1942. August.

 

1-8-1942.ENNISKILLEN MAN SENTENCED. EXPORT OF LORRIES. John O’Connor, a 26-year-old motor trader, of Enniskillen, was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment when he pleaded guilty before a Special Criminal Court in Dublin to four charges arising out of the purchase and exportation of motor-lorries from the 26 county area to a six county border area. Mr. Trant McCarthy, solicitor, for O’Connor, pleaded for a fine instead of imprisonment and said that O’Connor had been followed by tragedy from his early days. He was suffering from tuberculosis from 1935 to 1937 spent two years in hospital and was, compelled to use crutches after his discharge. He was about to undergo, a serious operation in a few days. The Court said that they could not vary the sentence.

1-8-1942. GAELIC PILCRIMS TO LOUGH DERG. One hundred and. thirty Gaelic speaking pilgrims left Dublin on Saturday on a Pilgrimage to Lough Derg sponsored by Croabh na h-Aiseirghe. It has for its object “Siochain an Domhain agus Saoirse na h-Eireann. They were joined by a party of Gaelic speakers from Tyrone and other parts of the Six Counties. The spiritual directors were An t-Athair Raghnall MacGiolla Gunna, O.F.M., and An t-Athair Leonardo Mattimoe, O.F.M. The Dublin pilgrims arrived back in the city on Monday.

1-8-1942.SEIZURES NEAR KESH.CATTLE AND SHEEP. Head-Constable Conlin, R.U.C., Kesh, Co. Fermanagh seized 200 sheep at Drumarn, Lisnarick, on suspicion of being imported from the 26 counties. He also seized 7 head of large cattle at Coalisland, Tyrone, on suspicion of being imported at the Fermanagh border.

1-8-1942.FERMANAGH YOUTH KILLED. EVIDENCE AT INQUEST. Charles Johnston, aged 20 years, a shop assisting at Gola, Lisbellaw, was killed in a motoring accident at Gola on Sunday. At about 6.45 p.m. he was travelling on a motor-cycle from Lisbellaw direction and at the cross roads he collided with a motor car being driven from Lisnaskea by Mr. B. L. Winslow, solicitor, Enniskillen. Death was instantaneous. At the inquest on Monday evening evidence was given that deceased emerged from the side road at Gola creamery and dashed into the side of Mr, Winslow’s car, which was on its proper side of the road. Deceased struck his forehead against the hinge of the door on the right hand side of the car, and went on for 19 or 20 yards when lie fell off the bicycle. A verdict was returned that death was due to haemorrhage and severe laceration of the brain and no blame was attached to Mr. Winslow. Sympathy was tendered to the relatives of deceased. Deceased resided with his uncle, Mr. George Clingan, Belleisle. Formerly he lived at Ballycassidy, when his mother, the late Mrs. Johnston, taught at Shanmullagh School.

1-8-1942.21,000 BOOKS GIVEN. ENNISKILLEN PAPER DRIVE. The people of Enniskillen and district responded on Saturday to the appeal for 5,000 books to help to swell the total in the waste paper competition. The town hopes to get a £1,000 prize. A temporary receiving stall was erected at The Diamond, and during the day this became the Mecca for hundreds of people who deposited their cast novels, magazines, etc. The local hon. organiser for salvage, Mr. D. Devine, had the assistance of several ladies, the Enniskillen Boy Scouts, Wolf Cubs and Girl Guides, as well as the Urban, Council employees. During the entire morning a U.S. Army band rendered selections. Shortly after 2.0 o’clock it was announced that 15,000 books had been received, and at 6.0 p.m. the total was in the region of 21,000.

1-8-1942. MILITARY EXERCISES IN TYRONE AND FERMANAGH. Large scale and realistic combined exercises in which Home Guards, military and auxiliary services in the Counties of Tyrone and Fermanagh took place during last week. The opposition was provided by the United States Forces whose tanks units, police, and A.P.R. services were in action.The tests were carried out in regard to communications between Tyrone and Fermanagh and in the matter of general administration and efficiency. (Ed. Who won?)

1-8-1942. Gaelic Festival at Ederney. PRIEST’S APPEAL FOR THE LANGUAGE, MUSIC, SONG AND DANCE. AN INTERESTING PROGRAMME. The greatest concourse of people ever seen in St. Joseph’s Park; Ederney, assembled on Sunday last to witness and partake in a real feast of Gaelic song, dance and sport while the close association between Gaelic culture and religion was indicated by the inclusion in the programme for the day of competition in Plain Chant. Rev. P. McCarney, P.P., in opening the proceedings, first expressed his regret and the regret of the people in general at the enforced absence of Mr. Cahir Healy, and hoped that we would soon have him amongst us once more as, no doubt he was present that day in spirit. In the unavoidable absence, he said, of prominent Gaels better qualified than he to deliver the opening oration he would enumerate a few points of interest in connection with such events as he was called on to declare open. The work of the Gaelic League is too well known to require any explanation. One can easily see evidence of preservation of Gaelic culture in language, arts and sports. Such events as these serve to remind the people, that as Irishmen and women they have a heritage to be cherished and handed on intact to future generations. When the most of Europe was uncivilised Ireland was the seat of culture and learning —a culture dating right back to prehistoric times and the Gaels were one of the most civilised and cultured races that ever inhabited any part of Europe. When aggression and other misfortunes fell to the lot of the Irish people and they had a series of bitter trials to endure this culture was in grave danger of destruction. The national language was prohibited and a foreign one substituted; education was denied to Irish children and later teachers who knew no Irish were appointed to teach children, who knew no English. In spite of these misfortunes the language still lives to-day, thanks to the patriotism and devotion of our forefathers and, in later years, to the founders and members of the Gaelic League. Recent misfortunes, continued Father Mc Carney, taught the people of France to cherish the ideals of their country and aid in bringing about a revival of patriotism and realisation of the duty they owed to past generations, but it is to be hoped that we in Ireland may awake, without the bursting of shells or crashing of bombs, to a fuller realisation of the beauties and greatness of our country, its language, music and sport. (Applause).

MUSICAL SELECTIONS. Appropriate musical selections were rendered by Tummery Pipers under the direction of their able bandmaster, Mr. James Irvine, and their rousing music and colourful native costumes added much to the brilliance and enjoyment of the proceedings. In this connection too St. Dympna’s Ceilidhe Band, Dromore, provided first class entertainment. Priests and people from all the surrounding parishes were present and helped to make the event the success that it was.

COMPETITION RESULTS.

Plain Chant 1.  Sacred Heart Choir, Irvinestown; 2, St. Joseph’s Choir, Ederney.

Songs in Gaelic—1, Ederney School Choir; 2 Irvinestown Boys’ Choir.

Anglo-Irish songs—1, Irvinestown Boys’ Choir; 2, Ederney School Choir.

Lilting—1, Michael McCann, Dromore; 2, Patrick Maguire, Sydare.

Traditional violin—1, P. Maguire, Sydare; 2, P. McNabb, Tummery.

Melodeon—1, Jack McCann, Dromore; 2, Sean McVeigh, do.

Three-hand reel. — 1, Knocknagor Troupe; 2, Kilskeery Troupe.

Hornpipe (senr.)- l, Mairead Bennett, Dublin.

Jig and hornpipe (junr.) —1, Knocknagor Troupe; 2, Kilskeery Troupe.

Ceilidhe Band—St. Dympna’s, Dromore.

Father Burns, C.C., Devenish, contributed humorous recitations which were greatly appreciated.

FOOTBALL COMPETITION.

First round—Irvinestown (8 pts.) v. Edemey (7 pts.). Dromore(12 pts.) v Pettigo (6 pts.) Final—Dromore (15 pts.) v. Irvinestown (1 pt.)

Valuable prizes were presented to successful competitors. The organisation committee was in charge of Fr. M. Donnelly, C.C., Ederney.

To complete the festivities a very successful Rinnce Mor was held in St. Josephs Hall, under the direction of Rev. E. O’Flanagan, C.C.

Gifts were presented to Mr. James McDonnell, Cahore, Ederney, and Mr. Monaghan, Derrybrick, Kesh, and Mr. P. Rooney, Ardmoney, Brookeborough.

1-8-1942.FAILED TO PLOUGH. FARMER FINED AT DERRYCONNELLY. “I cannot see any excuse whatever,” said Major Dickie, R.M., at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions, on Friday, when he fined Robert Acheson, of Drumskimbly, £40, with £3/14/0 costs, on a summons brought by the Ministry of Agriculture, for failing in part to comply with a direction to plough.

Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Grown Solicitor, prosecuting, said that defendant was served with a direction on 2nd January, 1942, requiring him to plough ten acres of his holdings in Drumskimbly, Cosbystown, Glenwinny, Kilgarrow, and Sandhill by the 30th. January, 1942, and a further 15½ acres by 11th April, 1942. Mr. Jordan, Ministry’s Inspector, visited the holding on 4th July, 1941, and reported that the area was 186 acres, of which an area of 51 acres was arable. On the 17th June, 1942, when the holding was visited, it was found that the total area cultivated was 12 acres leaving a default of 13½ acres. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, LL.B., M.P., defending, said that defendant was over 80 years of age; and had a nephew living with him. They managed to plough, and crop 12 acres. In that area, as his Worship knows, owing to work of national importance, labour was very scarce, and in fact if they had not a tractor well on in January they were likely to be left without one. The only defence was that defendant could not get sufficient labour and the area of his lands was scattered all over. Defendant said if he could have got the labour he would have been willing to crop as much as wanted. His Worship—Other farmers are in exactly, the same position and they managed to do it. Mr. Cooper said there was a previous conviction, defendant having been fined £10 last year. Mr. Ferguson—I think he did his best in the circumstances. His Worship—I cannot see any excuse whatever. Every other farmer in the county is doing his best. They seem to make no effort. .Defendant was fined as stated above.

1-8-1942. MANORHAMILTON NEWS. County Council Elections. Very little interest is being shown in the forthcoming elections. Probably the old members will again come forward. Not for years has Manorhamilton had a representative on the County Council and it is rumoured that the town will put up a candidate.

Clerical Appointment—Rev. M. Gilbride, recently ordained, has been appointed assistant to Rev. T. F. Brady, C.C., pending the appointment of a successor to the late Rt. Rev. Monsignor Soden, P.P., V.G., P.A.

Recent Deaths—The death of Mr. Jas. McLoughlin, Ross, which took place at an advanced age is deeply regretted. All his sons were prominent in the old I.R.A. movement. The funeral was large and representative. Another regretted death is that of Mrs. Feely, Castlemile, which took place last week. There was a large attendance at the funeral.

 

1-8-1942. TRACTOR OFFENCES. BALLINAMALLARD MEN SUMMONED. At Clogher Petty Sessions on Thursday Henry W. West, of Mullaghmeen, Ballinamallard, was fined Is for failing to show the maximum speed and laden weight on a tractor at Killclay, Augher, on 9th July, l5s for failure to have a reflecting mirror on the vehicle and for having no silencer attached he was dealt with under the probation Act. Terence McCann, of Beagh, Coa, Ballinamallard, the driver, for using the vehicle without having speed and weight displayed, was fined 1s, for having no bell or horn Is, for failing to have a reflecting mirror 5s, and a summons for having no silencer on the machine was dealt with under the Probation Act.

1-8-1942. ENNISKILLEN COLLEGIATE SCHOOL FEES. The students should not be enrolled on the register of the Enniskillen Collegiate School for Girls until their fees had been paid was the suggestion of Mr. J. Coffey at the meeting of the Co. Fermanagh Education Committee in Enniskillen on Friday. He advocated that a number of defaulting parents should be sent their accounts through legal channels. Rev. J. B. Jennings said it was a far more satisfactory method to pay the fees through the bank.

1-8-1942. DEATH OF POPULAR YOUNG KILTYCLOGHER LADY MISS ANNIE McGOWAN. A gloom has been cast over a wide area by the death of Miss Annie McGowan, of the Mental Hospital nursing staff, Sligo, which occurred in the Surgical Hospital, Sligo on Thursday week, following a brief illness. The deceased lady, who was only 22, was the second daughter of Mr. Patrick McGowan, Co. C., and Mrs. McGowan, Kiltyclogher. She was a nurse in Sligo Mental Hospital for a period of years, and during that time her gentle disposition and great charm of manner won for her the esteem and affection of all with whom, she came in contact. On Friday, amid scenes of deep mourning the remains were carried from the Surgical Hospital to the borough boundary by doctors and members of the Mental Hospital staff. A guard of honour was formed along the roadside as the hearse moved into Leitrim. On approaching Kiltyclogher, the cortege was met by relatives and a large body of people, who accompanied the remains to St. Patrick’s Church, where they were received by Rev. Father Brady, C.C. The funeral which took place to Rossinver on Saturday, was the largest seen in the district for years.

1-8-1942. ROAD WORKERS’ WAGES IN LEITRIM. COUNTY COUNCIL MAKE A RECOMMENDATION. At Leitrim County Council special meeting on Saturday, Mr. S. Flynn, T.D., chairman, presiding, Mr. Hoey moved that all men employed by the Council be paid the same rate of wages as those working in the bogs. Mr. J. Flynn seconded. Mr. Hoey said that the reason he moved his motion was that the road workers in the county were treated unfairly. He said that those employed on minor relief schemes and those employed by the Land Commission were paid a higher rate. Road workers should be paid at the same rate as those employed on the turf scheme, 6/6 per day. He proposed that the road workers be given, an increase of 8d per day in order to bring their wages to 5/6 per day. Mr. Callaghan, a representative of the road workers, said that all they asked was that the matter be put up to the Department and place the matter on the right shoulders. They, had asked Mr. Hoey to bring the resolution, forward as he argued they gave as good work as any of the others who had been granted an increase. The County Surveyor said that the matter was discussed at a conference he attended in Dublin and they had no power to grant an increase to road workers. At the conference this was a burning question. The only thing to do was to make a recommendation, as this question hampered them, when work was going on. They were allowed to pay 5/6 to workers on roads off the main roads and those on main roads were only allowed 4/10. There was a differentiation between what they could pay on grant works and improvement works. He would be glad if this was settled, as the men were not inclined to come out and work on the roads. Finally it was agreed to recommend to the Department that the road workers’  wages be increased to the same basis as the bog workers, not to take effect until after the 31st March, next.

 

1-8-1942. SEQUEL TO DELIVERY AT DERRYCONNELLY. ALLEGED ATTEMPT TO EXPORT. COURT CASE ADJOURNED. The seizure of 250 lbs. of tea had a sequel at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when John James Maguire and Mary Maguire, of Derrygonnelly, were charged with having in the month of November, 1941, knowingly, harboured 250 lbs of tea with intent to evade the export prohibition applicable thereto. Teresa Rooney, who is employed as a book-keeper in Lavery’s Bar, 80 Chichester Street, Belfast, said that in August last a gentleman named Maguire ordered tea to be sent to his sister, Mrs. Charles Maguire, in Derrygonnelly. In consequence of that she got in touch with a Mr. Lyons, of Donaghadee, gave him the address of Mrs. Charles Maguire, and told him to send the invoice to her. An envelope which was left in the bar was handed over to Mr. Lyons. Mr. R. A. Herbert, DL.B. (defending), called defendant, John James Maguire, to come forward, and asked witness: “Did you ever see that man before?” Witness—No; that definitely is not the gentleman gave me the order.

 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 8th 1942. THOSE BUTTER PARADES. It seems that there are some people who can be fooled all the time. The Ulster Scot having got all he wanted, having cut himself off from the rest of Ireland and sat in embittered loneliness behind an embattlement of tariffs designed to keep Irish goods out of the “ Paradise’ having for years denounced the Irish State as being just no good and a monstrosity whose existence should not be permitted, is now finding out that war’s lean and hungry grip in so far as his own bailiwick is concerned has imparted quite another hue to the land of Republican Green and that profitable and useful excursions can be made there with little or no hindrance. Thus, in hordes, are the Scots dwellers of the Six Counties pouring across the Border in search of that which cannot be had for love or money in their own quarters, and that is saying quite a lot. Anything that is rationed and everything that isn’t is fair game for these loyal sons of the Six Counties who have so suddenly discovered the catering and other amenities of the hated “Free State.”

One would think that the rigorous action only all-too rarely enforced by the Irish Customs authorities would have the approval and support of all the citizens of the State, but it appears not. Certain well-meaning people are getting up in the National assembly and suggesting that the Border seizures are creating a feeling that will lead only to the perpetuation of Partition! Was greater nonsense ever talked! The argument is that the Orange excursionists, whom the merchant and business houses of the Irish State would never see were it not for the circumstances of the times, are being won over to the national side by the courtesy and generosity of the “Southerners” with whom they are temporarily trading and that any official action taken to discourage this dealing will inevitably react against the national interests. Such is far from the truth. Scenery (and especially the scenery and panorama of well- stocked shop fronts) is the Orangeman’s sole interest in the Irish State to-day.

8-8-1942. JOTTINGS. Died While Bathing. – Private McAndrews, Belmullet, died while bathing at Rossnowlagh, near Ballyshannon.

Fatal Injuries.—Patrick Kelly (65), Drummond, Magheracloone, Carrickmacross, was fatally injured when his bicycle collided with a motor van.

Shop Entered—The confectionery shop of Mr. W. H. Creighton, Church Street, Enniskillen, was broken and entered and a quantity of sweets stolen. Police are investigating.

An Appointment.—At a special meeting of Monaghan Vocational Education Committee, Miss Maureen Duffy, a native of Co., Monaghan was appointed a commercial teacher to succeed Miss Forde, resigned.

Irvinestown Lady’s Success- Miss M. T. Dolan, S.R.N., C.M.B. has been appointed Ward Sister in the Belfast Union Hospital. She is daughter of Mrs. Dolan and the late Mr. John Dolan, Drumschool, Irvinestown.

Special Court—At a special court in Enniskillen on Monday before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., Wm. Hynes, Nugent’s Entry, Enniskillen, was charged with a serious offence and was remanded, on £10 bail to next Enniskillen Petty Sessions on 17th inst.

New Head Constable. — Sergt. John F. Traynor, R.U.C., who, until a few years ago, was stationed, (for twelve years) in Enniskillen, has been promoted Head Constable and transferred from Mayobridge, Co. Down, to Clogher, Co. Tyrone.

Professed.—Sister St. Macarten, professed at Convent of Bon Secours, Cork, is the daughter of Mr, and Mrs. Patrick O’Daly, Lisnashannagh, Carrickmacross, and , sister of Rev. B. O’Daly, C.C, Tydavnet, and Rev. J. O‘Daly, C.C.. Los Angeles,

Band performances — In a letter to the Enniskillen Rural Council, on Tuesday the Six-County Tourist Development. Association, Ltd., stated it was felt every encouragement should be given to military and other bands to give performance at towns throughout Northern Ireland. Such performances would help to entertain the large number of people spending their holidays at home.

Alleged Desertion— At a special court in Enniskillen Benjamin Cyril Rees a serving soldier, charged with being an absentee from his unit, was remanded in custody to await a military escort. J. Freeman gave evidence of finding Rees in Newtownbutler sub-district wearing civilian attire. As a result of enquiries made and assistance given by Rees, witness located his uniform.

Council Workers’ Wage Increases. Enniskillen Urban Council, on Tuesday evening, adopted recommendations from the Finance and Lighting Committee that Henry Sadlier, for carting work granted an increase in remuneration of 5/- weekly, and that Frederick Walker while acting as roller-driver, be granted 3/- weekly increase. The application of Mr. Bracken, contractor for scavenging, for an increase was pending the supplying by him of further details.

SIX MEN SENTENCED TO DEATH RESULT OF BELFAST TRIAL. PRISONERS PLEAD “NO PREMEDITATION.” Six young Belfast men were sentenced to death at the Courthouse, Crumlin Rd., Belfast, on Thursday week, after a trial lasting three days. They were charged with the murder of Constable Patrick Murphy of 53, Cawnpore Street on Easter Sunday. The men who pleaded not guilty, were —Thomas J. Williams (19), house repairer, 46, Bombay Street, Belfast; Henry Cordner (19), fitter; 35, Malcolmson St.; William James Perry (21) labourer, 264, Cupar Street; John Terence Oliver (21) painter, 167 Springfield Road; Patrick Simpson (18), sheet-metal worker, 86, Cawnpore Street; and Joseph Cahill (21), joiner, 60, Divis Street.

The jury returned a verdict of guilty after an absence of 2 hours 5 minutes. The executions were fixed for Tuesday, August 18. In the case of Simpson the jury recommended mercy on account of his youth.

PRISONERS’ STATEMENTS. Asked if they had anything to say before sentence was passed, the prisoners, made the following statements CORDONER—“ I am not guilty. There was no premeditation to murder. I would like to thank my counsel, Mr. Lavery, Mr. Agnew and Mr. Marrinan for their splendid defence on my behalf.”

PERRY—“1.am not guilty of murder. There was no premeditation to murder. I also wish to thank Mr. Lavery and the other counsel for the manner in which they conducted the case.”

OLIVER—“Not guilty of murder. I had no premeditation to murder.” He also thanked his counsel.

SIMPSON—“I am not guilty of murder. I had no premeditation to murder, and I state that the operation at Kashmir Road was the only one to be performed. I also wish through the medium of the Press, on behalf of my comrades, to thank everyone who enabled us to have such a splendid defence in the case’

CAHILL—“I am not guilty of murder. There was no premeditation or intention to take life.”

WILLIAMS—“I am not guilty of murder. I am not afraid to die. There was no premeditation to murder. I want to thank my counsel for the splendid defence they put up on our behalf.’’

Before passing sentence, Lord Justice Murphy said: “I do not intend to say anything to you young men that would add to the horror of the position in which you find yourselves.”

He then passed the death sentence. The men remained standing at attention and calm during the proceedings. When warders and police were removing them from the dock to the underground passage the prisoners waved to friends in the Court. Several women sobbed and screamed. One made a rush to the dock crying “God help you, Tom.” Some of the prisoners shouted “Don’t be worrying.” Others, cried “God save Ireland.’ A number of British officers and other men in uniform were in the Court, which was heavily guarded by troops. Afterwards six women relatives were seen going across to the jail.

RECORDED SENTENCE ON GIRL. A further case arising out of the shooting of Constable P. Murphy was heard in Belfast on Friday, when a recorded sentence of one year was passed on Margaret Nolan (aged 17), 32 Bombay St., Belfast at the City Commission, when she pleaded guilty to being an accessory after the fact in the incident concerned.

Mr; J. Agnew, who defended, said that the police had spoken highly of the respectability of Miss Nolan’s family. He honestly thought that the girl did not realise the terrible consequence of the acts in which she had played a part, and he asked his lordship to consider that she would have a memory all her life of what happened on that Easter Sunday which would be more poignant than any punishment that could be inflicted.

Mr. J. C. McDermott said that the prisoner had been put forward on this charge because the Crown regarded the part which she had played on that Sunday as being a minor one.

Lord Justice Murphy said that he had recognised before he heard the evidence given on her behalf, that she had been led into that affair by older people.

PETITION FOR REPRIEVE SIGNED BY THOUSANDS. Forma of petition to the Six-County Governor asking for a reprieve of the six youths in Belfast Jail under sentence of death for the shooting of Constable Murphy are being extensively signed in Belfast, and arrangements are complete to secure signatures all over the Six-County area.

A representative committee of the Irish Unemployed Workers’ Association, which is taking part in the organisation of the petition, are seeking the co-operation of other sympathetic organisations, both in the Six Counties and in Great Britain, and has issued also an appeal to people in the Twenty-Six Counties to help.

Telegrams have been despatched to President Roosevelt, to the British Premier, to Mr. Herbert Morrison, British Home Secretary, and to the Clan na Gael, New York, asking them to use their influence in order to prevent the executions taking place.

Already arrangements have been; made by the reprieve organisations to have forms available in provincial centres next Sunday. Influential people on both sides of the Border, including Church leaders, and of every shade of political opinion, are to be approached to add their names to the list. Copies of the petition are to be sent to Cardinal MacRory and the Catholic Bishops, as well as the Protestant Primate and the heads of other Protestant Churches.

The Irish Unemployed Workers’ Organisation will, it is understood, ask the Belfast Trades Council to use their influence in the trade Union section of the community. At Masses in Belfast city churches the

TWO APPOINTMENTS DECIDED BY PARTY VOTES. Caretaker of Cemetery and Tenant of Cottage. DISCUSSION AT ENNISKILLEN RURAL COUNCIL. An appointment as a graveyard caretaker and the choice of a tenant for a labourer’s cottage were decided by party vote at the meeting of Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry (chairman) presiding. Proposing Mr. James Bartley, Cleenish Island, for appointment as caretaker of the island cemetery, Mr. James Murphy (N.) said the graveyard had been, neglected and was covered with weeds and nettles. It was a disgrace and he knew that in Mr. Bartley they would have a man who would look after the graveyard properly. Mr.W. Kelly (N.) seconded.

Mr. W. A. Thornton. (U.) proposed Mr. John Balfour, Cleenish, and Mr. J. Beatty (U.) seconded. Mr. Kelly—Should not this be advertised? Mr. Thornton — Sure it is only 30/- a year. Mr. Murphy. — The previous man got £2 a year. Mr. Beatty—It isn’t a big thing, not worth advertising. Mr. Murphy —The graveyard was neglected and we were throwing away £2 of the ratepayers’ money. Mr. Thornton—Nearly all are neglected. By 10 Unionist votes to 4 Nationalist, Balfour was appointed. Mr. E. Callaghan asked who supervised the cleaning of these graveyards. Mr. Murphy—No one at all-they get their money for doing nothing.

Mr. Callaghan said there were ricks of hay on Pobal (Pubble?) cemetery, which was a disgrace in any civilised community. Mr. Beatty- I saw it .as well as you and there was nothing wrong with it. There was only a handshaking of hay on it. Mr. Murphy- But it is hay, Mr. Beatty. Mr. Beatty—He told me he would take it away next day. The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) said he would write to caretakers saying they must clean up the graveyards at once.

This was agreed to. Mr. Callaghan — A graveyard is no place for winning hay. Mr. Cathcart – Isn’t the hay won on any graveyard.

CINEMA PRICES-NO INCREASE. ENNISKILLEN URBAN COUNCIL DECISION. In the absence through indisposition of Mr. W. J. Monaghan, the following motion standing in his name, was proposed by Mr. T. Smyth at the meeting of Enniskillen Urban Council on Tuesday evening. “That the absolution of 1st June, 1942, refusing consent to the Regal Cinema Co. to raise the price of admission to balcony seats on Sundays by one penny to meet increased taxation be rescinded and that the application of the Company be granted.”

Mr. C. Patterson seconded Mr. T. Algeo moved the rejection of the motion, stating that if the cinema shows on Sunday the proprietors had the remedy in their own hands. The cinema, he said, should never have been allowed to open the cinemas on Sunday during the summer and he would propose later on that this be not allowed.

Mr. P. Kelly seconding, said he was opposed to the motion on the ground that he thought that there should not be particular seats for officers in the rear while the private soldier was as well entitled to sit in the balcony as anyone else. He thought the Regal Cinema should write to the Taxation Authorities on the matter instead of the Council.

Mr. W. E. Johnston (chairman), said he did not think there was any particular place in the Regal Cinema for officers. Mr. Kelly asserted that the balcony was being reserved for people with an inferiority complex. The Chairman replied that any soldier could go to whatever part of the cinema he liked. Mr. W. H. Creighton supporting Mr. Algeo’s amendment, said that when the Regal was granted permission, to open on Sundays the Council was informed the opening was purely to provide entertainment for the troops and that they did not want to make money out of it. He knew the proprietors were not running the shows at a loss. “If they were patriotic enough,’’ he added, ‘‘they would let them have the entertainment free, but instead of this they are trying to  make money out of it on Sundays.”

Mr. J. Logan said in wartime all businessmen had to contend with extra Expenses, such as extra wages. He understood that not one hundred officers would be frequenting this cinema so that the total amount involved would be 8/4. It was a very poor war effort. They should not charge anything on Sunday if it was for the benefit of the troops. He was afraid it was for  their own benefit. Mr. Patterson said he was given an explanation for. the suggested change—the  scarcity of coppers. Instead of the 8d seat as at present the 9d seat would exclude the use of coppers in payment, 6d and 3d pieces.

Mr. Algeo — They have their own remedy to close down. Mr. Creighton – That is right. The voting resulted- For the motion- Messrs. Fitzsimmons, Patterson, Smyth and the Chairman—4. Against—Messrs. Lee, Elliott, Logan, Creighton, Algeo, Kelly, Fox and McKeown—8. Mr. Weir did not vote. The Chairman declared the motion lost.

WIFE’S MAINTENANCE CLAIM AT BROOKEBORO’ HUSBAND SUED. Mrs. Mary Little, of Coolnakeklly, sued her husband, George Little, farm labourer, of Latnafree for maintenance, at Brookeboro’ Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M. Mr. Ferguson, M.P., solicitor, was for the wife, and Mr. Patterson for the husband.

Mrs. Little, who said she and her husband were over 30 years married, gave evidence of her husband having left her for no reason whatever that she knew of last May, and had not since returned. She lived with her grown up son and daughter, aged 16 and 13½ years. Defendant took his ration book with him and he paid nothing towards the upkeep of the family. All she had to live on with the family was 10/- a week brought in by her son. Answering Mr. Patterson, witness said her husband left her 18 years ago and again two years ago, but he came back afterwards. He was in the habit of walking away and leaving her for what reason she did not know. Defendant at present lived with his mother, and last March she and her family raised £15 to pay a fine imposed on him at Irvinestown Petty Sessions for the larceny of tools. James Little, a son, gave evidence of his parents not having got on well together for years back.

For the defence the husband alleged unfaithfulness on the part of his wife for 18 years back and said it was time for him to leave the house when the door was closed against him and his clothes thrown out on the street. He was earning 33/6 a week with board as a farm labourer. His Worship said it was perfectly clear a case of desertion was established and the defendant was entitled to maintain his wife and family. The question was one of the amount of contribution and he (his worship) thought a weekly allowance of 17/6 would be reasonable and he would make an order to that effect. Mr. Ferguson agreed the amount was reasonable as they did not want to take all defendant’s money from him. Defendant was ordered to pay in addition 28/- costs.

8-8-1942. MINISTRY WANTS IRON-ENNISKILLEN HAS IT. The Ministry wrote to Enniskillen Urban Council on Tuesday evening that it was requisitioning all available iron and steel railings in the Six Counties for the war effort, and it asked for the co-operation of local authorities. M. T. Algeo — There is 50 tons of cast iron railing lying outside the town for the last three years: why don’t they commandeer it? Chairman, (Mr. W. E. Johnston)—Mr. Donnelly (the surveyor) will assist the Ministry as far as possible. Mr. Donnelly said Mr. Ritchie and himself pointed out the iron, referred to by Mr. Algeo twelve months ago, and it was still there. Chairman—They will come now to take more stuff and may take it.

8-8-1942. Smuggling Charges—Terence McKeown, High St., Monaghan, was .fined £10 at  Aughnacloy for smuggling two cycle tyres, six cycle repair outfits, and three cycle wheel catches on July 20 at Mullaghtinney. Patrick McGlone, Belgium. Park, Monaghan, who was with the last defendant and who was charged with smuggling the same number of articles, did not appear. Both defendants had been out on hail, sureties being fixed at £10 each. The recognances in the case of McGlone were certified by Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., with a view to proceedings against the surety.

Clones Man Killed in Air Raid.—Mrs. J. McDonald, Roslea Tec., Clones, has been  informed that her husband, Mr. John McDonald, was killed in an air raid on Birmingham last week. He had been working there for the past year. He leaves a widow and two young children.

8-8-1942. R.A.F. MAN DROWNED. Aircraftsman A. Ernest Taylor, R.A.F., Killadeas, a native of Stoke-on-Trent, was drowned while bathing in Lough Erne during the week-end. At an inquest on Saturday, held by Mr. G. E. Warren, Coroner a verdict of accidental drowning was returned. It was stated that, with a companion, Tyler, went to bathe at Killadeas and the companion asked him could he swim. He said he could swim a little. The companion entered the water first and had only gone a short distance when he looked back and saw Tyler in difficulties. He went to help him, but Tyler caught him by the neck and was pulling him down, so that he had to let him go. He went out and shouted for help, which arrived, but Tyler had disappeared and could not be found. It was two and a half hours later when the body was recovered from a fifteen feet hole.

8-8-1942. CHURCHILL WILL NOT INTERVENE. CONDEMNED BELFAST YOUTHS REPRIEVE PETITION EXTENSIVELY SIGNED. Mr. Winston Churchill, British Premier, through his secretary, has replied to the recent telegram sent from, a conference of Nationalist Senators and Members of the Six-Co., Parliament in connection with the petition for the reprieve of the six young men under sentence of death in Belfast prison to the effect that “it is not a matter in which it is possible for him to intervene.” APPEAL. No date has yet been fixed for the hearing by the Court of Criminal Appeal of the appeal of the six young men. It is unlikely that it will come before the Court early next week.

THE PETITION. Satisfactory reports of the signing of the reprieve petition have been received at the Reprieve Committee’s headquarters in Belfast by Mr. Eamon Donnelly, Approximately 200,000 have signed the petition up to date and the campaign is still in progress. Thousands of signatures are being received daily at the Reprieve Committee’s office. The Duke of Abercorn, acknowledging the telegraphic, appeal, by the Lord Mayor of Cork (Ald. J. Allen) on behalf of the six men states, (through his private secretary, Mrs. S. Lewis Haslett) that it will have his careful consideration.

THE CONDEMNED YOUTHS. The six young men are attending Mass and receiving Holy Communion, each morning in a cell specially furnished for the purpose. They are visited daily by Rev. P. McAllister, Catholic chaplain to the prison Father Oliver, C P., and Father Alexis C.P., of Holy Cross Monastery, Ardoyne.

8-8-1942. Bundoran is having a record year. For the past month the resort has been crowded fully to capacity and hundreds failed to travel because of information that accommodation was not available. Nearly all visitors are from the Six Counties and County Fermanagh, especially Enniskillen, supplied a large proportion of cross-border holiday makers. The August weekend was the most crowded Bundoran has had in many years. Enniskillen sent hundreds of the visitors by train and bus while at least a dozen made the journey (32 miles) by bicycle.

Advertisements

1942. May. Fermanagh Herald.

9-5-1942. £50 FINE TO STAND. DERRYGONNELLY MERCHANT’S APPEAL DISMISSED. HARBOURING COFFEE, BEANS, RICE. At Enniskillen Quarter. Sessions on Thursday, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., dismissed the appeal of William Barton, merchant, Derrygonnelly, against the conviction, fine of £50, and forfeiture of the goods, for knowingly harbouring 6 cwts. ground coffee; 30 cwts. rice; 7 cwts. American navy (haricot) beans, with intent to evade the prohibition applicable.

Sergeant J. A. Law gave evidence of visiting defendant’s premises arid inspecting his stocks and seizing 7 cwts. of ground coffee, 33 cwts. rice and 10 cwts. American Navy (haricot) beans. Of this quantity the magistrate ordered the forfeiture of the amounts set out in the summons; the balance was to be returned to the appellant.Mr. Barton informed him that he sold 14 lbs. of coffee a week, and at that rate the quantity found would last him for three years. Barton said he sold 4 stone of rice weekly, so that his supply was enough, to do him for 66 weeks.Mr. Cooper—-Do the people in that locality drink coffee at all?Judge—I don’t think the witness knows their tastes for breakfast. Mr. Cooper — You inspected other, shops in the district? Yes. Judge—-Are you showing that appellant had monopoly of the coffee trade and therefore required a large Quantity? (Laughter). Sergt. Law said of the other shops, none had coffee, one had half a ton of rice, and the others two to four cwt. At the time neither, rice nor coffee were rationed. Mr. Cooper— Did you hear a pronouncement by Mr. De Valera as to what haricot beans were used for? Judge—I thought they were used for eating. Mr. Cooper— They are not used for eating. No one who eats them, once is likely to do so again. Mr. Ferguson— Was that why we had so many of them? (Laughter) Mr, Cooper—Did you hear Mr. De Valera’s’ statement? Witness—No. .

The appellant said he was fortunate in having such a small supply when Sergt. Law called. Rice became more popular because cereals were unobtainable at the particular time. In 1938, pre-war, one of his purchases of rice was of a ton in respect of which he produced the invoice. Green peas being off the market since the war, a. substitute was found in haricot beans, which were palatable and good to eat. If a person had his dinner of them he would require nothing else. Witness had always bought peas and beans in large quantities. Coffee was not rationed, and since tea was rationed the sale of coffee had increased considerably. Before the war he had a very big trade in tea as it was a good tea-drinking district— it was a mountainous country, and they knew that meant a good tea-drinking country. When tea was cut down a substitute beverage had to be found and he supplied coffee. Mr. Ferguson (for appellant), — The sergeant says there is a good price for coffee in the Free State?

Witness—I am in informed you cannot give it away to-day in the Free State. Mr. Cooper— Did you hear Mr. De Valera’s pronouncement that beans were to be ground up and mixed with flour? — I never heard it mentioned. Didn’t you tell us at the Petty Sessions that no one ate haricot beans?—No; – you suggested it- and I certainly changed the tune. Mr. Cooper cross-examined the witness as to his large purchases, and Mr. Barton replied, “A man must have some foresight and make some provision for the public if he is to live in business to-day, and right, well you know that. Provided you could not get tea, you would be interested in coffee. Mr. Cooper—I am very interested in coffee. Mr. Barton—You are and I know why, but if you could not get tea and wanted some other beverage, would not you be interested in coffee?—I think you would. Witness said in peace time his stock of rice was two tons. The Judge said he thought the stocks were very large, and that the magistrate’s order was right. He affirmed the conviction.

MAY 9, 1942.R.M. AND BORDER TRIPS. MOTORISTS FINED AT ROSLEA. Strong comments were made by Major Dickie at Roslea Petty Sessions in a case in which Patrick McEntee, Clonfad, Newtownbutler, was fined £3 for driving a car without being properly covered by insurance. A summon for having no driving licence was dismissed. John Hasson, Kilrea, Co. Derry, was fined £3 for permitting McEntee to drive the car without being insured. Mr. J. B. Murphy said Mr. McEntee lived near the Clones Border, His wife was a niece of two old people named McDermott, who were over 80 years.

These people lived 12 miles away and both of them died. . There was no one to look after them. but Mrs. McEntee. Mr. Hasson was a hardware salesman and came to Clones, leaving his car on the Northern side of the Border. He was advised it was dangerous to leave his car there, and went to Mr. McEntee’s house and got permission to leave his car there. Mr. McEntee asked Mr. Hasson to have the car to go to see his wife, and Mr. Hasson agreed. Mr. McEntee, who had a car in “Eire,” went in Mr. Hasson’s car to see his wife, leaving his car on the roadside. Sergt. Williams came along and seized the car as there were some goods in the back of it. Mr. Hasson had lost his car, which was a severe loss. Mr. Hasson lived 16 miles from Coleraine, where he was employed, and had since to cycle to his employment. He was an. entirely innocent party. There would be a Customs prosecution in connection with the goods, found in the car. Hasson, in evidence, stated he had been staying with friends in Clones. He thought McEntee was licensed to drive.

To Dist. Inspector Smyth —He drew a supplementary petrol allowance. Major Dickie — Is that what you travelled to Clones on? Witness—No. Major Dickie—The journey would be about 250 miles. Witness—I had some petrol saved. Major Dickie—-It is time the police looked into these cars at Coleraine and the cars this defendant is associated with. The sooner these 250 miles-per day trips to the Free State are stopped the better. This is a very different thing from a person running out a few miles on a picnic. Mr. Smyth said .he would communicate with the police in Coleraine.

9-5-1942. PRETTY DEVENISH WEDDING. MR. CHIVERS AND MISS MAGUIRE. A pretty wedding was solemnised in St. Mary’s Church, Devenish, on Thursday of last week, the contracting parties being Mr. Thos. Chivers, L.A.C, R. A.F. and Miss Eileen Maguire, youngest daughter of Mrs. Maguire and the late  Mr. Peter Maguire, Devenish. The marriage ceremony was performed by Rev. P. Monaghan, C. C., Devenish. Mr F McGovern, ‘The Hotel” Devenish was best man and the bride was attended by her sister Miss Kathleen Maguire. The bridegroom is a native of Wales and the happy couple are spending their honeymoon in that enchantingly beautiful country. The bridegroom who made a host of friends during his stay in Devenish was recently received into the Catholic Church.

9-5-1942. PROTESTANT APPOINTED WATERWORKS CARETAKER. Enniskillen Rural Council Party Vote. Applications for the position of caretaker of Tempo waterworks (£6 a year salary) were received by Enniskillen R. D. Council on Tuesday, from the following, James Rice, junr., Albert Spratt, Reginald Allen, Robert Woods, John Gilliland, all of Tempo.  Rice, a Catholic, was proposed by Mr, E. Callaghan (N.) 2nd seconded by Mr. T. McLaughlin (N.). Allen, a Protestant, was proposed by Mr, J. Beatty (U.), seconded by Mr. T. Bothwell (U.). On a party vote, Allen was appointed by 5 votes to 2. Mr. Beatty as a later stage in the meeting said £6 a year was useless. Mr. J. Burns— There are six people who like it. Mr. Beatty — Starvation wages! The other day 1 saw in the town four guineas for a pair of boots. You would not run very long in them to the reservoir and to fix bursts till they would be worn out. Mr, Crosier (late caretaker) said it would take £16 to pay him for the work. Mr. A. Elliott—Why is it there are six men in. for it, Mr. Beatty? Have a bit of wit.Mr, Beatty—£6 a year is useless. Chairman (Mr. J. J. Coulter, J.P.) — If this man you voted for does not accept it are you agreeable to the matter being brought up again and giving the job to one of the others? Mr. Beatty—All right I know it is useless. The discussion lapsed.

9-5-1942. DROWNING TRAGEDY. Fate of American Soldier. Ralph R. Helbing (22), a private with the American troops in the Six Counties, was the victim of a drowning tragedy on Tuesday evening. With four companions he was fishing on a raft, when the raft overturned throwing the five into the water. Apparently .the fishing line became entwined around the clothes and legs of the deceased. He was a strong swimmer and he disappeared immediately.

At an inquest on Wednesday morning, Private J. F. Genther said at 7-10 p.m. the previous evening he was standing near the water’s edge when he heard shouting from the direction of the water, and ran down to the edge of the water. He saw four men in the water and one man clinging to a raft. The four men were swimming towards the shore, and witness shouted to men in boats not far away. Two boats arrived and picked up three of the men in the water. He told the rescuers that there was another, but that he must .have gone under. A search was made for the deceased, whose body was recovered after an hour and twenty minutes. Private William Nain also gave similar evidence. Major Fred H. Beaumont said that when the body was recovered at 8.30 he applied artificial respiration, which was continued for two hours. The deceased did not show any sign of life when the body was taken ashore. It was found that the fishing line was entwined, around his clothes and legs. Death was due to drowning. The verdict was recorded of accidental drowning.

9-5-1942. LETTERBREEN HOUSE POSSESSION. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., upheld the appeal of  Mrs. Margaret Maguire of Brockagh, against the dismissal in the lower Court  of her ejectment proceedings against, John Fallon, Cornagee, in respect of a house at Cornagee, let as a weekly tenancy at a rent of 3/6. Mrs. Maguire stated she required the house for occupation by a person engaged in work necessary for the proper working of her farm. The defendant and his wife stated, the first they heard of the notice to quit was after Mrs. Maguire had asked and been refused an increase of rent. A decree for , possession was granted, with 8/- expenses and two guineas costs.

9-5-1942. KESH PETTY SESSIONS. At Kesh Petty Sessions on Tuesday week, before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., Ernest Stewart, Irvinestown, for using an unauthorised motor headlamp was fined £3. Patrick Wm. Molloy, Tullyhommon, was fined £2 in each case for driving a motor car without due care and failing to produce insurance.

George Walshe, Oghill, for riding a bicycle without due care, was fined 1/- and £1 2s costs.

Joseph McAlynn, Doochrock, was fined 1/- and £1 12s and costs for riding a bicycle without due care at Ederney.

John Cunningham, Dullaghan, was fined £4 in a case of eight sheep affected by scab.

Charles Simpson, Edenticrummon, was fined £5 in each case for importing eight head of cattle at Ederney without a licence and giving false information.

9-5-1942. £1,500 TO LEITRIM BOY. Fergus O’Rourke. (16½), Ballinamore, Co., Leitrim, who lost a foot in a shunting accident at Ballinamore railway station last June, was awarded £1,500 damages against, the. G.S.R. Company by a High Court jury,

1942 Fermanagh Herald.

January 17th 1942. PAIR OF TOUGHS AND BULLIES. £10 ON EACH OF TWO DEFENDANTS Ballinamallard Assault on Policemen. “ From your behaviour in Court I regard you as . toughs and bullies declared Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., when, at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, he addressed two men convicted of assaulting two policemen in Ballinamallard. One of the men, Arthur Smiley, of Coa, was summoned for assaulting “ B ” Special Graham, while in the execution of his duty, and the second man, Edward Wilson, also of Coa, was summoned for assaulting Const. James Glassey, R.U.C. D. I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr. Aidan Herbert, solicitor, defended.

Constable Glassey swore that when on duty in Ballinamallard on 13th December he saw and heard a number of strangers shouting and singing as they left a public-house. They appeared to be rowdy, and witness stopped them, and demanded their identity cards. As witness was taking out his notebook and pencil, one of the men, Wilson, struck him a violent blow in the face, knocking him down. Defendant jumped on top of him and, putting his two hands round witness’s head, tried to batter it off the kerbstone. Special Const. Graham came to his assistance and, while attempting to release him, Smiley caught him (Graham.) by the two legs and “threw him up the street.” D, I. — A rugby tackle. (Laughter). Witness — Yes, and he kicked him at the same time. A large crowd gathered and the two men cleared off.

Cross-examined, witness agreed the night was dark—it was about 9-20 p.m. He did not see another row on the street. “Isn’t Ballinamallard street only twenty or thirty yards long?” suggested Mr. Herbert. D.I.—It is more than that. R.M.—It is a quarter of a mile at least.  Continuing, witness said he saw Wilson later, struck in a hedge outside the town. ”When he was pulled out and asked what he was doing there,- defendant replied: “ I hit nobody. ”

Special Const, Graham gave corroborative evidence as to the alleged attack by Wilson on Const. Glassey. He .went to the latter’s assistance, and while trying to separate them Smiley tossed him on his back and kicked him as well. Witness identified the men with the aid of a torch. Witness did not see any other row on the street that night. Sergt. J. V. Lewis gave evidence that following a report of the incident he went out the road and found Smiley’s car. A person standing beside it was asked where the’ other gentlemen were, and he replied that he did not know. Witness then heard a “fissling” in the hedge, and on going over found Wilson pulling himself out of the thorns; his face was covered with blood, and his clothes were torn. The first words defendant said were: “I hit nobody, skipper.” (Laughter).

RECOGNISANCES ESTREATED AT ENNISKILLEN. At the second December Court in Enniskillen, four .men were fined for coming into the Six Counties without proper documents of identity. Only two of the men surrendered to their bail. The two who returned to their homes in the Twenty-Six Counties did not appear before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M. They were fined 40/- each, and. the two fines were paid by Francis Macken, publican, Belmore Street, who had bailed the men. At Enniskillen Petty. Sessions on Monday, Mr. Macken appeared on an application by the police to estreat the recognisances entered into. Head Constable Thornton made the application, and Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., said bailing a man was a most serious matter, and he granted the application, estreating the recognisances in the  sum of 20/- in each of the two cases.

RAILWAYS AND ARIGNA COAL. Arigna coal, mixed; with Welsh, steam coal, is being used by Great Southern Railways Co. on a large section of the Western circuit, with the measure of success anticipated, states an Irish Independent representative. An expert explained that Arigna coal did not really suit railway engines because it was too dirty. It left a big residue of ash, and also burned the fire bars quickly and the fire box as well and abnormal renewals would be called for. It produced a fire which was really too hot for engines, but in existing circumstances, the railways would be glad to get it. The company was prepared to take increasing quantities of the coal.

“MY WIFE IS A CATHOLIC” ENGLISHMAN WHO WAS REFUSED TOWN CLERKSHIP OF BELFAST. ALLEGATIONS IN AN INTERVIEW. “I WAS ASKED MY RELIGION” Mr. W. L. Allen, town Clerk, Barrow- on-Furness, was appointed by the “Big Six’ of the corporation as Town Clerk of Belfast. He was selected as the most, competent amongst a large batch of applicants. Mr. Dawson Bates, Minister for Home Affairs, refused to sanction the appointment. Now it is alleged that the Minister’s refusal was prompted by questions of religion. This was stated by Mr. Allen in an interview with pressmen on Saturday last. I would like to make it perfectly clear,” said Mr. Allen, “that it seems to me amazing that such an issue could be seriously raised either as a recommendation or an objection to the appointment to such an important position as town clerk of a city of the importance of Belfast.

Sir Dawson Bates, Minister of Home Affairs on Saturday informed the “Big Six” Committee of Belfast Corporation that, .as requested by the Corporation, he had interviewed Mr, Allen and that nothing had emerged from the interview to alter his decision not to endorse Mr. Alley’s appointment. The “Big Six,” it is stated, have decided not to press further for the appointment, and Mr. John F. McKinstry, Acting Town Clerk who is due to retire next May, will again be asked to continue in office for an indefinite period.

Mr. ALLEN’S INTERVIEW. Mr. Allen, in an interview, said “I came over here at the direct, request of the Minister of Home Affairs. I had an interview with him, lasting 40 minutes, and it would have been a simple matter for him to have told me his decision. The first time I was over here, the first intimation I had of the appointment being refused was through the Press. This time the same thing has occurred. ‘’Since arriving on the second visit I have reason to believe that the religious question has been raised, and raised as a very serious issue. “It is incredible to me that such an issue could be raised as either, an objection or recommendation to an appointment such as Town Clark of a city as important as Belfast. One wonders what are the views of the thousands of Irishmen who fight for freedom.

“The position is that I and my family and ancestors for 250 years have been Church of England Protestants. The girl, who became my wife two years ago, after I had been widowed six years, is an English girl of Irish descent and a Catholic.

January 17th 1942. GREAT DERRYGONNELLY CEILIDHE. FR. McCAFFREY’S POWERFUL APPEAL FOR GAELIC CAUSE.A stirring appeal for support of the native games, dances and language and all things Gaelic, was made by Rev. D. McCaffrey, C.C., when on Sunday night he presented the Junior Football League Cup to the victors in the 1941 competition, Derrygonnelly Harps G.F.C., at a ceilidhe mhor organised by the club in St, Patrick’s Hall, Derrygonnelly. There was an attendance of over 400 at the ceilidhe, which was the first organised in the district for many years. The extraordinary success of the event ensures that for the future ceilidhthe will be a prominent feature of Derrygonnelly social events. Enniskillen and Cavanacross between them, alone sent nearly a hundred patrons, while travelling accommodation prevented nearly fifty more from attending also.

It was a great Irish night. Mr. Jim Sheridan, popular M.C., from Cavanacross, had a comparatively easy task in dealing with a fine programme and an orderly and happy crowd. The St. Molaise Ceilidhe Band, Enniskillen, added further lustre to its name by providing splendid music under the direction of Rev. Bro. Bede, its conductor. An excellent supper was supplied by a hard-working ladies’ committee, and contributors to a most enjoyable selection of songs, dances, etc., were: Misses Maisie Lunny, P.E.T., Eileen Early, Kathleen and May Burns, Margaret McGlone and  — Duffy, Monea; Messrs. Sean O’Boyle, J. Sheridan and J. Quinn.

Although Irish dancing has not been done in the district for some years, the performance of the dances was excellent, the Enniskillen and Cavanacross Gaels leading their Derrygonnelly friends through the various movements. Happy faces were everywhere, and as the popular chairman of the club (Mr. J. J. Maguire) remarked aptly: “at no other event could there be seen so many happy Irish faces.” Those present in addition to others mentioned were Father Duffy, Derrygonnelly; Misses Vera Tummon, P.E.T.; May, McCaffrey, teaching staff, . Convent of Mercy, Messrs. Seamus O’Ceallaigh, Secretary, Co. Board; G. McGee, M.P. S.I.  Parties were present from Belleek and Irvinestown, as well as other places mentioned.

Mr. Maguire, presiding, expressed regret at the unavoidable absence of Very Rev. T. Maguire, P.P., who was to have presented the cup. Father Maguire was the best Gael in Fermanagh, and they were sorry not to have him with them, especially as he was a native of the parish. They had a good substitute in their own beloved curate, Father McCaffrey. (Applause). He thanked all the patrons, and said it was a revelation to them in Derrygonnelly to see the pulling power of a ceilidhe. It was a lesson they were not likely to forget for the future. (Applause). He hoped 1942 would be an even more successful year for their club than 1941, and that they would retain the cup they had and add further trophies to their collection He hoped, too, that ceilidhthe would form their social entertainments for the future. (Applause). The only game they had lost during the year was to Derrylin in the Junior Championship final. Victory in that would have meant that they had won the two junior cups, but they very heartily congratulated Derrylin on their victory and wished them all success in the future. He thanked, everyone connected with the success of the night: the ladies, for their catering and the excellent band from Enniskillen.

FERMANAGH TEACHER SUED. PUPIL LOST EYE AT PLAY. CLAIM FOR DAMAGES. HEARING IN HIGH COURT. A claim brought by a 13 year-old pupil against the principal teacher of a Border school came before the Lord Chief Justice in the Belfast King’s Bench Division last week. The plaintiff, Patrick Anthony Leonard, a minor by his father, John Patrick Leonard, of Creenagho, Belcoo, claimed damages far ,the loss of his right eye alleging negligence on the part of James Ferguson, a public elementary teacher, of Belcoo, in not exercising proper supervision. The boy when playing on the road during the midday break was struck by a stone.

Mr. C. L. Sheil (instructed by Mr. Jas. Cooper) was for the plaintiff; Mr. J. D. Chambers, K.C., and Mr, J. Agnew (instructed by Messrs. Maguire & Herbert) being for the defendant.

Mr. Sheil said the accident took place during the lunch hour on March 23, 1939. The school was the last building on the border dividing Fermanagh from Cavan. The school was staffed by the defendant and two women teachers. On the day in question there were about 70 pupils at the school. Those who lived in Belcoo village or nearby got home for their lunch and about 30 children brought their lunch with them.

Mont of the playground or field had been used for instruction in horticulture by the master, and as part of it not tilled was wet the children played on the public road to the knowledge of the principal teacher.

Counsel added that one of the complaints was that the children were so allowed to play on the public road without any person being in charge of them. The children were playing football, and it is alleged that one of them lifted a handful of road material and threw it at the plaintiff,; who was struck on the right eye. The boy was attended by Dr. Hamilton and sent to Hospital. He was later taken to Belfast where the eye was removed. He submitted that the defendant should have foreseen the danger of letting the boys play on the road because of the traffic and the presence of loose road material. Under the Education Act there was cast on the defendant the statutory duty of exercising care over the children and supervision during the luncheon hour. Defendant, counsel asserted, had interviewed some of the boys, dictated to the children, and they wrote down statements. One boy would say that he was sent for by the master, who asked him to say that he (the defendant) was in fact on the road at the time of the accident.  Plaintiff gave evidence, and in reply to Mr Chambers agreed that he sometimes played on the roads at his home but not with the sanction of his parents. Sometimes the master told them not to go on the roads. Answering his Lordship, the plaintiff , said the master had told them not to be out on the road on certain days.

James McGurl, aged 16 years, said the boys used to play on the road. They were forbidden to be on the road on fair days but not on other days. The following day the master spoke to him and …………….

“IMPARTIALITY ” SERIOUSLY QUERIED. To the Editor Fermanagh Herald. ”Sir, Some of your readers who are unacquainted with the Impartial Reporters peculiar principles of impartiality, may have been misled by one of its “impartial” statements, published last week; will you, therefore allow me a few words on the subject. An article in that journal commenting on Regional Education Committee matters, concluded thus “Strange, when Mr. Hanna was appointed Principal, Captain Wray voted against him, favouring a candidate in the same line but with qualifications inferior to those of Mr. Hanna. Under the sharp pangs of remorse for having failed to favour the “Impartial Reporter’s” “highly qualified. candidate, I can just barely recall, as feeble consolation that my iniquity  on that occasion was shared by several other Corrupt nit-wits of the Committee, a few citizens with rank and title to their names – spiritual and temporal. The “Impartial Reporters” ‘‘highly qualified” candidate was, of course, championed by our well- known stalwarts of public rectitude.

The poor mutt, with the ‘‘inferior qualifications” for whom I voted had only a lot of silly stuff as certificates, one of which was from a comic naval dockyard named Chatham and, incidentally, he was only the son of a common British Naval Officer —’how ridiculously absurd to associate our Technical School, or sully its academic air, with such unqualified and inferior persons and places. Needless to add, that fellow with the “inferior qualifications” was not a Presbyterian, he was only just a Protestant, the poor devil could hardly have been more unqualified, I suppose, according to the “Impartial Reporter” unless he were a b…….. Papist.

I am Sir etc. J. P. Wray 27-1-1942.

1954 January to June.

National Events.

The Flags and Emblems Act in Northern Ireland (6 April) bans interference with the Union Jack and effectively prohibits the public or private display of the tricolour
Michael Manning (aged 25) becomes the last man to be executed by the state in the Republic of Ireland: he is hanged on 20 April at Mountjoy jail, Dublin, for the murder of a nurse
General election in the Republic (18 May): a second coalition government takes office on 2 June with John A. Costello as Taoiseach
The IRA raids Gough military barracks, Armagh (12 June)
Brendan Behan’s The Quare Fellow opens at the Pike Theatre, Dublin (19 November)
A four-month bank dispute commences in the Republic (4 December)
The last issue of The Bell appears
Christy Brown’s My Left Foot is published
A record 84,856 people watch Cork beat Wexford in the All-Ireland hurling final at Croke Park

Births.

Jimmy Barry Murphy (hurler and Gaelic footballer) in Cork (22/8)
Ollie Campbell (rugby player) in Dublin (3/3)
Maud Cotter (stained-glass artist)
Síle de Valera (Fianna Fáil politician) in Dublin
Bob Geldof (rock musician, charity organizer) in Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin (5/10)
Richard Kearney (philosopher and writer) in Cork
Ger Loughnane (Clare hurler and manager)
Thomas McCarthy (poet) in Cappoquin, Co. Waterford
Kevin Moran (Dublin Gaelic footballer; Manchester United, Sporting Gijon, Blackburn Rovers and Republic of Ireland footballer) in Dublin (29/4)
Brian Mullins (Dublin Gaelic footballer) in Dublin (27/9)
Éilís Ní Dhuibhne (writer and lecturer) in Dublin
Julie O’Callaghan (poet) in Chicago
Mary O’Donnell (writer and broadcaster) in Monaghan
Dennis O’Driscoll (poet) in Thurles, Co. Tipperary
Bobby Sands (IRA member and hunger striker) in Belfast
Mikey Sheehy (Kerry Gaelic footballer) in Co. Kerry (28/7)

Deaths.

John Collins
Margaret Cousins
James Green Douglas
Denis Fahey
Henry Harrison
Elinor Price
Robert Smyllie.

Local Events.

2-1-54 Enniskillen new Fire Station, now completed, will be opened shortly. The brigade consists of 20 members under section leader Robert McCutcheon.

2-1-54 There is no need for alarm in Fermanagh says Dr. Brian Moore, Chief Medical Officer for the County, speaking about the four cases of infantile paralysis reported in Fermanagh in the past month.

2-1-54 A youth named Patrick Barron of Derryrona, Leggs PO, Belleek is in Fermanagh County Hospital suffering from head injuries suffered on Christmas Day while riding a motor cycle.

2-1-54 A Donegal youth, Johnston Morrow of Derrybrick, Clonelly was sentenced to one month imprisonment for driving a tractor while disqualified and without insurance or licence and also for obtaining a license while disqualified. He had been employed by David George Noble of Derrybrick.

9-1-54  St. Mary’s Hall, Devenish, was packed for “The Message of Fatima,” Pageant by the local school children. An enthralled audience drawn from four counties saw unfold scene by scene the wonderful miracle which shook the world only thirty six years ago. I take of my hat to Fr. Marron and his brilliant galaxy of juvenile stars and I think it only fair to hand a special bouquet to little Nuala Gilbride of Rosinver, who played the part of Our Lady of Fatima in a manner worthy of the highest commendation. The parts of the children to whom the apparition appeared were played by Bridie Neilan, Agnes Burns and M. J. Flanagan.

16-1-54 Irvinestown’s unbelievable plight to end soon. For years past they have had the water turned on for only two hours per day and only one hour in the Summer. In January they are to join up to the huge Lough Braden water network.

16-1-54 An application to have the Ballinamallard – Mossfield – Sydare closed for the annual “Enniskillen 100” motor cycle race this year was granted by Fermanagh County Council. Owing to a late application last year there was no race – the first occasion this happened since the war.

16-1-54  Lawyer and cattle dealer summonsed at Belleek as a result of accidents at a bad bend at Keenaghan, Belleek within five days of each other. The defendants were cattle dealer Maurice Leonard, Pettigo and Thomas T. Montague, LLB, Irvinestown. Leonard’s cattle lorry demolished a length of stone wall and had the front axle torn from the vehicle was fined £1 for driving without due care and 10s for not producing his insurance within five days. Evidence was given that the front tyres of the lorry were smooth. In his own defence Montague said that there was no evidence that he was driving without due care and that the skid marks and damage to the wall were just as likely to have been those caused by the lorry. Case dismissed for insufficient evidence.

16-1-54 In a sequel to a row over admission to a dance hall at Brollagh, Frederick Brock was fined £1 and bound over for a year on his own bail of £5. Sydney Brock who was trying to take his brother from the police was fined £3 for obstruction, £3 for disorderly behaviour and bound over for a year for £5. John Dolan was fined £3 for disorderly behaviour and £1 for obstruction and also bound over and Thomas Murphy was fined £1.

16-1-54 It was with regret that his many friends heard of the death of Mr. Patrick Eves, Kesh, one of the oldest and most respected residents of Kesh. Until he retired from business due to failing health he had carried on a long and successful business as a spirit merchant and farmer and had earned a fine reputation as a man of sound judgment, a good counselor and neighbour and the respect of men of all creeds.

23-1-54  Mrs Mary Mc Garrity, (49) wife of John Mc Garrity, tenant of apartments in the old Workhouse, Townhill, Irvinestown, gave her life on Friday night in an effort to save her two daughters, Josie (24) and Veronica (19) who were returning from the cinema at 11.00 when they became entangled in a live electricity cable in the darkness of an enclosed yard in front of their dwelling place. The wire had been broken in the storm. Hearing their screams their parents rushed down to help them and were aided by Samuel Gillespie, an electrician, who helped the father and two daughters get clear. Unfortunately Mrs Mc Garrity was fatally shocked and died on her way to hospital.

23-1-54  Garda William Melly, Dublin Metropolitan Police has retired after 39 year’s service from 1st January 1954. He was stationed all his time in Dublin and was attached to the Dublin District Courts for over 30 years. He served through all the troubled years in the city during his service. He was a native of Castle Caldwell, County Fermanagh.

23-1-54  It was with regret that the people of Devenish heard of the death of Mrs Ellen Feely on January 5th. She had been a member of the Total Abstinence Association since 1911.

6-2-54  Mr. S. Hernon, Secretary of Devenish GAA Club said in his report that last year was not an outstanding success although the Minor team had got to the County final only to be defeated by a very good Lisnaskea team.

13-2-54 The Annual Fermanagh County GAA Convention was held in Enniskillen on the last Sunday in January with 74 delegates present, the greatest ever number. Not counted were Mr. Denis Hogan and Denis Leonard of the newly formed Knocks club who were not allowed to vote since their team did not compete in the last championship in 1953. All three nominees for chairman were unwilling to put their names forward but this was not accepted and Mr. Thomas Campbell, Belleek, was retained in office for a fourth time. The most far-reaching motion to be decided was to reduce the number of players on Senior teams from 15 to 13. This probably suits most Fermanagh pitches better and should lead to a more open brand of football.

27-2-54 Lack Farmer, 54 year old, Francis Mc Cusker, Largy, Lack, was killed while loading trees on to a lorry from an embankment on his farm. A verdict of accidental death was returned at the inquest. He was a brother of Nurse McCusker, Ederney.

27-2-54 Regret has been occasioned by the death of Mrs F. Campbell, wife of Mr. Francis Campbell, Aghoo, Devenish, after a long illness.

6-3-54 A fine of £3 was imposed on Bernard Mc Kenna, Ardees, Roscor, Belleek for stealing an Exide battery from a motor cycle parked at Mahoo. District Inspector Wolseley said that the defendant had previously been convicted of stealing cattle.

6-3-54 The Belleek V Enniskillen Gaels football match was abandoned at half time due to snow with the score Belleek 0-4, Enniskillen 0-1.

6-3-54  Death of Leitrim-Born Christian Brother, founder of Australia’s Boy’s Town. Regret is felt in Kiltyclogher and district by the death of Rev. Bro. Paul Francis Keaney, which occurred suddenly at his Christian Brothers College, Perth, Australia last Friday, 28th February. Known all over the great Australian Continent as the founder of Australia’s Boy’s Town and beloved for his charity and kindness towards the flotsam and jetsam of humanity with whom his social activities brought him into contact. His death is mourned by hundreds of orphaned and abandoned boys who owing to Br Paul’s noble work are today happy and prosperous citizens.  He was born on a small farm at Corraleskin, Kiltyclogher in 1888 he was one of a family of nine of whom seven still survive. He joined the RIC in 1909 and served two years before emigrating. He received the OBE in the Coronation honours list. When he decided recently to return to Ireland after an absence of 42 years he was presented with a cheque for £1,500 by the Australian Prime Minister, Mr. Menzies, on behalf of a group of businessmen as a tribute to his services. However his return to Ireland was not to be. (Another view from the Internet)

Brother Kearney, of Bindoon notoriety, was a saint to the Catholic Church and a monster to the boys placed in his “care”. The Catholic Church erected a huge statue of him at Bindoon. In a case of typical Aussie larrikinism, former boys at the Home knocked its head off one day. Reports indicate that they were observed attempting to use it as a football.

One of the six Royal Commissioners, former Senator for Western Australia, Andrew Murray, once described Kearney as “a sadist who indulged in criminal assault and who knowingly protected rings of predatory Brothers engaged in systemic, long-term sexual assault on defenceless children (Hansard 2001, p.27275 – Matter of Public Interest). Presumably, Mr. Murray will be eager to revisit the matter during the course of the Royal Commission.

Former inmates of Bindoon also pull no punches with regard to “The Orphans’ Friend” (as the plaque on his statue reads) Kearney, an abuser who stood 6ft. tall and weighed 17 stone. Laurie Humphreys says that “I guess you could call him a sadist”. John Hennessy, also from Bindoon, speaks with a stutter which he says is a legacy of being stripped naked and publicly flogged by Kearney. He notes that “At Bindoon, the threat of violence was ever present. The Brothers carried a strap consisting of leather stitched together and a metal weight.”

In a glowing tribute to Kearney, even the Christian Brothers had to acknowledge that “Conversely, some former inmates remember him as a brutal disciplinarian with an ungovernable temper, who neglected their education, exploited their labour and turned a blind eye to sexual abuse of them by other members of the staff.” Note the use of “some” rather than “all” in that statement. The paragraph concludes, for some reason, with the statement that “An enthusiast, Keaney was easily depressed by criticism.”

The 2001 Australian Senate Community Affairs and References Committee Report, titled “Lost Innocents: Righting the Record – Report on Child Migration”, detailed evidence which revealed the “depraved, violent and abusive nature” of Brother Keaney and his role in the “systematic abuse of children under his care”. In submissions to the Committee report, individuals who had been abused by Keaney described his brutality; “I lost my teeth at Bindoon – my face kicked repeatedly by Brother Keaney”. Similarly – “Br. Keaney was a very sadistic, perverted and deviant paedophile. He abused many of the boys… in his care. Tragically, there was just no one that we victims could go to for help. Who would have believed us anyway?”

Another former Bindoon resident stated that “The Christian Brothers used to walk around with a thick 18in leather strap hanging from the waist of their long, black outfits, and they’d give you a wallop at the slightest opportunity. They’d hit you wherever they could – be it on the backside or sole of the foot – and boy, did it hurt. Once I was on the receiving end of a real hiding from one of them. He was giving a younger lad a hard time and I must have said something under my breath. He lashed out with his strap and put in his boot. I ended up cowering under my bed, trying to escape him, and was left covered in bruises.”

Yet another noted that “He liked to prod us with a walking stick, and was one of the cruelest people I’ve ever met.”

A secret church report about Christian Brothers’ institutions such as Bindoon in Western Australia from the mid-30s right up to the mid-60s refers to:

  • brothers who were “odd or mentally unstable”,
  • of a “sex underworld”
  • of brothers who “shared boys” for sexual purposes
  • and that often the church hierarchy knew of the abuse and did nothing about it.

Kearney’s Bindoon was billed as an educational institution, but as one former resident claimed, “There was no teaching at Bindoon, and I know of several former inmates who still cannot read or write.” Another reported that “there wasn’t much in the way of schooling. I’d always been good at school in England but it pretty much ended overnight. A lot of the boys at Bindoon never learnt how to read or write.”

A CBS Television documentary aired in the U.S. claimed that, at Bindoon, “The priority was construction. Brother Francis Keaney, an imposing, white-haired Irishman who ran the place, was obsessed with building the largest Catholic institution in Western Australia. He used his charges as labor. From sunrise to sunset, the boys built Brother Keaney’s shrine, with no shoes, and no questions asked.”

When the Christian Brothers arrived in 1939 with the first group of seven boy labourers, the only building on the property was a mud-brick homestead which became their home. After the work of a generation of boys, the facility is grandiose and has been listed by the West Australian Government as a heritage-listed property.  The “Statement of Significance” refers to “The design, use of local materials, use of child labour, relationships of the buildings, and period during which they were constructed, make the places exceptionally significant, both individually and in their precinct setting. The place has an exceptional ‘sense of place’ for the ‘boys’, and their families.”

When Kearney arrived in 1940, with another eight boys, foundations were dug and one wing of the first building, the dormitory block now known as Edmund House, was officially opened by 1941. Most of the building work was completed by 1953. During construction, two boys died in accidents and a third died from an undefined cause. They are buried in simple graves on the site, while Br. Kearney’s grave has a large marble headstone, and, of course, a (headless) statue.

Not only did Kearney use forced child labour to build his edifice, he treated the boys badly in ways other than sexual abuse and violence. One of his slaves remembered that, on arrival, “We were immediately put to work. I learnt how to milk a cow within a week, and then we began constructing a new building. By the time I was 14, I was driving a truck. We’d work, sleep and eat. That was it.”

He also reported that “We slept on open verandas all-year round – and when a wind blew up, it got pretty cold. Foodwise, we’d get crushed wheat or porridge for breakfast, followed by bread in dripping (cow fat). The rest of the meals were similarly plain: we seemed to subsist on a diet of swedes and turnips.”

For his efforts, Kearney received Imperial Honours awards, known as an MBE and ISO. Despite all of the evidence of his unworthiness for such prestigious awards, attempts by many people to have the awards rescinded have, so far, been unsuccessful.

6-3-54 A Chemist Shop is now open at Mill Street, Pettigo under the management of M. T. Egan, M.P.S.I.

13-3-54 During the weekend telephone engineers started to erect telephone poles from Pettigo village to Tievemore Post Office where a Post Office telephone is being installed.

27-3-54 The Belleek Erne Drainage Strike over the sacking of a fitter who complained about their conditions of employment especially at the Marion crane at which he worked.

27-3-54 Devenish Pioneer Social on Sunday last in St. Mary’s Hall was a great success. The Sligo Pantomime Players provided the entertainment. Rev. Fr. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo was the guest of honour and was welcomed by Rev. Canon Coyle, a member of the Association for 33 years. The Association was first set up in the parish in 1945 and three Councils were established at Cashel, Toura and Devenish. The parish now has 242 Pioneers and 105 probationers and the juvenile section is being especially catered for in the schools.

27-3-54 The residents of Pettigo village and district deeply regret the transfer of Sergeant M. J. Mc Donagh, Garda Siochana, from Pettigo to Newtowncunningham during the week. Sergeant Mc Donagh was a very popular member of the Garda and for his brief stay in Pettigo village had endeared himself to everyone. Of a retiring disposition he was genial and had a most efficient manner in the discharge of his various duties. During his term as Sergeant in charge of Pettigo Garda Station lawlessness had completely disappeared in the area.

27-3-54 During blasting operations in a quarry at Cashelinney a small piece of rock from the quarry travelled 500 yards landing on the roof of Lettercran School and broke a few slates.

3-4-54 The opening of the Adelphi Cinema, Irvinestown on April 5th with the first film “Ivanhoe” with Robert and Elizabeth Taylor. Telephone Irvinestown 242.

3-4-54  Donegal defeat Fermanagh at Glenties. The ex-Fermanagh player Matt Regan (Belleek) was in sparkling form against his old colleagues. Many strange decisions by the referee almost led to the Fermanagh team leaving the field on several occasions in the second half. Sean Gonigle (Belleek) was the best player on the Fermanagh team.

17-4-54 Garrison man, Thomas Murphy, of Knockaraven, was fined £2 for assaulting another youth, Walter George Carson on March 14th. Murphy had caught hold of Carson’s bicycle by the carrier and bounced it up and down several times.

17-4-54 Very Rev. E. Canon Coyle, PP, Devenish paid tribute to the Anti-Partition League after an anti-Partition film show, concert and meeting in St., Mary’s Hall, Devenish on Sunday night. After thanking the speakers, Mr. Cahir Healy and P. J. O’Hare he said, “No other movement is doing anything only talking.”

24-4-54 Junior Football League – Holywell 2-11 – Devenish 1-7.

24-4-54 Garrison Publican, Patrick Casey, of Casey’s Hotel, was fined £1 for allowing the consumption of intoxicating drink on his licensed premises and his wife Margaret was fined £1 for aiding and abetting. Four persons found on the premises were each found 8 shillings. They had drink on the counter in front of them when the police entered at 10.00 p.m.

24-4-54 The O’Donnell Rally opens in Ballyshannon with glorious weather for a memorable occasion. It was attended by Mr. Aiken, Minister of External Affairs, Count O’Donnell and The O’Donnell.

24-4-54 Ballyshannon Notes. The town was gaily decorated with flags and bunting during the Easter weekend. This was to celebrate the opening of An Tostal and the O’Donnell Clan Rally. The Power House was illuminated with bright yellow lights, and viewed from the bridge, was an inspiring sight.

1-5-54 On Friday morning when travelling to her place of employment at Waterfoot, Pettigo, Miss Maggie Mc Caffrey, Mullinagoad, heard a fox barking and on investigation found a young fox which she promptly killed with a stick from the roadside.

1-5-54 Tievemore Post Office was on Thursday officially opened as a telephone call office.

1-5-54 The cuckoo was heard for the first time in the Pettigo area during the weekend, and also the corncrake, which is late compared with previous years.

1-5-54 The “Robe” at the Regal Cinema, Enniskillen. Enniskillen is this week enjoying its most stupendous cinematic treat. And when I say “stupendous” I know I am employing one of the superlatives that Hollywood blurbs have largely made meaningless. But using it with a due sense of proportion, one can only say of the magnificent drama, “The Robe” brought to the Regal, Enniskillen this week, in the new screen medium, cinemascope, that it is a stupendous achievement. Many feel that a wonderful religious performance like “The Robe” should finish only with a suitable religious air at the conclusion. There are three performances daily – Balcony 2/-, stalls 1/-.

1-5-54 In the Junior League Derrygonnelly defeated Devenish by 3-3 to 1-2. Devenish had a grand full back in J. Mulrone, who gave a sound display while others to impress were P. Keown, R, Mc Dermott and J. Treacy.

8-5-54 Enniskillen Unionist majority on the Town Improvements Committee which has Council powers in the allocation of houses voted to give four new Council houses in Derrychara to Protestants. This makes a total of 77 houses let at Derrychara, all to Protestants. There are 18 left to be let.

8-5-54 On Wednesday morning the wedding took place at St. Patrick’s Church Belleek of Mr. George Johnston, Pettigo and Miss Molly Monaghan, daughter of Mr and Mrs Edward Monaghan, Aghafoy, Pettigo. Mr. Edward Monaghan, brother of the bride was best man and Miss Mona Flood, “The Hotel” Pettigo was bridesmaid. Afterwards the happy couple set off for Bundoran for their honeymoon.

8-5-54 The wedding took place of Mr. John J. McGurl, Farrancassidy and Miss Maureen Doogan, Corry, Belleek.

8-5-54 The death is reported of Mr. John Dolan, Drumnasrene who was one of the most respected residents of Devenish Parish.

15-5-54 Ballyshannon’s new GAA Park opens with a Donegal win over Armagh in a challenge game.

5-6-54  The death is announced of Mr. James Maguire, Seemuldoon, building contractor, responsible for the erection (and of the design) of many fine schools, halls, churches and buildings. He had erected the curates house and Ederney Hall in his own parish.

5-6-54 A 22 mile dash by Enniskillen fire brigade saved the world-famous Belleek Pottery from possible destruction on Sunday. They reached Belleek in a record time of half an hour. Workmen and others, including police under Sergeant John Mc Michael, formed a bucket chain which confined the flames to a limited area of the kiln polishing room where the outbreak started. Fire fighting units from Ballyshannon also attended the blaze and Customs formalities were waived as they crossed the Border.

12-6-54 By attaching a wooden frame behind his motorbike, Mr. John O’Connor, Mulleek, was able to “top” two acres of potato drills in a few hours. When done by hand this usually took several days. Miss Rita Dolan, a nurse, of Killybig, Garison, was fined £2 for allowing a juvenile to drive her car without being properly licensed, and covered by the insurance, and she was disqualified for driving for a year. The RM suggested an early application be made to the court for the removal of the disqualification on Miss Dolan.

19-6-54  Daring Raid on Armagh military barracks. Fifteen khaki-clad men seize 700 guns from the Armory. Officers held up at pistol point.

19-6-54 For the second time in a fortnight the River Erne between Belleek and Roscor will be drained of all water.

19-6-54  Juvenile Football League. Ederney’s Grand Win over Gaels by 4-13 to 1-1. Ederney proved to be far too good for Gaels Juveniles. It was a pleasure to watch the Ederney team and especially their grand nippy forwards with their well-worked and constructive moves, and their beautiful finishing. Practice, training and constructive coaching were apparent in every movement. All were splendid but M. Maguire, Joe Turner, J. Moohan and especially A. Mc Grath, a grand little player with a great “pick-up” and a delightful body swerve merit special mention. J Wylie, N. McClurg, H. Herbert, V. Henderson and Nolan in goals were best for Gaels.

19-6-54  Mr E. Thompson, Castle Caldwell had a narrow escape from injury when, swerving to avoid an auto-cyclist, his car mounted a ditch and overturned. After treatment for injuries he was able to resume his journey in a friend’s car.

19-6-54 Senior Football Championship. Enniskillen Gaels qualified for the Divisional Final with a narrow victory over Ederney by 4-2 to 3-4. Best for Ederney were Jim Eves, B. Sheridan, B. Mc Hugh and the McKervey brothers. The stewards had the excellent idea of clearing the goal lines before the game started, thus leaving the two umpires at each goals free to carry out their duties more efficiently. Referee Mr. Bill Thompson.

26-6-54 In the league Irvinestown 1-4, Belleek 1-4. Best for the home team were O’Hanlon, Charlton, McGrory, Lennon (Joe who played for Down) Mahon, Maguire and Hegarty. The visitors were well served by McCann, Gonigle, Rooney, and Tinney. The match was refereed by Fr. Tom Marron, Ederney.

26-6-54  On next Sunday, June 27th, Pettigo village will be en fete for the annual Memorial celebrations which it is hoped will be a success. There will be a fancy dress parade led by Ederney and Irvinestown Bands to the new Memorial Park, where many football teams will compete for the Memorial Cup.

26-6-54 Irvinestown mid-week Tournament, 13-a-side for wristlet watches valued at £120 at St., Molaise Park, Irvinestown. Fixtures include Pettigo V Derrygonnelly Thursday 24th June and Trillick V Ederney Thursday 22nd July.

1952 to June.

1952.

National Events.

An Aer Lingus aeroplane, the St Kevin, crashes in Wales with the loss of 23 lives
George VI dies (31 January); Elizabeth II accedes to the throne
Seán T. O’Kelly starts a second term as President (25 June)
Bord Fáilte (the Irish Tourist Board) is set up (3 July)
In the Republic, an act permits the adoption of orphaned or illegitimate children by couples of the same religious denomination (13 December)
Belfast and Dublin governments agree on joint control of Foyle fisheries
The Irish Greyhound Racing Board is established
The Irish Society (set up in early 17th century to organize Derry/Londonderry plantation) sells its last major asset – the Foyle Fisheries
13 issues of Kavanagh’s Weekly, edited by Patrick Kavanagh and published by his brother Peter, appear from April to June
John Ford’s film The Quiet Man is released

Births

Gerald Barry (composer) in Co. Clare
Angela Bourke (writer and scholar) in Dublin
Pierce Brosnan (television and film actor) in Co. Meath
Harry Clifton (poet) in Dublin
Eamonn Coghlan (athlete, world 5000 m champion 1983) in Dublin (21/11)
Evelyn Conlon (fiction writer) in Rockcorry, Co. Monaghan
Gerald Dawe (poet) in Belfast
Joey Dunlop (motorcycle racer) in Armoy, Co. Antrim (25/2)
Pat Eddery (jockey) in Blackrock, Co. Dublin (18/3)
Ciaran Fitzgerald (rugby player) in Galway (4/6)
Gabriel Fitzmaurice (poet and editor) in Moyvane, Co. Kerry
Gene Lambert (artist) in Dublin
Thom McGinty (‘the Diceman’; Dublin outdoor mime artist) in Strathclyde
John McKenna (broadcaster and fiction writer) in Castledermot, Co. Kildare
Dermot Morgan (comedian) in Dublin (31/3)
Michael Mulcahy (artist) in Cork
Nuala Ní Dhomnaill (poet) in Lancashire
Jonjo O’Neill (jockey) in Castletownroche, Co. Cork (13/4)
Malcolm Proud (harpsichordist and organist) in Dublin
James Scanlon (stained-glass artist) in Brosna, Co. Kerry (18/10)
Matthew Sweeney (poet) in Lifford, Co. Donegal

Deaths.

Molly Allgood
Kathleen Coyle
Frederick Crawford
Bernard Duffy
Sam Henry
Michael Kinnane
Edward O’Brien
Joseph O’Neill

Local Events.

5-1-1952 Sad deaths of Lisnaskea Garage owner and his two sons in a car accident in the Wattlebridge area. Samuel Kettyles age 41 and sons Derek age 6 and Mervyn aged 4 died when their car overturned into a flooded ditch and they were drowned.

12-1-52 Devenish Parish is in the forefront in the fight against imported dances and all the other pernicious influences, which are retarding the progress of the nation towards complete freedom equipped with two splendid halls. The young people are enthusiastic about Irish dancing and the picturesque little village of Devenish is justly proud of having produced the champion dancer of the nine counties of Ulster, Mr. John McDermott. The Robinson sisters are also talented step dancers and several other young dancers are coming into the limelight, we ask the Republic of Ireland to follow the example of their neighbours across the Border because at the moment, an Irish dance in a Leitrim hall is about as rare as a white crow.

12-1-52 Owen Melly of Loughall, Belleek was summonsed for assaulting his father Peter Melly in a domestic dispute. The father said it was as much his fault as that of his son. Paid 3 shillings court costs.

19-1-52 On the 5th day of hearings at a special court in Enniskillen of summonses arising from Westminster Election victory celebrations in Enniskillen on 5th November last 11 people have been fined between £1 and £10. Many alleged that they had been battened insensible by the police.

19-1-52  Sensational Features on the New Fordson Major. Choice of three new engines, many basic components common to all engines, six forward speeds and two reverse, new hydraulics, car type controls and steering, compact and maneuverable.

19-1-52 The death has occurred at an early age of Mrs. J. Dolan, The Island, Devenish, nee Elizabeth O’Reilly. She was the widow of the late James Dolan who met a tragic end by drowning in Lough Melvin a few years ago. (17 years)

19-1-52 Aer Lingus plane crashes in Wales at 7 pm last Thursday on a flight from London to Dublin. Most of the 23 people on the St. Kevin were from Dublin. The plane came down in a heavy storm of hail, rain and sleet.

26-1-52  Death of Mr. Michael Flanigan, Carran West, Garrison at the age of 85. He was a stout Nationalist and uncle of Mr. P. J. Flanigan, solicitor, Enniskillen.

26-1-52  Wedding in Pettigo of Mr Ronald Mc Crea to Miss Etta Aiken.

26-1-52  First Anniversary dance in the Rainbow Ballroom, Glenfarne on Wednesday night 30th January. Music – Stephen Garvey’s Band with Hammond Organ. Also featuring the man with the golden voice, Ronnie Howes, Radio Eireann resident singer. Admission 5 shillings.

26-1-52 In his review of the Fermanagh Gael’s year Mr. Fee stated that our Minor Team was probably the best that ever represented the county at this grade.

26-1-52  Mr. P. Keown, secretary of St. Mary’s GFC, Garrison, said 1951 was a year of progress. He said it would be advisable to bring in the Cashelnadrea area so as to have one strong club in the parish.

26-1-52 I.N.F. Modern Dancing in the Forester’s Hall, Enniskillen, on Sunday 27th, January. Dancing 9-2. Admission Ladies 2/6, Gents 3/- Patrons from Strabane will attend.

2-2-52 Sarah Sweeny of Gortnagullion, Kesh was fined £2 for stealing a book of 40 tobacco tokens.

2-2-52 Six drowned in Derry lake beside the convent of Mercy, Kilrea. John and Rosetta Deery, their son Louis and daughter Lavinia and grandchildren, Patrick and John. The children had been sleighing on a hillside beside the lake and their “run” got further and further out into the lake.

2-2-52 The GAA must be more than an athletic association said Mr Thomas Campbell, Belleek at the County AGM. He believed that there was not the same enthusiasm for National ideals as there had been twenty years ago. He alleged that some prominent GAA men were the best jitterbuggers in the country.

9-2-52  AGM of Cashel Branch of the Ulster Farmers Union in St. Joseph’s Hall, Cashelnadrea Feb. 14th. Mr. Asquith and Mr. Armstrong, group secretary will address the meeting. All farmers are invited to attend.

9-2-52 Burnhouse Services, Ireland. A quick, reliable service is offered to farmers for the immediate collection of all dead and worn out animals. Phone your nearest agent at Omagh 187 or Enniskillen 2270.

9-2-52 Visit of BBC talent scouts to Enniskillen. Auditions will be held in the Town hall on 21st and 22nd of February. The auditions will be held in private with the adjudicators listening in another room, exactly as in a BBC studio, and the performers known to them only by a number. The Childrens’ Hour programme will be open to choirs and young people who have written poems, short stories etc. There will also be auditions for the popular programme, “I want to be an actor.”

16-2-52 By a majority vote at a Convention at Omagh it was decided that Cahir Healy M.P. and Michael O’Neill, M.P. should take their seats at Westminster. Cahir Healy took his seat at Westminster from 1924 to 1935 and although winning in 1950 the convention decided on abstention at this time. He was imprisoned twice from 1922 to 1924 on the prison ship Argenta in Belfast Lough and from 1942 to 1944 in Brixton Prison.

16-2-52 Mr Edward Lawn, Scarden, Leggs P.O. was fined £1 for riding a bicycle while drunk, £1 for riding without due care and attention and 11 shillings and costs for having no lights and bell, that a pedestrian was knocked down, receiving facial injuries and having her false teeth and glasses broken. District Inspector Shea prosecuting said a Mrs Flanagan was walking out of Belleek and defendant was coming from the fair on his bicycle when he knocked her down.

16-2-52 One of the oldest and most popular residents of Garrison Parish has passed away. She was Mrs B. Burns, Rogagh, Cashel.

16-2-52 The funeral of the late King George VI will take place at Windsor on Friday. Messages of sympathy have been flooding in to the Queen Mother and the new Queen Elizabeth 11. One of the first was from the Pope.

23-2-52 Brendan Faughnan may soon be back in the Belleek team again. After a season with Pettigo he has applied for a transfer to the Young Emmets team.

1-3-52 On Sunday and Monday nights of last week the Brollagh Players presented “The Damsel from Dublin” in St. Mary’s Hall, Garrison. The large audience present were treated to a remarkable display of dramatic talent. Certainly the Brollagh Troupe are living up to a long established tradition of good acting.

8-3-52 The present bounty for killing foxes is 10 shillings for an adult and 5 shillings for a fox cub.

15-3-52 Death of Roger Maguire, Carran West, Garrison after a brief illness aged 20.

15-3-52 Regret is expressed in Pettigo and district at the departure of Mr. Brendan Faughnan from the district. Both he and Mrs Faughnan had made many friends in the area. He took a keen interest in promoting Gaelic Games in the locality.

22-3-52 Almost 400 people attended a lecture in Enniskillen on the subject of Fatima of the Apparitions given by Mr. L. Harvey, M.A. Oxon. He gave a graphic outline of the evil forces which threaten Christian Civilization.

5-4-52 Fermanagh fail against Donegal in the Ulster Junior Championship in Glenties by 3-9 to 2-8. M. Regan and S. Gonnigle, Belleek played and P. Casey, Devenish.

5-4-52 Join the army of Ireland. Many young men from the Six Counties have joined. Pay and conditions are now far ahead of most available in civilian life. Finner Camp, Bundoran is now open as a permanent recruiting depot. Any not accepted for the army will have their railway fare refunded and be given a railway warrant home.

5-4-52  Pettigo man Mr. Wm. Leonard had 39 head of cattle forfeited valued at £1,600. Constable Redpath, Tullyhommon gave evidence of seeing the animals incorrectly punched by Patrick Rogers.

12-4-52  Preliminary notice of Monster Football Tournament in St. Molaise Park, Irvinestown Sunday June 8th, 1952.

12-4-52  Tyrone defeat Fermanagh in poor McKenna Cup game at Irvinestown by 2-9 to 2-1 at Irvinestown. “There has never been a goal like that scored by Malachy Mahon in the County Ground, a long toe to hand dash ending with a smashing shot the Ulster goalie Thady Turbett never saw.

19-4-52  Belleek man John Mc Nulty of the Battery, Belleek, who is married and in his early 30s is missing presumably drowned. On Sunday 6th at 11 am a body was seen to fall into the river.

19-4-52   Derrygonnelly boy, 14 year old Brendan Walker, killed by wartime bomb which he found while playing on Innishlougher Island. The boy lived at Rosnafarson, Drumcose, Derrygonnelly.

19-4-52   Enniskillen on the radio. BBC broadcasts from the Town hall, Enniskillen. Childrens’ Hour and the popular quiz, “Up against it.” Also Joan and Valerie Trimble with the Ulster Orchestra. Admission free.

19-4-52  Modern Dancing in Bannagh Hall, Kesh on Wednesday 23rd 9-3 with music by Melody Aces (Newtownstewart) Ladies 4/6, Gents 5 shillings including supper.

19-4-52 New Ration Books being issued. Mc Cabe’s Hall, Belleek and Mc Govern’s Hall, Garrison.

26-4-52    The Ulster colleges team had an easy victory over Connaught in Croke Park. John Maguire of Ederney was the man of the match. Before ten minutes had elapsed practically every spectator was rooting for him. He set up scores for his colleagues, he dummied his way through a bewildered defense time and again, he sent over points from every angle and almost every position.

3-5-52 Almost 200 spectators travelled to the new football grounds at Tempo to see the locals take on Belleek. They defeated Belleek by 2-7 to 2-5 with Brendan Faughnan the star of his side.

3-5-52 The body of John McNulty, Moneendogue, Belleek, a pottery worker was recovered from the Erne on Saturday. He had been missing since April 6th. Constable McCutcheon gave evidence of finding the body. Patrick Feely gave evidence to the inquest of seeing a person jumping into the Erne on the day in question. Joseph McNulty, brother, gave evidence that John had been depressed and in failing health and said that he had told him that he had not slept for a fortnight.

3-5-52 The death is reported of Mrs Mary A. Feely, Slisgarron, Devenish at a comparatively early age.

3-5-52  Victory Ceili in Ederney where Mr Tommy Campbell, Belleek presented Ederney with the Junior Cup which they won last year. The hall was tastefully decorated and the national flag was flown from the stage. Mr. B. Cunningham, N.T. was fear a toighe. It was a notable success since the club had only been reorganised two years ago.

17-5-52  Henry Acheson, Gorteen, Garrison was fined £20 for obstructing the police in the exercise of their duty when they tried to seize three cattle from him at Belleek Fair on March 17th.

17-5-52  The death has taken place of Mrs George Elliott, 63, of the Bungalow, Tullyhommon, Pettigo She was the mother of Bert who was killed in Italy in the recent war and of another son who was killed in a submarine accident. Deceased who was married twice had a large family. Her first husband was killed in an accident in Canada and she later married G. Elliott, motor engineer and garage proprietor.

31-5-52 Fermanagh County Feis at Newtownbutler, Sunday 20th July with An Taoiseac Eamon De Valera in attendance. Bodyguard and National Flag Bearers confined to Fermanagh Old IRA.

31-5-52 Irvinestown defeat Belleek by 2-5 to 2-2 to win Divisional League honours.

7-6-52 Mrs Elizabeth Carson of Knocknashangan, Garrison, was charged with stealing items from a Youth Hostel and a neighbour Mrs Gallagher. Returned for trial at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions.

7-6-52 The death is announced of Mr D. Mc Manus of Moniendogue, Belleek at the age of 84.

14-6-52 Lord Bishop of Clogher Most Rev. Dr. O’Callaghan critical of teachers and their union the INTO. “Some of the modern teachers wanted to spend as little time as they could in the country and then go to the cities and towns as if they might be contaminated by living with the ordinary people. The teachers had become snobs. It was preposterous to think that in a little school, where they had only 30 or 40 children they should expect to have a caretaker cleaning it out “for these lords” who are coming in for a few hours.”

21-6-52 The death is announced of Mr. John Mulligan, Drumnasrene, Garrison, at the age of 75.

28-6-52 Cashelnadrea Sports. St. Mary’s Pipe Band in attendance. Cashel won the 7 a-side football competition by 2-3 to 2-1.

28-6-52 Fermanagh has a decisive victory over Donegal in the first round of the Minor Football Championship by 2-12 to 1-8 at Irvinestown. Claude Maguire, Ederney was the best back on the field.

28-6-52 Mrs Elizabeth Carson of Knocknashangan, Garrison is sentenced to two months imprisonment for stealing clothing from Kathleen Gallagher and receiving bedclothes stolen from the N. I. Youth Hostel Association. She had received a three year suspended sentence on five counts of breaking and entering and theft in 1949.

 

28-6-52 Scandalous housing discrimination against Catholics in Fermanagh was condemned by Mr. P.J. O’Hare in the Northern Senate.

The Famine 1847. Ballyshannon Herald.

1847. The issue of January 1st records a classic tale that ought to be filmed for it has all the ingredients of high drama or perhaps more accurately melodrama. On Christmas Eve a schooner lay just inside the Bar at Ballyshannon. The Bar is a high sandy ridge four miles down river from Ballyshannon that constantly threatens to block the exit of the Erne to the sea and the schooner was sheltering here waiting on a favourable wind. The ship was bound for Liverpool later with bacon and lard and had been charted by Mr. Edward Chism of Ballyshannon (Food was constantly being exported from Ireland during the famine). After a time a boat owned by Mr. Wade pulled alongside the vessel and men who claimed that they were from the saltworks at Ballyshannon asked to come aboard to light their pipes. (The real salt workers would have had to row outside the bar (sandbar) of Ballyshannon estuary) to the open sea to get saltwater which was then evaporated at Portnason, Ballyshannon, to get the salt for preserving the fish and meat exports from the area). Several men came on board and then produced guns, overcame the captain and crew and took a large quantity of bacon and lard from the ship. This is the Irish famine equivalent of Bob Cratchet’s Christmas turkey, especially when (as it turned out later that) it was hogsheads of ham and bacon that were on board. Many a starving household must have had an unexpectedly happy Christmas as a result of this piece of local piracy. By Christmas day the police recovered some of the booty buried in the nearby sand dunes and the soldiers were out combing the area. Three were arrested. Scarce a night passes by without a robbery in town or the vicinity, the paper reports.

1847.January 8th. There is great distress in the area. One man died after just being admitted to the Ballyshannon Workhouse. People won’t come in for aid until the last moment. The dead from the famine are not being buried properly in the Abbey graveyard in Ballyshannon as the graveyard has not deep enough soil. A man on his way from Ballyshannon to Donegal heard the sound of lamentation from a house along the way. Going into the house he found a girl of about sixteen dying and her parents trying to keep her warm. He gave money for food, etc., in the tradition of the good Samaritan, but the girl died in a short time.

January 22nd reported that Colonel Conolly and his family were staying at Cliff for the winter in order to give aid to their tenantry and a terrible increase of poverty, sickness and death was recorded by the paper. Unfortunately and damningly for the paper the above words were all they reported. It says volumes for their social attitude and incomprehension of the situation that they could write: “The details are too horrid to be published.” From Fermanagh the paper reports the action of the Rev. Grey Porter, whose principal estate was at Lisbellaw and who had brought in 150 tons of Indian meal at Derry per the ship Peru. He had bought in the grain at £10-10s-6d per ton and was going to sell it to his tenants at cost price which he hoped would be less than £12 per ton. This compared with £24-10-0 for Indian meal or £30 for oaten meal at market prices. Robberies for money, cattle or arms are a nightly occurrence.

On February 19th the Ballyshannon Herald published a very long letter from John Hamilton of St. Ernan’s near Donegal Town. This man was estate agent for the Conolly Estate around Ballyshannon and possibly for the Leslie Estate of Pettigo and other estates as well. In his own way he seems a man sensitive to the situation and practical for the future, although badly lacking in short term solutions. He seeks to combat apathy and fatalism in the tenantry which is admirable, if the person has the energy to look some distance ahead, but useless if starvation is a matter of days away.

John Hamilton begins by asking everyone to work hard in order to hold on to their tenancies. “Stir yourself and be doing. Drain a rood of ground and dig it eighteen inches deep and you will be paid for it if it done right and get many years to repay this money” (not a generous bargain and in the same vein) “seed will be provided and can be paid for later. Sow corn and not potatoes in rows nine inches apart and the seed two inches apart. This requires two stone of seed and repays 200 stone if the !and is well dug or well ploughed and is dry”. Tenants will be allowed to burn as much as they like and he (John Hamilton) will say nothing for this season (burning the dried sods of the land gave a short term fertility but was ultimately ruinous and absolutely forbidden normally). Tenants were urged to burn as much as they liked on black land i.e., bog land and to cart it to other ground to grow turnips. Sow “pease” (sic) and barley and field and garden beans (and mangle wozzels. Come to him for help. Uncommon work is required and he will not help anyone who holds land but will not work it. He, Hamilton, works hard himself and expects others to do likewise.

In the same issue Colonel Conolly has imported 500 tons of rice and one ton has been sent to the Bundoran schools and two to the Ballyshannon Relief Committee. The columns were illuminated by a row between the Vicar of Drumholm Mr. M. G. Fenwick and a local land agent. Alexander Hamilton, on the question of who should be allowed to get a place on the Relief Works. Should a man who has paid his rent get on the Relief? — if he is able to pay his rent does he need relief work? (as long as you managed the rent you could do what you liked afterwards and if you hadn’t the rent you could work until you could pay the rent — either way the rent was sacrosanct and Catch 22 was born long before Joseph Heller).

From now until April the Famine cannot squeeze into the Ballyshannon Herald and on March 12th we are informed that Fermanagh is improving and that petty thefts and slaughter of cattle had completely ceased, according to the Erne Packet. The reporting of the Donegal Assizes on March 12th at Lifford hints at what the newspaper doesn’t report. Bartley Loughlin, a former bailiff to Mr. H. Coane of Waterloo Cottage, Higginstown, Ballyshannon was alleged to have sent a threatening letter to Mrs. H. Coane saying that their family would be blown up with gunpowder for their oppression of the tenantry. Laughlin had been bailiff for Coane for fifteen years and his handwriting was familiar to his former master. In his capacity as bailiff Laughlin had been ordered to serve notice to quit on thirty tenants and ordered to distrain those persons who had not paid — as far as the landlord was concerned it would not be hard to seize fodder in lieu of rent. For inability or unwillingness to carry this out Bartley Loughlin was sacked. Councillor Doherty defended the ex-­bailiff and demolished the case by asking if Laughlin’s handwriting was so well known to Coane then why would he be so stupid as to write the letter in his own hand? A not-guilty verdict was returned. In the next case a John Donald got seven years’ transportation for stealing sheep from Michael Ward, but a woman, Rebecca Brack, (Brock?) was found not guilty of exposing a child to die at Finner, near Ballyshannon.

1847.In an echo of the Christmas Eve piracy in the Erne Estuary, James Currie, was accused of receiving a ham knowing it to be stolen. The ship’s name is now given as The Confidence and its Master as Joseph Davidson. The ship had been boarded by two boat’s crews and nine bales of bacon and hogsheads of ham had been stolen. Sub-Constable Davis arrested Currie walking through Ballyshannon on Christmas day carrying a ham. Currie said that he had found it in a hole in the ground among the sand dunes. He was found guilty with a recommendation for mercy and got nine months hard labour.

At Fermanagh Assizes at this time Daniel Nealy was convicted of stealing valuable property, plate, etc., from J. C. Bloomfield at Castle Caldwell. He was sentenced to seven years’ transportation. For a similar crime in the same area, the breaking into the house of Launcelot Corcoran near Castle Caldwell on the previous December 27th the following were tried:- James Mulrean, Maurice Connor, Peter Gallagher, Francis Gallagher, Maurice Lannon, William Lannon, George W. O’Connor and Edward Muldoon. All were found guilty and sentenced to fourteen years’ transportation except the last four, who got seven years’ transportation.

The March 26th issue details a brutal occurrence in the Pettigo area which happened on March 23rd. George Allingham with one Patterson and “the notorious Melanefy, the bailiff” came to the house of John McCrea of Clonaweel. Their purpose seemed to be to execute on order upon the person of John McCrea who wasn’t present. Only his two sons were there and after some persuasion they managed to get the three intruders out of the house. They seemed rather inebriated and threatened the sons and finally Melanefy fired at young Edward McCrea “wounding him dreadfully” in the head. Melanefy has run off and the countryside is now in pursuit!

By 2nd April, 1847 things have got so bad in the area as to force its attention upon this blinkered newspaper. It reports that the poor house is crowded to excess and fever and dysentery are spreading alarmingly. “Deaths are frightfully numerous. A fever hospital is urgently needed and its building would give employment to the poor.”

  1. April 23rd:- Captain Fortescue has arrived to take charge of the Commissariat Department, i.e., to give out food for the starving. A vessel with breadstuffs for this town and Enniskillen is waiting for a fair wind to get into port. It is hoped that she will get in today as the people discharged from the workhouse are in great distress. There is plenty of food coming in from America, but it is still at famine prices. Captain Lang is to superintend the public charities. Arrangements are in hand to setup a public soup kitchen to the plan of Mr. Sayer (but the paper notes with unaccustomed concern). “We fear it will not answer the purpose.”

Between Garrison, Derrygonnelly and Holywell many hundreds of acres wilt be left without crops because of the utter poverty of the people. Farmers and graziers cattle are being stolen nightly.

April 30th: There is a great fever sweeping Fermanagh especially in the country districts and arising largely from those who have left (or been sent out) of the workhouse and had now gone home and infected their friends who had generously but fatally taken them in.

  1. May 7th: Reports the hanging of Samuel Crumrner at Lifford. He was hanged for the murder of his father. His wife had also been sentenced for the same crime, but the sentence was commuted to transportation for life. It was the first hanging in Donegal for fourteen or fifteen years and about a thousand people came to watch. On the scaffold Crummer said (the name was not printed) swore his life away for small money in these times. He was a big man of 6’-2” and he said goodbye to his wife and children from the scaffold, although they were not present, before he was launched into eternity.

The steamship Albert under Commander Geary arrived in Ballyshannon with breadstuffs. It also towed in two ships which had been waiting outside the Bar for a favourable wind. The Albert is 147ft long, 42 feet wide, can carry 600 tons and has a capacity of 200 horse power. Many people have been shown over this ship.

On May 14th it is reported that the deaths around Clones, Co. Monaghan, are “inconceivably great”. In Enniskillen the poor and starving rushed the Board of Guardians meeting and all had to be admitted. Colonel Conolly has given his tenants eight tons of rice this week free plus free turnip seed. John and William Tredennick (local landowners between Ballyshannon and Belleek) are reducing their rents by 40% to 50%.

1847.May 21st reports the melancholy death of Captain Drake of the 92nd Regiment and a young local man, Henry Lipsett of Ballyshannon, who were drowned when their sailing boat was upset in the estuary.

Hundreds of the poor are being provided for by the Johnstons of Magheramena Castle near Belleek and their rents are reduced also.

There is great fever in Fermanagh and the well known Dr. Collum has recently succumbed. “God knows who will be next sacrificed on the altar of pestilence and death”. This last item is reprinted taken from the pages of the Erne Packet.

  1. May 28th: reports great fever in the locality of Ballyshannon and all classes were affected. People are warned not to feed beggars at their own door, especially strange ones. Heaps of manure must be removed from thoroughfares, lanes and alleyways as otherwise the Committee of the Ballyshannon Board of Guardians will cause them to be removed and prosecute the offenders. This is signed by M. Davis J.P., chairman.

In the June 11th issue the fever has greatly moderated and not a single death has been reported last week. There is a huge plague of snails affecting crops and people are advised to gather them as they are very suitable for feeding pigs.

June 18th: issue contains a very indignant letter protesting about a pauper with fever lying on Ballyshannon Bridge since Sunday last. The Board of Health should have put him in a lodging house and had a doctor visit him. Only one death has been reported in the past three weeks and that was of Matthew Donohue, an inoffensive, industrious man who kept a public house in Main St., Ballyshannon. There are very good prospects for the harvest. Enniskillen jail is said to be the most crowded in the kingdom.

At the Donegal Petty sessions reported on June 25th a little boy pleaded guilty to stealing a few ship’s biscuits from Messrs Bradshaw of Donegal Town. He was given six months’ jail. He cried as he was led away. Mary Ward got two months jail for stealing two hens.

Sept. 17th: reports that no rot can be seen in the potatoes and that a great fever rages about Enniskillen. The news from Fermanagh continues in the Oct 1st newspaper as it reports on the dissolution of Lowtherstown (Irvinestown) Poor Law Union. The immediate cause was the raising of the salary of the R.C. Chaplain to the Workhouse. In the row that followed the Protestant Chaplain’s salary was raised. Further rows caused the dismissal of the master of the workhouse and finally the Board of Guardians themselves were dismissed! This is the newspaper version of the dissolution of Lowtherstown P.L.U., but in fact there were much more grievous reasons why this

Union was taken over by a Government appointed Commissioner. The Guardians failed to levy anywhere near sufficient funds to support the poor and starving of the locality, thus causing the effects of the Famine to be even worse than need have been and the Workhouse which they were in charge of was very badly run. An inspector who visited Lowtherstown Workhouse wrote that he found people half naked dying in their own vomit and excrement, lying on the floor. He said that Lowtherstown was the worst workhouse that he ever visited. (See Parliamentary Papers: Irish Famine).

October 15th: reported the dissolution of Ballyshannon P.L.U. Commissioners and the appointment of a new government inspector. November 19th sees a letter saying that the people of the country are living on turnips and nothing else. The Gentlemen of the country must unite to stave off famine as they did last year.

The final note of 1847 reports the death of Mr. William Hassard of Garden Hill near Belcoo in Fermanagh. He was shot in the leg and died later. Suspicion pointed to one Creagh, (probably a Mc Grath from the Irish rendering of the name Mc Creigh) but there was insufficient evidence. Creagh’s father had been jailed by Hassard for non-payment of arrears of rent and had died in jail. (This is the type of indirect evidence of the Famine and its effects which makes one wish that this paper had made any decent attempt to write about the momentous events it was living through).

FERMANAGH HERALD. SAT., NOV. 9, JOTTINGS

  1. FERMANAGH HERALD. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, JOTTINGS

THE FATHER O’FLANAGAN FUND. THE hosts of admirers of the Rev. Father Michael O’Flanagan, not only in North Roscommon but throughout the whole, of Ireland, are anxious to inaugurate a Fund to mark in some small degree the feelings they entertain for his fearless work in Ireland’s Cause. With this object in View they respectfully solicit subscriptions, which will be duly acknowledged in the columns of the Press from time to time. Subscriptions can be sent to the Treasurers of the Fund in Crossna, namely Mr. Edward Doyle, Chairman of Boyle No. 1 .Council, Crossna (Co. Roscommon) and Mr. Patrick Kerins, Knockvicar, Boyle.

SHAUN MCDERMOTT’S. F. C. STOP-WATCH COMPETITION, 2 minutes to 10. At Arney Gaelic Hall, Sunday Evening, 3rd THE WINNER: MISS BONNIE WARD, CO. MONAGHAN.

ENNISKILLEN TECHNICAL SCHOOL, (TOWN HALL). IRISH FOR NATIONAL TEACHERS. THIS Class will reopen on SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, at 1.15 p.m. JOHN W. MANSFIELD, Principal.

DEATH. KELLY- October 30, 1918, at St. Vincent’s Hospital, Dublin, Anna Teresa, third daughter of William and Susan Kelly, The Hotel, Belcoo. Age, 22 years. R. I. P. At a rehearsal of the Blacklion Dramatic Club a resolution was passed in silence on the motion of Miss M. Maguire, seconded by Miss A. Dolan tendering the sincere sympathy of the members to Mr. and Mrs Kelly, Belcoo on the loss sustained by them in the death of their beloved daughter Miss Anna Kelly, and as a mark of respect to the memory of the deceased all the rehearsals for the week were adjourned.

John Small, C. C. Belturbet, for cutting the tyres of bicycles belonging to P. Callaghan, Knockaraven, Co., Fermanagh, and Jas McDonald, Milltown on the night of the East Cavan election result was traduced for £3 and £8 in the respective cases at the Cavan Quarter Sessions. Defendant, who did not appear, was with the Sinn Fein crowd said the plaintiff Callaghan.

Manorhamilton Electric Light Co. has increased the charge for light from 6d to 9d per unit.

At the meeting of workers in Enniskillen on Saturday week a resolution was passed urging shop assistants to join the National Union.

The licensed vintners of Enniskillen are taking steps to have the hours of closing in the afternoon altered, especially on fair and market days.

Mr. W, J. Brown, J.P., presided at a meeting of the Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday. The business was purely routine.

At the meeting of Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday, Mr. W. J. Brown, J.P., said that vaccination was a humbug and fraud.

The medical officer of Lisnaskea Guardians reported that six cases of influenza, three of them exhibiting serious pulmonary complications, were admitted to hospital daring the last week. (The ‘Spanish Flu’ which killed about 50 million people around the world at this time including populations in the Pacific Islands including my grandmother at the age of 28.)

The Earl of Belmore, Mr, J. Crosier, J.P., and Mr. J. P. Gillin, Fermanagh County Council, have been surcharged in £50 expended in connection with Fox’s Ferry, Upper Lough Erne. An appeal has been lodged against the surcharge.

Several new members have joined the Derrygonnelly branch of the National Amalgamated Union of Labour, and it is stated that labour candidates will go forward at the next local government elections.

In the course of his quarterly Report to the Fermanagh County Council, Mr. J. P. Burkitt, county surveyor, paid a tribute to the work of Mr. Finnegan, assistant county surveyor, who, he said, carried out his duties in an admirable manner.

A special meeting of the Enniskillen Urban Council will be held on Friday night to co-opt a member and to consider an application from the National Amalgamated Union of Labour asking for an increase for the employees who were members of the Union.

The “flu” is fairly prevalent in Enniskillen and district, but there are signs that the epidemic is abating. Several schools have been closed including Portora Royal School, where a number of the students contracted the disease.

At Enniskillen Quarter, Sessions C.E.R.A. Irvine, solicitor, sued W. J. Browne, J.P., auctioneer, Kinawley, to recover £17 for-costs incurred on defendant’s behalf. Mr. Irvine appeared in person and Mr. Clarke (Messrs. Clarke and Gordon) for the defendant. The case was dismissed,

MR, ARCHDALE, M, P. AND LABOURERS’ UNION. At the quarterly meeting of the Fermanagh Co. Council on Thursday, Mr. John McHugh (Pettigo) presiding, a letter was read from Mr. M. Donnelly, Derry, National Amalgamated Union of Labour, applying for an increase of wages on behalf of the members of the Union who were in the Council’s employment as surfacemen, attendants to steamrollers and other works in connection with road maintenance.

Mr. Archdale, M.P. — I think the National Amalgamated Union of Labour is going to destroy the labourers of this country. It will upset them and put them out of work. It is of no help to the labourers. Lord Belmore — What are their present wages?

The Co, Surveyor said that the drivers were paid £2 or 35s: the attendants, 24s; surfacemen from £l to 25s. He believed that none of the men should be paid any less than 22s 6d per week. Mr. Archdale —  None of them are paid less than that fixed by the Wages Board?

Co. Surveyor — I don’t think so. We have very few men who are constantly employed. The application was referred to the Roads and Quarries Committee.

ENNISKILLEN MILLING SOCIETY. The Committee of the Enniskillen Milling Society had under consideration at their last meeting, the question of erecting a new patent kiln in their new mill. It appears that a Belfast firm have arranged to make kilns of the new pattern known as “air drying which dries the grain before milling at the rate of about one ton per hour without any labour whatsoever, thereby saving the very expensive operation of turning the dried grain as it had to be done on the old kiln heads. It was decided to have this new invention established in their new mill.

DECEMBER 21, 1918. ENNISKILLEN WORKHOUSE ‘BURIALS.

DIGGING THE GRAVES. Assistant Clerk’s Report.

At the meeting of the Enniskillen, Guardians on Tuesday, Mr. Edmund Corrigan, vice-chairman, presiding, Mr. Joseph Ross, assistant clerk reported:—“Owing to the illness of the Master and Matron and the inmates who usually assist at burials, being laid up with influenza, I asked Mr. James Harvey to allow a couple of his men to open the, graves for two inmates in the Workhouse Cemetery on Friday last, who died three days previously, but these men were stopped at the work by Felix Cleary (who is at present under suspension), who went up to them. Two others (who are in the employment of Mr. Rutherford) were, got to bury one of the bodies, and the remains of the other man were buried in the new cemetery by Mr. Millar, who kindly undertook to nave a grave ready after a few hours’ notice. In connection with the above I paid a sum of 10s for having the work carried out, which I would ask the Board to refund me under the circumstances.”

Mr. Carson said it was very kind, of Mr. Ross, and it was a most blackguardly and disgraceful act of Cleary. Mr. W. Elliott (Greentown) said the Board must be in a powerful fix if they would tolerate such work. Mr. Ben Maguire suggested that they should consult their solicitor with the object of having proceedings taken. Mr. Cathcart said he had never thought before that the country around Enniskillen had gone to such a pitch.

The Chairman said there was no member of the Board or no man outside the Board who believed more than he did in the principle of a man being paid a living wage, but when it came to this — to try and leave corpses unburied — it was going too far for him. Mr. B. Maguire proposed that their solicitor be consulted with the view of having proceedings taken against Cleary. Mr. Cathcart thought the matter should be reported to the police authorities. Mr. Ross said a police sergeant was sent round with the coffin to the burial ground lest the men would be interfered with. No further action was taken in the matter.