciation as far afield as possible.  Meanwhile we suffer from our own supineness.

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  THINGS PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW.  Is the White Hart Entry, Townhall Street, Enniskillen, now become the most disordered the part of the town?

Why are we now hearing so very little about the two million pound electrical lighting scheme which was (or is?) to be started at Belleek?  Would one’s money be better invested in that or in the War loan?

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  WAR NEWS.  Among the officers included in the recent casualty list is Lieutenant R. K.  Lloyd, of the 10th King’s Liverpool Regiment (Liverpool Scottish), who is reported wounded.  Lieutenant Lloyd is the brilliant Portora half, who captained Ireland last season and was associated with the wonderful triumphs of the great Liverpool Rugby Football Club.  With him in the Liverpool team were Lieutenant W.  R.  Poulton–Palmer and Lieutenant F.  H.  Turner, the English and Scottish captains, both of whom have been killed in action.

We noticed with very great pleasure that Captain Maurice F.  Day, 2nd King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, who is the youngest son of Right Rev. Dr. Day, Bishop of Clogher, of Bishopscourt, Clones, has been awarded the Military Cross.  Captain Day is adjutant of his battalion, and has been twice mentioned in dispatches.

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  WAR NEWS.  Since the middle of last August never a day has gone by without the names of Ulster Volunteers appearing in the casualty lists.  Even in the so-called Irish Division which went to England a few weeks ago, amidst Mr. Redmond’s demonstrations of joy, over a third of the men are Ulster Protestants, and another third are English Protestants.

Our Ulster Division was equipped and clothed by local enterprise at no trouble to the military authorities and with a notable saving of expense.  This was the work of a few businessmen associated with the headquarters of the Ulster Volunteers.

It is hardly necessary to mention the splendid work which is being done in our shipyards, which Mr. Lloyd George publicly stated were the most satisfactory in the kingdom.  Similarly our great textile resources have been freely placed at the disposal of the Government, and in no class of work has there been any trouble between employers and workers, thanks to their mutual common sense and patriotism.

No doubt we shall have again as before whining about the large number of old men to be found in Ireland.  We have no desire to deal with such persons.  We direct attention solely to men of military age.  Of these one and four has enlisted in Ulster, when only one in 17 has enlisted in the three Nationalist provinces.  If we were to omit the Nationalist counties of Ulster where the recruiting has been very poor, it would be seen how magnificent has been the Unionist response to the call for men.

At the same time we have never been slow to admit that those Nationalists who have joined the colours fought magnificently.  They are a credit not only to Ireland but to the whole Empire.

A hospital ship arrived in Dublin on Sunday morning from France with 731 wounded soldiers, of whom 230 were lying down cases. 300 of the men were sent to Belfast, and the remainder stay in Dublin.

The miners are the most Radical and Socialists of the Labour section of the country, of course, the most adverse to being compelled to increase the output of coal.  They object even to be brought under the terms of the Munitions Bill.  This is probably because all the miners who are patriots have gone to the front, and only those who are not – only Socialists and Radicals – are left.

Fermanagh Times July 1st, 1915.  THE GENERALSHIP AND THE SOLDIERSHIP OF THE RUSSIANS HAVE BEEN MAGNIFICENT, but, as Mr. Lloyd George remarked, and it is a only stating the obvious, the best and bravest of troops can be of little avail unless they have guns and ammunition to use against the enemy.  It is, we are convinced, in the failure of these, and not in strategy or courage, that the Russians have failed.  It is a lesson and a home lesson, for all our workers that they must be up and doing, working in season and out of season instead of striking and slacking if our own troops are not to fall in the same way and fail for the same cause.

In two ways lack of British munitions is responsible for the Russian losses in Galicia.  We were unable to supply our Ally with shells, and our own want of machine guns and high explosives in the West enabled the Germans in the middle of April, to transfer some part of their western forces to the Eastern theatre.  The Government conceal these things from us so long as concealment was possible, and it is small wonder that the comparatively sudden realization of our mistakes, and of their costly consequences, has depressed many minds.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  FERMANAGH AMBULANCE.  Next week the motor ambulance ‘Fermanagh’ will be on tour through the county, and people will have an opportunity of viewing it.  It has cost £550, the funds being collected by Mr. E. M. Archdale, D. L.  The ambulance will go to the Ulster Division which will have 21 motor ambulances, all provided by public subscription.  Many other divisions have no ambulance of their own.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  BITS AND PIECES.  Dundalk Prison has been added to the list of closed prisons in Ireland.

The fruit trees and potato crops in of the west of Ireland have been destroyed by frost.

At Chicago on Saturday, Davio Resta won the 500 mile automobile race at an average speed of 97.6 miles per hour.  This is stated to be a record.

The Noxious Weeds Act was sought to be put into force at the Tyrone Committee of Agriculture, but failed.  Irish ‘farmers’ prefer weeds to the trouble of extirpating them.  Our proverbial laziness or indolence prevents us keeping our fields and fences as tidy as they should be.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  TURKS PAINT THEMSELVES GREEN.  Lieutenant Colonel Leslie Wilson, D.S.O., M.P. writing from Gallipoli says: – ‘The Turks are brave and clever snipers.  The frequently place small trees on their back and crawl up to the trenches. I watched a rush which seemed to be shaking a lot although there was no wind then I and another man got on to it with rifles.  It moved quickly enough then.  Some of the Turks paint themselves and their rifles green, and are practically invisible.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  FUNERAL AT ENNISKILLEN.  The remains of Sergeant Major Hall of the 4th Inniskilling Fusiliers where interned at Enniskillen on Friday afternoon with military honours.  Deceased, who had been in the army for a number of years, and served through the South African war, was well known and highly respected in Enniskillen, where he had been stationed for a number of years.  Deceased had undergone an operation and complications followed, terminating fatally.  The cortege was headed by the bands of the 4th Inniskillings stationed at Buncrana, and the funeral was also attended by a company of men from the unit under the command of Captain W. G. Nixon.  The coffin was wrapped in a Union Jack and was borne to the Roman Catholic cemetery.  The deceased had been a member of the Church of England and was attended by Canon Webb just before his death, but he was buried in the Roman Catholic burying ground according to the rights of the Roman Catholic Church, his wife being a member of this church.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  ARMS AND AMMUNITION IN ULSTER.  Mr. Ginnell (N). asked the Under Secretary for War if he would say what quantity of the arms and ammunition privately imported into Ulster in 1913 and 1914 had been placed at the disposal of his Majesty’s Government for the purposes of the war; by whose authority and for what purpose stores of arms and ammunition were kept in the mansions of certain landlords in Ulster; and what action the Army Council proposed to take regarding them.

Mr. Tenant – No arms and ammunition reporting to have been imported into Ulster during the period mentioned have been placed at the disposal of the War Office.  I have no information on the second part of the question, and I am not aware that any action is called for.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  Fermanagh Gaelic Feis.  (Contributed.) It was remarkable that the numbers present were smaller than usual, but still the grounds of the Technical School were well filled with comely maidens and many stalwart young men who might well have been expected to have been filling the ranks of the army.  The number of entries was about the usual.  The Feis although interesting and deserving of more encouragement, was somewhat monotonous from the limited and undeveloped nature of its competitions.  Dancing seemed to evoke most interest, and the little girls looked pretty as they went through the unemotional evolutions of the Irish folk dances which strange to say, are unemotional, and appeared to lack life and colour in comparison with the Russian, Spanish, or even Morris traditional dances; yet to be truly Irish they should be altogether unemotional.

The clear voices in the choral competitions were very pleasant.  The dramatic recitations in Gaelic did not attract much interest, as the words had not the musical assistance which enlivens a performance so much.  In the history competitions, the amount of knowledge shown was rather disappointing, even the battle of the Boyne seeming a misty subject to some.  It was amusing to watch a child when asked its candid opinion of James 11 hesitate between his real opinion and what it thought might be the required answer.  A girl about 15 was asked whether she thought the violation of the Treaty of Limerick or of Belgium’s independence the greater crime.  After a few moments thought she replied the violation of Belgium, and her examiner seem to be well pleased with her answer, although his partner did not seem to agree with that opinion.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  AN INNISKILLINGS KILLS EIGHT GERMANS.  A comrade writing home to his mother in Limavady alludes to Private Robert McLaughlin, 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers by first stating – If every man killed as many Germans has Bob McLaughlin, the war would soon be over.  The letter narrated a hot time a small detachment of the 2nd Inniskillings had somewhere in France.  This small handful of men had taken possession of a house, and as they were being subjected to heavy shelling, their position soon became untenable, as the masonry was falling all round them, and it was decided to clear out.  Just after emerging from the shattered building a German machine gun began to rake the little band of Inniskillings, and all the officers were shot down.  Led by Private Robert McLaughlin the men charged the machine gun and captured it, all its team been stricken down.  McLaughlin, who had a number of hand grenades, hurled them with the unerring aim as he advanced and killed 8 Germans.  It is hoped that his gallantry will be recognized although no officers were present to witness it.  McLaughlin was a reservist and proceeded to the front last November.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  DUELS IN THE AIR.  A THRILLING STORY.  THE AEROPLANE IN FLAMES.  On Friday June 18 there were two engagements in the air on this day.  Near Roulers one of the British machines on reconnaissance duly encountered a hostile aeroplane, and after a machine gun duel, forced it to descend hurriedly to earth.  A combat with machine guns at a height well over a mile above the earth’s surface, though now not uncommon, may be considered to provide some excitement, but on the same day two other officers of the Royal Flying Corps had a still more exciting experience.  While reconnoitring over Poelcapelle at a height of about 4000 feet they engaged a large biplane having a double fuselage, two engines and a pair of propellers.  The German machine at first circled around the British shooting at it with a machine gun but so far as is known not inflicting any damage. Then the observers fire about 50 rounds in return at under 200 yards range.

This had some effect for the hostile biplane was seen to waver.  After some more shots its engine stopped and its guns stopped and its nose dived to the level of 2,000 feet, where it flattened out its course, flying slowly and erratically under heavy fire from the antiaircraft  guns below..  The pilot turned towards the British lines to complete his reconnaissance when his machine was hit and he decided to make for home but the petrol tank had been picked and as the aeroplane glided downwards on the slant the petrol was set alight by the exhaust and run down the front of the body of the aeroplane which travelled on to the accompaniment of a rattle of musketry as the unexpended rounds of the machine gun ammunition exploded in the heat and those in the pilot’s loaded revolver went off.

The pilot however did not lose control and the aeroplane proceeded steadily on its downward course. Before it reached the ground a large part of the framework had been destroyed, and even the hardwood blades of the propeller were so much burned that the propellers ceased to revolve in the rush of air.  When the machine finally landed behind the British lines both officers were severely burnt and the pilot on climbing hurriedly and of the blazing wreck tripped over a wire stay, fell, and sprained his knee.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  THE DEATH OF REV. MR. MITCHELL.  HIS WORK, HIS LIFE, HIS CHARACTER.  The rather sudden illness of the Rev. S. C. Mitchell, Presbyterian minister of Enniskillen terminated rather unexpectedly in his death early on Thursday morning last about 1.00.  It came as a shock to the community and only comparatively few had been aware of his illness. The Rev. Samuel Cuthbert Mitchell was instituted as minister of the Enniskillen congregation 33 years ago in succession to the Rev. Alex Cooper Maclatchy, M.  A., and during his pastorate the present new church in East Bridge Street which was opened in 1897 was provided, and the Manse built.  Of the 25 members of the congregation who had signed the “call” 33 years ago only three remain, Mr. James Harvey, Mr. Thomas Wylie, and Mr W. Copeland Trimble, so great have been the ravages of time. He went to Leghorn in Italy as pastor of the Scots church there and when he returned a great change was noticed in his voice and appearance, not for the better – he appeared to have aged; but he was unconscious of any decadence in health and spirits and spoke of feeling younger and brighter than before.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915.  A SLANDER ACTION.  A HUSBAND IS RESPONSIBLE FOR HIS WIFE’S TONGUE.  This was held in Fermanagh County Court on Saturday the plaintiff being Mrs. McCaffrey, Sessiagh and the defendants Thomas Owens and his wife Annie Owens.  The plaintiff said that she married 16 years ago to Owen McCaffrey and had no children until the 18th of April last.  It had been told to her and that the child was not her husband’s.  Andrew McManus said that on the 31st of March Mrs. Owen told him that the plaintiff’s husband was not the father of her child but mentioned another man as the father.  On different occasions before that she told him the same story and this became general conversation all over the country.

Maggie McManus on the 14th of August detailed several conversations with Mrs Owens. In cross-examination the witness denied that she was ever put out of houses in the country for carrying stories. His Honour said that he was satisfied that the evidence of McManus was true and there must be a decree and the only question was the amount of the decree.  The decree would fall on the shoulders of Thomas Owens, who was comparatively innocent, but he was liable for his wife’s torts which is one of the privileges of married life.  The costs in that case would be very severe and he would be inclined to give heavy damages if it were not for the fact that the costs would be heavy and amount to between £10 and £20.  This action was only brought to get rid of this very scandalous annoyance and the plaintiff did not want heavy damages.  All she wanted was clear her character and put a stop to these imputations and as Thomas Owens met the case very firmly and was a decent sort of man, the damages would be only £3 and costs.

Impartial Reporter.  July 1 1915. FERMANAGH LADIES DEMAND CONSCRIPTION.  SHOP ASSISTANTS CRITICISED.  RECRUITING COMMITTEES A FAILURE.  11 ATTEND OUT OF 40.  Some weeks ago the Central Recruiting Committee in Fermanagh acting under instruction from headquarters, appointed a Ladies Recruiting Committee, to assist in the campaign to get men for the army.  To further develop the scope of this committee it was decided to ask the ladies of the Central Committee to appoint subcommittees and accordingly a meeting was summoned for Tuesday last when only 11 attended.  Mr. J.  Collum, H.  M.  L. explained the object of the meeting and said that it was thought that Ladies Committees could do a lot more good than men.  There were he continued a lot of shop assistants and certainly it was not man’s duties to be in shops at the present moment when girls could take their places and amongst these the ladies would have influence. Of course proprietors of shops should give them every encouragement and undertake to take back after the war any assistant who enlists.  Among the comments made – Mrs. E.  M.  Archdale – “The women are as bad as the men. I point out that I have four sons serving, and the reply is – it is different for the quality.”  Mrs. Column – “the farmers’ sons have done the worst at the present crisis.”  A unanimous resolution was passed stating that the time has now arrived that some scheme of conscription should be put in force in this country.

Fermanagh Herald July 3rd. 1915.  ANGLING ON THE ERNE.  THE LORD LIEUTENANT IN BALLYSHANNON.  For the week ending Saturday, the 26th of June the fishing has been very good at Ballyshannon. Mr. Glynn had 19 salmon and grilse from 4lb to 17 ½ pounds.  Lough Melvin for the week ending 26th inst., Mr. J. Gallacher took 15 Gillaroo and sonaghan trout weighing 10 ½ pounds on the 24th.  Many anglers over the lake caught between 10 and 20 trout.  On Monday Lord Wimborne, the Lord Lieutenant spent the greater portion of the day angling for salmon in the Erne from Ballyshannon Bridge.

Fermanagh Herald July 3rd. 1915.  IT IS ANNOUNCED THAT LIEUTENANT-COLONEL SIR JOHN MILBANKE, BART., V. C., commanding the Notts Yeomanry, has been killed in action at the Dardanelles.  Sir John, who succeeded to the baronetcy in 1899, was married in the following year to Amelia, daughter of the Hon. Charles Frederick Crichton, eldest surviving brother of the late Earl of Erne.  Lady Milbanke’s only brother, Major H. F. Crichton, of the Irish Guards was killed early in the war.  Sir John Milbanke was born in 1872, and served in the 10th Hussars, retiring with the rank of major in 1911.  He rejoined last October and was posted to the command of the Notts Yeomanry.  During the Boer War he was A. D. C. to Sir John French, and was seriously wounded.  It was in that campaign that he won the VC for gallantry, rescuing a wounded trooper after he himself had been seriously injured.  The baronetcy dates back to 1661, and a daughter of a previous holder of the title was the wife of Lord Byron.

Fermanagh Herald July 3rd. 1915.  THE VALUE OF THE HOLY MASS.  At the hour of death the Masses you have heard will be your greatest consolation.  Every Mass will go with you to judgment and plead for pardon.  Every Mass can diminish the temporal punishment due to your sins, more or less, according to your fervour. The power of Satan over you is diminished.  You afford of the souls in Purgatory the greatest possible relief.  One Mass heard during your life will be of more benefit to you than many heard for you after death. You shorten your Purgatory by every Mass. Every Mass wins for you a higher degree of Glory in heaven. You are blessed in your temporal goods and affairs.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  FACTS AND FANCIES.  THE VICTORIA CROSS.  The Victoria Cross was first established in 1856 and is awarded for conspicuous bravery on the part of naval and military officers, and of any member of either service who has done a brilliant deed in the face of the enemy.  The badge is a plain crosse-patee in bronze with straight bounding lines, and is attached by the letter V to a bronze bar laureated.  The centrepiece is a lion and upon an Imperial Crown with “For Valour” inscrolled below.  The bar bears on the reverse the name and rank of the recipient, and the cross the name and date of the distinguished action or campaign.  In the case of the Army it is suspended from the left breast by the Garter-red ribbon and in the Navy by a blue ribbon.  It carries with it in the case of non–coms and privates a pension of £10 a year, £5 being added for each bar.  Although the intrinsic value of the decoration is but fourpence, its wearer must be saluted by all members of the services no matter what their rank.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  “A GHASTLY AFFAIR.”  A DONEGAL TYPHUS OUTBREAK.  A serious outbreak of typhus fever has occurred in the Dungloe district of Donegal (the County, which has provided fewer men for the war than any other in Ireland), and at Saturday’s meeting of the Glenties Rural Council it was stated that six patients were in the fever hospital attached to the institution.  One man afflicted with the disease had died under horrible circumstances in his own home.  Dr. C. E. R.  Gardiner reported that one of the patients died on Thursday.  He wired to the relieving officer, to bury the body.  When the coffin arrived on Friday, the doctor and a nurse put the body into it and placed it outside the house, where it remained until about 1.00 on Sunday morning, when, owing to the failure of the relieving officer to do his duty, the doctor and two nurses dug a grave and buried the body in a field near the house.  This was not the first time, the doctor added, that they had to bury a fever infected corpse, but it would be the last.  As there was nobody in the house to do anything but a decrepit old woman and a girl of 13 years, we asked relatives and neighbours to leave milk, turf, and water on the roadside.  With great ado the nurses managed to beg a sufficient quantity of milk, mostly sour, but how they managed for turf and water is a puzzle to me, as nobody would bring them either.  There were some cattle about the place which the relatives were very anxious about, thinking that the nurses and I should attend to them.  It seemed not to matter that human beings should die and rot above ground as long as the cattle were all right.  On Tuesday when the three patients were convalescing and the ambulance had been ordered to take them to the fever hospital, a brother of the patient arrived on the scene, assaulted the nurses, frightened the patient’s by shouting and falling over their beds, and was only induced to leave the place when the police arrived.  Next morning, when the police had gone, he reappeared and commenced the same antics.  By threats of imprisonment under the Public Health Act I induced him to go with the fever ambulance.  We burned the bedding, clothes and the fowl that died of the fever.  The byre is in an extremely filthy state, and the house swarming with vermin, and ought, in my opinion, to be burned.  The whole ghastly affair is an almost incredible example of cruelty, selfishness, and cowardice which it is humiliating to think could occur in Ireland in the 20th century.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915. SCOTCHED.  NATIONALIST BUILDING SCHEME.  SANCTION OF L. G. B. REFUSED.  The much discussed scheme of the Nationalist Party in Enniskillen for adding to their voting strength in the East Ward by erecting a number of new houses and peopling them with the faithful “swallows” has received its quietus – at least for a considerable time to come – at the hands of the Local Government Board, the Secretary of which wrote to the or Urban Council at their meeting on Monday as follows: – “I am directed by the Local Government Board for Ireland to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 2nd of June forwarding an application from the Enniskillen Urban District Council for sanction to a loan of £8,500 pounds for the purpose of erecting working class lodging houses under the Housing of the Working Classes Acts, and I am to state that, in the present circumstances the proposed expenditure is not such as the Board would feel justified in sanctioning borrowing for.”

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  THINGS PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW.  Has not Captain J. G. Porter, Belleisle not covered himself, his family and his native county with honour by his gallantry in the present war?

Is there not likely to be another Local Government inquiry and a clearance in Lisnaskea Workhouse over the constant bickering’s going on there between officials?

Has the Scottish Co-operative Wholesale Society not set a wonderfully good example to other great business firms by investing no less than £250,000 in the War Loan?

Does the condition of the lake at the East Bridge, Enniskillen at the present time not constitute a scandal?

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  FERMANAGH MEN REWARDED FOR GALLANTRY.  Captain John Grey Porter, 9th Queen’s Royal Lancers, a son of Mr. J.  Porter Porter, of Belleisle, and who has been twice wounded has also been made a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order.  How he won the coveted honour is officially recorded: – “On 10 May, 1915, when a very heavy attack was made on the front line near Hooge, Captain Porter went up to the infantry line there, and brought back very valuable information regarding the situation.  On the 13th of May he rendered the greatest possible assistance in taking messages under terrific shell fire to various parts of the line, and reporting on various local situations.  He set an example of coolness and total disregard of danger that was beyond all praise.  He had been twice wounded previously in this campaign.

Major Charles William Henry Crichton, 10th Prince of Wales Own Royal Hussars, has been made a Companion of the D. S. O. for gallantry which is officially described as follows: – Near Ypres, on the 13th of May, 1915, showed conspicuous gallantry and ability in collecting and rallying men who were retiring under heavy shell fire through the 10th Hussars position.  In our counter attacks he continued to direct operations, giving great encouragement to his men as he lay in the open under heavy shell fire with his leg shattered.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  OBITUARY. REV. A.  BEATTIE, IRVINESTOWN.  The death of Rev. Archibald Beattie which took place at Irvinestown on Monday cast a gloom over the town, and the news of his demise was heard with heartfelt regret by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances in the neighbourhood.  For 32 years the deceased gentleman laboured with much acceptance in the Irvinestown district and since he was installed in the Presbyterian Church there he has enjoyed the respect and esteem of a devoted congregation and all creeds and classes regarded him as one whom respect was a duty, and his acquaintance was a privilege.  He was ordained as a minister of the gospel in May 1876 and he was installed in Irvinestown in May 1881.  Though he resigned from active duties about four years ago, he took a deep practical interest in Church work up to the time of his death, and the welfare of the congregation of which he had so long been pastor was to him a matter of deep concern.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  A FARMER ASSAULTED.  John Magee, a farmer of Trustan, charged a young fellow named Patrick McCloskey, of Brookeborough, with assault on the 28th ult.  Plaintiff described his movements in Brookeborough that night, and on his way home he was overtaken by the defendant at Mr. Rainbird’s gate. They had some words about witness allowing his servant girl to go to a football match and afterwards about some wood the defendant had bought in Enniskillen to make a press for the priest vestments.  Defendant then shoved witness into the hedge and beat him severely.  The defendant was fined 10 shillings and sixpence and three shillings and sixpence cost or in default a week’s imprisonment.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  A RECRUITING MEETING AT KESH.  SPIRITED APPEALS BY REPRESENTATIVE SPEAKERS.  MEN WHO REMAINED OUT OF EARSHOT AFRAID OF HEARING A FEW HOME TRUTHS.  The recruiting meeting which was held in Kesh, on Monday was remarkable for two reasons fault.  One was the number of young men who purposely remained away, and the other the number of fine young men, who were present but did not respond to the earnest and spirited appeals that were made to them by the different speakers.  It was the fair day and therefore there was a good gathering in the village.  No effort was spared by the local committee to have the objects of the meeting attained, and the arrangements were admirably carried out by the local secretary, Mr. James A. Aiken.  The brass band of the 4th Battalion Inniskillings from Omagh played through the village at intervals and the meeting was held at 11.00 outside the Courthouse, where a platform was erected for the speakers.  The motor ambulance presented by County Fermanagh to the Ulster Division arrived from Riversdale where it had been overnight in charge of Mr. E. M. Archdale, D.  L., and it was immediately surrounded by an admiring crowd.  It is splendidly equipped, having four stretchers, in which four wounded men can be conveyed for treatment, a complete medicine chest comprising all modern first aid requisites, and by the side of the driver there is an ever ready patent fire extinguisher

The meeting started punctually at the hour fixed and there was a large attendance, but although every house in the district where there were two or more available men of military age was communicated with by circular acquainting the house holders of the time and object of the meeting that turnout of likely young men was disappointing.

The village of Kesh itself has sent a practically all its sons to the various camps, but we were informed, the country round can do a great deal better.  In fact we were told that with the exception of several men who had been in the North Irish Horse there were very few in the district round about who had joined the colours.  The earlier part of the day was showery and the meeting had scarcely been opened when rain fell heavily and continued till the end when the clouds rolled away and a beautiful evening followed.

Colonel Leslie who is in command of the 12th Battalion at Finner Camp said that the last time he spoke in his own village of Pettigo they did not obtain one single recruit and he hoped  that day the Kesh district would be shame his own village by at least getting one man into Kitchener’s Army.  “Think it over, men of Fermanagh,” concluded Colonel Leslie, “you’re in absolute danger, the British Fleet once destroyed we’re done; our armies are fighting gallantly, but they are making no progress whenever, and they are just where the where months ago.  I am glad to hear the farmers are making money, but if the Germans come here they are only making money for the Germans to spend.  Think it over men of Fermanagh and join the great and glorious army of King George the Fifth. (Loud cheers.) We understand that four recruits were obtained and it must be admitted that this is but a poor recompense for the energy and forethought displayed by the Kesh Committee, the members of which deserve the warmest congratulations for getting together so many representative and influential speakers and for the manner in which all details were looked after during the day.

Fermanagh Times July 8th, 1915.  WAR NEWS.  Private James Quigley, Dublin Fusiliers, son of Mr. Patrick Quigley, Clones, is reported to have been killed in action.  His brother Owen, who served in the trenches throughout the winter has been invalided home.

The unofficial report of the death in action of the Private John Roy, Irish Guards, has been officially confirmed.  He was a native of Clones, and his brother is serving with the colours.

Private Stephen Johnston, son of Mr. Robert Johnston, Clones, who enlisted in the Irish Guards after the outbreak of war, and has been missing since the 18th of May, is now unofficially reported killed.

Impartial Reporter.  July 8 1915.  NOTES.  Mr. Harry Lauder the great Scottish comedian has applied for £10,000  of the War Loan.  The Scottish Co-operative Wholesale Society has subscribed £250,000.

Drinking by soldiers’ wives is said to be less excessive than ever in England.

The total British casualties at the storming of Dargai, the charge of Balaclava, the battles of Omdurman, Waterloo and Magersfontein, were in the aggregate 8,480.  Up till recently our losses in the Dardanelles were 38,636.

Trillick.  Longevity in a cat.  “Old Girl” is the pet name of a celebrated mouser belonging to Mr. and Mrs. Stafford, Ivy Cottage, seems to be a most appropriate title.  He is 27 years old and is still doing faithful service in the third generation of that family.  All her teeth are gone except three.

Impartial Reporter.  July 8 1915.  RECRUITING AT KESH.  THE CALL TO ARMS.  THE VISIT OF THE DEPOT BAND.  Monday last being Kesh fair day a recruiting meeting was held on the village for the purpose of trying to bring home to the people of the district the realities and needs of the present great war.  Fewer recruits in proportion to population have perhaps gone to the army from the Kesh district, than any other Unionist portions of Fermanagh, and the recruiting committee for the district up to this have had a poor response to their appeal.  Before the meeting the band from the depot paraded the village under Mr. Ramsay band master and attracted many young people in its wake.  Colonel Stewart of the Depot declared that the farmers’ sons had not done as well as they might.  Mr. John McHugh, J.  P., Chairman of the County Council, took exception to this statement, and in a capable, patriotic address, gave examples of how the farmers’ sons had recruited and the difficulties under which they laboured.  If the government did not get sufficient men, he declared, the only means that were left to them was compulsion.  A half a dozen recruits for the 12th (Reserve) Inniskillings were secured.

Impartial Reporter.  July 8 1915.  INNISKILLING OFFICERS AWARDED THE D.S.O.  Their Distinguished Service Order has been awarded to the following officers: – Captain Edward William Atkinson, 1st Batt. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  On the 2nd of May, 1915 during operations south of Krithin, for gallantly leading a counterattack capturing a Turkish trench 300 yards to his front and for the efficient command of his battalion, all the senior officers having become casualties.

Captain Cecil Ridings, 1st Batt.  the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  On April 28, 1915 during operations the south of Krithin, for exceptionally gallant and capable leading under difficult conditions maintaining a forward position in spite of heavy losses at a critical moment, though unsupported on either flank and being himself severely wounded.

Impartial Reporter.  July 8 1915.  GALLANT FERMANAGHMEN AWARDED THE D.S.O.  This is one of the highest awards that can be granted an officer for service in the field and has been awarded to two Fermanagh officers Captain John Grey Porter, 9th Queen’s Royal Lancers for on the 10th of May, 1915 when a very heavy attack was made on the front line near Hooge, Captain Porter went up to the infantry line their and brought back very valuable information regarding the situation.  On the 13th of May he rendered the greatest possible assistance in taking messages under terrific shell fire to various parts of the line, and reporting on various local situations.  He set an example of coolness and total disregard of danger that was beyond all praise.  He has been twice wounded in this campaign.  He is a son of Mr. J.  Porter Porter, of Belleisle, County Fermanagh.

Major Charles William Henry Crichton, 10th (Prince of Wales Own) Royal Hussars.  Near Ypres on the 13th of May, 1915, showing conspicuous gallantry and ability in collecting and rallying men who were retiring under heavy shell fire through the 10th Hussars position.  In our counter attacks he continued to direct operations giving great encouragement to his men when he lay in the open under heavy shell fire with his leg shattered.  Major Crichton is the eldest son of the Honourable Henry George Louis Crichton, K.C.B, and a brother of the fourth Earl of Erne.

Impartial Reporter.  July 8 1915.  DARDANELLES LOSSES.  Mr. Asquith in the House of Commons on Thursday said the naval and military casualties in the Dardanelles to the 31st of May were as follows: – killed 496 officers and 6927 men.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  AN EX-PAUPER EARNS £15 A WEEK.  THE WORKHOUSES ARE EMPTIED BY THE WAR.  “There are less men in the workhouse today than there have been for the past quarter of a century, and probably for a much longer period than that”, said the master of a large workhouse to a London to Daily Chronicle representative.

“In my own case I have not a single able-bodied man here.  Since the war began several hundred men of every age and condition, have gone out and got work and well-paid work too.  Men who have done no work for many years may now be found doing munitions and other work and earning good wages.

Enquiries made at many metropolitan workhouses confirmed the statement.  The able-bodied male pauper –and often the pauper who is not able bodied has vanished.  He has reappeared as the ordinary honest and industrious workmen, driving his van or shouldering his tool bag in a manner he is not known for years.

In the East End, the Daily Chronicle representative was informed there is a man of over 60 who, until recently, was a pauper receiving outdoor relief.  His Christmas dinner was provided by a charity, but he subsequently got work in a munitions factory, and is now earning sometimes as much as £15 in one week.  The ex-pauper, amusing to relate, has acquired the habit of smoking cigars – and also of outing his own acquaintances in the street.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  POSSIBLE BOOT SHORTAGE.  The demand for army boots has affected the ordinary trade in this country, and the result will be a smaller range of footwear and much advance prices and the disappearance of the lower priced boots, says the Daily Mail.  There is prospect of a shortage in civilian footwear.  Already boots cost an average of three shillings more a pair.  A Northampton manufacturer confessed the other day that he was experiencing no difficulty in securing advanced prices.  The only trouble is in filling orders.  Very few new samples are being shown, and these are mostly boots which can be handled concurrently with army orders.  Special work, though very highly priced, is discouraged.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  FOUR STEAMER ARE SUNK BY GERMAN SUBMARINES.  For more vessels have been sunk off the Scilly isles by a German submarines – the London steamer Richmond (3,214) tons from Queenstown to Boulogne, the Belgian steamer Bodugant (1,441) tons from Bayonne to Barry; the Leith steamer Craigard (3,286 tonnes) from Galveston to Harve; and the steamer Gatsby (3,497) tons, Cape Breton for London.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  JOTTINGS.  Private Stephen Johnston, son of Mr. Robert Johnston, Clones, who enlisted in the Irish Guards after the outbreak of war, and has been missing since the 18th of May, is now unofficially reported killed.

The unofficial reports of the death in action of Private John Roy, Irish Guards, already reported has been officially confirmed.  He was a native of Clones and a brother of his is serving with the colours.

Private James Quigley, Dublin Fusiliers son of Mr. Patrick Quigley, Clones, is reported to have been killed in action.  His brother Owen, who served in the trenches throughout the winter, has been invalided home.

Mr. Patrick McDermott, of Newtownbutler, has been notified by the War Office that his son, Private Mark McDermott, of the second Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, is missing since the 16th of May.  He joined the army immediately after the outbreak of war, and has seen much service in France and Belgium.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  THE WAR LOAN.  BIG SUBSCRIPTIONS.  FIVE MILLION POUNDS FROM GUINNESS.  Today brings a number of notable subscriptions to the War Loan.  They are Messrs. Guinness & Company £5,000,000; Imperial Tobacco Company of Great Britain and Ireland, one million; United Tobacco Company, £50,000; Bath City Council – practically the whole of its sinking fund, amounting to £50,000; Northampton Town Council – All the available funds, approximately £16,000.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  A GREAT ACTIVITY ON THE WESTERN FRONT.  A REPORT FROM SIR JOHN FRENCH.  Since my last report there has been no change in the situation on our front.  Fighting has been mainly confined to intermittent artillery duels, of which a feature has been the employment by the enemy of a large quantity of gas shells, particularly in the neighbourhood of Ypres.  During this period the enemy has exploded eight mines at different points of our front without any damage to our trenches.  On the other hand, on the 30th of June we blew in 50 yards of the enemy’s front line north of Neuve Chapelle.  An evening of the 4th of July, north of Ypres, a German sap was blown in by our artillery fire and a platoon of infantry advanced to complete its destruction.  The few Germans who survived the artillery bombardment were driven out by the bayonet, and a machine gun in the sap was found to be destroyed.  Our casualties were insignificant, and the platoon returned practically intact to its own trench, having completely succeeded in its mission.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  CLONES MAN MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES.  In the list of those mentioned in Sir John French’s dispatches occurs the name of the Clones man, number 64880, Private Reuben C. Farrell, A Company, 1st Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers.  Private Farrell has seen service in the Boer war, for which he holds decorations, and has distinguished himself for bravery in the present war.  During an engagement when an officer was seriously wounded, Private Farrell with others risked his life under heavy shell fire and rescue the wounded officer, whom he conveyed to where his wounds could be dressed.  Private Reuben Farrell is the eldest of three brothers who have served in the army during the present campaign, but, unfortunately, the second eldest (John), a sergeant in the Royal Irish Rifles was accidentally drowned on the 5th of March last in the river Lys, and Thomas, the youngest, a lance-corporal in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, has been discharged through wounds received at Armentières. These soldiers are the sons of Mr. Christopher Farrell, photographer, Clones.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  BRIDES IN BATH CASE.  SMITH FOUND GUILTY.  PRISONER’S OUTBURST.  The trial of George Smith for the alleged murder of Bessie Constance Annie Mundy in a bath at Herne Bay, came to its ninth and final hearing today.  As in all great murder trials, public interest increased as the case reached a climax and this morning the court was besieged by a crowd of people anxious to be spectators of the last dramatic scenes.  Mr. Justice Scrutton, before he commenced his summing up, had to order the fastening of the doors, saying that enough people were already accommodated in court.  Most of the spectators were women.

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  A THRILLING STORY FROM THE PEN OF SIR IAN HAMILTON describing in detail the earlier operations by the land forces cooperating with the Fleet in the attack on the Gallipoli Peninsula and the Dardanelles has just been issued.  It is the story of a military operation without precedent in history – the successful landing of troops on a precipitous coast whose natural defensive advantages were accentuated by Turkish cunning, German ingenuity and every conceivable modern military device.  The land forces were under Sir Ian Hamilton, and in graphic language he tells of the deeds of the Irish regiments in the landing operations on “V” beach.  When the enemy defences had been heavily bombarded by the fleet, three companies of the Dublins were to be towed ashore, closely followed by the collier River Clyde – the ship which has been referred to as playing a part like that of the wooden horse of Troy.  She was carrying between decks the balance of the Dublin Fusiliers, the Munster Fusiliers, and the West Riding Field Company, among other details.  No sign was made by the Turks while the collier and the boats were approaching, but a tornado of fire swept them immediately the first boat touched bottom.  The Dublin Fusiliers suffered exceedingly heavy losses while in the boats, but those who gained ground gallantly advanced, taking cover wherever possible.  Many of the Munsters were shot down or were drowned while gallantly pressing to affect the landing, but 24 hours after disembarkation began the survivors of the Dublin and Munster Fusiliers were crouching on the beach, and under Lieutenant–Colonels Doughty-Wylie and Williams they went forward with other regiments, to the brilliant attack which resulted in the capture of Hill 141.  He also pays a tribute to the fine work of the Inniskilling Fusiliers, who he says advanced with their right on the Krithia Ravine and reached a point about ¾ of a mile southwest of Krithia.  This was, however, the farthest limit reached and later on in the day they fell into line with other corps.  The tribute paid by Sir Ian to one section of the force may be applied to the landing operations as a whole – “No finer feat of arms has ever been achieved by the British soldier or any other soldier.”

Fermanagh Herald July 10th. 1915.  THE LORD LIEUTENANT AS AN ANGLER IN BALLYSHANNON AND BELLEEK DISTRICTS.  On the 28th ult.  his Excellency the Lord Lt.  of Ireland fished the river and caught one salmon and lost another from Ballyshannon Bridge.  His Excellency left Cliff for Dublin on the 29th ult and is expected back on the 8th inst..  The three gillies employed by the Lord Lt.  fished the river for salmon throughout the week, and caught salmon and grilse from 6lbs to 13lbs.  Messers. Glynn and Stone had similar captures of salmon and grilse, as recorded in last Wednesday’s issue.  Sea trout anglers fishing down the estuary and below Assaroe Falls enjoyed fair sport.  Mr. Sweeney took a bag of 13 sea trout on the 28th ult. – largest fish 4lbs.  Mr. Hildebrand and a friend had a similar bag of trout on the 29th ult, largest fish 3½ lbs, and several other good catches were taken.

Lough Melvin, for the week ending the 3rd inst.  – Sport among the trout continued good and many bags of gillaroo and sonaghan and trout were taken by anglers daily, containing from 15 to over 20 trout.  Mr. Burns had a bag of 15 trout, weighing 12 ½ lbs, on the 29th ult, the largest three fish gillaroo trout, 2lbs each, and 1 ½ lbs.  Mr. A.  and Mr. F.  Crawford had several good bags of trout on the first, second and third inst.  Amongst them were a number of gillaroo trout from 1lb to2lb each.

Fermanagh Times July 15th, 1915.  FRICTION AT LISNASKEA.  For a period extending not over weeks or even months, but actually over years there has been what looks uncommonly like a feud going on between the officials engaged in Lisnaskea Workhouse and Infirmary, respectively, with results most prejudicial to the efficient and harmonious workings of those institutions.  First, it is about one thing and then about another; the most trifling incident is magnified into a matter of grave importance and continuous friction and heat and a want of cooperation between the officials concerned is the natural and inevitable result.  It is time this was finally stopped.  Half measures and warnings have already been tried in Lisnaskea and have proved a complete failure. Drastic measures are now absolutely necessary.  Into the merits of the present dispute it is not our intention or province to go.  The Master, (Mr. Lunny) virtually, and in fact called Nurse Power a liar, and she returned the compliment. Suffice to say that two weeks ago the Master made somewhat serious charges and said he would prove them if given an opportunity to do so.  The Guardians took him at his word and appointed Saturday last for the purpose, but when asked to fulfil his promise the Master failed to do so.  Now, these charges are either true or untrue.  If true then the nurses against whom they were made should be held responsible and strong action taken regarding them but if untrue then the Master should be called upon to retract them and apologise as well as to give a satisfactory explanation as to why they were ever made.  The position at present is unsatisfactory to all parties and if allowed to pass will only result in a fresh ebulition of temper and recrimination in a short time.

Fermanagh Times July 15th, 1915.  THE “TWELFTH.” Monday it was only a ghost of a “Twelfth” as we have been accustomed for generations to know it.  Only in the neighbourhood of Belfast were there any processions, and as neither drum was heard nor flag was seen at these they were most unlike their musical and picturesque predecessors.  In Fermanagh here we had not even a silent and colourless parade.  We obeyed strictly the wish of the Grand Lodge that the historic anniversary should be observed solely by special services on a the Sunday in the Churches. Great congregations of the members of the Orange Institution, wearing their sashes attended Divine Worship and listened reverently to the Word and the Gospel discourse had a direct application to the famous events that naturally filled their minds.  But on the 12th the work-a-day was much as usual.  In the town there was no cessation of business; in the country, farmstead’s and field monopolised attention.

Fermanagh Times July 15th, 1915.  WAR PROSPERITY.  AMAZING DISCLOSURES.  “A pound a week and no husband to keep!  Why its Paradise – I tell you ma’am this war is too good to last.”  (Working woman’s remarks quoted by the Lady Seely, The Times, the June 10, 1915.

“The percentage of unemployment among the trade unionists is lower than at any time during the past 25 years.  During the five months ended May 31 the rate of wages of 1,937,440 workers increased upon last year’s rate by £343,374 a week or three shillings and sixpence per head exclusive of overtime.” Paupers to the number of 16,500 have left the workhouses compared with a year ago. (Board of Trade Labour Gazette.)

Any man who can crawl out of the workhouse can get well-paid work today.  (Master of a big London workhouse.)  The working woman was right.  Never were there such times for the working people of this country.  The little chance points emphasized above are but few  among scores that might be quoted, all tending to show that the prosperity of the working classes through the war is, for the moment, such as has never been touched in the history of the country.  But one thing on a moment’s consideration is apparent.  £21,000,000 a week is being spent by the government for war purposes.

Scorers of poorer wives, whose sole income in the past came from her husband’s work, have now in addition the billeting of soldiers, through which work they can add appreciably to the family income.  And lastly there is that great source of revenue to the poorest working families – separation allowance.  Is a well-known fact – sinister, and as it may be on our normal industrial conditions – that thousands of families, especially in the poorer quarters of the great cities and in the rural districts, where wages were low, have a bigger income now through “father” being in the Army than ever they have known before.  “A pound a week and no husband to keep; why it’s Paradise!”

To the ironworking families of the Clyde, were a father and son may bring home £20 a week between them; to munitions making families of Birmingham, where a family income of £30 a week is not unknown; to the woollen and clothing families of Yorkshire, where every boy or girl can now find a place in mill or factory; to the ammunition makers of Woolwich and district, where boys of 17 years can afford to turn up their noses (and have done so) at wages of 27 shillings a week – what is the increased cost of living to these lucky people?  And a there are many such.

Fermanagh Times July 15th, 1915.  FROM THE FRONT TO CLONELLY.  Mr. Harry Hart, a stepson of Mr. Folliott Barton, J. P., Clonelly, and who is at the front with King Edward’s Horse, writing home to his mother says – 2nd K. E. H., June 25? 1915.  My Dear Mother, – We are back in billets again.  Came out last night 24th and had a walk of about 5 miles to a village where we were billeted in some houses and had a most enjoyable sleep on flags, free from the sound of even our own guns, which was something of a relief.  No one is keen to know what is going to happen, but we are moving further down the line for some reason or other.

I had a funny experience last night, as the first thing we do when we have a rest is to go and look for coffee and something to eat.  Another chap and I walked into a house, and he asked in his own good French if we could get some coffee.  The ladies’ reply was, “No, my boy, we have no coffee, but we have some tea on especially for you.”  You should have seen the look on that chaps face.  I don’t know what mine was like.  It turned out she was from Southampton and was a governess out here, and it also turned out that we had a good time.  I can tell you we weren’t sorry to get out, six days at that the redoubt was quite enough.  You can’t exactly keep clean when you are in the trenches no matter what you do.  We were very lucky as our troop got out without any casualties for the week.  There was something doing the last day we were there –the bally Huns put up three mines, but they all missed.  One went up close to us, and I was lucky on being on the lookout just when she went up and let me tell you if you had been on the top of it you would have had a good ride for your shilling a day.  Strange to say we heard no report.  I was waiting to get knocked over with the report after I saw the splash.

July 2 1915 My Dear Mother, -we are shifting out tonight up to the front line for four days and then four days on the reserve – that I believe is the programme.  So if you don’t get a letter for a few days you will know everything is OK.  The trenches here are an easy thing; very little doing they say.  Last night the Germans sent up about a dozen shells over our way and we counted seven squibs – don’t know whether their munition is getting bad or the wet ground was the cause of it; I hope the former.  The weather round here has been rotten lately, it won’t rain and it won’t keep decently fine.  Have struck a better part of the country here, the people are much better, and most of the children talk English some of them very well; they teach it in the schools.

Fermanagh Times July 15th, 1915.  OUR LITTLE WARS.  NYASALAND SKIRMISH. HOW A FERMANAGH AN OFFICER, LIEUTENANT IRVINE WAS KILLED.  The British forces were composed of 50 Northern Rhodesia police and 25 Northern Rhodesia Rifles as they attacked an enemy stockade that was raiding Nyasaland villages under British protection.  The attacking party, under Lt.  Irvine, rushed the gate of the stockade with great bravery and immediately heavy firing started. Irvine was shot and the bullet entering his left arm blew away about 4 inches of bone.  Sergeant Mills got to him first, and, although nearly dead from loss of blood, Irvine said “Leave me, Mills, leave me and take charge of the men.  As the poor fellow was carried away he smiled and waved his right arm in farewell. He was operated on next morning his arm being taken off and died that night.  The fighting was all over in 20 minutes.  Lt. Irvine was a brother of Major Irvine, D. L., of Killadeas and of Mr. Geoffrey Irvine, Goblusk.

Impartial Reporter.  July 15 1915.  TRILLICK RURAL COUNCIL met on Saturday and discussed extracts from the last report of Dr. Stephenson, medical inspector.  In it he referred to common lodging houses not being registered; town pump not in repair; no sewage system in Trillick; no bylaws under the Public Health Act; and no efficient disinfecting apparatus.  A deputation from the road contractors in the district appeared and asked for either an increase in the amount of their contract or a reduction in the amount of road metal, owing to the increased cost of labour and material.

Impartial Reporter.  July 15 1915.  DERRYGONNELLY.  Mister J. Nixon of Cosbystown, was almost killed by his own bull on Friday.  Mr. Nixon was driving his cattle from one field to another when the animal attacked him.  Mr. Nixon held him for a long time by the horns and was getting exhausted and fell upon the ground when Mr. R.  Armstrong and his brother John arrived, and drove off the infuriated brute.

Impartial Reporter.  July 15 1915.  BELLEEK FARMERS SUICIDE.  An inquest has been held on Friday by Mr. George A.  Atkinson, coroner for North Fermanagh, on the body of John Dundas, farmer, of Killybeg, Belleek.  Deceased, who was unmarried, and was aged 65, was found sitting on his bedside with his throat cut by a razor.  He was then dead.  Dr. Kelly Belleek stated that he had treated the deceased his mind had been overbalanced.  The jury returned a verdict of suicide during temporary insanity.

Impartial Reporter.  July 15 1915.  AT DERRYLIN PETTY SESSIONS, before Dr. Irwin, R.M. (in the chair), W. G. Winslow, A. Burns and Thomas Bullock, justices.  District inspector Marrinan charged a man named Francis Reilly, of Derrylea with seriously assaulting one Peter Gunn.  The depositions of Gunn were read that on the 9th of June he was assaulted by Reilly with the result that he had to go to Enniskillen hospital for treatment.  He declined to prosecute and the District Inspector said he had a summons issued against the defendant for a common assault.  Gunn, the injured man told the District Inspector that he was better and nothing the worse of his injuries.  Peter Gunn swore that on the evening in question at about 9.00 he was standing at the Derrylea crossroads when Reilly came up and asked them was he as good a man as he was yesterday.  Witness said nothing and Riley started to use his feet and hands on him.  He was knocked down and kicked in the private parts.  He felt weak and was attended by a doctor who had him sent to Enniskillen hospital.  He did not believe there would be any repetition of the assault.  Defendant admitted the offence and the chairman in cautioning him said he was getting off very lightly for a fine of five shillings.

Impartial Reporter.  July 15 1915.  THE TWELFTH – A DRUMLESS CELEBRATION.  In the ordinary course of events the anniversary of the battle of the Boyne would have been celebrated with all its old time ceremonial on Monday last, but owing to the present Great War, all demonstrations were vetoed, and the only outward celebrations by the orange brethren were the church parades in various parts of the country.  It was a drumless Twelfth  No bands paraded to herald the anniversary, no drums sounded as the flags were hoisted on the churches.  The flags this year were in most cases Union Jacks instead of the Orange and Blue.

Fermanagh Herald July 17th. 1915.  A BELFAST EXTERMINATION CAMPAIGN.  THE CORPORATION SERVES EVICTION NOTICES ON 160 POOR FAMILIES IN WEST BELFAST TO DISENFRANCHISE SOLDIERS.  Writing to the Irish News Mr. Joseph Devlin, M.P. for West Belfast says “I wish to call attention to what I think will be admitted to be one of the most outrageous transactions which have ever disgraced any community, and which, I am sure will shocked people of humane and patriotic instincts in every part of the United Kingdom. In one small area of West Belfast steps have been taken by the Corporation to throw out on the roadside some 160 poor Nationalist families, who owe no rent, and scarcely one of which is not represented in the Army by one or more members.  It is safe to say that, outside the Unionists of Belfast, there is no political party in these countries who would take advantage of the present unparalleled national situation to perpetuate such an outrage.

On Thursday last, by order of the Public Health Committee of the Belfast Cooperation, which is dominated by two leading members of the West Belfast Unionist Association, 160 families in a small and very limited area of West Belfast were served with notices to quit.  This order was made at a meeting not called for this purpose, but, as the notice states to consider the supply of coal to a local asylum.  The notices are served to terminate the tenancies on July 19th, so that the votes of the absent soldiers would be lost, because they would not be in possession of their houses has tenants on July 20th, the last day of the qualifying period and they or their families would be unable, even if other houses where available, which they are not, to get into other houses in time to preserve their franchise.  This makes the motive of the notices to quit tolerably clear.

Fermanagh Herald July 17th. 1915.  THE WELSH COAL CRISIS.  DRASTIC GOVERNMENT DECISION.  It has been decided by the government to put down the threatened Welsh coal will strike, under the provisions of the Munitions of War Act.  The proclamation, which will be issued on Wednesday, will have the effect of making it an offence to take part in a strike or lockout unless the difference has been reported to the Board of Trade and the Board of Trade have not, within 21 days of such report, referred it for settlement by one of the methods prescribed in the Act.  The announcement in Parliament was received with cheers.

Fermanagh Herald July 17th. 1915.  IT IS WITH SINCERE SYMPATHY that we announce the death in action of Private John Spillane, Head Street, Enniskillen, while serving with the British Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.  Deceased leaves a widow and four small children to mourn his loss.  Sincere sympathy is extended to the deceased’s father and his wife and other relatives in their sad loss.  Prayers were offered up for the repose of his soul in St., Michael’s church on Sunday.  R.I.P.

LIEUTENANT CHRISTOPHER T. C.  IRVINE, OF THE INDIAN ARMY, who belonged to a well-known Fermanagh family, was killed at the Dardanelles a few days ago.  He was the younger son of the late Inspector General G. J. Irvine, R. N. and brother of Mr. Charles E. Irvine, Drumgoon Manor, Maguiresbridge, Co., Fermanagh, and Enniskillen whose two sons are serving their country.  In 1909 he entered the army as a second lieutenant in the Connaught Rangers, transferring three years later to the Indian army, and being attached to the 25th Punjab Cavalry.  His eldest brother was wounded at an early stage of the war.

Fermanagh Times July 22nd, 1915.  RECRUITING DEMONSTRATIONS IN FERMANAGH.  GOOD GATHERINGS IN PETTIGO, BALLINAMALLARD AND LISNASKEA.  On Tuesday the recruiting party with their band visited Pettigo.  The weather conditions were very unfavourable, but as it was a fair day there was a large crowd in the village.  The meeting was held in the open the speakers addressing the crowd from a wagonette drawn across the roadway.  Very little enthusiasm or concern was displayed by the crowd who gather round and it took little to distract their attention from listening to the words of warning and appeal of the various speakers. During the speech of Lieutenant Kettle, Professor in the National University, and one of Ireland’s foremost orators, a car was passing down one side of the broad street and the majority of the farmers, dealers, and labourers present turned and watched it, and for the time being seemed more interested in its progress than in the spirited words of the speaker.  As another speaker Mr. Lloyd, of Dublin was speaking a man who was bringing some sheep along the street drew the attention of a section of the audience.  There were many who were impressed by the speakers but the general demeanour of the crowd bore eloquent testimony to the fact that in that district at any rate the seriousness of the situation and the peril of the country is little understood.

Impartial Reporter.  July 22 1915.  ENLIST NOW.  A BIG RECRUITING RALLY THROUGHOUT COUNTY FERMANAGH.  THE ORANGE AND GREEN UNITE WITH A STIRRING ADDRESS BY LIEUT. KETTLE AND HE IS CHEERED BY ORANGEMEN.  There was a large crowd at the recruiting meeting held on yesterday Wednesday afternoon at Lisnaskea when Mr. J.  Porter Porter, D.L. occupied the chair.  On the platform were men of all shades of politics and religion as the chairman appealed for young men to join the ranks and help to keep their country free.  They would have a speech from Lieutenant Kettle, one of the leading lieutenants of Mr. John Redmond.  He was a good fighter, and he would go and fight the Germans with them and when the war was over he would be glad to fight Lieutenant Kettle himself.  (Cheers.)  Lieutenant Kettle, in describing German atrocities, said that when the war began he was in Belgium and he would tell them a secret that had not yet been told in the Press.  He was over there engaged running rifles for the Nationalist Volunteers and he was proud to say he got them into Ireland.  He had this claim on Ireland: he represented for a time East Tyrone and when he left the Orangemen made him a presentation; one of the few he ever got in his life.  (Cheers.)  The evening before he had been addressing the Ballinamallard Orangemen and in all his experience he had never got a better hearing.  Party politics were now aside, and in Flanders and the Dardanelles there was no question of religion.

Fermanagh Herald July 24th. 1915.  THE DARDANELLES.  CASUALTIES TO THE END OF JUNE.  In the house of commons Mr. Asquith said the total casualties sustained by both naval and military forces in the Dardanelles to the end of June were as follows: – OFFICERS –  killed 541, wounded, 1,257, missing 135.  Total 1,933. MEN – killed, 7,543, wounded, 25,557, missing 7,401.  Total 40,501.

Fermanagh Herald July 24th. 1915.  NO PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL.  The Football Association Council have decided that no international matches or matches for the Challenge Cup or Amateur Cup of the Association, will be played next season, that no remuneration shall be paid to players, and that there shall be no registration of players.  Association leagues and clubs can arrange matches to suit local conditions but such matches must be without cups, medals, or other rewards, and must be played only on Saturday afternoons, early closing days, and recognized holidays.

Fermanagh Herald July 24th. 1915.  THE KAISER’S FINANCES.  The Paris Newspapers, says a Press Association War Special, publish a letter from a private source received in Rome according to which the Kaiser is reported to be in a very precarious financial situation.  The war has already cost him 100,000,000 marks and other German Princes are also very embarrassed pecuniarly.

Fermanagh Herald July 24th. 1915.  LISNASKEA MAN KILLED AT THE DARDANELLES.  Mrs. McFarland of Lisnaskea has been notified that her son James a private in the Inniskilling Fusiliers has been killed at the Dardanelles.  He had only landed two days before.

Fermanagh Herald July 24th. 1915.  DEATH OF A BRAVE DERRYGONNELLY MAN.  The news of the sad death of J. J.  O’Dare, Lance Corporal., Royal Irish Fusiliers, from wounds and gas poisoning at Ypres, has been received in Derrygonnelly with widespread regret. It was on 10th May that he succumbed to his wounds in the  Red Cross ambulance before it reached the clearing station.  A pathetic feature of the matter is that he had been drafted home after nine years’ service in India and had arrived at Winchester, only to be ordered to France on Christmas Eve, and was unable to go home to say goodbye to his relatives and friends.  His death has caused widespread regret in the district and heartfelt sympathy is expressed for his mother and sisters in their great bereavement. He was the youngest son of the late Bernard O’Dare whose pen and brain were ever at the service of the poor of the district, in every negotiation with Estate Commissioners, landlords or old age pension officials and who was always prominent in the Nationalist movement.  To his sorrow-stricken mother the crushing news came doubly hard in so much as the first notifications from the War Office was to the effect that he was only slightly wounded, but the murderous gas only did its work too well.  He has given his life nobly and manfully in his country’s cause and added another name to the long list of Ireland’s heroes. (From a correspondent.)

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  PANDEMONIUM IN LISNASKEA BOARD ROOM. THE CHAIRMAN’S EXTRAORDINARY ATTITUDE.  INSULT HURLED AND BLOWS THREATENED.  The liveliest spot in Fermanagh on Saturday was undoubtedly the Boardroom of the Lisnaskea Workhouse during the progress of the weekly meeting of the Board of Guardians.  The scenes enacted there were both regrettable and unnecessary.  Lisnaskea has of late loomed rather large in the public eye owing to serious disagreements which have taken place there between officials and now apparently the querulous discontented spirit that apparently prevails in the internal management of the workhouse and infirmary has communicated itself to some members of the Board which is responsible for administering the affairs of the whole Union.  The present cause of strife is the appointment of a Medical Officer for Maguiresbridge Dispensary District, which position has been rendered vacant by the resignation of Dr. Thompson, whose application for a slight increase in salary, it will be remembered, was refused by a majority of the Board.  Since his departure it has been found impossible to procure a successor at the meagre salary of £80 a year with the result that a very wide and populous area of the County has been left without the services of the resident dispensary doctor.  What to do under these circumstances is a question that has been exercising the minds of the Guardians for the past month or two, and finally they came to the somewhat Quixotic decision that rather than pay a resident doctor £100 a year they would prefer to pay a locum tenens £130 pounds a year, for to visit the dispensary each week.  This appointment is to be for an indefinite period as they decided not to re-advertise the vacancy.

A peculiar situation has thus been created, which has naturally given rise to a considerable amount of feeling throughout the Maguiresbridge District and has been the cause of much heated controversy among the members of the Lisnaskea Board. This culminated on Saturday in a condition of things which our reporter describes as chaos.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  THINGS PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW IN DIFFERENT FERMANAGH DISTRICTS.  How many people in Fermanagh are now learning the Irish language?  And if the craze, so popular among certain classes a couple of years ago is not now obsolete so far as this district is concerned?

If the large band of slackers belonging to the Ballyshannon Irish Nationalist Volunteers who paraded Bundoran streets on Sunday heard the pitying and contemptuous remarks which were made by all sections of visitors regarding them?  And if all these men, the great majority of whom were of military age, should not have felt ashamed to be seen parading their cowardice in the public streets in such a conspicuous manner?

What will the next row in Lisnaskea be about.

If the habit of some young ladies of utilising public entertainments such as that given by Mr. Brown–Leckie in Bundoran, on Monday night, to personally approach members of the audience, about whose private circumstances they know nothing, and urge them to join the army is not most reprehensible and should not be tolerated?  And if such mistaken tactics do not do a great deal more harm than good to recruiting.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  THE MEETING OF THE ENNISKILLEN PRESBYTERIAN CONGREGATION TO ELECT A CLERGYMAN FAILED TO DO SO.  A meeting of the members of the Enniskillen Presbyterian Church qualified to vote was held on Monday night to elect a successor to the late Rev S. C. Mitchell.  There are 47 members so qualified, but only 39 of these were present.  The chair was occupied by the Rev John Wilson, Tempo.  The first query put to the meeting was – are you prepared to make a call to a particular minister or licentiate?  To this there was a conflicting response, and on a vote being taken 25 answered in the affirmative and 13 in the negative.  One did not vote.  Then came the inquiry – who is the minister or licentiate you propose to appoint?  The minister or licentiate named in answer to this demand would require a 2/3 vote to insure his acceptance, and as it was evident from the previous vote that there would not be a 2/3 majority for any individual no response was made.  This was the more significant because if a name had been mentioned and the clergyman nominated did not secure the 2/3 majority he would have been disqualified from any for their candidature in the election.  Matters where thus, so to speak at the deadlock.

In such an eventuality General Church Regulations require a list to be prepared out of which a selection can be, after due care and trial, subsequently made.  Accordingly, the Moderator declared that a list should be now opened and asked if any present who had a clergyman to bring forward should now name him.  Whether the name would be allowed to go on the list was subject to a vote.  The Rev Mr. Jenkins, who had charge of the pastorate during the Rev Mr. Mitchell’s absence in Italy was then proposed and passed on to the list.  Several other names followed but the 25 who voted solidly at the earlier stage of the proceedings steadily vetoed every one of them.  The result was that the meeting, which was pretty animated at times, was adjourned for a fortnight, when it is hoped that the good sense of the congregation will find some means of coming to a united and wise decision.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  BUNDORAN.  100 YOUNG MEN, WHY DO THEY NOT ENLIST?  Bundoran, where holidaymakers of both sexes were in scorers, was visited by the recruiting party on Friday.  The meeting, which was held from a wagonette drawn up just outside Mr. Rennison’s establishment opposite the Station Road, was largely attended – women being in the majority.  The day was bright and bracing and speeches, having as their object the enrolment of men to do their share amid the shot and shell and carnage of France and Belgium seemed out of place in this peaceful seaside resort of South Donegal.  So serious, however, is the situation in which the Country and Empire is placed that every corner of the land must be reached and every man, and woman too, called upon to do something in defence of the liberties which they enjoy under the British Constitution.  Every speaker was accorded a patient and attentive hearing.  The members of the gathering gave evidence every now and then of their appreciation of the arguments placed before them concerning the necessity for more men, but, we understand that there was not one to offer his services at the end of the meeting.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  BALLYSHANNON.  A PRIEST A DECLARATION AT THE RECRUITING MEETING.  From Bundoran the party motored to Ballyshannon where a meeting was held at 7.00.  The most noticeable feature of the crowd here was the very large number of physically fit young men who attended it.  There must have been nearly 200 men of military age around the motor car and from which the speakers addressed the meeting.  The parish priest, Rev Canon Rogers, presided, and made one of the strongest and most sincere appeals we have heard during the tour.  The Canons fine personality and convincing delivery is lost in the retelling of what he said, but we give his remarks almost in full, because they are the words of a gentleman of learning and distinction, whom the people of the district greatly respect and esteem The band of the 4th fourth Inniskillings as usual played selections of lively areas and the speakers were given a respectable hearing. But there were no recruits at the conclusion.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  DERRYGONNELLY.  At a recruiting meeting in Derrygonnelly it was said that it had sent more to the army out of its population of 212 than any small town in Ireland, and in proportion to its population Derrygonnelly had more men killed and wounded than in any other town or city in Ireland.  (Cheers).  After the meeting the speakers and the band were entertained to luncheon by the local committee of which Mr. C. Parke is the capable Secretary.

Fermanagh Times July 29th, 1915.  PETTIGO AND RECRUITING.  Rev T. C. Magee, The Rectory, Pettigo, writes: – I wish at once to correct the false impression left in the minds of the readers of the Fermanagh Times concerning the number of young men who have enlisted from Pettigo.  Up to the present 42 young men from the district of Pettigo have joined the colours; a number which I think he’s very creditable considering the scattered population of the neighbourhood and the smallness of the town. Colonel Leslie has held recruiting meetings in Pettigo on the fair days during the last four months and there was no great flourish of trumpets at these meetings or newspaper reports, although they were worthy of some notice.  There was no expense incurred yet after each of his appeals and for days after young men went off to Enniskillen, others to Derry and a few to Belfast to enlist.

Impartial Reporter.  July 29 1915.  PRIESTS IN THE IN THE TRENCHES.  MASS AND CONFESSION IN THE OPEN.  Rev.  J.  Gwynne, S.  J.  Chaplain attached to the Irish Guards who was wounded some time ago in the course of a letter to Dr. M.  Garvey, Tunaderry, says he had a narrow escape and it was prayer that saved him.  The last thing he remembered was seeing the Guards get to the top of the ridge, when a lurid red blaze seemed to flash into his eyes with a deafening crash.  He was hurled back some 5 yards or so and lay unconscious for some minutes.  When he came to he felt his face all streaming with blood and his leg pained him.  He was suffocated two, with the thick, warmly, vile gas, which came from the shell. “A doctor bandaged me up and I found I was not so bad and in an hour’s time when everything was washed and bandaged, I was able to join and give Extreme Unction to a poor Irish Guardsman who had been badly hit.  When in the trenches I see any wounded man immediately he’s hit and give him the last Sacraments.  Then I hear the confessions of the men in the trenches, in their dugouts.  I can tell you it is easy to have contrition when the air is simply alive with bullets and shells.

We have to have Mass in a field, here as the Irish Guards are nearly all Catholics and we are at present the strongest battalion in the Guards Brigade.  The men then sing hymns at Mass, and it is fine hearing nearly 1000 men singing out in the open at the top of their voices.  You have no idea what a splendid battalion the Irish Guards are!  You have Sergeant Mike O’Leary, V. C. with you.  I often have a chat with him when he comes to see me.  But do you know that there are plenty of men in the Irish Guards who have done as bravely as O’Leary and there is never a word about it

Father Gwynne in a further letter tells of strange events.  One man he was called to had been shot through the throat and made his confession by signs being unable to speak.  He had to crawl out flat to a Coldstream Guardsman who was shot through the head and give him the last Sacraments.

Impartial Reporter.  July 29 1915.  TWO RUFFIANTLY SOLDIERS DISGRACE THEIR UNIFORMS BY ASSAULTING CHRISTIAN BROTHERS.  Private C. E.  Gillespie and Private Betts, 9th Batt. Inniskilling Fusiliers (Ulster Division) were sentence at Ballycastle Petty Sessions to two months imprisonment with hard labour for an assault on Christian Brothers.  Rev. Brother Craven said when taking a walk on Saturday evening with Brother Conway on the road leading to the Catholic Church he passed some soldiers belonging to the Inniskilling fusiliers who were cursing the Pope and uttering blasphemous language. It was said they never saw a more ferocious and violent crowd than these soldiers. After a severe beating they eventually escaped by running into the church.

Impartial Reporter.  July 29 1915.  AT A COURT MARTIAL EVIDENCE WAS TAKEN  and Lieutenant Colonel C.  Lawrence Prior pleaded not guilty to inviting several officers to a gambling house to the prejudice of good order and military discipline. Evidence was given by a number of officers mentioned in the charge that on February 17 the accused invited his brother officers to dinner in the Café Royale to celebrate his coming promotion.  Towards the end of dinner accuse received a note from a man who was dining at another table and a little later said to his guests, “A fellow has asked me to come and have drinks in this house and there may be cards.  I am thinking of giving £100 a run.  What about you fellows?”  Five or seven officers accepted the invitation and went to a house where they played chemin de fer with two men, one of them spoke with an American or Canadian accent the latter winning a considerable amount of money.  Captain Gibson thought that all of the party had lost money and considered the game was not properly played.

Fermanagh Herald July 31st 1915.  JOTTINGS.  Private John Johnston, 15th Battalion Australian Infantry, has been killed at the Dardanelles.  He was a native of Kesh, Co., Fermanagh and was formerly in the Glasgow Police, subsequently serving with the Queensland Police.  He was a brother of Detective Johnston, of the D. M. P. (Dublin Metropolitan Police.)

Fermanagh Herald July 31st 1915.  SAD OCCURRENCE NEAR GARRISON.  FARMER’S TRAGIC DEATH.  Writing on Tuesday at Derrygonnelly a correspondent says: – A well to do farmer named P.  McManus, who resided at Rogagh, about 8 miles from here in the Garrison police district, shot himself dead on Monday.  The facts to hand are as follows: – McManus visited Belcoo on Monday to purchase some provisions and returned back to his home.  When he entered the house there was a man named Burns in it.  He took down a gun and asked Burns to go out to the mountain to have a shot.  Burns decline to go and he went himself, bringing the gun with him.  He had only gone a few perches when he sat down on a ditch.  He was afterwards discovered lying dead as the result of gunshot wounds to the head, which appeared to have been self-inflicted.  McManus, who was well known, leaves a wife and two small children to mourn his loss.