August – September Fermanagh Herald 1950.

23-9-1950. Fermanagh heavily defeated last Sunday by Tyrone. Two of the chosen team turned up without boots and togs, “and some of the others did not exert themselves unduly at any stage of the game.” Final score Tyrone 3-12 Fermanagh nil.

30-9-1950. Details of the Erne Development Scheme unveiled. It is estimated to cost £750,000.

30-9-1950. Mayo take the All-Ireland Football Title by defeating Louth by 2-5 to 1-6 in a dourly contested game.

7-10-1950. In Irvinestown Lisnaskea recapture the Senior Football title from Belleek by a score of 1-8 to 1-4. Best for Belleek were Kevin Mc Cann, M. McGurn, J. P. Mc Cann, Patsy Rooney, Matt Regan, Brendan Faughnan and John Doogan. Belleek’s new centre forward Brendan Faughnan was so impressive he was afterwards picked to play on the county team. Eddie Mc Caffrey was a surprise selection in goals for Belleek as he normally plays wing half. Admission 1 shilling. Sideline 1 shilling extra.

14-10-1950. Blessing of the foundation stone of new Franciscan Church at Rossnowlagh by Monsignor McGinley PP, Ballyshannon. The friars have been here since 22nd July, 1946. Their first church was a large Nissan hut made up of two ordinary sized Nissan huts.

14-10-1950. Devenish Annual Sports were held in St. Mary’s Park despite the bad weather. In a Minor Match Devenish defeated Derrygonnelly by 5 points to 1 point. Mr. Kevin Mc Cann, Belleek, refereed. The youngest competitor was Master Chivers who is six and the oldest spectator was Mr. John Mc Garrigle.

14-10-1950. Irvinestown Rural District Council is ordering 100 Orlit houses. There is great difficulty in obtaining suitably priced tenders to erect these houses which are factory made at a cost of £823 each. The question is being asked will they stand up to rural conditions with their two to three inch exterior walls and half inch plasterboard wall on the inside.

14-10-1950. Walter Kerr of Carn West, Garrison was fined £10. He had taken 11 cattle to last March 17th Belleek Fair via the concession road but only had 8 when he arrived. He claimed he had sold them on the way to the fair.

21-10-1950.  Devenish Division AOH at their quarterly meeting in Brollagh Hall passed voted of sympathy with Brothers Bernard and William Magee of Knockaraven on the death of their mother and with the relatives of Bernard McGowan of Muggainagrow and the late Bernard Flanagan of Tullymore.

21-10-1950. Dr. E. Grey Turner, at a Conservative meeting at Welling, Kent, said that in his opinion there was a drug cure to Tuberculosis “just around the corner.” “There will be a drug cure within the next ten years,” he said.

21-10-1950. Fermanagh defeated by Donegal in the Dr. Lagan Cup by 12 points to 3 points. Brendan Faughnan at full forward twice went narrowly wide from attempts at goal after being fouled close in. The Fermanagh team was E. Mc Caffrey, Belleek, E. Duffy, Lisnaskea, S. Gunn, Lisnaskea, F McAneney, Gaels, M McGauran, Belleek, J. Cassidy, Teemore, J. Martin, Ballyshannon, F. Maguire, Lisnaskea, M. Regan, Belleek, M. Mahon, Irvinestown, J. Doogan, Belleek, P. Clarke, Teemore, T. Dundass, B. Faughnan, Belleek, K. Shannon, Morans.

21-10-1950. The Late Mrs Austin Stack’s Enniskillen Associations. Una Stack was a daughter of the late Austin Stack

widow of Austin Stack, T.D, Minister of Home Affairs in the First Dail, died at her house, Strand Road, Merrion, Dublin, last week. She was a member of the Ranellagh Branch, Cumann na mBan from shortly after 1918, and later a member of the Executive.

Daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Cassidy, The Graan Enniskillen, she was first married to District , Inspector Patrick Gordon, R.I.C., and after his death joined the American Ambulance working in Paris during the 1911-18 war. The sound of the guns when O’Connell Street was shelled during the 1916-Rising, was her first introduction to the Republican movement. She volunteered to help the wounded, and worked for a fortnight in Baggot Street Hospital. After the executions she joined Cumann na mBan, and, her house became a depot for making and distributing first-aid material and Mr. Oscar Trainor, T.D., Officer Commanding the. Dublin Brigade, used her house for meetings.

She took the Republican side in 1922, and was arrested and imprisoned in Kilmainham Jail and the North Dublin Union for about nine months.

In 1925 she married Austin Stack, who was by then in poor health owing to hunger strikes and the hardships of the struggle in which he had taken part.

She was interested for many years in the work of the Infant Aid Society, among the co-founders of which was her brother. Dr. Louis Cassidy, Master of the Coombe Hospital.

Older Enniskilleners will remember the Cassidy family, no member of which is now resident in the district, though there are cousins in the O’Dolan family of the same district, and the late Jas. Cassidy, Eden St., Enniskillen was a second cousin. Her father, the late Anthony Cassidy came to Enniskillen in early life, and established a wholesale grocery business in the premises now occupied by McHenry’s of High St., a tobacco factory behind the premises, near the present Telephone Exchange, and the extensive wholesale wine and spirit business in Market Street known as “The Bond Stores.” His business prospered until he became Fermanagh’s leading. businessman. Incidentally, one of his first employees was a man named Sullivan, who later had a jeweller’s shop in Darling Street in the premises of the late Michael Devine, and later still became the first agent of the Prudential Assurance Company in the town. When Mr. Cassidy retired from business he acquired the extensive lands at the Graan, which were later disposed of to the Passionist Fathers.

The late Mrs, Stack left Enniskillen when she was fairly young, but she paid occasional visits to her native place throughout her life, and was always commenting upon the many changes that had taken place, remembering only two prominent business establishments which remained from her early days, Campbell’s, hairdressers, of East Bridge Street, and John Martin’s, of the Diamond. One of her brothers was. killed in a railway accident at Clones station when returning from Dublin.

Mrs., Stack met the late Mons. Tierney and Mr. Cahir Healy, M.P. on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land about twelve years ago, and exchanged many reminiscences of old Enniskillen, in which she maintained a deep interest until the end.

28-10-1950. Minor League Final on Sunday – Devenish V Roslea. Referee Bill Thompson.

28-10-1950. The leg injury sustained by John Doogan in the Lagan Cup game against Donegal has proved more serious than was thought at first and is slow to respond to treatment. It is to be hoped that this popular Belleek player’s recovery will not be long delayed. John first played schoolboy for Drumavanty, a junior team no unhappily no longer in existence. Drumavanty did not win many matches but like the fine sports they were they carried on ear after year until finally emigration left them without a team.

28-10-1950. Ederney fans may recall an occasion when they entertained Drumavanty who at that time had not won a match for almost two years. Ederney were then one of the most powerful Junior teams but their visitors created the sensation of the year by administering a strong beating and ending the home team’s interest in that particular competition.

4-11-1950. Belleek Co-Operative Agricultural and Dairy Society are open to receive turkeys for shipment at their stores, Corry, Belleek. As always highest prices will be paid.

4-11-1950. Dogma of the Assumption proclaimed in Rome by Pope Pius X11.

11-11-1950. Big Belleek Seizure. On Sunday Sergt.  Cordher and Constables. Forde and McAlinden seized a Ford 8 car with 9,300 cigarettes, 15ibs of butter and other articles from John Johnston, New Lodge Road, Belfast. The goods were in the upholstery of the car. Released on bail of £300 and a surety for the same amount. Garrison police seized 3,000 cigarettes on the Kiltyclogher border.

18-11-1950. Death of Mr. Patrick Keown, Gortnalee, Roscor, aged 78. The funeral was to Toura Graveyard.

18-11-1950. Devenish to play Teemore in the Fermanagh Junior Final. Teemore are strongly fancied. W. Thompson (Bill, father of Breege Mc Cusker)) of Irvinestown to referee.

18-11-1950. Crucifix erected in Leitrim County Council chamber in Carrick-on Shannon. A choir sang sacred music at the blessing and erection of the crucifix.

25-11-1950. Figures in the Fermanagh Herald suggest that although the Protestant population of the County amounts to only 44% of the total the vast majority of the jobs under Fermanagh County Council are held by Protestants including all those in highest positions.

28-11-1950. Teemore defeat Devenish to win the Junior League Final in a scrappy game before a small attendance by 1-2 to 1-0. Teemore were handicapped by the absence of their chief marksman Paddy Clarke but Jim Cassidy was on his best form. Danny Magee was Garrison’s best player and scored their only score a goal. J. F. O’Brien was good in Garrison’s defence. Devenish suffered only one defeat up to now when beaten by Enniskillen in Enniskillen. “After the game Devenish officials had many hard things to say about the state of the Enniskillen pitch.” (From Nov. 18th paper)

2-12-1950. Death of 80 year old PP of Magheraculmoney, Rev. P. Mc Carney. He was ordained in 1901 having trained at the Irish College in Paris.

2-12-1950. Ederney started the season in somewhat unimpressive fashion but have improved considerably as their young players have gained experience and confidence. Patsy Cassidy at centre half is the mainstay of the side but it is by no means a one-man affair. The Mc Hugh brothers are very promising young players. Frank Murphy is one of the most stylish players in the county but is not sufficiently forceful to earn the scores which his craft makes possible while Lunny is a robust if somewhat unpolished centre forward.

2-12-1950. Shocking disaster at Omagh Railway Station. The 9.25 train from Derry killing five men, John Cleary, John Cassidy, John McCrory, Dan McCrory and Charles Flanagan.

9-12-1950. Snow fell heavily at the weekend but traffic was not seriously dislocated. Buses were running on time except for one district.

17-12-1950.  Santa Claus arrives in Enniskillen on Monday afternoon with 200 excited children greeting him on his way from the Railway Station. He travelled on a small turf cart and threw balloons to the children. Eighteen lorries and three cars made up an involuntary procession behind Santa.

30-12-1950.  FH Castle Caldwell Tragedy – Miss Brigid Mc Grath, Ballymagaghran, aged 50. Her small grocery shop burned to the ground and her body found in Lough Erne near Castle Caldwell Railway Station. Her body was found by search parties from the RUC Stations at Belleek and Letter. John Mc Caffrey of Tiergannon and Edward McGauran gave evidence of having tea in her house the night before and her appearing quite normal. A neighbour John Mc Goldrick raised the alarm at 6.30 the following morning. Dr. Gerald Clerk, Belleek carried out the autopsy and the jury returned a verdict of death by drowning.

 

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Dead Man’s Island.

Donegal Vindicator May 11th 1935.  Circulating in Donegal, Tyrone, Fermanagh, Leitrim and Sligo.  Price one penny. 46th year.

The Dead Man’s Island – a tale of Lower Lough Erne –reprinted from the Donegal Vindicator dated June 1st 1889. John McAdam, founded this paper in Ballyshannon at the behest of the Irish Land League in 1889. It ceased to publish in 1956.

In the lower lake near Roscor is a small island or islet designated by the country people “The Dead Man’s Island.”  Why it came to be so-called is told in the following tale.  In writing it I wish to state that I have done it in as impartial a spirit as possible, not desiring to offend against the prejudices of any party but as a historian rather than a partisan.  All the legendary lore associated with that part of the country extending as far as Bundoran I have tried to weave into the narrative but I must regret, along with many other is, that the tale ends so tragically as tradition relates.  Whilst the outlines of the story is strictly true I am not very certain if I have given the correct names of the two rebels one of whom was shot as I could not accurately ascertain them.

On the 13th October 1799 the date preserved in an old song in the remote mountain valley named Glenalong in view of Lough Erne, three young men armed with guns but very weary and foot sore after travelling several successive days arrived in a mountain cottage the natal home of one of the young men named Duffy.  They were three stout young fellows athletic and brave, possessing a light patriotic spirit, the enthusiasm of which had led them to join the United Irishmen.  They had fought at Ballinamuck and narrowly made their escape from the dreadful slaughter of their countrymen that had taken place there.  Then wandering about and concealing themselves in the cottages of the peasantry – afraid to return to their own part of the country, but still preserving their arms against capture.  A whole year had passed away ere they could venture from the disturbed state of the country and the watch after fugitives to return to their homes.

On the night of their arrival in the house of Peter Duffy, father of one of the young men, there was much joy on the occasion of the safe return of his son.  The companions were also warmly welcomed.  Their natal homes lay north of Lough Erne near the mountains of Donegal and they were impatient to reach them.  Young Duffy, in reply to the interrogation of his friends related much of what they and their companions had suffered in the late rebellion, their privations, fatiguing journey’s and narrow escapes from death. When I think upon it said young Duffy the narrator of all we endured, of the cold blooded butchery of Ballinamuck perpetrated by the savage soldiers it makes me shudder; wild beasts could not have exhibited so much ferocity.  My comrades and I as soon as we saw the field lost and the carnage begun made our escape and pursued by the soldiers who sent a shower of bullets whistling around our ears.  How we escaped when I think of it now was a pure miracle.  In one instance that hat was shot off my head: I then real reasoned that the soldiers fired too high and in a sloping position each of us ran until we got out of range of their balls.  The dragoons over took and sabered numbers but we ran to soft ground to a bog convenient where their horses could not follow us.  After effecting our escape how far we travelled on that day I cannot well remember but towards evening we received hospitality in a farmhouse.  Afterwards disguised in the daytime in old clothes supplied by the farmers and the laborers in the fields we escape detection in the hunt that took place by the yeomen after fugitives (rebels).  How close was the watch and pursuit after us you may guess when it occupied us a whole year assuming various disguises to return home.

“Alas” said old Duffy “for poor Ireland!  What its valiant sons have suffered for its freedom and have not gained it.  Yes said a man, a guest named McNamara, it is wonderful to reflect what patriotic blood has stained its sod.’  ‘Let us change the subject’ said young Duffy ’it is too painful – Mr. McNamara it is a long time since I heard you sing and I never saw one of your name and kindred but was a good singer.’  ‘Do please sing’ said one of young Duffy’s comrades named McGoldrick ‘and my friend and companion in danger Hugh Ward will give us another for like the McNamaras I never saw one of his name who was not a good singer.’  ‘The family obtained the name Ward’ said old Duffy ‘from the fact that there they were bards and poets in old times and played on the harp and composed songs and sung them.’  ‘And the faculty of song’ said young Duffy ‘like the wooden leg has long run in the blood.’  ‘At all events Mr. McNamara I request you to sing.  I was once amused by your ballad of the fishermen – your own composition – please have the goodness to sing it.’ Mr. McNamara began.

THE FISHERMAN AND THE FAIRIES –  A LEGEND.

A peasant stood at a mountain lake

And fishing long was he

But never a fish could that peasant take

Till the sun went down on the sea.

 

Then came a change –it was joy to see

What fish on the shore he flung:

On gads he made of the rowan tree

The speckled trout he strung.

 

Then his home he sought in the mountain wild

With a bosom of hope and joy

To meet with a wife and prattling child

And the fish on the fire to fry.

 

As on he went in the solitude

The moon shed her light on the scene

Till on the pathway before him stood

A boy with a jacket of green.

 

Beware of the fairies good fishermen

Said the boy with the jacket of green

They follow to take them every one

At a lake forbidden you’ve been!

 

O, never looked back no matter what noise

Of menace of harm you hear,

O, never looked back said the fairy boy

Or you’ll mind it all days of the year

 

As a glimpse of the Moon that has come and fled,

As a meteor bright is seen,

He came and he passed with his scarlet head,

That boy with the jacket of green.

 

The noise of a cannon is very loud

Of Belleek the waterfall

But the noise made by an invisible crowd

Was louder than them all.

 

Look round they shouted you rogue and thief

You thief, you rogue, look round

Or we cut off your head in a moment brief

And fling it on the ground.

 

But on to that house in the mountain land

The fishermen hastened still.

Nor flesh nor blood this abuse can stand

He said and look round I will.

 

Because he was near his cottage door

His courage waxed bold

He turned him round with the load he bore

And what did he then behold?

 

Ten thousand fairies in fighting mein

Each urging a fierce attack;

But the little boy with a jacket of green

Was trying to keep them back.

 

Why did he look round like one of old

And the warning disobey?

His brain was as weak as his heart was bold,

As he knew in an after day.

 

The fish on his back that his hands had strung

Say whither are the gone?

Their heads alone on the Rowntree hung

For their bodies they now had none.

 

The fairies had taken them every one

Away to their home afar;

And since at eve doth the fishermen shun

The lake of Lough Na-na-vhar.

‘Long life to you Mr. McNamara’ said old Duffy, ‘I knew the man well who lost the fish.  His name was Luke Ward.  He lived in the mountains.  It was wrong you see to fish after sunset in the fairy lake and he should have taken that fairy’s advice.  That fairy was a cousin of his own who had been taken away by the good people.’  ‘It rarely ever was good to look back’ said McNamara, ‘think of Lot’s wife.’  ‘True,’ said Duffy, ‘except one has some good reflection of the mind to look back upon or recollection of an meritorious action.  But in going a journey, I never look back or turn back except I meet a redhead woman or a hare crosses my path; then I never proceed on my journey as it would be unlucky to do so.’  ‘You are quite right Peter’ said McNamara but this is different to disobeying a command like the cases we mentioned’.  ‘I know that James.’  I’ve only been thinking in another way.  But I believe on the whole ‘tis better to look forward than back; and in the language of the poet : –

‘Never looked back when onward is the way,

Duty commands.  They err who disobey.’

The two young men, Duffy’s two companions were homesick and notwithstanding the pleasantry of the fireside anxious to go away particularly as the silent hours of night formed  the safer time in which to travel through Whealt as yeomen were on the lookout there in the daytime and frequently passed through it at night visiting any papist house in which they saw a light with a view to discerning dissatisfaction or ferret out the haunt of a rebel as the panic in the North excited by the rebellion in the South had not yet completely passed away.  The two young men accompanied by Duffy made their way to the shore of Lough Erne with intention to cross in a boat.

In a cottage north of Keenaghan Lake (not far from Lough Erne) and in the shelter of the Donegal Mountains on that night in a warm room with a cosy fire, two females sat in conversation. One, the younger woman of the house, named Mary Ward, and the other a guest named Ann McGoldrick, the sweetheart of Mary’s brother Hugh Ward. ‘Mary’ said Ann, ‘is there any truth in dreams’ I dreamed last night I saw your brother Hugh, coming home from the war very glad looking. His face was smiling, his cheeks like roses, and he attired in a new suit of broadcloth with a white rose in the buttonhole of his vest, and I dreamed more than that – and Mary, I’ll not deny it of you – I thought he and I were going to be married tomorrow – poor Hugh! He is long absent; do you think he will return or is my dream good?’ ‘I do not know Ann, I fear it is not. I would rather you had seen him come home sorrowful, as I dreamed I saw your brother Patrick returning. It is curious we were both dreaming of the two on the same night. God grant that nothing may happen to add to our sorrow for we have had enough of it since Hugh went away and persecution too on his account by the landlord. ‘The very same with us, as you know Mary.’ While this conversation was going on in a room of the cottage between the female friends, two men, one of them William Ward, the owner of the cottage, and a Mr. John Daly, a schoolmaster from Bundoran sat at a good fire in the kitchen smoking their pipes and relating stories of incidents of the past. ‘So John, you told me your side of the common playing match at Finnard Strand.’ ‘Certainly, because we took the right steps and gave plenty of poteen to Flairtach – poured a libation to him as they call it.’’ And isn’t Flairtach the king of the fairies at Finnard and how did you give him the whiskey; did he stand up like a man to receive it?’ ‘Not at all. This is the way we do it. There is a large pillar stone standing alone on the hill between Bundoran and Finner; we bring our liquor there, either in bottles or a jar; we break the vessels on the stone spilling the liquor upon it and let it flow down the sides of it on the ground; and happy is the party of common players or any other match, who is there first and pours the libation; they are sure to win that day. It was I broke the last jar of whiskey upon it on Easter Monday. The Sligo side and Donegal had to play against each other on the Finner Strand. We were at Flairtach’s stone first and no doubt Flairtach himself would be more friendly to us than the Sligo people, except that we neglected to pay him the offerings – his due. Well, well, sir we gained the day, for when we met on the strand each side tossed up for a position, North or South. The Sligo men gained the toss but it did them no good. A strong gale was in their back, blowing from the south but as soon as the first ball was struck the wind changed and a fierce blast blew from the North raising a cloud of sand and blowing it into the eyes of our opponents; we then beat them easily. At horse-racing also at Finner the same thing takes place. Whoever sacrifices first to Flairtach is sure to win.

‘I’ve heard something before about him,’ said Ward. I’m sure you did sir, he can do a good turn or a bad one.’ On one occasion half a dozen soldiers were billeted on a rich innkeeper in Ballyshannon. When he saw the the large number he got frightened, as the fellow was a miser. He said he had no place for them, but there was a gentleman named Flairtach residing between that and the sea in a fine castle and said he told him to send any soldiers to him as he had a large castle and a cellar of drink that never goes dry. ‘By Jove’ said they, we’ll go.’ They were strangers and set out towards Finner thinking they were going to a gentleman’s. On the way they met a man on horseback; they stopped him and asked him the way to the house of the gentleman Flairtach. ‘Who sent you there,’ asked he. Mr. McBrearty of Ballyshannon they said. I’m Flairtach, said he, and do you proceed to a large white stone, and near it you will find a castle, where you can stop for the night, sure enough, and be accommodated with plenty of meat and drink, but it will be at that miser’s expense.

They proceeded to the great tall stone and beside it they saw a large castle. They entered, laid aside their guns and took off their belts in the hall and were then conducted to a spacious chamber. A long table stood in the centre with deal forms around it on which they sat down and in a short time the table was covered with liquor, jugs and glasses and an excellent dinner of bread and beef – enough for fifty soldiers – was left before them. They ate and drank as long as they were able and then fell into a heavy sleep of drunkenness. In the morning they awoke and where did they find themselves, do you think? Lying on the grass beside the stone, their guns and bayonets lying beside them. But the tale does not end here. The miserly innkeeper in Ballyshannon had not one drop of liquor in his store the next morning, not one loaf of bread in his shop, or one fat heifer, out of half a score on his farm outside the town – all were gone. He deserved it said Ward. ‘Sure no one was sorry for him but all glad because he was a miser.” “Flairtach treated the soldiers well,” said Ward. “It was only to punish the niggardly inn-keeper he did so, but if he was of my mind he would not love the soldiers, from all I saw and heard of their conduct—alas!” and here he felt a spasm of acute feeling, as the thought of his son away in the rebellion, and perhaps murdered, occurred to him.

“I do not love soldiers,” he said. “I have heard so much of their raids, forays, and cruelty in this part of the country. In my father’s early days the religion was so persecuted that the priests had to meet with their congregations, in remote valleys and glens the soldiers often making a descent upon them while they were employed in public devotion, and causing them to run for their lives. The good Sir James Caldwell, pitying them in the winter, when they had to stand in the wind, rain and snow, gave them the use of his “bullock house” as a shelter, but afterwards finding that they were an inoffensive people, and persecuted he gave the use of an upper storey of a barn at Castle Caldwell, thereby disappointing the soldiers, who hunted through the glens on Sundays in search of them.”

“Bad as things are now,” said O’Daly, “there is much more improvement from the former state of things.” “But think” said Ward, “of the glory of ancient days, the prosperous state of religion, the wealth of its ministers in olden times—before the days of persecution began. A splendid abbey stood on the shores of Keenaghan Lake and another at Castle Caldwell—the present castle erected on its ancient site, the subterranean or lower chambers of the abbey still remaining. Both Abbeys belonged to the Franciscan Order. The present estate of the Johnston’s comprises the lands assigned for the support of Keenaghan Abbey, and the lands adjacent to it belonged to the other abbey. The Johnston’s had taken as their family crest the “Wing and Spur,” to show that they made their conquest when riding on horseback. From each abbey to the shore of Lough Erne is an ancient pass or highway, the one from Keenaghan named the “Friar’s Pass,” and the one from the place now named Castle Caldwell, the “Dean’s Pass.” We know those ancient roads and look on them with reverence. Before the words were cleared or roads made along the shores of Lough Erne the Bishop of the diocese, when making his tour through the parish was carried on a litter by strong men, to whom was given a respectable support for their labour, consisting of so many graces of poultry, so many loaves of bread, &c. Then the people were free, obedient and happy. They are obedient to their pastors still, despite the persecution and robbery. Some freedom has been obtained, but, alas, not enough. Our religion is still enfettered, we need emancipation, and it only remains with God to know if it will ever take place.”

“God grant it,” said O’Daly. “Amen’ said Ward, “it is still a time of sorrow and persecution; we all had hopes of gaining the freedom of this country by the sword, as no other method remained to us; but alas in that hope we have been woefully disappointed. British gold undid us; it purchased the treachery that undid our cause. How many a brave patriot has been disappointed, how many a valiant soldier fighting for Ireland has fallen?” and thinking of his son, perhaps dead, as he conceived, in the field of battle, his spirit groaned and tears stood in his eyes, and conversing in this manner the night passed on As related the two young men, Ward and McGoldrick, accompanied by Duffy left on that night the cottage in the mountain valley of Glenlough, and travelled to the shores of Lough Erne. There they called in the house of a relative of one of them and obtained a boat. Ere they separated they stood some time on the shore together, indulging in feelings of affection and emotion. Urged (not wisely, but too well) by a feeling of patriotism they had embarked in the same cause, travelled and fought together, suffered defeat and braved danger, bore hunger, toil and outlawry, and were closely united together by strange ties of fraternity, friendship and love.

“Farewell, old comrades, may God conduct you safe home,” said Duffy. “Many a long journey we have taken together, many a danger passed through—-and thanks to the Almighty, we have escaped with our lives. We will, I hope, soon meet in better times when the sorrows of poor old Ireland will have passed away.” and taking each by the hand with tears in their eyes, he said—“Farewell, old comrades. May God be with you.” Then they parted, Ward and McGoldrick entered the boat and rowed over the lake.

The moon and stars shone brightly, the air was thin and clear, a keen frost was prevailing. As they rowed along the moon and stars were mirrored in the calm lake beyond them, and the shadows of tall trees fell adjacent to the neighbouring islands. It was a scene of beauty, of silence, of solemnity, and in a short time they crossed the lake and landed on the shore, not far from Devenny’s Point at Castle Caldwell. The night was now advanced and they expected the dawn, but were, afraid of foes, and having forgotten that they had not charged their guns when setting out, as they chanced to pass by the door of a small cabin situated in the hills above the lake, they thought proper to enter and see to their guns and ammunition. The family were asleep. A door made of wickerwork was on the cabin. They removed it, entered and raked out the coals on the hearth, put on a fire and with its light charged their guns and divided their ammunition. Then sitting at the good fire, and being without sleep for some nights previously, they fell into a sound slumber.

Then the owner of the house who had been awake and listening, stole out of bed and gave word to the sergeant of the Castle Caldwell Yeomen stating that two rebels were in his house armed with guns &c., and that they had  plenty of ammunition, and he did not  know what they intended to do, &c. An alarm was raised, and bugles sounded. The yeomen assembled, and as the sun arose they marched down Lowry Hill, towards the cottage where the poor fugitives lay asleep. The woman of the house knew what had taken place, and with feelings of humanity peculiar to women, she told them to fly for their lives. They got up frightened, and the hill was covered with yeomen. Leaving their arms behind them, as they knew they were useless against so many they fled, McGoldrick taking one path and ward another. McGoldrick by some means escaped but ward was met in his flight and almost surrounded by the yeomen. He could not proceed without breaking through their ranks and he turned reverting his path and ran towards the lake, the yeomen in a body pursuing. The race was pretty long and he gained ground rapidly upon them. He was a fine young man, tall, vigorous and athletic; they admired his agility and in the race some were near enough to shoot him but they hesitated.

The chase was exciting, some of them shouting aloud in order to deter him, but that only had the effect of quickening the steps of the fugitive, he gained the shore, cast his eyes on the island (Roscor), and being an excellent swimmer, jumped into the water and swam fast forward. Some say they fired in the air, not with intent to kill, and some say they commiserated with him and did not fire at all. However, among them, as it has often happened, was one murderous wretch, who fired, but the by-standers did not think it was with intent to kill. Missing his aim, he knelt on one knee, put the gun to his eye a second time took sure aim, drew the trigger and shot the poor fellow in the water. His comrades cried, “shame,” and with heavy hearts returned to their homes. The wretch who shot him, hoped by the good of it to gain the favour of Sir John Caldwell, but the contrary was the fact. He censured his conduct, considering it an act of great inhumanity, and ever after the neighbours of the murderer nauseated his presence, and their descendants to this day desecrate his memory.

The remains of poor Ward were taken up in the lake and buried in an islet opposite the island of Roscor, and ever since it has been called, “The Dead Man’s Island.” McGoldrick as related, escaped and gained his home, but the joy of his arrival was only transient, for the news of the murder of his brave comrade, Ward, eclipsed the joy with sorrow.

The dream of Ann McGoldrick, as most dreams turns out “contrary,’ and to her, by the loss of her sweetheart, might be applied the words attributed to the bereaved Scottish maiden, who lamented her slain lover when his dead body was found in the waters of the River Yarrow:—

 

‘The tear shall never leave my cheek.

No other youth shall be my marrow.

I’ll seek thy boy in the stream.

And then with thee I’ll (sleep in Yarrow.

M.

Some believe that Ward’s body was taken up and buried in Keenaghan Graveyard. A man named Quinn was reputedly the Yeoman who shot him.

November 1918.

November 7th 1918. V.C. FOR FERMANAGH HEROISM OF COL. WEST IN FACE OF CERTAIN DEATH.

The King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Victoria Cross to the under- mentioned officer:—Captain (A. Lieutenant-Col.) Richard Annesley West, D.S.O., M.C., late North Irish Horse (Cav. S.R.) and Tank Corps, For most conspicuous bravery, leadership and self-sacrifice.

During an attack, the infantry having lost their bearings in the dense fog, this officer at once collected and re-organised any men he could find and led them to their objective in face of heavy machine-gun fire. Throughout the whole action he displayed the most utter disregard of danger, and the capture of the objective was in a great part due to his initiative and gallantry.

On a subsequent occasion, it was intended that a battalion of light tanks under the command of this officer should exploit the initial infantry and heavy tank attack. He therefore went forward in order to keep in touch with the progress of the battle, and arrived at the front line when the enemy were in process of delivering a local counter-attack. The infantry battalion had suffered heavy officer casualties, and its flanks were exposed. Realising that there was a danger of the battalion giving way he at once rode out in front of them under extremely heavy machine-gun and rifle fire and rallied the men. In spite of the fact that enemy were close upon him he took charge of the situation and detailed non-commissioned officers to replace officer casualties. He then rode up and down in front of them in face of certain death encouraging the men and calling to them ’Stick it men; show them fight; and for God’s sake put up a good fight. He fell riddled by machine-gun bullets.

The magnificent bravery of this very gallant officer at the critical moment inspired the infantry to redoubled efforts, and the hostile attack was defeated.  The deceased officer was a native of Fermanagh, being the fourth and younger son of the late Mr. A. G. West, of Whitepark. He was born in 1878, and fought in the Boer War .with Kitchener’s Scouts, afterwards taking a commission in the North Irish Horse. The West family has long been connected with Fermanagh and Tyrone, but Mr. E. E. West,  its present head, now lives, in Dublin.

Lieut-Colonel Herbert N. Young, D.S.O., Royal Inniskillings (temporarily commanding a battalion of the Sherwood Foresters), killed in action on 25th October was one of the best-known officers of the Inniskillings, with whom he had soldiered for 15 years.

THE MILK SCARCITY.

If the members of the Enniskillen Urban Council who raised the question of the scarcity of the milk supply were genuine in their anxiety for the poor, they have done nothing in the matter till it now is too late to do anything. A year ago an attempt was made to get milk from Fermanagh for Dublin’s poor, and this attempt the Impartial Reporter frustrated, pointing out at the time that any spare milk was badly needed by our own poor in Enniskillen. We then advocated the founding of a municipal milk depot, as had been done in other places, but the Urban Council took no action. The Council was asked to make preparations for the founding of a communal food kitchen to cook food for the very poor. This suggestion was also scouted by the very men who are now crying out about the coal shortage. It is the usual grumble without action. Everyone knew that coal would not get more plentiful, and it was common knowledge that milk would be much scarcer. To talk of obtaining a milk supply now is beating the air. The Chairman of the Urban Council should surely know that creameries have no milk to spare for sale in a stock-rearing county like Fermanagh, except perhaps from the Belleek district. The farmers require all the skim-milk they can get; the creameries dare not cut them short, and thus lose some of their best customers. Milk is scarce to all, rich and poor, alike, and if the poor are in a bad way for milk this winter they know who had it in their power to save them, from such a catastrophe but did nothing till too late, and then, as usual, only talked.

A MEMORIAL SERVICE. Enniskillen Presbyterian Church. It was a moving service — but just one of those things which Rev. Mr. Jenkins knows how to do well, at the proper time, and in the fitting way. Three soldiers of the Enniskillen Presbyterian Congregation have passed away quite recently—Lieut. John Darling, M.C., 9th Royal Irish Fusiliers, from wounds received in action ; Company Sergt. Major Wilson, of the 1st Royal Inniskillings, died in action; and Private Herbert Caldwell, from ill-health and starvation, when wounded as a prisoner-of-war in Germany. The congregation at Enniskillen, which has given most of its manhood to the army, per cent., has also had the greatest number of casualties.

November 21st 1918.

Lance-Corporal Seaman, of the Inniskilling Fusiliers has been awarded the Victoria Cross. The official record states that he is awarded the coveted distinction. For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty. When the right flank of his company was held np by a nest of enemy machine guns he, with great courage and initiative, rushed forward under heavy fire with his Lewis gun and engaged the position single-handed, capturing two machine guns and 12 prisoners and killing one officer and two men. Later in the day he again rushed another enemy machine-gun position, capturing the gun under heavy fire. He was killed immediately after. His courage and dash were beyond all praise, and it was entirely due to the very gallant conduct of Lance-Corporal Seaman that his company was enabled to push forward to its objective, and capture many prisoners.

BAR TO M.C.

The Commander-In-Chief of the B.E.F. has made an award of a Bar to the Military Cross to Second Lieutenant T. J. Adams, M.C., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, for conspicuous gallantry in action last month. Second Lieutenant Adams is a son of Mr. Thomas Adams, Tullywinney, Ballygawley.

DERRYGONNELLY MAN WINS D.C.M.

The Distinguished Conduct Medal has been awarded to Sergeant J. Foy, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (Derrygonnelly, County Fermanagh)

For conspicuous gallantry in command of his platoon during an attack. When an enemy machine gun attempted to check his advance he came round its flank and with another man charged it and captured the gun and four prisoners. He set a splendid example of courage and determination to his men.

The Cork Eagle records the death in hospital of Cadet Frank Semple of the Royal Air Force, son of Mr. John Semple, Bandon, and formerly of the General Manager’s office, Great Northern Railway, Enniskillen. The “funeral at Cavereham Cemetery was a military one, and the coffin was covered with wreaths. Mr. Semple’s eldest son, Herbert, a brilliant scholar, also gave up a career of bright promise to serve his country and fell in her cause.

PRIVATE JAMES MCTEGGART. Mrs. Quinn, Henry-street, Enniskillen, has been informed that her brother, James McTeggart was killed in action on the 7th November. He had seen much active service with the Inniskillings at the Dardanelles in the retreat from Servia, and in Palestine, before coming to France. His captain in a letter of sympathy says—‘His pals and I miss him very much as he had done good service for the battalion. He was struck by a bullet in the head and death was instantaneous. He is nearly the last of the good old boys who came out with the battalion.’

Private Wm. Manly, 9th Inniskillings, from Tullyavey, died in action on the 29th September, leaving a wife and seven children. His brother, who also had worked at Riversdale, had also served In the army, having served in the 27th Inniskillings in the Boer war. Trory parish yielded 37 of the Protestant men to the army at the call.

Private Bernard Drum, of the Royal Inniskillings has been at home on leave, after having been six months in hospital from wounds received in France, and has gone to Oswestry to join the reserve battalion of the regiment.

Clones and the Epidemic. SHORTAGE OF MEDICAL MEN.

Clones has been terribly in the grip of the Spanish influenza, and suffered all the more because that Dr. Henry, who has a wide circle of patients and the Union hospitals under his charge, became a patient himself.

The town found itself with only one doctor available to minister to the whole district, Dr. Tierney, and lamentable cases on every side. But Clones rose to the occasion. Its chief men met, as they generally do, as neighbours and friends, not as politicians, and subscribed money to meet the emergency; the ladies of the town provided meals for the poor; and by good luck one young doctor was found to take up medical duty in the district, and Mr. Knight obtained the friendly advice of Dr. Kidd of Enniskillen as to procedure; and Dr. Kidd advised among other things, that the assistance of men of the Army Medical Corps at  Enniskillen headquarters be requested, to enable nursing and care to be attended to.

Since then, the so-called influenza has got a bad grip of the Clones district, it has also brought its people together to meet the danger and combat it; and we trust their praiseworthy effort will meet with the success which it deserves.

The Recent boxing tournament in Enniskillen for the benefit of Inniskilling prisoners of war resulted in a net profit of £57, which has been sent to the Secretary of the fund at Omagh.

Sale of Fruit to Householders.—Instances having been brought to the knowledge of the Food Control Committee for Ireland, that apples are being sold to householders and others at prices in excess of those set out in the Apples and Perry Pears (Sales) Order, the attention of consumers is directed to the advertisement which appears in this issue.

The Cattle Feeding Staffs supply to Ireland is to be increased.

The German Army committed continual robberies in its retreat, including herds of cattle, carts, chickens, clothing, and vehicles.

The rumour is Revived that the ex-Czar is alive, and that he may be replaced on the Russian throne.

The Galway Board of Guardians have felt hurt that out of 156 circulars sent out, asking that medical practitioners who have been interned for political offences should be released to relieve the scarcity of medical practitioners, only five applies should have been returned, and of these one (Belfast) was against the resolution. Dungannon burned it.

A BIG FIRE AT THE GRAAN MONASTERY. HUNDREDS OF POUNDS DAMAGE.

A destructive fire, entailing the loss of several hundred pounds worth of property, broke out at the Gabriel Retreat, The Graan, about two miles from, Enniskillen, in the early hours of Sunday morning. Residing at the Retreat are four or five priests and about twelve students or novitiates of the Passionists Order of the Roman Catholic Church.

Shortly before one o’clock on Sunday morning one of the resident brothers observed a light in the office-houses near the main dwelling, and upon investigating the matter found the building was on fire. He immediately raised an alarm, but by this time the whole building where the cattle were stalled was a mass of flames. There being no efficient fire extinguishing apparatus about the place, efforts were made to quell the outbreak by means buckets of water drawn from water barrels near by, but these were quite ineffectual.

Word of the fire having been sent to Mr. Christopher Bracken, whose residence is close at hand, both that gentleman and his eldest son were soon on the scene, and worked very hard in assisting the inmates in their fight against the flames. Despite all exertions, however, eight valuable cows, worth from £40 to £50 each and also two calves were burned to death, while the byres, calf-house, and piggeries were razed to the ground. Fortunately the fire did not spread to the large barns attached, in which much corn, hay, and other inflammable material were stored, else the loss would have been considerably heavier. As it was, a valuable staircase, a huge quantity of glass, and other articles intended for use in the new building at present in course of construction, and which were stored temporarily in one of the office-houses, were all burned.

End of WW1. Impartial Reporter November 7th 1918.

End of WW1. Impartial Reporter November 7th 1918.

The Sinn Fein in Convention are as insane as their members individually. They have asked by resolution for the complete evacuation of Ireland of the British military forces, the release of all ‘Political’ prisoners, and the absolute independence of Ireland. Imagine any body of sane men being so idiotic as to gravely prefer such a request expecting it to be granted. How truly they have been termed ‘dreamers.’ How thoroughly impractical! If it could be possible that such a request could be granted we would have Bolshevism in Ireland, massacre and robbery. Men who cannot control themselves cannot control anyone else; and Ireland under them would be a veritable hell—far worse than Dublin under the bloody gang of Easter week. Happily, Ireland will never, under any circumstances, be under men who have turned the whole world against a disgraceful set of scheming fanatics.

DISPATCHES.BY AEROPLANES.
We mention as an historical fact, so that readers of the Impartial Reporter generations hence, when perusing its files, may want to know when mails went locally first by aeroplane, that military dispatches have been sent by military aeroplane to Enniskillen, and been received in the Enniskillen fairgreen by an orderly in a spot appointed
for the purpose. In Ballinamallard, at Mr. Archdale’s function for the Red Cross, on Thursday, two aeroplanes circled about and dropped recruiting literature.

THE INNISKILLINGS.
The Inniskillings have been again engaged in action and have suffered many casualties. We deeply regret the death of Colonel H. N. Young, D.S.O., a very brave soldier, in Italy. He recently received a bar to the D.S.O. His command of the 7th Inniskillings produced a model battalion, ‘the Fighting Seventh;’ and one of the smartest in the Army.

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.
The epidemic of influenza has prostrated people from town and country, and has caused a few deaths. On the whole it has been less fatal in this district than in others. Our Royal School was badly crippled, owing to the number of cases, but Major Bruce, Army Medical Corps, very kindly sent nine of his Army nurses to Portora, and the very sight of the men in uniform cheered the boys, as they ministered to them. A household of 112 people was not an easy one to grapple with. Yet School was kept going all the time for those who were free from the disease. All the other schools in the town had to be closed, as in other places, but the worst of the plague is now over. (My Granny died in it)

KESH.
A social meeting of the Kesh C.A.S. was recently, held. In the absence of the chairman, Mr. Phillips, Mr. Hall of Lack presided, and Shareholders, with members of their families, were strongly represented. Messrs. Lowry and M‘Gee of I.A.O.S. gave addresses on co-operation, and urged the members to subscribe more capital to meet the developments and increasing trade of the society, Two hundred pounds .have already been deposited in the society; and as a result of the meeting £300 more have been promised. It was decided to canvass the district. The co-operators who sympathised with this society in its struggles will be gratified to hear the loss of £800 caused by the fire has now been reduced to £400, and the management feels that if the members supply them with sufficient capital to save all discounts and buy in larger quantities that this latter sum can be very soon wiped out.

Owing to pressure on our space we are unable to publish an article received from. Mr. H. E. Watkin, Enniskillen, on “The Art of Dancing Well.” Mr. Watkin deals at considerable length with the “Waltz. He says that “during the present year attempts were made to introduce Rag Time in Enniskillen, but the good sense of the public gave it an inglorious quietus.’’

A severe wind and rain storm passed over Enniskillen and district on Thursday night, when some damage was done to house property. A portion of the roof on premises at the rere of Messrs. Plunkett’s establishment in High Street was blown off.

The news of the conclusion of the war was announced in Enniskillen by the
ringing of joybells, the booming of guns and the blowing of factory horns. Flags were displayed from a number of houses, and the Union Jack and Irish and American flags were flown from the Townhall.

Capt. Rev. Father J. Nolan, son of Mr. J. Nolan, Aghabog, Co. Monaghan, has arrived home from Germany. He was an army chaplain for two years, and last May was reported missing. Subsequently his relatives were informed he was taken prisoner. Father Nolan was formerly a curate at Arney, parish of Cleenish, and later Dromore, Co. Tyrone.

‘Mr. H. Walker, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, said it had been suggested that the Court should be adjourned in view of the very joyful tidings received that morning but as there were only two small cases they had decided to dispose of them. A man charged with drunkenness was allowed off “owing to the day being one of rejoicing.”

1950 May to August.

6-5-1950. Advertisement – For Springtime – Rabbit dishes. Delicately appetising for warmer days, rabbit is really nourishing too. Easy to get now, inexpensive, and one rabbit gives big helpings for four to six people. Here is an easy to do suggestion. Rabbit stew: With a little bacon, a touch of onion, seasoning to taste, and cooked, dried or canned peas added before serving.

6-5-1950. Advertisement. Have you got your new Ration Book? Some people haven’t got their new Ration Books yet! Are you one of these? If so don’t leave it any longer. Get your new book right away please – you will need it from 21st May.

6-5-1950. Devenish girl, Miss Bridget Agnes Feely of Glen West, Garrison, receives the holy habit at Franciscan Hope Castle, Castleblayney, County Monaghan. Her sister is a member of the Little Sisters of the Poor in France.

6-5-1950. Widespread sympathy has been evoked in Dromore, County Tyrone and Mulleek, County Fermanagh by the sudden demise due to a railway accident at an early age of Patrick O’Connor, Garvary, Leggs, County Fermanagh. He was secretary and playing member of Mulleek and a member of the Mulleek branch of the Anti-Partition League. His loss to the community is a great one but greatest of all to his sorrowing mother, brothers and sister.

13-5-1950.  Cashel and Ederney draw. Ederney travelled to Cashel on Sunday last to fulfil their Junior League fixture. This was Ederney’s first appearance in Fermanagh fixtures from 1947. Considering that this is practically a new look team Ederney gave a grand display to hold Cashel to a draw. The final score was Cashel 3-3, Ederney 2-6. The scorers for Cashel were Tracey, Leonard, Gallagher and Mc Laughlin and for Ederney, Monaghan, Mc Hugh, Murphy, Maguire and Lunny.

13-5-1950. Fermanagh Woman’s tragic fate at Bundoran. Inquest verdict of accidental death. The body of Mrs Ellen Hennessy sister of Charles Reilly of Drumbinnis, Kinawley was found on the rocks of Rogey, Bundoran.

13-5-1950. Harnessing the Erne for Hydro-Electrification. Dublin and Belfast agree on joint plan to drain Lough Erne Area. The total cost of both schemes will be £1,090,000 of which the government of the Republic will pay £750,000 and the Six Counties £350,000. The river will be deepened from Roscor to Belleek where a new bridge will be built. The new river channel will have a capacity of 660,000 cubic feet per minute. The prospect of hydro-electrification of Donegal are now very bright. This may mean that not a single area in the scattered county will be omitted from the benefits of rural electrification.

20-5-1950. The change over from hand passing to boxing the ball has caused some players a lot of difficulty. At one match on the first Sunday in May, it was amusing to watch the despairing gestures of one player who realised that little bit too late that flicked passes were banned. He was not so resourceful as his colleague who erred against the new rule, but carried on as if everything were normal and scored a goal. He was lucky the referee (who shall be nameless) had forgotten also.

20-5-1950. Until recently only one Fermanagh referee has been entrusted with a whistle outside the county, Jimmy Kelly, Farnamullan, Lisbellaw. Lately Ederney’s popular Johnny Monaghan’s worth has been recognised and his name is down several times in this year’s inter-county fixture list.

27-5-1950. Green is definitely first choice with Fermanagh teams when choosing jerseys. All four teams in Division A of the Junior League favoured the National colour, Cashel’s jersey having a white stripe added, while Derrygonnelly, Ederney and Devenish sported green and orange. The similarity of the jerseys caused great confusion in all the matches in this division. Derrygonnelly have now secured a new outfit which, as far as it can be ascertained will clash with no other club’s colours.

10-6-1950. Fatal Ballyshannon Shooting Accident. Seamus Gordon, a 25 year old fitter’s helper of the Abbey, Ballyshannon was the victim of a tragic shooting affair when the rifle he was carrying on a fox hunting expedition went off, apparently as he was crossing a stone ditch and the bullet entered his head.

1-7-1950. Early on Sunday morning the Russian sponsored North Korean Government invaded South Korea following a declaration of war. On Tuesday President Truman ordered US air and naval forces into action into Korea and instructed the Seventh Fleet to prevent any attack on Formosa.

8-7-1950. Belleek Young Emmetts per Mr. T. Campbell have subscribed £35 to the County Minor Training. Contingents of players arrived in Irvinestown on Monday and Tuesday to begin training under the famous Cavan footballer, Tony Tighe. On Monday night the boys were provided with a cinema entertainment in Irvinestown.

1-7-1950. Fermanagh Minors for the next round of the Championship defeating Tyrone by 1-1 to 3 points. Throne had appealed the match on the grounds that Billy Charlton of Fermanagh had taken a penalty which struck the crossbar and he had collected the rebound and scored a goal. Tyrone appealed to the Ulster Council and quoted the rule that another player had to touch the ball before the taker could play it again. The appeal was turned down. This was the only part of the meeting conducted in English the rest being in Irish.

15-7-1950. Cashel Annual Sports held were attended by almost 1,000 people. In the match between Cashelnadrea and Kiltyclogher the ball was thrown in by the newly ordained Fr. Sean McKeaney, OMI.

15-7-1950. Fermanagh Minors train for Ulster Minor Championship v Armagh. Under Tony Tighe, trainer and Malachy Mahon assistant the boys are going through a thorough training programme which fills their days and which is having many obviously good effects. Accommodated on 22 beds in St. Molaise Hall they have a portable wireless set and a gramophone and at their disposal two billiard tables. Rising daily at 7.30 am the boys have a cup of tea and a couple of miles walk before breakfast at 9.00. They have physical exercises, ball practice and tactics before having a light lunch at 1.30. Between then and 4.30 when they have a cup of tea they have more ball practice, tactics, and a football match between fifteen of the players and the remainder strengthened by local St. Molaise players. Finally they have after tea, physical training, long distance running and sprinting, followed by a mile walk and then before 10 o’clock to bed.

15-7-1950. Newly ordained Garrison priest at Oblate College, Piltown, County Kilkenny, Rev John J McKeaney. Son of Michael McKeaney, Scribbagh, Garrison and the late Mrs McKeaney. He has two sisters nuns.

22-7-1950. Death of Mrs Mary Quinn, Teebunion, Cashel on June 30th, 1950.

22-7-1950. Fermanagh heavily defeated by Armagh 5-5 to 4 points in the Ulster Minor Championship. Sean Gonnigle of Belleek on the team, John Maguire of Ederney and Pat Casey of Garrison.

22-7-1950. Kesh Bank cashier gets four years. Samuel H. Henderson of the Belfast Banking Company, Kesh, aged 47 married with one child pleaded guilty to stealing c £9000. He had been a faultless employee for 30 years and will lose a pension of £500 p.a. He had been asked to reduce his overdraft by the bank and turned to moneylenders to do this and then to gambling money from accounts in sums of £40 and £50 on football pools. His local stature was such that when he was bailed his bailsmen were people from whose accounts he had taken money.

29-7-1950. Armagh wins first Ulster Senior GAA title for 47 years to record their third victory. They beat Cavan.

12-8-1950. Belleek Man Sells a Rat – Mr. Bill Thornton, Belleek, who lives alone in a house with about 30 rats, sold one a few days ago to an Omagh publican for 8/6. So enamoured was the customer with his bargain that he paid a second visit to Mr. Thornton to make a second purchase, but Mr. Thornton refused to part with another of his pets. Mr. Thornton feeds the rats and looks after them as people do of more normal pets. They swarm around him at feeding time and he can fondle them and handle them without the slightest danger of being bitten.

12-8-1950. The new teams of 1950, Ederney, Cashel and Kinawley are engaged in a special competition for new teams. The trophy for this competition will be the old Championship cup which is being replaced as Senior Championship trophy for the county by the beautiful Gold Cup presented to the Fermanagh GAA by the Fermanagh Men’s Association in New York.

12-8-1950. Tommy Gallagher, Belleek, who emigrated last week, was one of the best men of the New York team that conquered Cavan recently at Croke Park and won the National League. At centre full he had the measure of O’Donoghue and Mick Higgins and completely subdued both. This played a big part in the victory.

12-8-1950. Trout fishing on Lough Melvin. Trout fishing has vastly improved on Lough Melvin as a result of the recent heavy rains and consequent flooding of rivers. Professor Marshall of Derry caught 21 trout in a few hours fishing during the weekend and had catches of 16 and 17 trout last week. Other anglers had catches of a dozen each.