1942 Fermanagh.

2-5-1942 ENNISKILLEN GROCER’S SUCCESSFUL APPEAL. Ernest Colvin, grocer, High St., Enniskillen, appealed at Enniskillen Quarter. Sessions on Thursday against a penalty of £50 imposed at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on a charge of knowingly harbouring seven sacks of coffee beans with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereon. Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, said that after Colvin had been convicted they succeeded in arresting a man from the Free State named Keenan, .for whom, this coffee was, and he was fined £50. When the case same on against Keenan they had interviewed Mr. Colvin and his assistant, and got them to come and give evidence against Keenan. In view of this fact the Customs Authorities would agree to this penalty, being reduced to £25. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, D. L. (for Colvin) agreed to this course, and accordingly his Honour affirmed the conviction, but reduced the penalty to £25.

2-5-1942 WHISKEY SEIZURE BY FLORENCECOURT POLICE. Sergeant Ryan and Constable Redpath, Florencecourt, on Saturday evening stopped a car at Drumcarn, Belnaleck, Co. Fermanagh, and on searching it found 6 five naggin bottles of whiskey, four similar bottles of wine and two large bottles of gin, as well as a dozen egg cups, a quantity of tobacco and cigarettes, a showerproof coat and quantity of sweepstake tickets, all of which were seized, together with the car. The driver was taken into custody,, and on. Sunday afternoon was allowed out on £20 bail to appear at next Enniskillen Petty Sessions. Major Dickie, R.M., attended at the Barracks, on Sunday afternoon, and the car driver was ,present with his solicitor, but no court was held, the reason being that the magistrate could not discharge any judicial function on a Sunday, though he can sit as a magistrate. The case could only have been .proceeded with had the man sufficient money to pay any fine which, if he had been convicted, might have been imposed. Had the case been heard and a fine inflicted, the order would have been unenforceable, as the Court was held on Sunday.

2-5-1942 FIRE AT CASTLECOOLE. BUILDINGS DESTROYED. An outbreak of fire occurred on Saturday afternoon in outhouses at Castlecoole, Enniskillen, the residence of the Earl of Belmore. The Enniskillen Town Brigade and the Auxiliary Fire Service, both under Mr. James Donnelly, town surveyor, receiving notification at ten minutes to one, were on the spot before one clock a quick turn-out which probably saved extensive buildings because the fire had gained a firm hold on the solid buildings and was burning fiercely. The efforts of the Brigades were chiefly directed towards confining the outbreak. Until. 2.30 p. m, the battle with the flames continued, ending only when about forty yards of the buildings had been destroyed roof and floors being burned out. The A.F.S. Brigade was under the immediate command of Mr. Freddy Bleakley with Mr. J. Lusted, A.F.S. chief in attendance.

2-5-1942 PARTY VOTE ECHO. FARTAGH COTTAGE TENANCY. An echo of a recent Enniskillen Rural Council party vote on a cottage tenancy was heard at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions, on Friday, when the Council was granted a decree for possession of a cottage at Fartagh, against Miss Mary Millar. Miss Millar’s father was the tenant until his death a few months ago. Miss Millar applied for the cottage, but it was granted to a Unionist by a party vote of the Rural Council. Miss Millar is a Catholic.

2-5-1942 SEIZED BICYCLE AT BELLEEK BARRIER. JUDGE RECOMMENDS RETURN ON PAYMENT OF DUTY. Are bicycles liable to purchase tax? Although, according to Mr, George Dixon, Surveyor of customs and Excise for County Fermanagh the tax is collected throughout Great Britain and the Six Counties on bicycles, Mr. R. A. Herbert, L.B. (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert, Enniskillen contended during the course of an appeal at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Monday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., that the wording of the Section of the Act governing the matter makes bicycles not liable.

The appeal was one brought by Terence McGowan, of Ross, Tullyrossmearn, Co. Fermanagh, against an order of Major Dickie, R. M., forfeiting a bicycle under the Customs Acts. When cross-examining Mr. Dixon, the Customs Surveyor, Mr. Herbert referred the witness to the Finance Act No. 2, 1940, which created the Purchase-Tax, and stated that the schedule set out goods that were chargeable with purchase-tax. In the first column (that setting out goods charged at the basic rate of one third were the words: Road Vehicles and Cycles (whether mechanically propelled or not) being vehicles and cycles constructed or adapted solely or mainly for the carriage of passengers.” Mr. Dixon said that was the Section, which gave authority to charge purchase tax on bicycles. Mr. Herbert — Who would be the passenger on a bicycle?—He is his own. passenger. It is being definitely charged and paid all over the United Kingdom. It is time it was questioned. Mr. Herbert said a passenger was already interpreted in law. This boy cycling on this bicycle could not be said to be a passenger. Judge Ellison said he did not think the language in the Section was very neat for the purpose.

Mr. Herbert — It is very far from neat. He further argued that a machine constructed for one person to ride did not make the machine one “constructed for the carriage of passengers.” His Honour held against Mr. Herbert who raised the paint because one of the taxes the appellant was stated to have failed to pay was his purchase tax. Giving evidence for the respondent,  Customs Officer George Forrest, Belleek, stated McGowan was cycling past the barrier there, not stopping, when witness called on him to stop, seeing that he was riding a new bicycle. McGowan in answer to witness’s questions said he belonged to Kiltyclogher, but produced a national registration, card with his address at Ross, Tullyrossmearn. He asked him to account for the fact that he had stated he was from Leitrim, while he was from Ross, and McGowan said he lived at both places off and on, and that he had been, living in the Six Counties for ten years. He said he had borrowed the bicycle from his brother in Kiltyclogher as his own had been stolen. He then offered to pay whatever was necessary. Witness seized the bicycle and an order for forfeiture was granted at the Petty Sessions. “There has not been one single instance,” said witness, “of where a bicycle has been smuggled and has been confirmed as having been smuggled into the Six Counties where the bicycle has not been stated to have been a borrowed bicycle although the bicycle has actually been new at the moment. In cross-examination by Mr. Herbert, witness said cyclists should stop, and go into the Customs hut if necessary.

Do you stop all cyclists? —I do if I am on the road. We all pass these huts and see what occurs?—Sometimes it is after five o’clock (when the Customs hut closes). George Dixon, Customs Surveyor at Enniskillen, stated a Customs duty of 30 per cent, ad valorem was chargeable on Eire-built machines unless satisfactory evidence was produced (a certificate of origin from the manufacturer) that the machine was Empire-made and that the cost of materials and labour involved reached a certain percentage. Mr. Herbert—Could it have been of anything but Empire origin in these days? –Witness stated he admitted the present circumstances, but still the certificate was necessary. Mr, Herbert—Playing with the law like a child, isn’t it?—No, it isn’t. Would you swear this is a foreign article?— I cannot swear it, but it is for the importer to displace the prima facie charge by providing evidence. Were these things drawn to the attention of’ the importer? —It is the importer’s duty, if he wishes to claim preference, to make a declaration that he claims preference.

Don’t you think it would only be fair before putting Customs duty into force that the attention of the importer should be drawn to the provisions? —Undoubtedly, if the citizen had come into the hut and stated he had imported it. Mr. Herbert—A sort of Please, sir, can I pass? Mr, Herbert said McGowan came from Kiltyclogher but had been staying with friends in Ross for some years off and on. This was the smallest thing he had ever come across in the Customs line The same sort of point was raised before where a solicitor in Donegal drove his, car up to the barrier and the Customs seized it as having been imported, but the car was subsequently returned. This boy came along a proper route at a proper time and his bicycle was seized. He had gone a hundred yards or two into Six- County territory. It was straining the law very far to say a certificate of origin was required. Why didn’t they tell him to go back? When he found out the position the boy offered to pay. Mr. Cooper said this was not the only case brought up at the same place. The snuggling of bicycles into the Six Counties was a wholesale business. Mr. Herbert—There is no evidence of that.

Judge Ellison said he should be inclined to confirm the order and say he thought this boy should be let off if he paid what he should pay. Mr. Cooper—-We will forward it to the Customs, and they will obey your Honour’s recommendation. Mr. Herbert said Major Dickie had stated that if the brother had appeared to say the bicycle belonged to him he would have given it back. Unfortunately the brother could not appear as he was engaged in munitions work in England. His Honour—I think Major Dickie’s view of that was the right one.

25-4-1942. BELNALECK YOUTH’S LAPSE. A Belnaleck youth’s lapse led to his appearance at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on .Monday, before Major Dickie, R.M., charged with, larceny. The defendant was John Patrick Boyle, Toneyteague, and the articles concerned were a coat value £4, a silver watch value £4, a gold watch valued about £5, and the sum of 5/-. District Inspector Peacocke, who prosecuted, said that the silver watch, coat, and the sum of 5/- had been recovered. Constable Ewart gave evidence of a statement made by defendant, and, in reply to Mr. P. J. Flanagan, LL.B. (defending), said that defendant made a clean breast of the whole thing. Mr. Flanagan said that this had come as a complete surprise to defendant’s parents and everybody else, as heretofore defendant had borne an unblemished character. “He says he simply did not know what came over him,” said Mr. Flanagan, who added that defendant was prepared to make restitution for the gold watch that had not been recovered. His Worship bound over defendant for two years in his own bail of £10 and one surety of £10. He also ordered him to pay within three months the sum of £5 to Mrs. Cathcart, Belnaleck, the owner of the gold watch, and 31/6 costs of the prosecution.

25-4-1942. £2 FINES FOR BAD LORRY BRAKES. ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. At Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday Thomas Coogan, Gortnacallon, Newtownbutler, was summoned, as owner, for permitting a motor lorry to be used with inefficient brakes.  James P. Connolly, Cloniston, Clones, was summoned as driver. Sergt. Sherrard said as a result of an accident he examined the motor lorry owned by Coogan and driven by Connolly. At 20 miles per hour Connolly was unable to stop the vehicle with the band brake before travelling 25 yards. The vehicle travelled a similar distance before being stopped by the footbrake. Constable Wilson, inspector of vehicles, said both brakes were defective on all wheels except the offside front. That was not due to the effects of the accident. Connolly did not appear. Coogan, in evidence, said the driver had full charge of the vehicle, and witness did not know that the brakes were defective. They had been adjusted a fortnight before. District-Inspector Peacocke—Can you say why Connolly is not here to-day?—I cannot; he was to be here. A fine of 40s was imposed on each summons. Sergt. Codd said both defendants were from the Twenty-Six Counties, and had temporary Six-County addresses.

25-4-1942. FRUITLESS SEARCH. TWO HOUR INCIDENT AT BELLEEK. A party of about thirty-six young men from the Enniskillen, district attended the great ceilidhe in O’Carroll’s Palais de Danse, Bundoran on Wednesday night of last week, to which parties came from the Six Counties. When the Enniskillen bus reached Belleek, just across the Border, in the Six Counties, on the return journey at about 4 a.m. they were met by a party of Enniskillen police under Head-Constable Thornton. The bus driver was ordered to proceed to the barracks. On arrival there, the dance patrons were taken into the barracks in groups of two and three at a time and were closely searched. Every particle of paper and article in the possession of each was taken out, placed on a table and examined thoroughly. The men had to take off their coats and these were gone through; several of the youths were made take off their boots and socks, which were minutely scrutinised. Three rooms at the barracks were engaged by the police party for the purpose and while the search proceeded three constables did duty with the young men in the bus whose turn had to come. In all the search took almost two hours and the bus did not .reach Enniskillen until after 8 a.m. An American who was on the bus, was not interfered with. The bus conveying the party from Belleek to the ceilidhe was also searched.

25-4-1942. A. O. H. DEVENISH DIVISION. The quarterly meeting, of the above Division was held in the A.O.H. Hall, Brollagh, on Sunday, 12th inst., the President occupying the chair. A vote of sympathy was passed to the relatives of the late Terence Keown, Larrigan, also to the relatives of the late James Reilly, Corrakeel. The motion was passed in silence.

 

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Fermanagh Junior Football 1942.

FERMANAGH JUNIOR LEAGUE. MULLEEK’S WIN OVER CASHEL. Mulleek 6-2. Cashel 0-3. There was a good attendance at Cashel Gaelic Park on Sunday, when Cashel and Mulleek teams met in the Junior League competition. Mulleek started with a slight breeze in their favour. From the throw-in they broke away bombarding the Cashel goals, but Leonard  (the goalie) did some splendid saving. For the first ten minutes Cashel defence held good. A determined rush by Mulleek forwards resulted in a goal per H. McGauran. Despite some fine Cashel clearances, Mulleek had another major per H. McGauran. Inside of a few minutes Pat McGauran again raised the red flag for the visitors. At this stage play waxed very rough, and one of the Cashel, players had to retire owing to severe head injuries. Fisticuffs were indulged in and it was only by exercising great tact that the referee settled the fracas. In the last five minutes of this moiety Mulleek added two goals per H. McGauran and P. McCaffrey and 2 points per P. McCaffrey arid Sean McCaffrey. Half-time score Mulleek, 5 goals 2 pts.; Cashel, nil. No sooner had the game resumed than Cashel went to the attack but the Mulleek defence was impregnable. Play veered from one side to the other, and several Mulleek shots went wide. A determined Cashel rush resulted in 3 points scored in quick succession by Frank Gallagher, Alfie McGovern and P. McGee. Frayed tempers resulted in further incidents. Mulleek had the last score of the match— a goal per Sean McCaffery. Cashel had much, lighter team than Mulleek, who also showed superior training in catching and combination. Mr, J. Daly, Belleek, refereed.

DEVENISH V. DRUMAVANTY. Before a large attendance of spectators the above teams met at Drumavanty on, Sunday. The game which was one of the closest and best contests ever witnessed at Drumavanty was an exhibition of good football of high standard played in a sporting manner and spectators were kept at a pitch of excitement with not a dull, moment from the throw-in to the final whistle. The final scores were:—Drumavanty, 0 goals 6 points; Devenish, 1 goal 2 pts. Rev. Brother Gilleece, Ballyshannon, was a very efficient referee.

As a prelude to the junior game a minor match was played between Ballyshannon and Devenish, which proved very interesting. In this game Ballyshannon, who were faster and better trained than their rivals, emerged victorious by the score of 3 goals 2 points for Ballyshannon; 1 goal 3 points for Devenish. Rev. J. Burns, C.C., refereed.

1951 to June. National & International.

 

The Northern and Southern governments agree on the running of the Great Northern Railway (9 January)
Ian Paisley co-founds the Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster (11 March)
On 23 March, Shannon Airport is the base for a rescue operation after a USAF C124 aircraft crashes into the sea – some wreckage is found 450 miles off the west coast, but all 53 people on board are lost
The Catholic hierarchy condemns the ‘Mother and Child’ scheme (4 April); Dr Noel Browne, Minister for Health, resigns; the scheme is abandoned on 6 April
A census (8 April) shows the population of the Republic to be 2,960,593; that of Northern Ireland on the same day is 1,370,921
The first demonstration of television in Ireland is held at the Spring Show in the RDS, Dublin (30 April)
The Arts Council is founded in the Republic (8 May)
Fianna Fáil regains power in a general election (30 May); Eamon de Valera becomes Taoiseach on 13 June
The Abbey Theatre, Dublin is destroyed by fire (18 July)
Ernest Walton of Trinity College Dublin is jointly awarded the Nobel prize for physics with Sir John Cockcroft
Liam and Josephine Miller found the Dolmen Press
T. J. Walsh establishes the Wexford Opera Festival
Samuel Beckett’s novels Molloy and Malone Dies, and Sam Hanna Bell’s novel December Bride, are published.

Births

Bertie Ahern (Fianna Fáil leader and Taoiseach) in Dublin
John Buckley (composer and teacher) in Co. Limerick
Dana (pseudonym of Rosemary Brown, singer) in Derry/Londonderry (30/8)
Peter Fallon (poet, founder of Gallery Press) in Osnabrück, Germany
Bill Graham (rock journalist and author) in Belfast (29/8)
Fred Johnston (poet and novelist) in Belfast
Paul McGuinness (manager of U2) near Hanover
Brian Maguire (painter) in Wicklow
Patrick Mason (theatre director)
John O’Keeffe (Kerry Gaelic footballer) (15/4)
Alan Shatter (Fine Gael politician) in Dublin (14/2)
Niall Stokes (founder and publisher of Hot Press magazine) in Dublin.

Deaths

Sir James Andrews
Daisy Bates
Joseph Warwick Bigger
Peter Cheyney
Joseph Chifley
Sir Ernest Clark
Louis D’Alton
Aodh de Blacam
George Gavan Duffy
Robert Flaherty
M. J. MacManus
Henry de Vere Stackpoole.

Local Events

13-1-1951. Death of Mr. Patrick Magee, Garrison, at an advanced age. Very Rev. Canon Coyle officiated.

27-1-1951. Sympathy is extended from the residents of his native Grouselodge to the brothers and relatives and to the clergy of the Diocese of Clogher on the death of the Very Rev. Denis Canon Mc Grath, P.P. of Bundoran last week. The late Canon Mc Grath was beloved by the people of Grouselodge in which townland he was born and reared.

3-2-1951. “You have often passed through a Woolworth store and marvelled how such a large staff can be maintained and goods sold so cheaply – or apparently so. In 1950 the firm set a new profit record of £5,355, 272.

3-2-1951. Much debate was occasioned at the County GAA Convention on the state of Gaelic Park and criticism of Enniskillen Gaels re state of Gaelic Games in the town and especially the Enniskillen pitch. Mr Jim Brady of Enniskillen excused the unplayable state of the pitch on account of a circus having been there for some time or perhaps because of the rising level of water from the adjoining Erne. Mr. Fee, County Secretary interjected, “It was because it was full of holes.” Mr. Fee welcomed the re-affiliation of Ederney and Kinawley to the association.

3-2-1951. Omagh man Mr. Maurice J. Hackett of Kevlin Road, Omagh, has bought six occupied dwelling houses at Prospect Terrace, Omagh for £80. The price represents the most astonishing bargain in house property. The former owner was Miss Louisa Crawford, Omagh.

3-2-1951. Enniskillen grocers request their customers to bring shopping baskets with them for general groceries, bread etc. and containers for potatoes owing to the increased cost of wrapping paper, paper bags and twine. Co-operation in this matter is urgently requested.

17-2-1951. The oldest inhabitant of Devenish has passed away in the person of James Mc Grath, 96, Rogagh, Cashelnadrea whose death occurred on Friday last. Also the death of Thomas Melaniphy, Frevagh, Devenish and of Mrs. M. Cassidy, wife of Mr. Michael Cassidy, Rossinuremore.

17-2-1951. Wedding bells for Tracey and Kelly at the Cathedral, Sligo. Miss Agnes Tracey, “Woodvale,” Kilcoo, Garrison to Gerald Kelly, Kiltimagh, County Mayo.

17-2-1951. Customs Fines at Belleek. Michael Ferguson, Drumbadreevagh, prosecuted for having in his possession a smuggled bicycle. He claimed he had got the bicycle from his brother-in law, Michael Gallagher, Rockfield, Ballyshannon to go to work on the Erne Scheme.

10-3-1951. An Ellen Donohue was fined £5 at Derrylin Court for concealment of 9 turkeys. She was suspected of having smuggled then by boat across a border river as tracks led from the river to the house of a friend.

10-3-1951. The death is announced of ex-senator John Mc Hugh of Pettigo at the venerable age of 92. He was chairman of Fermanagh Council from its inception in 1898 until it was dissolved by the Six County Government in 1922. He was one of two Nationalist M. Ps for County Fermanagh until the “gerrymander” of 1929 rearranged the boundaries to give two Unionist and one Nationalist M.P for a county which had a Nationalist majority.

10-3-1951. Lord Bishop of Clogher on the dangers of the Dance Craze. He wants amusements curtailed and the closing of all halls by midnight. He made a special appeal for prayer especially the Rosary.

17-3-1951.  Rabbits are not pests on Sunday. With an all-out war being waged on the rabbit pest it is, nevertheless, an offence in the Six Counties to kill rabbits on a Sunday. This was made very clear at Rathfriland Court when Patrick Travers, Lassize, was fined 10 shillings for the offence, and Kevin Travers, Lurgancahone, fined 20 shillings for using a net, “to kill rabbits on a Sunday.”

24-3-1951. Death of Master Ted Feely, Knockaraven, Garrison, aged 9. His coffin was carried on the shoulders of his classmates to his last resting place.

24-3-1951. Death of Mrs Maguire, ex-PT, Corgra House, Belleek. She retired last December after 44 years of service in Cornahilta School. Unfortunately she has passed away before the presentation organised for her by the local people. Two of her daughters are Sisters of Mercy.

31-3-1951. Tempo had an unexpected victory over Belleek in the Senior League by 2-5 to 1-4.

31-3-1951. The Ulster Farmer’s mart in Enniskillen celebrates its first birthday. Initially there were grave doubts in the minds of farmers as to whether the weekly sales would be a success but their fears proved unfounded. During the past 12 months 27,776 animals and total receipts for the period amounted to £672,147. The Farmers’ Mart Co. had helped put Fermanagh on the map as a centre for cattle sales.

7-4-1951. Fermanagh defeated in the Ulster Junior Championship by Donegal by 2-12 to 0-4.

14-4-1951. Death of Mr. John Flanagan, Glen West, Devenish. He had a long and trying illness.

14-4-1951. Derry defeat Fermanagh in the Dr. Mc Kenna Cup by 3-11 to 2-5. Playing for Fermanagh were M. McGurren, M. Regan, and J. Connors of Belleek.

14-4-1951.  E. F. Fairbairn, Ltd., Ireland’s best chicks. Accredited eggs only at Portadown, Enniskillen, Larne, Coleraine and Belfast. Pullets are dispatched in boxes bearing the name of the firm and marked, “Pullets.”

14-4-1951.  Ederney defeat Cashel 2-2 to 1-1. For Cashel best of a well-balanced defence was Timoney, Mc Garrigle and Ferguson. Of the forwards McGovern and Maguire were always dangerous and took careful watching. Despite the inclement conditions it was a good match. Ederney’s well merited win was mainly due to a very strong defence in which Kelly making his debut in goals made some really fine saves. F. Mc Hugh at centre back, the Lunny brothers and Durnian all played a major part. The forwards made good use of their scoring chances and had in B. Mc Hugh the outstanding player afield. Mc Carron also had a good game at right full forward. Scorers Ederney, Murphy (1-1), McKervey (1-0), Cassidy (0-1). Cashel, Maguire (1-0), McGovern (0-1).

14-4-1951. Opening Announcement. Funeral Undertaking. Messrs Magee and O’Connor, Mulleek, County Fermanagh wish to announce that they are in a position to supply, coffins, shrouds, wreathes etc. Modern Dodge motor hearse. Distance no object. Charges moderate. Phone Leggs No 1 or Ballyshannon 41 (Day or Night)

14-4-1951. YP Pools. Total Dividend for Saturday 7th April £8,112-12-6. There were two winners of the First Dividend with 23 goals each.

28-4-1951. Devenish defeated Enniskillen Gaels in Enniskillen by 5-1 to 3-4. The chief player responsible was Dan Magee, former stalwart of the Gaels team.

5-5-1951. Fermanagh Senior League Tie. Belleek defeat Irvinestown by 4-7 to 0-4 dispelling the fears that Gaelic football was on the decline in the area. A feature of the game was the sparkling display given by the homesters full forward P. Cox whose hat trick of three goals surely establishes a record among Fermanagh front line attackers.

5-5-1951. Tempo calling. Tempo calling, Tempo Calling. Old customers please bring in your ration books to be registered for meat. New customers invited Hugh Tunney, Tempo Established 1879.

19-5-1951. Irvinestown defeat Belleek by 1-4 to 6 points.

9-6-1951. The last County Board meeting was largely taken up with a debate about the result of the recent match between Belleek and Irvinestown. Irvinestown said that after the match the referee said that Irvinestown had won by a point while the official report sent in said that the match was a draw. The report has been sent back to the referee.

16-6-1951.In a challenge match Pettigo defeated Bannagh by 1-4 to 1-1. A fine match played in a splendid spirit was that between Pettigo and Bannagh, at Bannagh, on Sunday, refereed by Mr. Patrick Maye. The new Bannagh team formed as a result of the enthusiasm and organisational ability of Mr. Packy Calgy is serving up splendid football and promises to be heard of soon in prominent headlines. Scorers for Bannagh were Frank Armstrong (goal), and P. Mc Gibney (point), and for Pettigo P. Gallagher (4 points), and M. Reid (goal) Gallagher and Reid were outstanding for Pettigo and Nugent brothers, Keown brothers and Calgy for Bannagh.

23-6-1951. Fermanagh Minors best against Monaghan by 2-7 to 0-7. S. Gonigle, Belleek and P. Casey, Devenish played.

23-6-1951. Very Rev. Dr. P.J. McLaughlin, Professor of Experimental Physics at Maynooth is to be the next President of the college. He is a native of Ballyshannon.

30-6-1951. After an absence of some years, Seemuldoon, one time Fermanagh County Champions, made a reappearance on the field at Ederney on Wednesday evening winning by 3-3 to 1-2. By their superb display of good football despite the difficult playing conditions due to the wet evening, the young Seemuldoon team proved themselves no mean successors of the earlier players, and capable of giving a very necessary fillip to the game in NW Fermanagh if the difficulty attending the formation of a team drawn partly from an area partly in County Fermanagh and partly in County Tyrone could be overcome.

30-6-1951. Cashelnadrea, County Fermanagh is very much in the news, reason being that electric light has come to the district. Your correspondent had the pleasure of switching on the light in the spacious premises of Mr. John Mc Gowan, Cashel House, on June 29th. Mr Mc Gowan has got the first connection but in a short time the Catholic Church, the new hall and the school will be lit up, and after that the wants of the entire district will be attended to.

30-6-1951. Death of Lady Gallagher is announced. She was the widow of Sir James Gallagher a native of Aghavanny, Kiltyclogher who became a Dublin Alderman and later Lord Mayor of Dublin. He was knighted by King Edward V11. He was apprenticed to a tobacconist and ended owning several tobacconist shops.

30-6-1951. Speaking on Monday at the annual distribution of prizes at Maynooth, Most Rev. Dr. D’Alton, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All-Ireland explained why the Hierarchy intervened in the Mother and Child Scheme.

August – September Fermanagh Herald 1950.

23-9-1950. Fermanagh heavily defeated last Sunday by Tyrone. Two of the chosen team turned up without boots and togs, “and some of the others did not exert themselves unduly at any stage of the game.” Final score Tyrone 3-12 Fermanagh nil.

30-9-1950. Details of the Erne Development Scheme unveiled. It is estimated to cost £750,000.

30-9-1950. Mayo take the All-Ireland Football Title by defeating Louth by 2-5 to 1-6 in a dourly contested game.

7-10-1950. In Irvinestown Lisnaskea recapture the Senior Football title from Belleek by a score of 1-8 to 1-4. Best for Belleek were Kevin Mc Cann, M. McGurn, J. P. Mc Cann, Patsy Rooney, Matt Regan, Brendan Faughnan and John Doogan. Belleek’s new centre forward Brendan Faughnan was so impressive he was afterwards picked to play on the county team. Eddie Mc Caffrey was a surprise selection in goals for Belleek as he normally plays wing half. Admission 1 shilling. Sideline 1 shilling extra.

14-10-1950. Blessing of the foundation stone of new Franciscan Church at Rossnowlagh by Monsignor McGinley PP, Ballyshannon. The friars have been here since 22nd July, 1946. Their first church was a large Nissan hut made up of two ordinary sized Nissan huts.

14-10-1950. Devenish Annual Sports were held in St. Mary’s Park despite the bad weather. In a Minor Match Devenish defeated Derrygonnelly by 5 points to 1 point. Mr. Kevin Mc Cann, Belleek, refereed. The youngest competitor was Master Chivers who is six and the oldest spectator was Mr. John Mc Garrigle.

14-10-1950. Irvinestown Rural District Council is ordering 100 Orlit houses. There is great difficulty in obtaining suitably priced tenders to erect these houses which are factory made at a cost of £823 each. The question is being asked will they stand up to rural conditions with their two to three inch exterior walls and half inch plasterboard wall on the inside.

14-10-1950. Walter Kerr of Carn West, Garrison was fined £10. He had taken 11 cattle to last March 17th Belleek Fair via the concession road but only had 8 when he arrived. He claimed he had sold them on the way to the fair.

21-10-1950.  Devenish Division AOH at their quarterly meeting in Brollagh Hall passed voted of sympathy with Brothers Bernard and William Magee of Knockaraven on the death of their mother and with the relatives of Bernard McGowan of Muggainagrow and the late Bernard Flanagan of Tullymore.

21-10-1950. Dr. E. Grey Turner, at a Conservative meeting at Welling, Kent, said that in his opinion there was a drug cure to Tuberculosis “just around the corner.” “There will be a drug cure within the next ten years,” he said.

21-10-1950. Fermanagh defeated by Donegal in the Dr. Lagan Cup by 12 points to 3 points. Brendan Faughnan at full forward twice went narrowly wide from attempts at goal after being fouled close in. The Fermanagh team was E. Mc Caffrey, Belleek, E. Duffy, Lisnaskea, S. Gunn, Lisnaskea, F McAneney, Gaels, M McGauran, Belleek, J. Cassidy, Teemore, J. Martin, Ballyshannon, F. Maguire, Lisnaskea, M. Regan, Belleek, M. Mahon, Irvinestown, J. Doogan, Belleek, P. Clarke, Teemore, T. Dundass, B. Faughnan, Belleek, K. Shannon, Morans.

21-10-1950. The Late Mrs Austin Stack’s Enniskillen Associations. Una Stack was a daughter of the late Austin Stack

widow of Austin Stack, T.D, Minister of Home Affairs in the First Dail, died at her house, Strand Road, Merrion, Dublin, last week. She was a member of the Ranellagh Branch, Cumann na mBan from shortly after 1918, and later a member of the Executive.

Daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Cassidy, The Graan Enniskillen, she was first married to District , Inspector Patrick Gordon, R.I.C., and after his death joined the American Ambulance working in Paris during the 1911-18 war. The sound of the guns when O’Connell Street was shelled during the 1916-Rising, was her first introduction to the Republican movement. She volunteered to help the wounded, and worked for a fortnight in Baggot Street Hospital. After the executions she joined Cumann na mBan, and, her house became a depot for making and distributing first-aid material and Mr. Oscar Trainor, T.D., Officer Commanding the. Dublin Brigade, used her house for meetings.

She took the Republican side in 1922, and was arrested and imprisoned in Kilmainham Jail and the North Dublin Union for about nine months.

In 1925 she married Austin Stack, who was by then in poor health owing to hunger strikes and the hardships of the struggle in which he had taken part.

She was interested for many years in the work of the Infant Aid Society, among the co-founders of which was her brother. Dr. Louis Cassidy, Master of the Coombe Hospital.

Older Enniskilleners will remember the Cassidy family, no member of which is now resident in the district, though there are cousins in the O’Dolan family of the same district, and the late Jas. Cassidy, Eden St., Enniskillen was a second cousin. Her father, the late Anthony Cassidy came to Enniskillen in early life, and established a wholesale grocery business in the premises now occupied by McHenry’s of High St., a tobacco factory behind the premises, near the present Telephone Exchange, and the extensive wholesale wine and spirit business in Market Street known as “The Bond Stores.” His business prospered until he became Fermanagh’s leading. businessman. Incidentally, one of his first employees was a man named Sullivan, who later had a jeweller’s shop in Darling Street in the premises of the late Michael Devine, and later still became the first agent of the Prudential Assurance Company in the town. When Mr. Cassidy retired from business he acquired the extensive lands at the Graan, which were later disposed of to the Passionist Fathers.

The late Mrs, Stack left Enniskillen when she was fairly young, but she paid occasional visits to her native place throughout her life, and was always commenting upon the many changes that had taken place, remembering only two prominent business establishments which remained from her early days, Campbell’s, hairdressers, of East Bridge Street, and John Martin’s, of the Diamond. One of her brothers was. killed in a railway accident at Clones station when returning from Dublin.

Mrs., Stack met the late Mons. Tierney and Mr. Cahir Healy, M.P. on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land about twelve years ago, and exchanged many reminiscences of old Enniskillen, in which she maintained a deep interest until the end.

28-10-1950. Minor League Final on Sunday – Devenish V Roslea. Referee Bill Thompson.

28-10-1950. The leg injury sustained by John Doogan in the Lagan Cup game against Donegal has proved more serious than was thought at first and is slow to respond to treatment. It is to be hoped that this popular Belleek player’s recovery will not be long delayed. John first played schoolboy for Drumavanty, a junior team no unhappily no longer in existence. Drumavanty did not win many matches but like the fine sports they were they carried on ear after year until finally emigration left them without a team.

28-10-1950. Ederney fans may recall an occasion when they entertained Drumavanty who at that time had not won a match for almost two years. Ederney were then one of the most powerful Junior teams but their visitors created the sensation of the year by administering a strong beating and ending the home team’s interest in that particular competition.

4-11-1950. Belleek Co-Operative Agricultural and Dairy Society are open to receive turkeys for shipment at their stores, Corry, Belleek. As always highest prices will be paid.

4-11-1950. Dogma of the Assumption proclaimed in Rome by Pope Pius X11.

11-11-1950. Big Belleek Seizure. On Sunday Sergt.  Cordher and Constables. Forde and McAlinden seized a Ford 8 car with 9,300 cigarettes, 15ibs of butter and other articles from John Johnston, New Lodge Road, Belfast. The goods were in the upholstery of the car. Released on bail of £300 and a surety for the same amount. Garrison police seized 3,000 cigarettes on the Kiltyclogher border.

18-11-1950. Death of Mr. Patrick Keown, Gortnalee, Roscor, aged 78. The funeral was to Toura Graveyard.

18-11-1950. Devenish to play Teemore in the Fermanagh Junior Final. Teemore are strongly fancied. W. Thompson (Bill, father of Breege Mc Cusker)) of Irvinestown to referee.

18-11-1950. Crucifix erected in Leitrim County Council chamber in Carrick-on Shannon. A choir sang sacred music at the blessing and erection of the crucifix.

25-11-1950. Figures in the Fermanagh Herald suggest that although the Protestant population of the County amounts to only 44% of the total the vast majority of the jobs under Fermanagh County Council are held by Protestants including all those in highest positions.

28-11-1950. Teemore defeat Devenish to win the Junior League Final in a scrappy game before a small attendance by 1-2 to 1-0. Teemore were handicapped by the absence of their chief marksman Paddy Clarke but Jim Cassidy was on his best form. Danny Magee was Garrison’s best player and scored their only score a goal. J. F. O’Brien was good in Garrison’s defence. Devenish suffered only one defeat up to now when beaten by Enniskillen in Enniskillen. “After the game Devenish officials had many hard things to say about the state of the Enniskillen pitch.” (From Nov. 18th paper)

2-12-1950. Death of 80 year old PP of Magheraculmoney, Rev. P. Mc Carney. He was ordained in 1901 having trained at the Irish College in Paris.

2-12-1950. Ederney started the season in somewhat unimpressive fashion but have improved considerably as their young players have gained experience and confidence. Patsy Cassidy at centre half is the mainstay of the side but it is by no means a one-man affair. The Mc Hugh brothers are very promising young players. Frank Murphy is one of the most stylish players in the county but is not sufficiently forceful to earn the scores which his craft makes possible while Lunny is a robust if somewhat unpolished centre forward.

2-12-1950. Shocking disaster at Omagh Railway Station. The 9.25 train from Derry killing five men, John Cleary, John Cassidy, John McCrory, Dan McCrory and Charles Flanagan.

9-12-1950. Snow fell heavily at the weekend but traffic was not seriously dislocated. Buses were running on time except for one district.

17-12-1950.  Santa Claus arrives in Enniskillen on Monday afternoon with 200 excited children greeting him on his way from the Railway Station. He travelled on a small turf cart and threw balloons to the children. Eighteen lorries and three cars made up an involuntary procession behind Santa.

30-12-1950.  FH Castle Caldwell Tragedy – Miss Brigid Mc Grath, Ballymagaghran, aged 50. Her small grocery shop burned to the ground and her body found in Lough Erne near Castle Caldwell Railway Station. Her body was found by search parties from the RUC Stations at Belleek and Letter. John Mc Caffrey of Tiergannon and Edward McGauran gave evidence of having tea in her house the night before and her appearing quite normal. A neighbour John Mc Goldrick raised the alarm at 6.30 the following morning. Dr. Gerald Clerk, Belleek carried out the autopsy and the jury returned a verdict of death by drowning.

 

1950 May to August.

6-5-1950. Advertisement – For Springtime – Rabbit dishes. Delicately appetising for warmer days, rabbit is really nourishing too. Easy to get now, inexpensive, and one rabbit gives big helpings for four to six people. Here is an easy to do suggestion. Rabbit stew: With a little bacon, a touch of onion, seasoning to taste, and cooked, dried or canned peas added before serving.

6-5-1950. Advertisement. Have you got your new Ration Book? Some people haven’t got their new Ration Books yet! Are you one of these? If so don’t leave it any longer. Get your new book right away please – you will need it from 21st May.

6-5-1950. Devenish girl, Miss Bridget Agnes Feely of Glen West, Garrison, receives the holy habit at Franciscan Hope Castle, Castleblayney, County Monaghan. Her sister is a member of the Little Sisters of the Poor in France.

6-5-1950. Widespread sympathy has been evoked in Dromore, County Tyrone and Mulleek, County Fermanagh by the sudden demise due to a railway accident at an early age of Patrick O’Connor, Garvary, Leggs, County Fermanagh. He was secretary and playing member of Mulleek and a member of the Mulleek branch of the Anti-Partition League. His loss to the community is a great one but greatest of all to his sorrowing mother, brothers and sister.

13-5-1950.  Cashel and Ederney draw. Ederney travelled to Cashel on Sunday last to fulfil their Junior League fixture. This was Ederney’s first appearance in Fermanagh fixtures from 1947. Considering that this is practically a new look team Ederney gave a grand display to hold Cashel to a draw. The final score was Cashel 3-3, Ederney 2-6. The scorers for Cashel were Tracey, Leonard, Gallagher and Mc Laughlin and for Ederney, Monaghan, Mc Hugh, Murphy, Maguire and Lunny.

13-5-1950. Fermanagh Woman’s tragic fate at Bundoran. Inquest verdict of accidental death. The body of Mrs Ellen Hennessy sister of Charles Reilly of Drumbinnis, Kinawley was found on the rocks of Rogey, Bundoran.

13-5-1950. Harnessing the Erne for Hydro-Electrification. Dublin and Belfast agree on joint plan to drain Lough Erne Area. The total cost of both schemes will be £1,090,000 of which the government of the Republic will pay £750,000 and the Six Counties £350,000. The river will be deepened from Roscor to Belleek where a new bridge will be built. The new river channel will have a capacity of 660,000 cubic feet per minute. The prospect of hydro-electrification of Donegal are now very bright. This may mean that not a single area in the scattered county will be omitted from the benefits of rural electrification.

20-5-1950. The change over from hand passing to boxing the ball has caused some players a lot of difficulty. At one match on the first Sunday in May, it was amusing to watch the despairing gestures of one player who realised that little bit too late that flicked passes were banned. He was not so resourceful as his colleague who erred against the new rule, but carried on as if everything were normal and scored a goal. He was lucky the referee (who shall be nameless) had forgotten also.

20-5-1950. Until recently only one Fermanagh referee has been entrusted with a whistle outside the county, Jimmy Kelly, Farnamullan, Lisbellaw. Lately Ederney’s popular Johnny Monaghan’s worth has been recognised and his name is down several times in this year’s inter-county fixture list.

27-5-1950. Green is definitely first choice with Fermanagh teams when choosing jerseys. All four teams in Division A of the Junior League favoured the National colour, Cashel’s jersey having a white stripe added, while Derrygonnelly, Ederney and Devenish sported green and orange. The similarity of the jerseys caused great confusion in all the matches in this division. Derrygonnelly have now secured a new outfit which, as far as it can be ascertained will clash with no other club’s colours.

10-6-1950. Fatal Ballyshannon Shooting Accident. Seamus Gordon, a 25 year old fitter’s helper of the Abbey, Ballyshannon was the victim of a tragic shooting affair when the rifle he was carrying on a fox hunting expedition went off, apparently as he was crossing a stone ditch and the bullet entered his head.

1-7-1950. Early on Sunday morning the Russian sponsored North Korean Government invaded South Korea following a declaration of war. On Tuesday President Truman ordered US air and naval forces into action into Korea and instructed the Seventh Fleet to prevent any attack on Formosa.

8-7-1950. Belleek Young Emmetts per Mr. T. Campbell have subscribed £35 to the County Minor Training. Contingents of players arrived in Irvinestown on Monday and Tuesday to begin training under the famous Cavan footballer, Tony Tighe. On Monday night the boys were provided with a cinema entertainment in Irvinestown.

1-7-1950. Fermanagh Minors for the next round of the Championship defeating Tyrone by 1-1 to 3 points. Throne had appealed the match on the grounds that Billy Charlton of Fermanagh had taken a penalty which struck the crossbar and he had collected the rebound and scored a goal. Tyrone appealed to the Ulster Council and quoted the rule that another player had to touch the ball before the taker could play it again. The appeal was turned down. This was the only part of the meeting conducted in English the rest being in Irish.

15-7-1950. Cashel Annual Sports held were attended by almost 1,000 people. In the match between Cashelnadrea and Kiltyclogher the ball was thrown in by the newly ordained Fr. Sean McKeaney, OMI.

15-7-1950. Fermanagh Minors train for Ulster Minor Championship v Armagh. Under Tony Tighe, trainer and Malachy Mahon assistant the boys are going through a thorough training programme which fills their days and which is having many obviously good effects. Accommodated on 22 beds in St. Molaise Hall they have a portable wireless set and a gramophone and at their disposal two billiard tables. Rising daily at 7.30 am the boys have a cup of tea and a couple of miles walk before breakfast at 9.00. They have physical exercises, ball practice and tactics before having a light lunch at 1.30. Between then and 4.30 when they have a cup of tea they have more ball practice, tactics, and a football match between fifteen of the players and the remainder strengthened by local St. Molaise players. Finally they have after tea, physical training, long distance running and sprinting, followed by a mile walk and then before 10 o’clock to bed.

15-7-1950. Newly ordained Garrison priest at Oblate College, Piltown, County Kilkenny, Rev John J McKeaney. Son of Michael McKeaney, Scribbagh, Garrison and the late Mrs McKeaney. He has two sisters nuns.

22-7-1950. Death of Mrs Mary Quinn, Teebunion, Cashel on June 30th, 1950.

22-7-1950. Fermanagh heavily defeated by Armagh 5-5 to 4 points in the Ulster Minor Championship. Sean Gonnigle of Belleek on the team, John Maguire of Ederney and Pat Casey of Garrison.

22-7-1950. Kesh Bank cashier gets four years. Samuel H. Henderson of the Belfast Banking Company, Kesh, aged 47 married with one child pleaded guilty to stealing c £9000. He had been a faultless employee for 30 years and will lose a pension of £500 p.a. He had been asked to reduce his overdraft by the bank and turned to moneylenders to do this and then to gambling money from accounts in sums of £40 and £50 on football pools. His local stature was such that when he was bailed his bailsmen were people from whose accounts he had taken money.

29-7-1950. Armagh wins first Ulster Senior GAA title for 47 years to record their third victory. They beat Cavan.

12-8-1950. Belleek Man Sells a Rat – Mr. Bill Thornton, Belleek, who lives alone in a house with about 30 rats, sold one a few days ago to an Omagh publican for 8/6. So enamoured was the customer with his bargain that he paid a second visit to Mr. Thornton to make a second purchase, but Mr. Thornton refused to part with another of his pets. Mr. Thornton feeds the rats and looks after them as people do of more normal pets. They swarm around him at feeding time and he can fondle them and handle them without the slightest danger of being bitten.

12-8-1950. The new teams of 1950, Ederney, Cashel and Kinawley are engaged in a special competition for new teams. The trophy for this competition will be the old Championship cup which is being replaced as Senior Championship trophy for the county by the beautiful Gold Cup presented to the Fermanagh GAA by the Fermanagh Men’s Association in New York.

12-8-1950. Tommy Gallagher, Belleek, who emigrated last week, was one of the best men of the New York team that conquered Cavan recently at Croke Park and won the National League. At centre full he had the measure of O’Donoghue and Mick Higgins and completely subdued both. This played a big part in the victory.

12-8-1950. Trout fishing on Lough Melvin. Trout fishing has vastly improved on Lough Melvin as a result of the recent heavy rains and consequent flooding of rivers. Professor Marshall of Derry caught 21 trout in a few hours fishing during the weekend and had catches of 16 and 17 trout last week. Other anglers had catches of a dozen each.