May 1942.

DUTY OF PEDESTRIANS ON ROADS. INTERESTING POINT IN IRVINESTOWN PROSECUTION. Ought pedestrians obey the road code and walk on the right-hand side of the road, or follow the custom and walk on the left? This question was discussed at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on. Friday, when a motorist was summoned for driving without due care, etc., arising out of an accident in which the car, travelling in the black-out, knocked down a soldier. Major Dickie, R.M., said it was apparent that defendant did not see the soldiers until he was right on top of them. Everybody knew that soldiers were likely to be moving out of the town about that hour, and surely defendant should have driven in such a way that he would have stopped in time. He (the R.M.) recognised that army uniforms were difficult to see in the black-out. Mr. P. J. Flanagan, LL.B., solr., defending the car driver, said the same thing could be said of the soldier, who knew there was traffic on that road, and he should have kept in. His Worship pointed out that the law said pedestrians had a perfect right to be on the road, and there was no obligation on them to be struggling along on the grass verge. Mr. Flanagan said pedestrians had no right to be all over the road.

His Worship—I do not say for a minute they were all over the road. All the Crown witnesses agree the soldiers were not over the centre of the road. His Worship added that at the present time it was much safer on the right hand side of the road at night. Mr. Flanagan said he understood the Code specified that side for pedestrians, yet if it was used they would be deemed to be negligent.His Worship remarked that in the case of traffic approaching from the front the pedestrian would have to clear into the hedge, and people objected to that. The case in question was that in which Thomas McCrossan, Irvinestown, was summoned under the usual two counts for careless driving and for not having a. P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan was summoned for permitting the latter offence.

Gunner Kane gave evidence that when walking home from Irvines town on 21st March, at 11 p.m., he was on the outside of two other soldiers, with some soldiers in front and some behind. A car came up behind them, and knocked him down. He next found himself being attended by nurses in hospital. He was not seriously injured. Cross-examined, witness could not say why he did not hear the car before it struck him. They had been in Irvinestown for a night’s jollification. He did not remember sitting on a coat on the aide of the road and smoking a cigarette after the accident. Gunner Young said he saw the car go past with the last witness on the front of it between the mudguard and the bonnet. The car had no lights lit when it stopped. Gunner Haydon estimated the speed of the car at fifteen to twenty m.p.h. Gunner Wosley stated he saw Haydon pull the other two soldiers into the left as the car drew near.

Sergt. Kelly, R.U.C., gave evidence of finding the car without lights beyond the scene of the accident. The headlights were in order when switched on, and a side lamp had been broken off in the mishap. The road is 19 feet wide, at the spot where the accident happened. Thomas McCrossan swore he could not find his brother, who had contracted to bring three men out of the town, and he had to drive them, though not duty licensed for the. purpose. He was travelling on the centre of the road, and was just passing the soldiers when he heard the bump. When he stopped he switched off the lights. Later he found that the bulbs were blown. He had since taken out a P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan testified to his having arranged to drive three men home, but was unable to get out in time to do so. He did not authorise his brother to drive the car. His Worship said it was not a bad case but drivers ought to drive within the circle of their own lights. For driving without due care Thomas McCrossan-was fined 40/- and 6/- costs. The second summons concerning the licence was dealt with under the Probation of Offenders Act. The summons against Daniel McCrossan was dismissed on the merits.

16-5-1942. BICYCLE WHEEL THEFTS. A Kinawley Man’s Experience. Thefts of a particularly mean type, of which cyclists are the victims, are now, with the shortage of cycles and accessories, becoming prevalent. A young man who left his bicycle outside a hall while at a dance in the Arney district found his front wheel stolen when the dance was over. Another close by had the tyres and tubes of his bicycle stolen. But a Kinawley man’s experience was worst of all. He cycled across the Border to Swanlinbar and left his bicycle on the street while he visited a house. When he emerged after some time, both, wheels had been removed from, his machine and stolen. He had to walk back across the Border with the frame on his shoulder. R.U.C. men took him to the barracks on suspicion of smuggling the frame, but on telephoning the Swanlinbar Gardaí they confirmed the man’s story that his wheels had been stolen. He had to do the rest of the journey on foot, carrying the frame on his shoulder.

16-5-1942. IDENTITY CARDS. People without National Registration Identity Cards, or with Cards which are inaccurate, will find difficulty in Obtaining new Ration Books, when they are due for issue next month. Anyone who has lost his or her Identity Card, or whose Card is inaccurate, should call at once at the local National Registration Office, which is usually the Food Office, and have the matter rectified. Some local Food Offices (see advertisement pages), intend, opening sub-offices, it which the public will be able to obtain new Personal Ration Books and Clothing Cards on production of properly completed Identity Cards and Ration Books, with the Reference Leaves accurately completed.

16-5-1942. EXCESS FLOUR AND MEAL SUPPLIES. SELLING EGGS TO A NEIGHBOUR. CHARGES AT CASTLEDERG. Before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., at Castlederg Petty Sessions on Friday, Elizabeth Harkin, Garvetagh, was summoned for being in possession of an excess quantity of flour and oatmeal, Henry McAnea and Samuel Greer, both shopkeepers, Castlederg, were summoned for disposing of excess quantifies of flour and meal. Const. Wilson said he found two seven stone packs of flour and a ten-stone bag of meal in Harkin’s house on the 2nd March.. In. a statement she took full responsibility and said about six weeks ago she bought a bag of flour from McAnea and about two weeks later ordered another from him, as one bag had only lasted her six weeks. She also purchased the meal at McAnea’s about six weeks ago. – Witness interviewed McAnea, who said he only supplied Harkin with seven stones flour and ten stones meal. He had no hesitation in giving it as it was a long time since she had obtained any from him. Greer told witness that he supplied Harkin with seven stones flour on the 13th December. Witness seized eleven stones flour and 7½ stones meal. The R.M. said it was now permitted to buy any quantity of’ ‘points’ food legally acquired and a month’s supply of unrationed food. The R.M. applied the Probation of Offenders Act in all cases, and forfeited one sack of flour. The R.M. added that the prosecution was properly brought, and it was only the circumstances of the cases that caused him to deal leniently with them.

Robt. A. Scott, Drumclamph, was summoned for having an excess, quantity of flour, namely, 10 stones. Const. Irvine said on the 31st March he went to defendant’s place and was told by him that he received 3 or 4 bags of flour from his brother-in-law, Mr. Rosborough, Derry. Witness found five ten-stone bags. He seized three of them. There were five resident in the house and four full-time employees. In a statement he said while he was at Derry show, he called with his brother-in-law and told him, to send him some flour. He received eight bags of flax and five of flour. The supply would have lasted him two months. The R.M. applied the P.O. Act and forfeited two ten-stone bags.

John Love, Crewe, was summoned for selling eggs other than to a licensed collector. Jeannie Love, do., was summoned for selling eggs at a price other than at the maximum price, and for selling without a licence. James Donaghey, Faughan Bridge, Drumnahoe, Derry, was summoned for purchasing eggs otherwise than at the fixed price, for obtaining 1 lb. butter otherwise than according to the rationing regulations, and for having one lb. butter without authority. Annie O’Neill, Creeduff, was summoned for disposing of 1 lb. butter without authority.

PETROL SHORTAGE FOR AMBULANCES. SERIOUS COMPLAINT AT ENNISKILLEN. Difficulty in securing supplies of petrol for Enniskillen Union ambulances was referred to at the meeting of the Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry presiding. In a letter to the Board, Mr. John Cathcart, ambulance driver, said: “I beg to inform, you of the difficulties that exist in getting a. supply of petrol for the ambulances. When application, would be made for 140 units 80 would be supplied, and when application- for 80 was made 50 would be supplied. The number of coupons is insufficient to keep the ambulance service going, and on the 8th. inst. an inspector from the Petroleum Office called at the Workhouse and informed me it was illegal to obtain petrol without coupons from any trader. He also called with Messrs. Topping and Co. and told him he would hold him liable if he supplied petrol without coupons. I have eight gallons of petrol in stock, and when this amount is exhausted the ambulance will have to be refused for the want of petrol.”

The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) corroborated Mr. Cathcart’s remarks, and said he (the Clerk) told the Petroleum Board representative that ambulances were of more importance than any other vehicles on the road, and that the general public could not possibly be left without ambulances to convey the sick to hospital. He also told the official that they would get petrol for the ambulances whether by surrender of coupons or not. The official promised to explain the matter at his headquarters. Mr. A. Wilson—Did you not ask the Ministry?Mr. J. J. Coalter—Send that letter to the Ministry of Home Affairs and explain the difficulty.  Clerk — The petrol authorities must have got it into their heads we were using it ourselves. Mr. Coalter’s suggestion was unanimously approved of.

CONFIRMATION AT DEVENISH. St. Mary’s Church, Devenish, was thronged on Friday last when the Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, administered the Sacrament of Confirmation to upwards of 140 children and some adult converts. His Lordship was met at the church by Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, and proceeded through the sacred edifice with a procession of over twenty priests to the High Altar. Mass was celebrated by Rev. P. Monaghan, C.C. Addressing the children after Confirmation, his Lordship congratulated them on being enrolled as soldiers in the army of Christ. Until now they had few responsibilities, but from this hour onwards it would be their duty not only to defend the Kingdom of Christ, but to extend it, and to do this they would have to take an intelligent interest in all that pertains to their faith, and particularly in the liturgy and functions of the Church. It would be easy for them to remain faithful to their religion while they were at home in Catholic Ireland, but if some of them found their way to countries where the faith has grown cold and many people would sneer at their religion, there would be danger for them unless their lives were lived in accordance with the teaching of their faith. They had in the main the Ten Commandments of God to be the general outline of their lives, and they had an informed conscience to tell them what was right and what was wrong. They had a leader, Jesus Christ, and if they were to be enthusiastic about their faith they must always remember the beauty of their Leader, and be ready to sacrifice everything for Him.

During the month of May it is the wish of His Holiness the Pope that all children should pray for his intention, and peace is a necessary preliminary to the restoration of Christian virtue. After administering the Total Abstinence pledge to the children until they attain the age of twenty-one his Lordship said it used to be a mere formality in the past for girls to take the pledge, but times had changed, and there were grave temptations for young girls to take intoxicating drink, particularly in seaside towns during the holiday season. Sponsors were, Mr. Henry McGrath, Devenish; and Mrs. Dick, ex-P.E.T., Cornahilta. His Lordship was much impressed by the splendid new Parochial Hall at Devenish, which competent authorities say is one of the best of its kind in the North.

Confirmation in Cleenish and Derrygonnelly. Administering the Sacrament of Confirmation in St. Mary’s’ Church, Arney, to the children of the three districts of the Cleenish Parish (Arney, Mullaghdun and Belcoo) , Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, referred to the death of Dr. McKenna, late Bishop of Clogher, and expressed sympathy with the people of the diocese in their loss. The children confirmed numbered 130, and his Lordship, told them that the Sacrament strengthened their faith.

GREEN CROSS FUND. ENNISKILLEN I.N.F. CEILIDHE FOR GREEN CROSS. The Devenish (Enniskillen) Branch of the Irish National Foresters on Sunday held a most enjoyable and successful ceilidhe in the Foresters’ Hall, Enniskillen, in aid of the Green Cross Fund. (Ed. a fund to support the families of interned Republicans.)

A very large gathering of patrons assembled, drawn mainly from the surrounding districts, but also fairly representative of a much larger area, parties coming from Omagh, Clones and  other parts. To the excellent music of the Enniskillen St. Molaise Band, the dancers enjoyed a very large selection of Irish dances, these being participated in with the utmost pleasure. Never for a moment did the spirit of pleasure flag, and the dancers parted as they had kept happy dancing company, in the best of humour. Mr. Jim Sheridan, Lackaboy, was an efficient master of ceremonies, his dance announcements being made all in Irish. He was assisted by Mr. C. P. Drumm, secretary of Branch Devenish and organiser-in-chief of the ceilidhe. The proceedings concluded with the National Anthem, played by the band and sung by the large assembly, standing at attention.

OTHER SIMILAR FUNCTIONS. Largely contributing to the great improvement in the Ederney parish contribution to the Fund (already acknowledged) was a similar ceilidhe held in Ederney recently. It is to be hoped that other parishes will follow the Enniskillen and Ederney , examples and organise ceilidhthe or football matches in aid of the Fund apart from the ordinary parish collections.

IRVINESTOWN. The Irvinestown district collection of the Irvinestown Parish is complete, but the lodgement is being held over until the Coa and Whitehill areas have also had an opportunity to contribute to the parish total.

ARNEY. A meeting will be held on Sunday evening next, 17th inst., in the vicinity of St. Mary’s Church, Arney, after Devotions, to arrange for this year’s collection in that area. A large attendance is earnestly requested.

KNOCKNINNY. The parish collection is being taken up, and it is hoped that Teemore will also be organised shortly.

KILLESHER. The parish collection in Lower Killesher is well advanced. Nothing has as yet been done in Upper Killesher, but’ an effort is being made to organise that area.

KINAWLEY. The Kinawley collection is practically finished.

DEVENISH. Very Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, has forwarded to the County Secretary a cheque for £34 10s 0d, being the 1942 Devenish parish collection for the Fund. The total is an increase of about £5 on last year, and Devenish is to he heartily congratulated on its prompt and generous response to the appeal.

OTHER AREAS. Will other parishes or districts in which no effort has as yet been made please arrange to have the collection taken up as soon as possible. It is desired that the county’s total effort should be concluded within a reasonable time.

EDERNEY’S FINE EFFORT. Ederney Branch of the Green Cross Society has forwarded to Mr P. J. O’Hare, Co. Fermanagh secretary, the sum of £30 2s 8d, result of the 1942 collection in the parish. This amount exceeds by nearly £10 the 1941 total, and Ederney is to be congratulated on its prompt and successful effort. Ederney has been the first parish to complete the 1942 collection. Enniskillen is almost complete, but there are still a few books to come in.

23-5-1942. BELLEEK BREAD CASES. At Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Mrs. Margaret McMahon, Ballynadoghy Belleek, was charged with having, on 22nd November, 1941, without a licence granted by the Board of Trade acquired 16 2 lb. loaves, whereby the total quantity of bread in her possession or under her control, exceeded the normal quantity required by her. The following were similarly charged in  respect to the same date, Mrs. Margaret McCann, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Alice Greenan, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Annie McGroarty, Fassagh, for 6 2 lb. loaves; Miss Mary Somerville, Fassagh, 7 2 lb. loaves.

Patrick John McCart, Forthill, Irvinestown, was charged with having on November 22nd unlawfully disposed of a quantity of bread to the above mentioned defendants, knowing that by reason of such disposal the quantity of .bread which may be lawfully acquired by these persons would be exceeded. Head Constable Briggs, Belleek, said that on the 22nd. of November, he visited a number of houses in the Commons district. He went to McMahons and found 19 2lb. loaves in a cardboard box. When questioned Mrs. McMahon told him she was giving some of them to friends in the Free State and made a statement to that effect.

The statement was read by Sergeant Blevin. Continuing Head Constable Briggs said that in McCann’s he found six loaves in a coarse bag and four in a handbag hanging from the roof. There were also two other loaves in the house some homemade bread and 9 stone of flour. There were eight people living in the house. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin, Mrs. McCann said she got six of the loaves from Hughes bread van. Witness sized ten of the loaves. There were five children in McCann’s as well as the defendant and her husband. The bread van only came round twice a week—on Tuesdays and Saturdays. The house was about 250 yards from the village. Head Const. Brigg’s, continuing, said he went to Greenan’s and found 14 loaves there. There was also some homemade bread and 9 stones of flour. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin defendant said she got all the loaves except two from Hughes van.

Sergt. Blevin cross-examined said Mrs. Greenan made no statement concerning her brother-in-law wanting the bread for a dance he was having nor did she mention her sister in hospital. One of the children made some reference to McCabe later. Head Const. Briggs said that in connection with the affair he interviewed McCart, the driver of Hughes bread van, who said he only sold bread for the use of Northern people. He sold one doz.  to McMahons; ½ doz. to McCann’s; 1 doz. to Greenan’s, ½ doz. to Miss Somerville and 5 doz. to Mrs. McGroarty. McCart had one dozen loaves in the van when he was stopped in Garrison. Cross-examined by Mr. Flanagan witness said that when questioned McCart told everything. He had been selling bread in the district for some time.

Constable Green said that on Saturday, November 22, he visited McGroarty’s and saw 9 21b loaves on the table. There were two elderly, and two young people living in the house. Mrs. McGroarty said the loaves were for their own use. Cross-examined witness said the nearest shop was a quarter of a mile away. Mrs. McGroarty would get the same bread there on Monday and Tuesday as she would buy on Saturday. There was flour in the house. Constable Green said he asked Miss Somerville had she any bread in the house and she said she had only two loaves. In a large box he found seven loaves. There were three elderly people in the house. The house was 50 yards from the border. Cross-examined witness said Miss Somerville was an old infirm woman and her brother and the other occupant of the house was much the same.

THE DEFENCE Mr. Flanagan said that his client had been selling bread in the district for some time. He was changed with “knowing” or ‘that he ought reasonably expected to have known, that the amount disposed of was in excess of the quantity to which each person was entitled.” The defendant had no means of knowing how many people lived in each house. His job was to sell bread and like a good businessman he tried to increase his sales. His worship had mentioned, perhaps rightly, that when a poor man was summoned under the Food Order, there were people behind him, but in this case, the firm who employed McCart had nothing whatever to do with it. The defendant had been suspended for a while. He was a young married man with six children.

Capt. Ramage said that Mrs. McMahon had a brother living across the Border, to whom she gave some bread. There was no question of sale. Concerning McCanns there were five, children, two who were working, and the defendant and her husband. There was not an excessive quantity of bread, in the house to last that family from Saturday evening until Tuesday. In McGroartys 9 loaves for four people for three days was not excessive.. All the cases were border line ones.

Mrs. Greenan said she had a brother- in-law John McCabe. At that time her sister Miss Gallagher was in the hospital and, her brother went to see her on that day and the house was locked up. There were three men living in it. On Friday her brother told her to get the bread for him when he was away. Mrs. McCabe was also away seeing her sister and sent a message with witness’s daughter to get some bread as her husband (McCabe) was having a dance on Sunday night, and wanted the bread for the band. She bought six loaves for McCabe, four for her brother and four for herself. Cross-examined, witness said she told the Sergeant about McCabe. There were only seven and a half stones flower in the house. McCart was fined 15/- and 6/7 costs; Mrs. McMahon, 10/6, and Miss Somerville, 10/6. The summonses against the other defendants were dismissed.

HEATH FIRE Peter Maguire, Scribbagh, was fined 8s and 2s costs for displaying a heath fire in an open field. Constable McMullen, Garrison, was complainant.

CAVAN MAN FINED. FOUND WITH CYCLE TYRES AND TEA. CHARGE AT ENNISKILLEN. A young County Cavan man with an address at Lisnaskea—John Stephen J Brady, of Cootehill,—was at a Special court in Enniskillen on Thursday before Major Dickie, R.M., fined £6 4 0d (treble the value of the goods involved) for being on the previous day knowingly concerned in dealing in six cycle tyres and 3lbs, of tea with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereof. Mr. J. Cooper prosecuted, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) defended. Mr. Cooper said the defendant was met by Constable McKeown with a parcel in which the articles were found.

Constable McKeown said defendant went to Westville Terrace, Enniskillen, watched by witness, knocked at two doors, failing to gain admittance, and then went up the Hospital lane. Witness went up by the railway station and met Brady coming down. Asked what was in the parcel Brady said tyres. Witness put his hand in and found another parcel, which Sergt. Sherrard later at the barracks found to contain the tea. Brady had been working for some time in Fermanagh. A. Dickson, surveyor of Customs and Excise, said Brady made a statement to .him in which he said nothing he had was intended for export. Of the tyres two were intended for a man at Lisnaskea, two for a man at Enniskillen and two for himself. He had got them all in Irvinestown or vicinity, and there also, from a woman whose name he would not give, he had got the tea for his own use.

Mr. Herbert said defendant was married and had five children. He had been working in Fermanagh for some time and had been residing in Lisnaskea. At his work his way of subsistence was to take tea three times daily and this as well as the tea he got in Lisnaskea was more than the two-ounce ration would supply. Therefore he took the chance to get this extra tea for himself. In evidence, Brady bore out this, statement and also swore to the statements made to Mr. Dickson. When apprehended at Enniskillen he told Mr. Cooper he was coming from Irvinestown and going to Lisnaskea. He did not go in by train to Lisnaskea because he had a bus ticket. Constable McKeown, recalled, said at the time it was 9.5 p.m. and Brady was looking for lodgings in Enniskillen. Major Dickie — That rather upsets his story. The magistrate convicted and in addition to imposing the penalty ordered the goods to be forfeited.

23-5-1942. 14½-YEAR-OLD GIRL EARNING 35/ – WEEKLY AS CLERK. A fourteen-and-a-half years old girl is earning 35/- weekly as a clerical assistant in the office of the Clerk of Enniskillen Union. (Mr. J. Brown). Referring to the matter at the Board of Guardians’ meeting on Tuesday, Mr. W. A. Thornton, J. P., expressed this view: “If the wage was three times the amount there would be no question about it. It is too cheap, I think.”

The matter arose through a letter from the Ministry to the Board, in which it was stated that in the absence of full details of the qualifications possessed by Ethel Armstrong—(the child concerned) — and the other candidates for the position of assistant in the clerk’s office, they were not prepared to approve of the appointment to this position of a girl of such tender years and lack of experience, particularly at the comparatively high scale of remuneration proposed. The Ministry asked to be furnished with full particulars of the qualifications experience, etc., of the other candidates whom the Board considered eligible for appointment, and that the Board should forward at the same time the original applications of each. It was stated that the little girl was receiving 35/- weekly. Chairman (Hon. C. L. Corry) —What sort of work is she doing ? The Clerk — It is not very important, She is only 14½. Mr. D. Weir — Does she not do the work as well as an applicant of 20 years of age? Clerk — The Ministry say she is too young. Mr. Weir — It’s a good fault. Mr. Thornton then expressed the view j already quoted. It was decided to ask the Ministry to reconsider their decision and to allow the little girl to stay on.

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1942 -Are you a passenger pedaling your own bike? Smuggling.

2-5-1942 ENNISKILLEN GROCER’S SUCCESSFUL APPEAL. Ernest Colvin, grocer, High St., Enniskillen, appealed at Enniskillen Quarter. Sessions on Thursday against a penalty of £50 imposed at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on a charge of knowingly harbouring seven sacks of coffee beans with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereon. Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, said that after Colvin had been convicted they succeeded in arresting a man from the Free State named Keenan, .for whom, this coffee was, and he was fined £50. When the case same on against Keenan they had interviewed Mr. Colvin and his assistant, and got them to come and give evidence against Keenan. In view of this fact the Customs Authorities would agree to this penalty, being reduced to £25. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, D. L. (for Colvin) agreed to this course, and accordingly his Honour affirmed the conviction, but reduced the penalty to £25.

2-5-1942 WHISKEY SEIZURE BY FLORENCECOURT POLICE. Sergeant Ryan and Constable Redpath, Florencecourt, on Saturday evening stopped a car at Drumcarn, Belnaleck, Co. Fermanagh, and on searching it found 6 five naggin bottles of whiskey, four similar bottles of wine and two large bottles of gin, as well as a dozen egg cups, a quantity of tobacco and cigarettes, a showerproof coat and quantity of sweepstake tickets, all of which were seized, together with the car. The driver was taken into custody,, and on. Sunday afternoon was allowed out on £20 bail to appear at next Enniskillen Petty Sessions. Major Dickie, R.M., attended at the Barracks, on Sunday afternoon, and the car driver was ,present with his solicitor, but no court was held, the reason being that the magistrate could not discharge any judicial function on a Sunday, though he can sit as a magistrate. The case could only have been .proceeded with had the man sufficient money to pay any fine which, if he had been convicted, might have been imposed. Had the case been heard and a fine inflicted, the order would have been unenforceable, as the Court was held on Sunday.

2-5-1942 FIRE AT CASTLECOOLE. BUILDINGS DESTROYED. An outbreak of fire occurred on Saturday afternoon in outhouses at Castlecoole, Enniskillen, the residence of the Earl of Belmore. The Enniskillen Town Brigade and the Auxiliary Fire Service, both under Mr. James Donnelly, town surveyor, receiving notification at ten minutes to one, were on the spot before one clock a quick turn-out which probably saved extensive buildings because the fire had gained a firm hold on the solid buildings and was burning fiercely. The efforts of the Brigades were chiefly directed towards confining the outbreak. Until. 2.30 p. m, the battle with the flames continued, ending only when about forty yards of the buildings had been destroyed roof and floors being burned out. The A.F.S. Brigade was under the immediate command of Mr. Freddy Bleakley with Mr. J. Lusted, A.F.S. chief in attendance.

2-5-1942 PARTY VOTE ECHO. FARTAGH COTTAGE TENANCY. An echo of a recent Enniskillen Rural Council party vote on a cottage tenancy was heard at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions, on Friday, when the Council was granted a decree for possession of a cottage at Fartagh, against Miss Mary Millar. Miss Millar’s father was the tenant until his death a few months ago. Miss Millar applied for the cottage, but it was granted to a Unionist by a party vote of the Rural Council. Miss Millar is a Catholic.

SEIZED BICYCLE AT BELLEEK BARRIER. JUDGE RECOMMENDS RETURN ON PAYMENT OF DUTY. Are bicycles liable to purchase tax? Although, according to Mr, George Dixon, Surveyor of customs and Excise for County Fermanagh the tax is collected throughout Great Britain and the Six Counties on bicycles, Mr. R. A. Herbert, L.B. (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert, Enniskillen contended during the course of an appeal at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Monday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., that the wording of the Section of the Act governing the matter makes bicycles not liable.

The appeal was one brought by Terence McGowan, of Ross, Tullyrossmearn, Co. Fermanagh, against an order of Major Dickie, R. M., forfeiting a bicycle under the Customs Acts. When cross-examining Mr. Dixon, the Customs Surveyor, Mr. Herbert referred the witness to the Finance Act No. 2, 1940, which created the Purchase-Tax, and stated that the schedule set out goods that were chargeable with purchase-tax. In the first column (that setting out goods charged at the basic rate of one third were the words: Road Vehicles and Cycles (whether mechanically propelled or not) being vehicles and cycles constructed or adapted solely or mainly for the carriage of passengers.” Mr. Dixon said that was the Section, which gave authority to charge purchase tax on bicycles.Mr. Herbert — Who would be the passenger on a bicycle?—He is his own. passenger. It is being definitely charged and paid all over the United Kingdom. It is time it was questioned.Mr. Herbert said a passenger was already interpreted in law. This boy cycling on this bicycle could not be said to be a passenger. Judge Ellison said he did not think the language in the Section was very neat for the purpose.

Mr. Herbert — It is very far from neat. He further argued that a machine constructed for one person to ride did not make the machine one “constructed for the carriage of passengers.” His Honour held against Mr. Herbert who raised the paint because one of the taxes the appellant was stated to have failed to pay was his purchase tax. Giving evidence for the respondent,  Customs Officer George Forrest, Belleek, stated McGowan was cycling past the barrier there, not stopping, when witness called on him to stop, seeing that he was riding a new bicycle. McGowan in answer to witness’s questions said he belonged to Kiltyclogher, but produced a national registration, card with his address at Ross, Tullyrossmearn. He asked him to account for the fact that he had stated he was from Leitrim, while he was from Ross, and McGowan said he lived at both places off and on, and that he had been, living in the Six Counties for ten years. He said he had borrowed the bicycle from his brother in Kiltyclogher as his own had been stolen. He then offered to pay whatever was necessary. Witness seized the bicycle and an order for forfeiture was granted at the Petty Sessions. “There has not been one single instance,” said witness, “of where a bicycle has been smuggled and has been confirmed as having been smuggled into the Six Counties where the bicycle has not been stated to have been a borrowed bicycle although the bicycle has actually been new at the moment. In cross-examination by Mr. Herbert, witness said cyclists should stop, and go into the Customs hut if necessary. Do you stop all cyclists? —I do if I am on the road. We all pass these huts and see what occurs?—Sometimes it is after five o’clock (when the Customs hut closes).

George Dixon, Customs Surveyor at Enniskillen, stated a Customs duty of 30 per cent, ad valorem was chargeable on Eire-built machines unless satisfactory evidence was produced (a certificate of origin from the manufacturer) that the machine was Empire-made and that the cost of materials and labour involved reached a certain percentage. Mr. Herbert—Could it have been of anything but Empire origin in these days? –Witness stated he admitted the present circumstances, but still the certificate was necessary. Mr. Herbert—Playing with the law like a child, isn’t it?—No, it isn’t. Would you swear this is a foreign article?— I cannot swear it, but it is for the importer to displace the prima facie charge by providing evidence. Were these things drawn to the attention of the importer? —It is the importer’s duty, if he wishes to claim preference, to make a declaration that he claims preference. Don’t you think it would only be fair before putting Customs duty into force that the attention of the importer should be drawn to the provisions? —Undoubtedly, if the citizen had come into the hut and stated he had imported it. Mr. Herbert—A sort of Please, sir, can 1 pass?

Mr, Herbert said McGowan came from Kiltyclogher but had been staying with friends in Ross for some years off and on. This was the smallest thing he had ever come across in the Customs line The same sort of point was raised before where a solicitor in Donegal drove his, car up to the barrier and the Customs seized it as having been imported, but the car was subsequently returned. This boy came along a proper route at a proper time and his bicycle was seized. He had gone a hundred yards or two into Six- County territory. It was straining the law very far to say a certificate of origin was required. Why didn’t they tell him to go back? When he found out the position the boy offered to pay. Mr. Cooper said this was not the only case brought up at the same place. The smuggling of bicycles into the Six Counties was a wholesale business. Mr. Herbert—There is no evidence of that. Judge Ellison said he should be inclined to confirm the order and say he thought this boy should be let off if he paid what he should pay. Mr. Cooper—-We will forward it to the Customs, and they will obey your Honour’s recommendation. Mr. Herbert said Major Dickie had stated that if the brother had appeared to say the bicycle belonged to him he would have given it back. Unfortunately the brother could not appear as he was engaged in munitions work in England. His Honour—I think Major Dickie’s view of that was the right one.

APPEAL AGAINST JAIL SENTENCE. SUCCEEDS AT ENNISKILLEN. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Thursday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., James E. Maguire, Cran, Fivemiletown appealed against sentence of three months’ imprisonment imposed at Kesh Petty Sessions in February, when he was charged with the larceny of tools from a camp where he had been employed on work of national importance. Mr. R. H. Herbert, LL.B. for appellant said appellant was a young tarried man, with two young children just school going age. He was a joiner and carpenter and had led an exemplary life.

Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, for the Crown, said that at the time of the prosecution irregularities had been going on in the camp—stealing of goods— and the sentence in this case was very fully justified. It was the least possible sentence the magistrate could put on. Since defendant had been convicted he had given certain information to the camp authorities which enabled them to trace very considerable quantities of other goods and put an end to a very big racket that had been going on. The camp superintendent had asked him (Mr. Cooper) to ask his Honour to deal with the appellant in the same way as another defendant had been dealt with—to fine him the sum of £15. He (Mr. Cooper) would consent to that if his Honour approved of it, but only because of the very valuable information which, appellant gave to the authorities. Sidney E. Sullivan, camp superintendent, told his Honour that appellant had helped him immensely as the result of information given. His Honour affirmed the conviction, but instead of the jail sentence imposed a fine of £15.

2-5-1942 “READ EXCEPTIONALLY WELL” Customs Officer Congratulated at Belleek. When nearly two foolscap pages of closely-written matter—a statement taken down by the witness—had been read in a loud, dear voice by Customs Officer George Forrest, Belleek, at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions, on Monday, Mr. J. B. Murphy, solicitor, congratulated Forrest, remarking: “It is the first, statement I ever heard read out which I was able to hear every syllable. He certainly read it exceptionally well.” Mr. Murphy had given Mr. Forrest a severe cross-examination, but said that, despite that, he must pay Mr. Forrest the above tribute.

 

9-5-1942. JOTTINGS. Accident.— Mr. Joseph Lendrum, Civil Bill Officer, Clones, sustained severe cuts to his face and hands when he was thrown from his bicycle while on official business in Newbliss district.

Nine Typhoid Cases in One Family—In her half yearly report to Enniskillen Rural Council, Dr. Henrietta Armstrong, medical officer, Tempo, stated on Tuesday that nine cases of typhoid had occurred in one family during the period.

Only a Third Tendered For—Although tenders had been invited for the maintenance of twenty-two roads only seven tenders were sent in, it was stated by Mr. J. Brown, clerk, at the quarterly meeting of the Enniskillen Rural District Council on Tuesday.

Train Derailed—Four wagons of the goods train from Clones were derailed at Enniskillen Railway Station on Friday evening, causing suspension of services on the particular line, from shortly after 12 till 11 p.m. Crane and other equipment had to be sent from Dundalk to restore waggons to the rails and clear the line.

Cycle Combination Strikes Bus.—Harry M. Burnside, an American technician, was fined 10/- at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday for having driven a motor cycle without due care and attention. District Inspector Peacocke stated that defendant pulled out of a line of traffic and struck a bus coming in the opposite direction.. The driver of the bus gave evidence that he tried to avoid a collision, but the sidecar of the motor cycle combination struck the bus.

£40 Sought for Mountain Burning— Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday received a preliminary notice of application for £40 compensation for the alleged malicious burning of heather mountain grazing and fences at Killyblunick Glebe, Kilskeery. The claim was forwarded by Messrs. Donnelly and O’Doherty, solrs., Omagh, on behalf of Francis Murphy. Mr. J. Brown, Clerk, thought this place was not in the Enniskillen rural area. Chairman, (Mr. J. J. Coalter, J.P.)— Part of’ the mountain may be. The matter was referred to the Council’s solicitor

9-5-1942. Tractors on Roads.—James Magowan, Innishway, Blaney, was .fined 5/- and 4s costs at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday for driving a motor tractor on the public highway without being licensed for the purpose. He was also fined 5/- and 2/- costs for not having the wheels fitted with smooth-soled tyres. Const. Wilson proved the offence. For a similar offence, John Cox, Ballylucas, was fined 5/-: and costs;. Major Dickie, B.M., expressed the hope that there would be no more of these cases, as the Co. Surveyors were complaining about these things.”

9-5-1942. COMING EVENTS

Tuesday, May 9—-Home Guard Dance, Townhall, .Enniskillen.

Sunday, May 10— Dance MacNean Hall, Belcoo.

Tuesday, May 12—Home Guard Dance, Townhall, Enniskillen.

Whit Monday, May 25—E.U.F.C. Dance Townhall, Enniskillen.

9-5-1942. NEW CEMETERY FOR CATHOLICS. The present Catholic Cemetery in Enniskillen being now almost entirely used, Ven. Archdeacon Gannon, P.P., V.G., announced at the Masses in St. Michael’s Church, on Sunday, that use will be made in future of the public cemetery at the Tempo road, near the town. In the Protestant part of this burying ground, there are hundreds of graves, but not more than a dozen interments have taken place in the portion reserved for Catholics.

9-5-1942. BROUGHT EGGS FROM CO., MONAGHAN. EMYVALE MAN FINED AT ROSLEA. At Roslea Court, before Major Dickie, R.M. John McCrudden, Golan, Emyvale, Co. Monaghan, was charged with illegally importing 60 doz. eggs from County Monaghan. Mr. Cooper said defendant was caught, bringing over 60 doz. eggs on a bicycle into the Six-County area. Mr. J. B. Murphy (for defendant) said his client was the son of a six-acre farmer in Co. Monaghan, and was cycling across with the eggs. He wanted to point out the sons of small farmers in “Eire” had nothing like the money they had in the Six Counties at the present time. Defendant was fined £5 11s, equal to the single value of the duty.

9-5-1942. EDERNEY P.P. INJURED. On Friday evening at Manoo, Cross between Kesh and Irvinestown, Co., Fermanagh, a collision took place       between a motor-car driven by Rev. P. McCarney, P.P., Ederney, and a military vehicle. Father McCarney, who was coming from Irvinestown direction, was seriously injured and his car completely wrecked. He was removed to Fermanagh County Hospital, Enniskillen.

9-5-1942. THROWN FROM CART. BELTURBET MAN’S TRAGIC DEATH. Dr. J. Stuart, coroner, held an enquiry in Cavan Surgical Hospital into the death of Jas. McManus (68) farmer and shop keeper, Drumgart, Belturbet at the institution as the result of falling from a cart. The evidence was that when drawing manure in a cart the pony bolted and the deceased was thrown out of the cart. Dr McInerney, house surgeon, stated that the man died from respiratory failure due to spinal injuries. A verdict in accordance with testimony was returned.

CIVIL DEFENSE EXERCISE IN ENNISKILLEN. The Wardens, Casualty and Rescue Services of the A.R.P. organisation in Enniskillen took part in an outdoor combined exercise on Tuesday night. Casualties and incidents were staged in various parts of the town and were expeditiously dealt with by the various services concerned. Work generally was well done, services quickly on the spot, and in general the leaders of parties and instructors have every reason to congratulate themselves on the degree of efficiency attained. More drill and more practices are needed to reach the required standard, but it is obvious from this practice that the groundwork has been well done.

The Report Centre exercised efficient control and showed that they had complete knowledge of the different business of co-ordination and control. The exercise showed very plainly the need for a really efficient messenger service. Telephonic communications for short distance calls during hostile air activity may be regarded as, if not impossible, at least much too slow. More messengers are required, especially those with bicycles. Special uniform and equipment are provided free to cyclist despatch riders. The umpires who supervised the practice were:—Casualty Services, Dr. W. A. Dickson; Wardens and Rescue Parties, Major J. A. Henderson, A.R.P.O.; Report Centre, Mr. J. W. Lusted; Transport, Mr. J. W. Maxwell; Director of Practice, Capt. W. R. Shutt, M.C., County Civil Defence Officer.

MAY 9, 1942. The Regal Cinema, Friday, May 8 and Saturday—

BING CROSBY, BOB HOPE DOROTHY LAMOUR.

THE ROAD TO ZANZIBAR

Monday, May 11 and Tuesday— VIRGINIA BRUCE, JOHN

BARRYMORE. THE INVISIBLE WOMAN

Also Dennis O’Keefe, Constance Moore in

I’M NOBODY’S SWEETHEART NOW

Wednesday, May 13 Thursday— MIRIAM HOPKINS CLAUDE RAINS

LADY WITH RED HAIR

Also William Lundigan, Eddie Foy, Jr, THE CASE OF THE BLACK PARROT.

9-5-1942. INSURANCE FOR SMUGGLERS. Comments on Fermanagh Solicitor’s Statement. Commenting on a statement made by Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor for Fermanagh, in a smuggling prosecution in Newtownbutler that in Co., Monaghan people could take out policies of insurance against capture whilst smuggling, a writer in the “ British Journal of Commerce,” the leading shipping paper, says: “ By inference, the Crown Solicitor appears to have considered these insurances to be reprehensible, but if they are, then such reprehensible practices are countenanced by the very law which, the Grown Solicitor was employing in his prosecution, the law of England, which, presumably, runs in Northern. Ireland save in so far as there is special legislation for that part of the United Kingdom..

“It was in 1779 that Lord Mansfield, to whom, we owe so much of our marine insurance law, held that it was not illegal to effect an insurance on a smuggling adventure into a foreign country. It was in the case of Planche v. Fletcher, and his very words were ‘At any rate this was no fraud in this country. One nation does not take any notice of the revenue, laws of another.’

“If, however, any would-be smuggler is thinking of effecting a policy, on a cargo of contraband, presuming he can obtain the necessary export licence, he should take care to inform his under-writers of the nature of the adventure, for while it may be legal to insure a smuggling venture, to fail to inform the insurers of its nature would, surely invalidate the policy by reason of concealment of material fact.”

9-5-1942. ENNISKILLEN VANDALISM CONDITION OF TOWN HALL. “For some reason there has been a determined attempt to wreck everything in the Town Hall and public lavatories,’’ said the Borough Surveyor (“Mr. T. Donnelly) at Enniskillen Urban Council on Monday. “There seems to be a systematic wave of destruction for the past, six or nine months,’ he added. These remarks arose out of a report upon a series of malicious damages to public conveniences and lavatories in the town; also electric light fittings and clothes racks in the Town Hall. “In all cases the damage appears to have been wilful, and carried out with the object only of destroying property. During the past months the entire water supply fittings to the urinals in the Town Hall lavatories have been broken away from their positions, and left lying on the floor, although they were properly secured to the walls, the chromium-plated stand to a wash-basin was smashed, and part of it taken away, etc.” Chairman (Senator Whaley)—This damage has not been done by children—it has been done by adults.

Mr. Devine said this was all due to lack of supervision. Mr. W: S. Johnston disagreed Damage would not be done while their caretaker was about, and he could not stand all day in the lavatories. Mr. Johnston then told how he and their Surveyor tried some of the fittings and could not budge them. “It would take a superman to pull off some of the fittings-it must have taken terrific strength,” he commented.

9-5-1942. WANT TURF PRICES FIXED. ENNISKILLEN COUNCIL REQUEST. Enniskillen Urban Council is to communicate with the Ministry of Commerce with a view to having the price of turf fixed. The matter was raised by Mr. W. Monaghan, at the Council meeting on Monday, when, he said fuel was a problem. In the interests of the poor, the Council, should take up with the authorities the question of regulating the supply and price of turf. He understood exorbitant prices were being given for stacks .of turf by people who were in a position to give high prices, and this might; react against the poor during: the coming winter. Some regulation of supply and price was made during the last war.         Mr. Devine said it was a very important matter. Turf prices should be controlled. The Chairman (Senator Whaley) said he believed it was during the coal strike that there was a collection in the district to supply turf to the poor of .the town at reduced prices. The Council agreed to write to the Ministry asking for the advice of the Ministry on the whole  position and to establish fixed prices for turf and regulate the supply.

 

1942.

28-3-42. PETTIGO FARMER’S DEATH. During the latter end of February 1942 in a stately home situated on a farm in the townland at Springtown, Pettigo, there passed to his eternal reward that  hard-working and prosperous farmer, Mr. Thomas McCrea, widely known and greatly respected, throughout the county, who although advanced in age continued to work on his farm in a manner and with such skill as to put many of the present and much younger farm hands to shame, and practically up to the time of his death; yes, he had undoubtedly splendid attributes in the family sphere and what an inspiration to those of us who had the good fortune to watch his zeal and activities in order to maintain the reputation he inherited from his ancestors. He was my greatest friend of a lifetime; he who for so long served as the last link to a chain of equally good farmers and friends within, the five adjoining townlands, all of whom have preceded him in death, and how when I last paid a visit to his home some three years ago we talked around the fireside of the many little episodes occurring in our earlier days when during the long dreary and wintry days we made our nocturnal visits to the neighbouring farm houses to engage in a game of cards or some other form of entertainments and journeying home along the lonely roads and paths with an atmosphere of silence save the barking of a dog away at some isolated farmhouse. His home of which he always felt so proud was not always regarded as a home, rather would I say an institution, because I well remember the days’ when, that stately home was filled to overflow with patrons who had paid their pence and in some cases a shilling for what was then generally known as a “tea meeting” or “soiree” to provide funds for the lone widow, the aged or infirm, who dreaded the sight of a poor law institution. Yes, this was the home of big hearts, filled with kindness and sympathy; most charitable and indeed hospitable in the fullest measure. The deceased was the son of a great sporting family. Indeed there are many, people, like the writer, who can recall the annual races held at Ederney, and the great event which was won by a horse called “Wire In,” bred by father, William. This was heralded as a great victory for Pettigo and was celebrated too. Indeed almost every hillside had its bonfire or tar barrel illuminations, but those were the good old days and enjoyed by the grand old men of that time. His wife and family together with numerous and widespread friends are left to mourn a happy ending to a life full of sacrifice, love and admiration for his family circles. The writer has suffered an irreparable loss by one of the most outstanding and staunchest friends he had the good fortune to associate with and little did I imagine that on my last visit some 3 or 4 years ago when I received a most cordial reception followed by his ever increasing hospitality that such a stately and. cheerful home should be overshadowed with death.— (R.I.P.). P. McC.

4-4-1942. PETTIGO NEWS. On Monday of last week an Inspector from the Department of Supplies visited Pettigo village and met and interviewed members of the Parish Council with regard to the shortage of flour in that area. At the suggestion of the official it was decided to ask all householders to hand in the names of all residents in these households to their grocers so as to arrange that all may receive a fair quantity of flour per week.

On Thursday night a very enjoyable concert was held in Pettigo Hall. The entire programme was produced by, local artistes. The sketches which were humorous created much mirth. Songs were rendered by Mr. J. Elliott and Mm. F. M‘Crea, the accompanists being Miss Dorothy Mulhern and Miss Patsy Galligan.

POLICEMAN SHOT DEAD IN BELFAST. SHOTS EXCHANGED IN STREET. Assailant Wounded. SIX MEN CAPTURED. On Sunday afternoon in an exchange of shots in a Belfast street, a policeman was shot dead and one of his assailants wounded.

An official report issued from Stormont Castle, Belfast, stated: “About 3.15 this afternoon (Sunday) a police car containing four members of the R.U.C., was passing along Kashmir Rd., when it was fired at from behind an air-raid shelter. The car was hit, and the driver promptly pulled up. The policemen got out and pursued the armed men, who took refuge in No. 63 Cawnpore St. The police were fired at again, and the fire was returned. Constable Patrick Murphy (3090), attached to Springfield Rd. barracks, was shot dead after wounding one of his assailants. Having entered the house, the six men ran up to the top floor, where they were captured. One of them, who had been wounded, was taken to hospital. Two women were also, detained.”

The wounded man’s name was given as Robert Williams, aged 19, Cawnpore St., Belfast. Intense police activity followed and several houses were searched. There was a large attendance at the funeral of the deceased constable which took place on Tuesday from St. Paul’s Church to Milltown Cemetery. Deceased leaves a widow and nine children.

MURDER CHARGE. FIVE YOUTHS AND TWO GIRLS REMANDED.

Charged with the wilful murder of Constable Patrick Murphy on Easter Sunday, following a gun-battle between the police, and civilians, five youths and two girls appeared at the Belfast Police Court on Tuesday before Mr. J. H. Campbell, K.C., R.M. A sixth man, Thomas J. Williams, Bombay St., is under arrest in the Royal Victoria Hospital, suffering from gunshot wounds. Joseph Cahill (21), of 60 Divis Street, one of the accused, had his head heavily swathed in bandages. Margaret Nolan, of 32 Bombay St., was aged 16 years.

The other accused were Henry Gardner, 35 Malcolmson Street, 19 years, fitter; William James Perry (21), 264 Cupar St., labourer; John Terence Oliver (21), 167 Springfield Road; Patrick Simpson (18), 86 Cawnpore Street, sheet metal worker; Margaret Burns, 39 Cupar St., an 18-year- old waitress. The accused were remanded for three weeks in custody.

Mr. John Deeny, who appeared for the accused reserved has defence.

GIFTED FERMANAGH MAN’S DEATH – MR. PHIL MARTIN. Something of a sensation was caused throughout County Fermanagh on Wednesday by the news of the death, at a comparatively early age, of Mr. Phil Martin, Kilturk, Lisnaskea, the gifted Uileann piper, Radio. Eireann artiste and

£650 SETTLEMEHT. Enniskillen Bootmaker’s Death Recalled. At Fermanagh Assizes a suit was mentioned in which Mrs. Mary McDonald, 5, Down St., Enniskillen, on behalf of herself and children, Bernard and Mary, sought damages for the death of her husband Patrick, who died following an accident on 20th May, at the Hollow, opposite Dickie’s shop. The defendants were Lieut. Robin F. Fryer, then stationed near Enniskillen, who was motor-, cycling and. was seriously injured, and John A. Armstrong, 17 High St., Enniskillen, shop manager.

A settlement was announced under which £650 and costs would be paid by the defendant Fryer, and the claim against Armstrong was dismissed. The £650 will be divided as follows:—£375 to the widow, £175 to the daughter, and £30 to the son, with £20 for funeral expenses. Mr. Justice Megaw made the settlement a rule of court.

BELLEEK GIRL’S INJURIES. Mary Catherine Timoney, a worker in the Belleek Pottery, of Garvery,. Leggs P.O., sued Richard G. Roe, Lake View House, Letter, P.O., for damages sustained by reason of defendant’s negligence in the control of a motor car at Ballymagaghran Cross (Belleek-Kesh road) on the 18th August. Plaintiff stated she was cycling from her home in the afternoon and emerging on the main road at Ballymagaghran Cross she was proceeding over to her proper side when the car suddenly appeared and bore down on top of her. She remembered nothing further.

Dr. Daly, Ballyshannon, stated plaintiff suffered serious injuries, including a fractured skull. Defendant stated he was coming out of Belleek fair with three passengers when, approaching the cross, plaintiff came out about ten yards in front. He braked and swerved to avoid her. The car was almost stationary when plaintiff ran into it. The three passengers also having given evidence, Mr. Justice Megaw said he had every sympathy for the plaintiff, but unfortunately he had to decide the case on law and not on sympathy. He was satisfied there had been contributory negligence and that the defendant had no opportunity of avoiding the collision.

CYCLING ACCIDENT NEAR BLACKLION. SEQUEL AT DOWRA COURT. Two Women Knocked Down. YOUNG LADY FINED. At Dowra District Court, before Mr. M. J. C. Keane, D.J., Supt. Jackson prosecuted Lizzie McManus, Mullaghboy, Blacklion, for cycling on 31st August last in a dangerous manner at Killyglasson, Blacklion. Miss Annie Mason said she was going to Mass at Killinagh. At Killyglasson Cross She met Mrs. Dolan and they walked together. She had only stepped on to the road, and was on her right side. She heard no bell, and the next thing was that they were knocked down by a bicycle which was ridden by Miss McManus. She fell off the bicycle, and when she got up she cycled off. Witness was in a Dublin hospital for three months as a result of the accident. Mrs. M. Dolan,  who was with the last witness on the occasion, said Miss Mason came out to the road from the stile when witness met her. Miss Mason was on the right-hand side of the road and witness was on the left. She was knocked on the road, and Dr. Horkins advised her to go to hospital, and she did not.

Guard Mahaffy said the road was 17ft., wide at the point of the accident, and the person going towards the church would have a view of 70 yards.

Guard Hegarty said he interviewed Miss McManus who made a statement. She said she sounded the bell, and she was passing between the two women. She cycled off after the accident as she was too frightened.

John Sheerin said he was walking to Mass on the occasion on his correct side of the road. He saw Miss Mason coming on the road. He saw the accident. Mrs. Dolan was on the left-hand side and Miss Mason came over and shook hands with her. Mrs. Dolan went to move to the left, and Miss McManus tried to pass between them, and the next thing was that they all fell.

To Mr. Keane—Only for Mrs. Dolan moving Miss McManus could have passed on her correct or left-hand side of the road.

To Supt. Jackson—I cannot say I heard a bell sounded.

Miss Maguire deposed that she was with last witness and Mr. Dolan on the occasion going to Mass. Mrs. Dolan was on the wrong side of the road and went to cross, and when she heard the bell she turned around. Witness heard the bell sounded. If Mrs. Dolan had kept her own side of the road there would have been no accident. Mrs. Dolan was responsible for the accident. Miss McManus tried to pass between the two women.

Miss L. McManus, defendant, stated she was 16 years :of age. She passed John Sheeran, and before doing so rang the bell, and did the same passing Mrs. Dolan and Miss Mason. She rang the bell for them to keep their own place. Only for Mrs. Dolan crossing the road there would be no accident. Her bicycle was broken.

To Supt. Jackson—I went away after the accident, and my sister stayed with the two women.

To Mr. Keane—I live with my parents, and no compensation was paid the two ladies. I am cycling a few years, and am still cycling. I did not report the

JAIL FOR NEXT OFFENCE R.M.’s WARNING IN R.A.F. BLANKETS LARCENY CHARGE. “ I would like it to be known that, the next person I find taking Air Force or Army property from airmen or soldiers will be sent to prison for a lengthy term, and I shall send them to prison without the slightest hesitation.” This stern warning was issued at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday by Major Dickie, R.M., when dealing with a case in which Mrs. Mary Dolan, 27 Market Street, Enniskillen, was charged with receiving six blankets, one sheet and one roller towel, property of the Air Ministry, and value £4 14s 10d, knowing same to have been stolen; her husband; Francis Dolan, was charged with receiving a pair of Air Force trousers, value 15/6, knowing them to have been stolen and Bartholomew McKeown, a lodger with, the Dolans, was charged with aiding and abetting Mrs. Dolan in receiving one Air Ministry blanket, value 12/6, by carrying it from a place of concealment to Dolan’s, knowing it to have been stolen.

Head Constable Thornton said on information received he obtained a warrant on the 9th March and went to Dolan’s house, accompanied by Sergeant Lockhart and Corporal Clarke, of the R.A.F. security police. He met Mary Dolan, wife of Francis, and told her he was going to search the house for Air Force property, and asked her had she any, and she said no. Then she said: “I will tell you the truth, I have; come on and I will show them to you.” She took them upstairs, and from, a number of lodgers’ beds she took blankets, sometimes one, sometimes two, totalling seven in all. Mrs. Dolan kept a lodging-house. They went into the room occupied by the Dolans, and from a chest of drawers she produced a sheet and roller towel. The corporal pointed out, hanging on the bedroom wall, a pair of Air Force trousers. All these were taken. Later, at an identification parade, Mrs. Dolan identified Quinn as the man who sold her the blankets and her husband the trousers. Her husband also identified Quinn. The R.A.F. man who had sold the first blanket had since been transferred to another station.

In a statement, Mrs. Dolan said she bought one blanket from an airman named Walsh. The remaining six blankets and one sheet and towel were bought from Airman Quinn, who Charged 18/- each for the first two, 15/- each for the second pair, and 8/- for the sheet, with the towel thrown in. She knew they were Air Ministry property, but did not know that there .was any harm in taking them, as Quinn, said they had been given to him. The husband, Francis Dolan, said Mr. Quinn, an Air Force man, who lived in Enniskillen about four or five weeks ago sold him a pair of trousers for 8/-. The head constable added that Quinn was a native of Enniskillen. In a statement, Keown said he was a lodger in Dolan’s, and two months ago he brought a parcel into Mrs. Dolan from a house in the country. He did not know what was in the parcel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Flanagan, the head constable said the price paid for the blankets by Mrs. Dolan would probably be£69s 0d in all. The value of the blankets would appear to be £4 14s 0d so she paid a bigger price than the actual value Yes, bigger than

1942 Fermanagh Herald.

.JANUARY 14, 1942. LARCENY CHARGE AT CASTLEDERG. ‘BOUGHT CYCLE FROM FERMANAGH MAN” Before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., at Castlederg Court, two youths, James Hegarty and William John Hegarty, Cormacoll, Drumquin, brothers, pleaded not guilty to the larceny of a cycle, value £4. They were not professionally represented. Thomas Lynch gave evidence that on Sunday, 7th Sept. he left his bicycle outside Castlederg Chapel and when he came out it was gone. On 28th Sept. he observed a cycle outside a house in Scraghey and on examination. identified it as his although the handle grips and oil bath had been removed. James Hegarty claimed the cycle and said he had bought it from his brother William John. Witness reported the matter to the police. Sergt. Blackstock said James Hegarty came to the barracks and said he bought the cycle from his brother for £2.15s.  William John said he bought the bicycle from a Fermanagh man for £3. He described the Fermanagh man but the police could not trace him. Mr. Long at this stage dismissed the case against James. William John Hegarty gave evidence that he met the Fermanagh man on the road and he offered to sell the cycle, but witness had no money at the time, and they arranged to meet at Castlederg later on. He did so and paid 30s and got possession of the cycle; he met him later by appointment and paid a further £2, getting 7s 6d as a lucks penny on condition that witness would give back the oil bath and witness agreed. The Fermanagh man appeared to have plenty of money. Cross-examined by the District-Inspector, witness said the Fermanagh man would turn his back to people who were passing them when they were negotiating the sale. He had not seen the man since he bought the cycle. Mr. Long said there was a doubt in the case and he would dismiss it, but he made an order that the cycle be returned to Thomas Lynch.

JANUARY 14, 1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER FIRE. BUSINESS PREMISES SERIOUSLY DAMAGED. Serious damage was caused by a fire which broke out during the blackout hours in the grocery and drapery premises of Mr. John J. O’Donnell, Main Street, Newtownbutler. The outbreak occurred on Saturday morning. The alarm was given by the proprietor, Mr. O’Donnell, who was awakened by the crackling of burning timber. He ran to his sister’s bedroom and carried her through the flames to the Main Street. R.U.C. and military assisted civilians to fight the outbreak but by the time they arrived the fire had a strong hold and the flames were extending to the adjoining shop. Water was carried by civilians from the two town pumps in buckets, tubs and creamery cans. When it was seen that it was impossible to try and confine it. Mr. Joseph McNamee and his four sons climbed to the roof of an adjoining shop and broke down the roof, portion of which fell on Mr. McNamee, who was rescued by his son, Marcus. The Enniskillen fire brigade was  summoned but when it arrived on the scene the local residents had the fire under control. Mr. O’Donnell’s premises included a private house as well as a large store, all of which were burned to the ground.

JANUARY 14, 1942. G.N.R. OFFICIAL DEAD. NATIVE OF MAGUIRESBRIDGE. The death has taken place at a Belfast nursing home of Mr. W. A. F. Graham, aged 46, deputy traffic manager of the Great Northern Railway Co. He was a native of Maguiresbridge, Co. Fermanagh, and was educated at Enniskillen Model School, and entered the railway service 29 years ago. He is survived by his wife and. one child.

January 7th 1942. A FERMANAGH DONKEY. AMUSING COURT EVIDENCE. An unusual claim in respect of alleged breach of warranty in the sale of a donkey came before Deputy Judge Ellison, K. C at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions in Enniskillen. Plaintiff was John Cassidy, of Cullintagh, and he claimed £4 10s damages for the alleged breach from Morton. Greaves, of Knockdooris, Derrylin, who sold him the animal for £2 10s on the 16th September, 1941.Mr. Cooper, solicitor for plaintiff, said the case was an unusual one. The animal was warranted sound and able to pull a 15 cwts. load. The animal was big but not too well looking. On being brought home the animal’s condition became worse and it died. Plaintiff in evidence said defendant asked him to buy the ass in the fair of Ballyconnell, but he did not like to buy it as it was imported. However, the deal was made and the animal was left for him at Blake’s of Derrylin. Defendant said the animal could draw 15 cwts anywhere, and was the best ass in County Fermanagh. (Laughter). He also told plaintiff that when trotting along the road the feet of the ass made a noise like a pony (laughter), and that it had mowed with a pony. The beast was brought home by plaintiff  but it died on 15th October. On the way home it was dragging its feet. Mr. Cooper – It looked like a lady doing one of these new dances. (Laughter). Plaintiff added that the ass had lumps on its backbone, and was, “jinked.” It also walked sideways. (Laughter). Mr. Ferguson (for defendant) —What did you think you were buying, a horse or a donkey?—-A donkey. I am not that far gone yet that I would not know a donkey. (Laughter). Did you ever see a donkey ploughing? –No, but he told me this one ploughed. Don’t you deal in donkeys?—No, but when I get an order I buy one. Didn’t you inspect this donkey? —No, I did not. I was in a hurry for the bus. (Laughter) Didn’t you run it up and down the fair green in Ballyconnell?—No, I took his word for it. You would think it was a thousand-pound horse he was selling. I could not keep him from warranting it. (Laughter). He told me it was the best in the world and was worth £20. This was .a stallion donkey ?—Yes. Did you find it on its back in a drain? —No. Have you got a girl in your house?— She’s not a girl3 she’s a woman. (Laughter) I will not differ with you about the age, but you have a. girl?—I have a housekeeper, if you want to know my business. (Laughter). I don’t want to know your business any more than necessary, but did it take you, the girl and your nephew to pull it out of the drain? There is not a word about it. Fred Hart, M.R.C.V.S. said he examined the carcass of the animal on 15th October and found that it had suffered ailments of the liver, heart and spine. The animal was about 10 years of age and the ailment of the spine was of five or six months standing. To Mr., Ferguson witness said the spinal trouble would be apparent to any one buying the animal. Mr. Cooper–What did it die of?— Witness— it was dead when I saw it. Laughter.). Apparently it lay down as a result of this spinal trouble and ‘konked out.’ (Laughter). To the Judge witness said his opinion was that the animal could not have pulled a load of 15 cwts.

In the witness box, defendant said he had the donkey in his possession for nine months, and the bargain was made with plaintiff in Ballyconnell fair in September. Plaintiff ‘vetted’ the animal in the fair and defendant told him it could pull a good load. No warranty was given, and the bargain was made by a man called Fitch. The first complaint he got about the animal was in the form of a note given to him in Derrylin fair in October, the note demanding defendant to take it back. Cross-examined by Mr. Cooper, defendant said the animal brought a load of 14 or 15 cwts. For him at times. There was no talk of mowing. Mr. Cooper I notice this ass was smuggled twice as a matter of fact. (Laughter). Defendant. Yes. Mr. Cooper. Well we are not going to say anything about that. (Laughter). You bought another ass? Yes. What age was it? It was a wee foal. Mr. Cooper. To plaintiff – What age was it? Plaintiff. It was an oul ass. (Laughter). What did he pay for him? – 18 shillings. Mr. Cooper. What do you intend to sell him for? Defendant – I don’t intend to sell him. (To the Judge)—-I didn’t notice anything wrong in the way the ass walked to Ballyconnell fair. Foster Greaves, son of the defendant, said the ass in question was a strong one, and had always been kept in the house or tied when let out while in defendants possession.

Thomas Fitch gave evidence of the making of the bargain and said plaintiff had been inspecting the donkey all morning. Mr. McEntee of Clones, “the biggest horse-dealer in the world” (Laughter)—was giving £20 for him not so long ago. Witness did not see anything wrong with the donkey when it was running up and down. It was represented that it could draw a load of 15 cwt., but no warranty was given. Mr. Ferguson questioned witness as to whether the offer of £20 was of recent date or not. Witness—Not so long ago, it was wartime. Mr. Cooper — During this war? I think it was the last one. (Laughter). But we have been told it was ten years old? —bout ten or twelve years. How could it have lived in the last war? I suppose it was the last. (Laughter). .It must have been this war?—No. You said it was not so long ago?—Mr. McEntee could have been here if he had been summoned. If it was not so long ago  when was it. I could not tell; I have not a good memory. Was it a year ago? It was more than a year. Was it more than two years?—It may be four or five. The man who owned him said he did not want him any more for the children. Mr. McEntee wanted him as a sire. It was represented he could pull 15 cwts.?— He could run like mad. He could leap over me or Cassidy either. (Laughter). His Honour held there was a breach, of warranty and allowed a decree for £3 with 15/- costs and expenses.

BALLYGAWLEY—Country butter Is 3d to Is 6d per lb.; potatoes 8d – to l0d per stone; fowl; chickens; 5s to 6s, hens 3s to 3s 6d, ducks 3s 9d to 4s 3d—each; slip pigs 75s to-85s, suckers 50 to- 60s— .each.

February 14th 1942. PETTICO COURT CASES. At Pettigo District Court on Tuesday of last week, before Mr. Justice O’Hanrahan, Guard Gallivan summoned Gerald McMenamin, Minchifin for using an unlighted cycle. Fined 5s.

Supt. Noonan charged Michael McGee, Carntressy, with cutting and carrying away eighteen young trees from a cut away plantation at Carntressy on the lands of William Monaghan. Guard James Ryan proved tracing the trees to McGee’s residence. Mr. Monaghan, the owner, refused to prosecute and pleaded for leniency for defendant. A fine of 10s was imposed.

Guard, Gallivan summoned Adam Eves, Gortnessy, for using an unlighted cycle. Fined 6s.

Guard Treanor summoned J. Fitzpatrick, tractor driver, for driving without licence and no rear light. The Justice fined defendant 10s.

February 14th 1942. BROOKEBORO’ COURT CASES. At Brookeboro’ Petty Sessions, before Major Dickie, R.M., Thos. Clarke, Little Mount, was charged with slaughtering a pig without a licence on 2nd January. D.I. Smith prosecuted, and Mr. Stewart, the Ministry’s Inspector gave evidence of visiting Clark’s house, and Clarke admitted having slaughtered the pig, and at that time there were only l0 lbs. of pork left in the house. Clarke pleaded that he killed the animal in November last, as he had a large number of men working, and wanted the pork to feed them.

His Worship, remarking that it was the worst case he had known, fined defendant 40/-.

CYCLISTS’ DIFFICULTIES. His Worship, when dealing with, a number of cases where cyclists, charged with no rear lights, gave the excuse that they could not get batteries, and he would like to make it known that cyclists should have a clear patch of white paint as a background to a reflector when they could not get batteries.

 

February 14th 1942. FERMANAGH CLAIM FAILS. ACTION AGAINST BELCOO TEACHER. BOY WHO LOST EYE. A denial that he had dictated a story to the pupils as to what they should say when asked about an accident was made by the principal teacher, the defendant in an action for damages, the hearing of which was resumed in the Belfast King’s Bench Division on Wednesday of last week before the Lord Chief Justice. Mr. James Ferguson, P.E.T., of Belcoo, was alleged to have been negligent by not exercising proper supervision over the pupils on March, 25, 1959, when one of the boys, Patrick Anthony Leonard, aged 13 years, of Creenahoe, Belcoo, lost his right eve. The plaintiff’s case was that while playing on the road during the luncheon interval he was struck by a stone and he sought damages against the master for negligence. Mr: C. L. Sheil (instructed by Messrs. Cooper and Cooper) was for plaintiff, Mr. J. D. Chambers, K.C., and Mr. J. Agnew (instructed by Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented the defendant. The defendant said it was customary for the boys to play on the road on which they had played in his predecessor’s time. Answering his Lordship, the witness agreed that he had no personal knowledge of that. Mr. Ferguson added that he had instructed the boys not to play on the road on Blacklion or Belcoo fair days and the days, immediately following. He had warned the children not to go on the road on the day of the accident as the previous day was Blacklion fair day. He said he was quite unaware that there were pupils playing on the road. In order to get a clear story of what happened he had asked the boys to write a letter stating what had occurred, but there was nothing in the nature of dictation.

In reply to Mr. Sheil, the defendant agreed that the road was the best, playground they had, as there was an open sewer in the yard. There had been a dancing class in the school during the lunch hour. Mr; Sheil commented that a girl pupil who had not been on the road had written in her exercise, book— “No one knows whether it was a ball or a stone that hit him,”

“Did that child imagine that story,” asked Counsel, to which the defendant replied that the girl heard the inquiry going on, and could think for herself and form her own conclusions. It was a description of what the girl had heard from other children. That pupil was only writing an essay. The witness mentioned that he had never seen children in Belcoo School throwing stones.         He agreed with Mr. Sheil that the Ministry of Education were apprehensive about children playing on the road, and that in a circular he had produced it was shown that between January and December, 1939, some 569 accidents to children at school had happened in Northern Ireland, and of that number 575 were due to the presence of the children on roads. He reiterated that he had taken all the care possible. Mrs. Annie McCabe, the first assistant in the school, and a number of pupils also gave evidence. The lord Chief Justice held that the supervision exercised was not unreasonable, saying that the accident was caused by a fellow-pupil who was acting playfully. Having detailed his findings as to fact, his Lordship entered judgment for the defendant, with costs.

February 14th 1942. £15 FINE AFFIRMED. KESH FARMER’S FAILURE TO PLOUGH

John. Spence, Bannaghbeg, Clonelly, Kesh, appealed to Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Friday against a fine of £15 and costs imposed on him at Kesh Betty Sessions for having, as alleged, failed to obey a direction of the Ministry of Agriculture to plough five acres. Mr. Aiden Herbert, solicitor, represented the appellant and Mr. J. Cooper was for the Ministry.

Opening the case Mr. Cooper said it was a somewhat peculiar case. The farm in question was almost twenty-five acres in extent. Appellant was visited by a couple of inspectors from the Ministry to whom he spoke of the difficulty of getting tractors to do the ploughing. To another inspector he said the land was not fit for ploughing. That official took him over the lands and, using a spade, pointed out to him that the soil was suitable for cultivation. He should have ploughed five acres but only cultivated a plot for potatoes and at the Petty Sessions a fine of £15 was imposed. At that Court appellant denied ownership of the farm and told the R.M. it was the property of his sister who lived in Co. Donegal for whom he acted as manager. Under the regulations, an occupier meant a person rated or liable to be rated to the poor rate in respect of the holding or who would be so rated or liable to be rated for the provisions of the Local Government (Rating and Finance) Act (N.I.), 1929, that was the Derating Act and included in relation to any holding, the occupier of which was absent from Northern Ireland, any agent or other person entrusted with the management of the land on his behalf. On appellant’s own statement that he managed the farm for his sister and that he was the herd he was convicted. Since then he (Mr. Cooper] had made a search and found that appellant was the person actually rated for the land (certificate produced). Mr. Herbert intimated that the defence was that the land was not arable.

Samuel Jordan, Ministry’s Inspector, said fifteen acres of the farm were arable. When defendant said the land was not arable witness got a spade, and showed him in the field he said was most suitable that there were four or five inches of soil.

Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness agreed that generally Clonelly was not an ideal district for tillage. He did not test the area he said was arable as there was no question raised by appellant at the time. Furrows in the fields showed that cultivation had been carried out previously.

  1. S. Flack, area officer, swore he visited the farm on 7th March and 26th May. Appellant complained of the difficulty of getting tractors to do work. There were about fifteen acres arable. He agreed that in general Fermanagh farmers were not very fond of ploughing. Appellant had taken out a crop of flax in 1940. In the witness box appellant swore that he was reared on this farm, owned by his sister, and never at any time had there been more than six or seven acres cultivated. In 1940 he got Samuel Mills to work the tractor plough on his land but owing to the rocky nature of the field he was unable to do the work. The soil was only two to four inches deep whereas one needed seven inches of soil to do successful work with the tractor. Appellant also got a man with horses and plough but his ploughman was no more successful than Mills. Mr. Cooper—I suggest you are what is known as a lazy farmer?

Appellant—I have had to work hard all my life.

Samuel Mills gave evidence of his unsuccessful effort to work the tractor plough on appellant’s land. On an adjoining farm he broke eight socks in the ploughing of three acres.

To Mr. Cooper—I believe with a different type of tractor yon could plough this land.

James Allen said he started to plough with a chill plough and gave it up as there was a danger of getting killed. He refused to do any more work on the farm. His Honour affirmed the lower court conviction and fine.

FEBRUARY 14, 1942. £120 REWARD FOR DOMESTIC SERVANT. SEVERE BURNS SUSTAINED. A domestic servant who received severe burns while working at eggs in the kitchen of her employer’s house; her clothing catching fire. and causing severe burns to face, right arm, shoulder and body, appeared before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions last week in connection with the recording of an agreement whereby the applicant .had agreed to accept £50 compensation, together with the sum of £10 costs, and £3 11s 0d medical expenses.

The applicant was Margaret Muldoon, Drumcullion, Dernacrieve, Co. Cavan, and the respondent Patrick Rooney, Sessiagh East, Inishmore, Lisbellaw. The matter had been referred to his Honour to see if the compensation was adequate or not. Mr. J; P. Black (for applicant) told his Honour that applicant was employed by respondent as domestic servant, and on the 10th March, 1941, at her employer’s residence she received serious burns.

Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B. (for respondent)—Not arising out of her work, according, to my instructions.

Proceeding, Mr. Black said that applicant was detained in Fermanagh County Hospital for a period of about, 4 weeks, and subsequently the agreement was arrived at as set out in the opening paragraph. Applicant gave evidence in the witness box. She said that respondent was in comfortable circumstances. Applicant had been living with a married sister since the accident had occurred, and had no means in the world at all.

Mr. Herbert—I am afraid it is more than a question of means. The doctor, he added, said that the only limitation she had was limitation of her arm on account of skin grafting. Her beauty might be injured, but beauty was not the subject of the Workmen’s Compensation Act.

Mr. Horace T. Fleming, surgeon in Fermanagh County Hospital, described the extent of applicant’s burns when she was admitted to hospital. He had again examined her that day and she was totally incapacitated for work.

In reply to Mr. Herbert, witness said that he did not think applicant could do the ordinary work of a house servant.

Mr. Herbert made an offer of £75 in settlement.        . .

Mr. Black said that applicant had agreed to accept £100. He thought she was meeting respondent very fairly in accepting £100.

His Honour—I am not inclined to sanction a settlement of £75.

His Honour made an award of £120, with £10 costs and £3 3s 0d medical expenses.

 

February 14th 1942. EVIDENCE AT INQUEST. The tragic death of a Kinawley school boy was investigated by Mr. James Mulligan, coroner; and a jury, at an inquest on 6th inst., on William John Thompson (7), Derryvran, Thompson’s Bridge, Kinawley, who was killed instantaneously the previous day by a motor lorry.

Head-Constable Thornton represented the police authorities, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B. (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) the driver of the lorry. James Molloy, a conductor on the bus, said the boy was travelling from Stragowna School to his home and got off at Thompson’s Bridge Post Office. Witness was helping other children off the bus; he heard the lorry go past and after a few momenta looked up to see that the accident had occurred. Bernard McGovern, Gortgesh, said he was standing on the roadside and saw the boy go forward from the bus and cross the load end collide with the lorry. He had seen the lorry pass the bus and it swerved as it met the boy, who, however, hit against the left front off side and fell, the wheel going over him. Dr. S. McQuaid, Derrylin, said the boy suffered from multiple injuries to the head and neck. Sergt. Devine gave evidence of measurements.

The lorry driver, Patrick Corrigan, Clonatrig, said he was driving from Derrylin—in the same direction as the bus was headed and the boy was walking— and saw the bus by the roadside at the Post Office. He was driving slowly and passed the bus. He saw no traffic on the road. When he had the engine of the lorry past the front of the bus he suddenly saw the boy a few feet in front of him, crossing the road. He applied his brakes and tried to avoid the boy, but after he got the front of the lorry past him he heard a noise and knew the boy was hit. He stopped and got out and found the rear wheel had passed over the boy’s head. There was four or five tons of sand on the lorry. A verdict was returned that death was caused by injuries received when the boy was knocked down and crushed by the lorry, loaded with sand, and that the accident was unavoidable. The funeral to the Protestant Cemetery, Derrylin, on Saturday, was very large and representative of all creeds and classes.

February 14th 1942. EDERNEY FARMER’S APPEAL CATTLE SEIZURE ECHO.

The seizure of seven cattle belonging to a young Ederney farmer and dealer, and the subsequent forfeiture of five of the animals, had a sequel at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Thursday, when David Jones, Crimlin, Ederney, from whom the animals were seized, appealed against their forfeiture of the five animals. Mr. G. Murnaghan appeared for the appellant and Mr. J. Cooper for the respondent authorities. Head Constable Conlin, Kesh, said the cattle were seized on 1st Sept. last on suspicion of being smuggled. Jones’ statement was that two black polly heifers were bought from John Kane, Kilgarry, and three from William Lunny, same place, on 35th June, 1940. Subsequently, Lunny and Kane stated the cattle were sold a year previously. Mr. Murnaghan said the whole thing was the result of a slip in regard to the date of the sale on the part of Lunny, who said 1939 instead of 1940. Kane, when questioned, said he could not remember the date but it was the same date as Lunny’s sale.

Five, witnesses having given evidence for the appellants, and Head-Constable Conlin (recalled) and Mr. J. McMenamy, veterinary surgeon, of the Ministry of Agriculture, for the respondents, Deputy Judge Ellison, G.C., dismissed the appeal.

1843 News.

October 19th 1843. LOUGH ERNE NAVIGATION.—Yesterday the committee held a meeting in the Court-house which was attended by the Earl of Erne, Wm. Archdall, Folliott Barton, Esqrs, Rev. J. G. Porter, George Wood, John Collum, Roderick Grey, and John Halliday, Esqrs. Every remaining arrangement for carrying this great object into effect was finally settled. The purchase of the Weirs was completed, and this principal obstruction is, now to be removed forthwith. The removal of several obstructions was likewise decided upon, and they are to be proceeded with early next spring.

BUTTER IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY.—Yesterday the Earl of Erne, Folliott Barton, Wm. Archdall, James Lendrum, Esqrs., the Rev. J. G. Porter, Robert Archdall, Esq., and others held a meeting in the Grand Jury room which was attended by the Sessions Grand Jury and a number of respectable farmers. Lord Erne addressed the meeting at length, and read some valuable communications on the subject. Mr. Porter also addressed the, meeting, and much useful conversation ensued which is likely to prove of great importance to this county in this material branch of Irish, produce.

3D DRAGOON GUARDS. Captain Nugent’s Troop of this Regiment quartered in this garrison for the last few months, marched yesterday to join headquarters in Dundalk, from which place the Regt. is to proceed to Dublin, and will be relieved by the 5th, or Green Horse, a Troop of which is expected here on the 30th. The troop was played out of town yesterday by the fine band of the 53d,

EXPECTED FACTION FIGHT AT PETTIGO. From information which has reached the local magistrates of the Pettigo district, and forwarded to the military and police authorities here, for detachments to attend the fair there on to-morrow. This day a company of the 53d left this garrison for the purpose, and Captain Henderson and twenty of the Constabulary also, left, this town for Pettigo, and will be reinforced by parties of Police from. Donegal and other stations,

THE WEATHER—Monday night we had a fearful storm here; it blew most violently during the entire night. Some large trees were blown down in the neighbourhood, and hay and corn were knocked about in different places, but neither in the town nor country have any houses suffered. The weather has been fine since,

THE FINE ARTS.—In the collection of prints now on sale with Mr. Caddy, as agent for Mr. Thomas Boys, London, Printseller to the royal family, we were particularly gratified with the splendid style in which “The last moments of Charlies I.” ‘‘Trial of the Earl of Strafford,” and “Cromwell’s family interceding for the life of Charles the First” “Belton Abbey, &c’ are executed. Mr Boys’ Fine Art Distribution takes place in London on Wednesday, 25th October inst. By the prospectus we perceive the prizes vary from four to five hundred guineas, and each subscriber—independent of his chance of drawing a prize on payment of one guinea—receive from the agent a print value for the sum paid—which is selected by the subscriber from unrivaled collection now on view with the agent. We wish Mr. Boys every success in his interesting lottery. Indeed we have in doubt the nobility, gentry, clergy, etc. will justly appreciate this great Artist’s laudable undertaking.

DANCING,—In directing attention to Mt. Sullivan’s advertisement, we are justified in remarking that his patronage in this place has arisen solely from his merits, and that the advantages held out in his proposed evening class are such as are worthy of attention by those wishing instruction in the graceful art.

Saturday last, the Earl and Countess of Belmore, family and suite, arrived at Castlecoole from Cowes, Isle of Wight.

The Lord Lieutenant has appointed the Rev. J. G. Porter Commissioner of Education in the room of Lord Vesey Fitzgerald deceased.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE ERNE PACKET. Sir, beg leave to send you an extract from the last report for 1843, of the Dingle colony, in the county Kerry, which you may probably think worth inserting in your paper. They are valuable, as showing the influence of Gospel truth amongst our poor benighted fellow-countrymen, and at the present moment when there is so much to distract and dishearten, may prove peculiarly gratifying to many of your readers who probably have not have been aware of the satisfactory work now in progress in the above remote corner of our native land and who may be induced to aid it by  their contributions, which I am sure you would readily transmit to any of the following persona appointed to receive the same, namely—Mr. Robertson, 3, Grafton-street; Messrs. William Curry, jun., and Co , 9, Upper Sackville-street; or Messrs. La Touche and Co., Castle-street Dublin; the Treasurer, the Rev. Charles Gayer, Ventry, or the Secretary Miss Mahon, Booterstown, near Dublin. I am etc. A FRIEND OF IRELAND.

In the town of Dingle, which is situated in the most western part of Ireland, on a promontory extending forty miles into the Atlantic ocean, and in the district immediately around it, there have been 750 persons brought out of the Church of Rome by the preaching of the Gospel, within the last seven years. Three entirely new congregations have been formed of converts: two Churches have been erected and five school houses for the children and it is now found necessary to enlarge the Church at Dingle the third time, as in that town alone there are 250 converts added to the original Protestant congregation. In Ventry there are 200 converts, a Church and School-house have been erected, and ten houses are now being built for the protection of the converts. At Dunerlin there are 65 converts, a Church and School house have been erected. In Donequin and the adjacent Blasquett Islands there are 110 converts. At Donequin a commodious building is nearly completed, which will be used as a school-house during the week, and for the Church services on Sundays; a school-house, with a residence for a master, has also been built on the Blasquett Island.

In Kilmechedar parish, there are about 45 converts a school-house is now being erected there. In addition to these enumerated, there are about fifty converts scattered in different places who cannot be counted with any particular .congregation.

Besides those still living, nineteen converts have died since the commencement of the work, all of whom, without any exception, have remained steadfast in the faith, notwithstanding the violent and persevering efforts that in some cases have been used by their Roman Catholic relations to induce them at their dying hour to recant. Such testimonies have been most valuable, proving if anything were needed prove that their change was no tone of mere outward profession to secure for themselves any supposed earthly gain, while the full value of the testimony cannot be felt by those who are not acquainted with the assault of mingled warning and threat, and earnest entreaty which the dying convert has often to endure.

If .more were needed to confirm the reality of the work, the following extracts from the letters of the Bishop of Limerick, and the. Rev. Denis Browne the Rev. Charles Gayer, might be so:—In a letter, dated September 1, 1842, the Bishop of Limerick states—“ Nothing I consider has taken place in Ireland of so much importance to the furthering of true religion, and for the Interest of the Established Church, as the movement that has manifested itself in your parishes.

The Rev. Denis Browne writes September 1, 1842. I cannot tell you the interest which, my late visit to Dingle has produced in my mind in the progress of the work there. I was prepared to expect some little disappointment in visiting and personally inquiring into a work of which I had heard so much at a distance but so far from being disappointed, I have found in reality to exceed far my most sanguine and having visited every post in the district, and in minutely inquired into all the particular work that is going on in it, and having carefully examined some of the principal converts, I am satisfied that the work is of God.

Of the state and progress of the colony, Rev. C. Gayer writes in a letter, dated December 31 1842 “I have now to state that in addition to the houses mentioned in your last report, ten been completed in Dingle, and ten more are now of being built at Ventry, five of which, finished. In the Dingle colony there are one hundred and fifty individuals receiving shelter, among who are twelve widows. The numbers of children attending the Sunday school are one hundred and seventy-six. The adult Sunday class .has increased to one hundred and thirty. Since the operation of the Society have been enlarged three scripture readers and two schoolmasters have been supported by the colony.

SERIOUS LOSS OF PROPERTY BY FIRE,

Early on Sunday morning last, Adam Nixon, Esq., Graan, had his entire, range, of offices, including stables, barn, cow houses &c., entirely consumed, together with between 60 and 70 cocks of hay that were stored on the lofts; a quantity of farming and, jaunting-car harness, &etc., &etc., and the dwelling house and inside properly narrowly escaped falling a prey to the destructive element likewise. The disaster originated in the negligence of a farm servant, who in going to bed in a room over the stables placed the candle against the bed post and fell asleep. About three o’clock the family, of the house was alarmed, and on getting out found the whole range in flames; the alarm was extended in every direction; and messengers were dispatched to town for assistance. Captain Henderson and the police repaired to the place forthwith, and Col. Philips with the utmost promptitude sent out two officers and a company of the 53d. The country people, the military and police used every possible exertion to get the fire under but without effect. The pump on the premises was broken in a short time and water having then to be brought from a distance rendered the most strenuous exertions fruitless. The only object then was to cut off every, communication from the dwelling-house, which was happily effected. The furniture and property of the house were all carried out, and though strewn about the most trifling article was not lost. The military and police remained till the offices were burnt out, and all fears of the mischief extending further removed. All praise is due to these forces for their exertions, both officers and men, as also to the country people who left no labour unemployed. A young stable-boy lying in the room where the fire originated did not awake till surrounded by the flames, and in getting out was severely scorched; he had to be conveyed immediately to the Infirmary. Mr. Nixon’s loss cannot be much less than £200. It is melancholy to reflect that a corporate town like Enniskillen could not afford an Engine, which would on this one occasion have saved more than its own value.

1953 July to December.

25-7-53 Ederney Parochial Sports. Teams from Pettigo, Dromore, Ederney and Trillick took part with Pettigo and Dromore reaching the finals by defeating respectively, Trilliok and Ederney. The final was not played owing to the rain and Pettigo won the tournament on a toss.

25-7-53 Weeping mothers and sweethearts crowded the GNR terminus at Great Victoria Street as more than 100 young men and women left by train for Cobh on their way to Canada. This was the 4th Emigrant Special to leave Belfast in the last six months and contained many families and Queen’s University graduates. The front of the train was decorated with the head of a giant Elk’s head. They will join the Cunard liner, “Georgic” at Cobh. Already on board from Southampton are 36 members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police who have been attending the Coronation ceremonies.

15-8-53 At Belleek Court, Francis Devanney of Forkhill Park, Irvinestown was fined £3 with costs and bound him to keep the peace for twelve months on his own bail of £5 plus one surety of £5 for striking James Burns, Brollagh, Belleek on 30th June. Devanney, who has a family of 10, came out of a pub convenient to the Cementation Works yard and struck Burns in the face for being unwilling to go on strike. The R.M. said he would have sent Devanney to jail only that he had a large family. Devanney has a long list of previous convictions for similar offences.

22-8-53 After the unveiling ceremony in Pettigo on Saturday members of “C” Company, headed by their pipe band paraded to what was formerly the RIC barracks in Pettigo. (Currently in 2002, the Priest’s House) and observed 2 minutes silence in memory of the late Commandant P. Breen, who was in charge of taking the barracks in 1921. Afterwards the band played, “The Minstrel Boy,” which was Comdt. Breen’s favourite tune. (Unveiling of Pettigo 1922 memorial.)

22-8-53   Donkey owner fined at Belleek. Susan Johnston, Commons, Belleek was summonsed for allowing her donkey to wander on the road. Seamus O’Connor, a driver employed by the Cementation Company said that the donkey wandered out in front of him. He did the donkey little harm but the front of his car was smashed in. The defendant said that the donkey must have jumped over the ditch and that on the evening in question all the animals were being annoyed by flies. She was fined 7/6 with 18/- costs.

22-8-53 Enniskillen child drowned. Inquest on Lough Erne fatality. Gerald Divine, Darling St., Enniskillen, aged 6 years drowned on the afternoon of the 8th while playing at the Round “O,” Enniskillen.

22-8-53 Enniskillen Convent’s great achievement. Every one of the 28 pupils entered for the Senior Certificate Examination passed.

22-8-53  Northern Patriots remembered in Impressive Ceremony. War of Independence Recalled at the Unveiling of Pettigo Memorial. The names on the Memorial are Patrick Flood (Pettigo), William Kearney and Bernard Mc Canny (Drumquin) and William Deasley, (Dromore, Co., Tyrone). The commemorative Mass was said by Rev. A. Slowey, C. C., Belleek and an FCA Guard of Honour, under Lieutenant L. Emerson, Ballyshannon, rendered Compliments at the Consecration. Minister of Defence, General Sean Mc Keown attended. Mr. Oscar Traynor made the oration at the unveiling of the statue commemorating the invasion of Pettigo on June 4th, 1922.

29-8-53   Irish-Ireland Activities in Devenish. Children’s classes attended by almost 60 children of the Parish up to the age of 14 years. The classes have been enthusiastically attended and supported by the children on three nights weekly, and lessons have been given in Irish Prayers, conversational Irish, Irish singing, dancing and history. There have been lessons in etiquette and a football team of juveniles chosen from the boys has been established and has proved a match for the best in three counties. The season closed on the 15th of August with a Ceilidh in St. Mary’s Hall. Among the prize winners were: – Best mannered child, Mary Flanagan, Corramore. Irish Prayers, Eileen Burns, Cashel. Exercise Books, J. J. Carty, Knockaraven. Accordion 1. J. J. Carty, Knockaraven; 2. Gerald Feely, Knockaraven.

29-8-53 Lord Bishop’s Regulations – Dances must end at Midnight. The Lord Bishop of Clogher, Most Rev. Eugene O’Callaghan, D. D. has issued regulations governing the organisation and attendance of Catholics of the Diocese at dances which continue until after midnight. The regulations are to come into force on September 1st. All Cross-roads, open air and dancing decks are to close before lighting-up time, All Parochial Halls and halls controlled by Catholics are to close not later than 10 o’clock midnight – old time. In addition I forbid Catholics of this Diocese to attend any public dance which is to continue to a late hour. These regulations bind in conscience i.e. under pain of sin from 1st September. Priests are to exert vigilance to see that the Diocesan Law for the conclusion of all public dances is strictly observed.

5-9-53 Newtownbutler are new County Champions after beating Irvinestown in a grueling final by 0-6 to 0-4. The game was played in Gaelic Park, Enniskillen through terrific downpours but the large crowd cheered on while sheltering under trees. Billy Charlton was at the centre of an almost impregnable full back line for Irvinestown. Kevin McCann (Belleek) was a scrupulously fair referee whose handling of the game was beyond criticism.

12-9-53 Garrison Man Unconscious for Seven Days. William George Acheson of Gorteen, Garrison, was unconscious for 7 days and in hospital for a month after cycling into the side of a shooting-brake. As he had suffered a lot through his own negligence he was only fined 5 shillings.

19-9-53 A fine of 15 shillings plus costs was imposed on John Murphy, Stranlongford at Irvinestown Court on Friday for being drunk in charge of a bicycle twice. His wife appeared in his stead and said he was ill and asked for a month to pay the fine.

19-9-53  Ederney drew with Irvinestown 3-3 to 1-9 although the league points were of little interest to either in this local derby. In the juvenile match before Irvinestown easily defeated a much lighter Ederney team. Most promising for Ederney were Manus and Martin Maguire, Sean and Joe Rolston, Joe Turner, Tony Maguire and Tony McGrath. In goals for Ederney Seamus Milligan made several fine saves including two penalties.

19-9-53 On Tuesday morning after 11 o’clock Mass in St. Mary’s Church, Pettigo, His Lordship, Most Rev. Dr. O’Callaghan, Lord Bishop of Clogher, blessed and opened St. Mary’s new national school at Pettigo. At the blessing ceremony a guard of honour was provided by the school children under their teachers Master B. Egan, B.A., N.T., Mrs T. Bradley, N.T. and Miss Mc Fadden, N.T. The minister of Education was represented by Mr. Joseph Brennan, T.D. who in a short address said Pettigo people should be proud of their beautiful new school, which had been such a necessity for the past 30 years. The building, he said, was a credit to the contractor, Mr. Geo. Irwin, Donegal, and his staff of tradesmen and workers. Thanks was expressed to the Rev. priests, Very Rev. P. Dempsey P.P., Rev. Jas. F. Brennan, C.C. and Rev. A. Slowey, C.C. for their unfailing efforts and constant attention until the beautiful building was completed. To Fr. Jas. F. Brennan alone the parish are deeply indebted for all his work for both the welfare of his parishioners and for the churches and schools in both Pettigo and Lettercran, and it is hoped that he will remain many long years in the parish so as to reap the reward of his zeal. His Lordship also blessed the twelve new houses erected in the village under the housing scheme. The choir with Miss Dora Mc Neill at the organ rendered sacred music during the Mass.

19-9-53 Pettigo Girl’s Licence Suspended at Belleek. Kathleen Monaghan, Ballymacavanney, Lough Derg, was fined £2-2-6 with costs and disqualified from driving for a year in N. Ireland, for driving without due care, and without a licence, insurance and tail lights. She admitted all offences. Constable Bell who stopped her said she came into the town from the Ballyshannon direction on the wrong side of the white line and swerved up the Main Street. She said she was learning to drive.

26-9-53 Omagh, St. Enda’s win Irvinestown Tourney Final by defeating Lisnaskea by 5-8 to 2-7. The fifteen wristlet watches were presented to the Omagh players afterwards by Rev. J. Mc Kenna, P.P., Irvinestown. Omagh opened the scoring with two goals. The 13 a-side format suited Omagh.

3-10-53 All the residents allotted new houses in Pettigo have taken up their residence during the weekend and are delighted with such splendid houses with every modern convenience.

3-10-53 Armagh gallant in defeat as they fail in the All Ireland final to Kerry by 0-13 to 1-6. Armagh missed a penalty and squandered chances to win. The official attendance of 85,155 and receipts of £10,904-9-1 constitute a record and an additional 7,000 got into the ground without paying.

3-10-53 During Monday’s floods Mr. P. Halpin, Customs Officer, Pettigo, performed a plucky act when he rescued four sheep from the Termon River as they were being swept away. He waded waist deep into the fast flowing river to rescue them.

3-10-53  Marian Year Proclaimed. The Pope has proclaimed 1954 as Marian Year in celebration of the centenary of  the definition of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception by Pope Pius X1 on December 8th 1854. The Pope ordered the World’s 400 million Catholics to concentrate on Our Lady’s intercession for three objects:- The Unity of the Church, The Peace of the World and The Church of Silence – 60 million Catholics behind the Iron Curtain.

3-10-53 Mr. Cahir Healy, M.P., again unanimously chosen at the Nationalist Convention to run as an anti-partition candidate in South Fermanagh. It was decided not to run in Enniskillen or Lisnaskea (where the Prime minister held) as these areas had been gerrymandered to return two Unionist candidates although Fermanagh had a Nationalist majority.

10-10-53 Cost of Dying Rising Too. Enniskillen Rural District Council is losing £300 to £400 per year in running Brendrum Cemetery. Increases are to be made in the burial and grave charges.

10-10-53 Fermanagh give grand display in losing to Derry by 9 points to 6 points. Following a draw with Tyrone it seems that a corner has been turned in Fermanagh’s fortunes since they were last a team to be feared in 1935. “P. Rooney was sound enough … Matt Regan, a supposedly volatile footballer, was as sound as a bell, brilliant in placing, deadly in tackling and as clean a player as was on a clean field. More performances like this and Matt will have beaten the best of his past  …. Gonigle was a good plodding midfielder, with a flash of brilliance in him quite often … J. P. McCann seemed a grand player playing with the foot brake partly on.

10-10-53 Mrs Brigid Maguire, relict of Mr. Peter Maguire, died at her home at Knockaraven, Devenish on Tuesday 15th September.

10-10-53 On Sunday evening Pettigo village was en fete with bonfires and cheering crowds when the residents learned that their Junior team were victors in the County Final against the Doe team at Ballybofey.

10-10-53 On Wednesday of last week torrential rain fell in the district for twenty-four hours continuously causing the most devastating floods ever remembered in the district. In Cortness (Gortanessy?)district a bridge connecting the farm of J. Fletcher, with the leading Pettigo to Castlederg road was swept away, nothing being left on the iron girders. The village street was flooded to a depth of two feet from the Diamond to the railway station. Pedestrians had to wade to the railway station in their bare feet. Ricks of hay and corn were swept away and in the mountain district sheep were swept away. Roads were also torn. The Pettigo to Castlederg road was under water for three miles at Lettercran.

17-10-53 Ceilidhe Mhor in St. Joseph’s Hall, Cashel, on Sunday 18th, October. Music by McCusker Bros. Ceilidhe band (first visit to Cashel. Dancing 8 o’clock, Admission 3s-6d.

17-10-53 Dance in Mc Cabe’s Hall, Belleek, Friday 23rd October with music by Derrylin Starlight Band. Admission 4 shillings.

17-10-53 On Friday night Pettigo GFC held a victory ceilidh in St. Mary’s Hall, Pettigo, to celebrate victory over St. Michael’s (Doe) at Ballybofey the previous Sunday in the junior County Final. The cup was carried in procession through the village by the team headed by the captain. The hall was packed by patrons from both north and south of the Border. The dance which was from 8 to 12 concluded with the National Anthem.

17-10-53 Tully’s High St. Enniskillen – Special Coat Display – Lady’s Gabardine Coat in popular new colours for 6 ½ guineas.

31-10-53 At Kesh court, Pettigo man, Thomas Reilly of Mill St. was fined 40s and had his licence suspended for 12 months for driving a car without insurance and 10s for driving without a licence. William Elliott of Killsmollen was fined 8s for carrying two passengers on a goods vehicle without a licence, Grace Elliott, Tulnagin, Ederney and Patrick Meehan, Largy, Lack who were both fined 2s-6d. Hugh McGrath, Ednaveigh was fined 8s for allowing three heifers to wander on the road. For allowing four animals to wander on the road William R. Johnston, Lack was fined 6s. John A. Harron, Gubbaroe, was fined 5s for throwing fireworks in Kesh. Thomas Mc Clelland, Feddans, Kesh was fined 20s for using a goods vehicle without a licence and Edward Maguire, Main St. Ederney was fined 3s for having no reflective mirror on a motor vehicle, and 5s, for having no horn.

31-10-53 Ballinamallard Couple’s claim against Kesh man. Charles Leonard and his wife Kathleen of Coolgarron, Ballinamallard sued Malcolm Turner of Tievaveeney, Kesh for £50 and breach of contract. They alleged that the defendant had invited them to live with him and that he would transfer his lands to Kathleen. They took up residence and put in two acres of potatoes and one of corn but the plaintiff refused to complete the contract or allow them to take away the crops. The defendant claimed that they had ordered £25 of groceries from Blakley McCartney of Kesh in his name and used them solely for themselves and family. The Judge granted £10 to the plaintiffs and allowed the defendant to keep the crops.

31-10-53 Enniskillen Fishery Board member disqualified for six months and fined £7 and costs after a fishery prosecution in Derrygonnelly. He was Mr John Maguire, Boa Island, a fisherman and his partner Edward Cassidy who was fined £4 and costs. Evidence was given that they had failed to stop their boat when challenged by the police launch, were fishing with worms with long lines and had undersized eels in their possession.

31-10-53  Fermanaghman to share in the residue of a ten million pound estate. One of two brothers who will share in the residue of the estate of the Duke of Westminster, Britain’s richest landowner, after many legacies and annuities to members of the family, friends and servants is Lieutenant Colonel Robert George Grosvenor, Ely Lodge, Enniskillen. The Duke died last July aged 74. He came to Fermanagh in 1951 when he bought the Ely Estate from Mr. Cathcart. He and his brother are cousins of the late Duke.

31-10-53  Old Character Passes. An old man of the roads, Bob Davitt, died in Ballyshannon. He was almost 80 years old and had been known to generations of families in the North-West as a gentle, kindly, old man who moved from place to place with his familiar, “bundle on his shoulder.” Youngsters delighted in letting imagination work on the mysteries of the great bag, which was opened occasionally to show the small articles that Bob would sell. He had great dignity and would only condescend to take a meal at some houses, and indeed to call only in some. He slept in haysheds or at the foot of haystacks; he was loved by children of several generations. By his passing a link has been broken of Ireland’s “men of the road.” He had a considerable sum of money when he died.

31-10-53  The sudden death took place at Killybeg, Belleek, of Mrs Jane Keown, wife of Mr. Patrick Keown. She had been in indifferent health for some time past.

7-11-53 A decree of £3 was awarded against Thomas Duffy, Commons, Belleek, for trespass by his cattle on lands at Rathmore, Belleek. The action was taken by John Mc Elroy, Auctioneer, Belleek who had the setting of the land. He claimed that the land was worth £20 per annum but Duffy would only offer £12 which was refused.

7-11-53 Inquest on Ballyshannon woman adjourned. Mrs Agnes White (49), widow of James White, one of the leading merchants of the district in his time was found dead in the attic of her home on Tuesday of last week. She was suffering from heart trouble for a number of years and was inclined to excessive worry. She was found lying in the attic with a rug under her head as a pillow. He found a cup and a small glass beside the body. Guard Flynn gave evidence of finding traces of vomiting and two partly dissolved capsules of a purplish colour. Dr. Patrick Daly gave his opinion that the capsules could not have caused her death.

7-11-53 Mr. S. McGinley is appointed secretary of Pettigo GAA Club. (John McGinley, Customs Officer and father of Sean McGinley, noted Irish actor.)

7-11-53 Storm over Fermanagh – Torrential rain all over the county during Sunday caused the most serious and extensive flooding in years. The Belleek to Letter Road was impassable at Rosscreenagh, where water poured down from the hills and covered the entire valley.

7-11-53 The case was dismissed against Joseph McDermott, Corry, Belleek, for riding his bicycle without due care and attention. He had been badly injured when struck by a lorry while cycling from his farm at Brollagh. He had spent 15 days in the Shiel Hospital, Ballyshannon, with severe head and arm injuries. A similar case against the lorry driver was adjourned.

14-11-53 The death has occurred of Rev. W. Babbington Steele, Castletown, Monea, retired minister of the Episcopalian Church of Ireland. He was born in 1865 and was the son of Rev. William Steele, headmaster of Portora from 1857 to 1891.He was the brother of  the convert, Rev. John Haughton Steele, born 1850, who had been minister at Deryvore, Co., Fermanagh, incumbent of Trinity Church, Crom, Newtownbutler for 27 years, before becoming a priest in 1912. Fr. Steele died on March 17th, 1920 and is interred in the grounds of Cavan Cathedral.

14-11-53 The death of Mr. James Cleary, Donegal House, Bundoran. He was a native of Lissan, Garvery, Enniskillen and had spent his early years in America returning in 1925 to set up a successful business in Bundoran. He had been on his way to Benediction on Monday evening when he died.

21-11-53 A fire broke out in the roof of Letterkeen School, Kesh, on Wednesday 11th. The 40 children were removed by their teacher Miss Mary I. Stephenson. Two sections of Enniskillen Fire brigade arrived within a half an hour, making the 18 mile journey in record time. They were able to put out the fire before any serious damage was done.

21-11-53  Opening Announcement – Radio and Television Service of Thomas P. Gannon, 37 East Bridge Street, Enniskillen opposite the GPO. Leading makes of radio and television stocked, batteries, valves and all radio components, sheet music and gramophone records, complete repair service, batteries charged.

21-11-53 Two men drowned in shocking Belleek tragedy. Both were employees of the Cementation Company. The dead men are Jack Lawler, Athy, Co., Kildare and Jack Mc Grath, Lisnarick. Edwards, J. Maguire of Boa Island was rescued. Mc Grath’s body has not yet been discovered despite search parties of up to 50 people searching the banks of the river. Mr. Maguire gave a graphic description of what happened to members of the Press.

28-11-53  Border fireworks. Guard James Dowd summonsed James McInern (18) of Bannaghbeg, Clonelly, Co., Fermanagh for exploding squibs in Main St. Pettigo and then running into the North out of the jurisdiction. McInern was caught but another youth escaped. The case was adjourned as McInern’s sister had rung in to say he was ill and unable to attend. Daniel McGrory was fined 10/- each for being lying down drunk on the road and having no light on his bicycle.

5-12-53 The minor Football Championship between Lisnaskea and Garrison was a very one sided affair with Lisnaskea having an easy win Garrison conceding two very soft goals at the beginning.

12-12-53 Ending of the Marian Year in a three day ceremony. Overflowing crowds at all Masses. “The cry for a new Redemption, a Redemption coming through Mary, has been answered.” Said at a ceremony at the Graan.

19-12-53 The longest ever Ballyshannon inquest lasting 3½ hours was resumed on the 9th on Mrs Agnes Fyffe White, proprietoress of the well-known business bearing her name, at the Mall, Ballyshannon, whose body was found in the attic of her home on 28th of October.

26-12-53  Inquest into Belleek tragedy. Accidental drowning verdicts were returned on John Lawlor (39) Athy, County Kildare and John McGrath, Rossgweer, Lisnarick, employees on the Erne Scheme at Belleek who lost their lives on the 16th November, when their boat was swept away after their engine had failed. The inquest on Lawlor was held in Belleek Courthouse and a jury of which Christopher Ross was foreman. John Maguire, Boa Island, the boatman gave evidence. The engine died out and they missed the first safety rope because the boat passed over it. They caught hold of the second but it sagged leaving them under the water. He let go and was swept through the open sluice gates. Below Belleek Bridge and the eel weir he caught up with the overturned boat and it took him to the bank where he clung to a tree until rescued. Like Lawlor he was wearing a life jacket but Lawlor’s head struck the sluice-gates and he was drowned. McGrath had no life jacket and his body was not found for days after. As his body was found on the Eire side of the Border an inquest was conducted in Ballyshannon. Frank McCauley found McGrath’s body having searched each day for it.

1952 to December

5-7-52. Dedication of the new Church and Friary at Rossnowlagh. Leaders of Church and state at the historic ceremony including Mr. De Valera.

19-7-52. Don’t miss Mullaghmore Races next Wednesday at 3 pm. £200 in Stakes. Special buses from Bundoran on the day at intervals of 15 minutes.

19-7-52. Great progress is being made with the building of the new County Council cottages at Frevagh, Cashel.

19-7-52. Mr John Mc Gowan, Cashel House, Devenish has been unwell for some weeks but is recovering. He is one of the most popular businessmen in South Fermanagh.

26-7-52 An award of £3,600 was made to Mrs Agnes Wilson Cameron and her husband Neil Cameron a Customs Officer at Belleek. On March 18th, 1849 Mrs Cameron was permanently disabled by a rock which crashed through the roof of her house. This was the result of an explosion on the river Erne as part of the drainage works. The defendants were Mc Laughlin and Harvey Ltd. of York Road, Belfast.

26-7-52  Eamon De Valera visits Fermanagh. A crowd of about 20,000 gathered to meet him in Newtownbutler.

26-7-52  Fermanagh to play Cavan in the Minor Championship Semi-final next Sunday. Among those playing are C. Maguire, Ederney, S. Mc Manus, Belleek with M. Regan, Belleek substitute.

26-7-52  Miss Alice Mc Teggart of Derryhooly, Derrylin was given a six months suspended sentence for the infanticide of her infant son.

2-8-52. Aer Lingus have made a record profit in the past year of £92,180 up from £14,686 the previous year.

2-8-52.  At Ederney Sports on Sunday 20th Pettigo were defeated by Irvinestown by 4 pts to 3 pts.

2-8-52.  Fermanagh overwhelmed by Cavan in the Ulster Minor semi-final by 5-10 to 1-2. Only Claude Maguire and T. Deveney (Irvinestown) played at all well.

2-8-52.  Mr and Mrs Patrick Keown, Killybig, Garrison celebrated their Golden Jubilee of their wedding on July 18th. They received many congratulations. Mr Keown, a well-known traditional singer made a successful recording in McGovern’s Hotel, Garrison two days later of two old favourites, “The Brown Girl” and “I’ll wear the britches now.” His son, Mr. Francis Keown, the well-known entertainer made a recording of whistling and lilting. Mr. Keown had made a great recovery from near death a short time ago.

2-8-52. The death is reported of Mr. John Albert (Bertie) Siberry of Lakeland, Belcoo formerly of Manorhamilton who was born in Garrison. He was a well-known cattle dealer and much beloved in the countryside. A huge crowd attended his funeral to Manorhamilton so much so that the journey of 13 miles from Belcoo took five hours and many wept openly at the roadside and in the graveyard.

2-8-52. The death of Mr. Michael Feehily, Glen West, Garrison, removes a link with the early days of Sinn Fein. After meeting Sean Mc Dermott who was organising Sinn Fein in North Leitrim he became a well-known public speaker. He crossed and re-crossed the Atlantic five times organising for the movement.

2-8-52.  To mark the anniversary of the Christian Brothers in Australia all members of the Federal Parliament who had been educated by the Brothers planted a tree in the grounds of the new War Memorial College in Canberra. They have 80 houses and 110 colleges in Australia and about 1200 members.

9-8-52 At Scraghy annual sports Pettigo were the winners of a football match.

9-8-52 Belnaleck defeat Garrison in the first round of the Junior Championship by 1-9 to 1-3.

9-8-52 Fermanagh listeners will be listening keenly to the programme, “One Minute Please.” Ace speaker on the programme will be Mr. Jack Sherry of Arney, County Fermanagh timed at 286 words to the minute. He will be accompanied on the Mens’ Team on the programme by those stars of Radio and Television, Kenneth Horne and Philip Harben.

9-8-52  Eddie Gonnigle has been transferred back to Belleek after a spell in the colours of Carrickmore, Co., Tyrone.

9-8-52  Late Dr. P. J. Timoney. It was incorrectly stated in our report last week of the regretted demise of Dr. P. J. Timoney, Dublin (formerly of Enniskillen) that he was a native of Sligo; he was in fact a native of Garrison, Fermanagh. Dr. Timoney was a brother of the late Fr. Timoney, P.P. His widow Mrs Timoney resides in Dublin with her daughter Mary who is employed in the clerical department of Guinness’ Brewery. Another daughter Yvonne, is a medical doctor practicing in Belfast. She was for some time practicing in Omagh.

16-8-52 Annual Parochial Sports in St. Joseph’s Park, Cashel commencing at 2.00. 7-a-side football tournament for a set of medals (open) Teams: – Belcoo, Blacklion, Ballaghmeehan, Belleek, Devenish, Cashel, Glenfarne. Microphone relay on the field.

16-8-52 From midday Friday to midnight Saturday thousands made their way to Drumshambo, County Leitrim to avail of the Franciscan Indulgence of Portiuncola at the local Convent of Perpetual Adoration. Two barefoot nuns kept vigil before the Blessed Sacrament and changed with others every hour to the accompaniment of bells ringing out over the town.

16-8-52  Irvinestown Carnival Week. Reduction in Dancing Prices. Owing to a decrease in our estimated expenses we have pleasure in announcing the following reductions – All 7/6 dances reduced to 5/- and all 5/- dances to 4/-.

16-8-52 Irvinestown defeat Belleek in the semi-final of the Senior Championship 3-2 to 2-3 in one of the best games seen in Fermanagh in years. The deciding factor was the speed of the Irvinestown half backs.

16-8-52  Pettigo Sports (Under the auspices of the GAA, St. Mary’s Club, Pettigo) on Sunday 24th, August, Mc Hugh Park, Pettigo. Junior Championship Football match Pettigo V Donegl. And the Donkey Derby for 1952 plus from 5.00 to 7.00 a 7-a-side football tournament. N.B. Teas served at Field. Prizes exhibited one week before Sports in window of Mrs John Flood, Corner House, Pettigo. Admission to Park adults 2/-, children 1/-.

16-8-52 Plans have been approved to extent the Sewage System at Belleek at a cost of £900.

16-8-52 The death is reported of Mrs. Margaret Maguire, Lattoon, Tullyrossmearn, County Fermanagh, wife of Mr. Fred Maguire. She had spent a number of years of her early life in America.

23-8-52 A motor car, the property of Mr. Joe Maguire, Drumnasrene, Devenish, went on fire and was completely destroyed.

23-8-52  Cavanacross, 2-2, Devenish 0-1 in the Junior Football League with the home side waiting for an hour before Devenish arrived to take the field. Highlight of the game was a spectacular display in goals for Cavanacross by veteran, John McKervey, who received a great ovation on his return after 20 years retirement.

23-8-52 The wedding took place in Devenish of Mr. James Mulrone, Clyhore, Ballyshannon and Mary Kathleen Kerrigan, The Cottage, Devenish. The reception at which over 40 guests were entertained was held in the Melvin Hotel, Devenish.

30-8-52  Cashelnadrea Parochial Sports were held in beautiful weather, Devenish A defeated Belleek in the 7-a-side while Devenish B defeated Cashel. Devenish A won the final and were presented with their medals at the ceilidhe afterwards.

30-8-52   Irvinestown are the new County Champions by a score of 0-6 to 0-3. “I have seldom witnessed such close marking and such ruthless tackling as characterised this game straight through.” “It was a punishing hour’s football, a game of hard knocks, knocks that were given without bitterness and taken without flinching.” “For the winners I thought Billy Charlton, Liam Mc Kinney and Malachy Mahon were the men of the match.

30-8-52  Uncle from New York meets nephew from Australia. Thomas Mills, born 1861, and Edward Mills, born 1875, were the 2nd and 10th respectively, of the 11 children of Edward Mills of Aghnablaney, Letter, County Fermanagh. When Edward was 9 years old his brother Thomas, then in his mid-20s, emigrated to Australia in 1884 and never returned. He was killed in an accident there in 1909. He had, married Margaret Flanagan of Downpatrick. Edward, the 10th child, himself emigrated to New York in 1900. Edward remarked that when he had first went to America it took him 13 days and he had come over on this occasion in 13 hours. His wife, Mary Johnston of Kinlough, County Leitrim, died 3 years ago. He had come over for the wedding of his neice, Eva Mills, a London nurse, to Harry Elliott, a merchant navyman. As Harry’s time of leave was uncertain he had extended his holiday, otherwise he would have missed his Australian nephew. In August of 1952, Francis James Mills, aged 54, son of Thomas came to Ireland and there by accident met up with his uncle Edward, from America, aged 77, on his second visit to Ireland in 52 years, at the old homestead in Aughnablaney. Francis James (Frank,) is now co-owner in Australia with his brothers Hubert, Edward and Thomas of one of the largest furniture removal businesses in Sydney, Australia, founded by his father in 1899. The firm uses 40 vans and has 90 workers and covers everything except Western Australia. He came to Europe to a Furniture Remover’s Conference in Belgium and decided to be the first of his generation to visit the homeland of his parents and there met his sprightly uncle Edward who was out in the fields helping with the harvest. There was a joyful reunion between the Australian, American and Irish branches of the Mills family.

13-9-52 A juvenile was summonsed at Belleek Court for assaulting Michael John Cullen on 27th July at a football match at Cashel. Evidence was given of the defendant striking with an iron bar and causing a three inch cut in Cullen’s head. The juvenile was bound over for one year on his father’s bail of £10. A fine of £3 and costs was imposed on Thomas Maguire, Corramore, Garrison for stealing a piece of bog oak 8 ft long, value 15 shillings, the property of John Keaney, which Keaney had stored in a drain covered by sods. Sergeant Mc Quillan had found the item at Maguire’s house and the defendant said that he thought it was of no value. Keaney said he wanted it for a post.

13-9-52 Mr. T. Campbell, Belleek presided over a meeting of Fermanagh County Board last week. The Irvinestown, St. Molaise team asked for a postponement of the Senior Football Championship match against Roslea as Malachy Mahon, the Irvinestown captain, would not be available on that day. After discussion, and with Rosslea’s consent, the request was granted.

20-9-52  Irvinestown has scored another FIRST with the Carnival Week which was brought to a close on Sunday last. At least 10,000 patrons enjoyed the 8 day festival. This was the first ever Carnival held in Fermanagh and crowns a number of Irvinestown firsts of which a drama festival, inter-county football competition and the provision of a County Gaelic Park were others. The idea of a carnival was mooted a mere five weeks before it was actually held.

27-9-52 At Kesh Court, Martin Maughan, of no fixed abode was fined £5 and ordered to pay £16-17-6 damages for breaking a plate glass window and six glasses in the public-house of Edmund Armstrong, Kesh. For driving a lorry without ue care Francis Murphy was fined 10/- for reversing a lorry out of a gate and colliding with a passing car. He had been driving 12 years without any accident.

27-9-52  Rail services between Belleek and Bundoran on the Great Northern Line are suspended from Monday 22nd September until November 2nd while the bridge over the River Erne, west of Belleek, is repaired. Connecting omnibus and lorry services will operate in the interim.

11-10-52 Enniskillen Catholics to be faced with over £50,000 outlay in schools.

11-10-52 Major Lloyd George, British Food Minister, announced at Newcastle-0n-Tyne on Thursday last that tea is to be derationed and the price control of tea scrapped.

18-10-52 Cavan defeat Meath in the All Ireland Football Final by 0-9 to 0-5 on Sunday last. This is their fifth title.

18-10-52 The beautiful new National School being erected in Pettigo is nearing completion.

18-10-52 The provision of a pump convenient to Cashelnadrea village has supplied a long felt want in the district where clean water is hard to procure. The gratitude of the people of the district and particularly the schoolchildren is extended to Councillor Pat Casey, Devenish, who worked so hard to secure the concession. The work was efficiently carried out by Mr. Patrick Carty, Devenish.

18-10-52 Work on four cottages at Scribbagh, Cashelnadrea, is nearing completion.

25-10-52 At Lisnaskea on Sunday Irvinestown repeated their League final victory over Roslea and so annexed the Senior Championship as well by a score of 2-2 to 1-1. The game was played in Lisnaskea on a greasy muddy pitch in wintry conditions. A crowd of about 500 to 600 attended.

25-10-52 Fermanagh’s first Juvenile title has been won on merit by the Newtownbutler Club, a solid, compact, and lively team that did well to wear down a gallant Enniskillen, St. Michael’s defence which was sadly overworked. This was a splendid game played in the best sporting spirit – a pleasure to watch. Fermanagh’s minor team can recruit plenty of material for the next few seasons from the boys on view on Sunday.

25-10-52 James Eric Carson, Knocknashangan, Garrison was fined £1 with £2-10-0 costs for having drawn his wife’s rations during the time she was in an institution in Armagh. He was also fined 10 shillings for allowing his horse to wander on the road.

25-10-52 Lisnaskea branch of the British Legion unanimously passed a resolution to be put before the Area Council that the award of £15 to men who were prisoners of war under the Japanese, “is a complete and disgraceful insult.”

25-10-52  The finishing touches are being made to St. Joseph’s Hall, Cashelnadrea, which was commenced three years ago. It will be a fitting tribute to Very Rev. E. Canon Coyle, who gave a very large personal contribution to the fund.

25-10-52  The wedding has taken place of William Slevin, Ballinacarrick and Miss Katherine Campbell, of Cashelnadrea, Devenish, in St. Patrick’s Church, Ballyshannon.

1-11-52 Mr John Dolan, Carran West has beaten local records by growing a turnip weighing 10 pounds on his farm.

1-11-52 Seven head of cattle valued at over £210 were recently seized in the Rossinvermore district between Derrygonnelly and Cashel. Customs Officials have taken note of all farm stock along the Leitrim/ Fermanagh border in an all out drive against smuggling.

1-11-52 The wedding has taken place recently of Michael Collins, ESB official, Ballyshannon and Miss Susan Frances Grogan, SRN, WV, only daughter of Mr. Timothy Grogan, Knockaraven, Devenish and Mrs Grogan, Principal of Glen East School.

8-11-52 We are very glad and relieved to learn that TV is coming to the Six Counties within a few months.

15-11-52  Ballyshannon ratepayers of the East and West Ports oppose the construction of the new by-pass which is to cost £69,000.

15-11-52  Mid-Ulster M.P. Mr M. O’Neill, addresses the gathering at an Ederney Ceilidhe in St. Joseph’s Hall. Mr. B. Cunningham, N.T. was fear a toighe and a highlight of the programme was the dancing of Amadio and Giovanni Coyle, Main St. Castlederg, the former being Ulster and Tyrone step-dancing champion.

22-11-52 The committee of Ulster Folklife and Traditions wrote to Fermanagh County Council reforming a committee in Fermanagh to collect folklore and traditions of folklife in the county. Northern Ireland is the last area of the U.K. and Ireland to set up such an organisation.

 

29-11-52 “John Joe” O’Reilly is dead. At the age of 34 Cavan and indeed all the GAA community of Ireland has lost one of their most popular and chivalrous personalities after a short illness. He was one of a group of high-grade footballers who played for Cornafean. His father played for Cavan in 1908 and with his elder brother “Big Tom” he shared in Cavan’s All Ireland triumphs in 1933, 1935 etc. He was a native of Kilmorer, Killeshandra, and helped St. Patrick’s College, Cavan to win three Ulster College’s titles between 1935 and 1937. He helped Cornafean to win SFC titles in 1936, 1938, 1940 and 1943. He has two young children after his marriage to Joan Margaret Fox of Dublin four years ago.

29-11-52 Fermanagh’s share of the pooled Lagan Cup receipts this year amounted to £150.

13-12-52 Obituary, Miss Elizabeth Cullen, Rosculban, Kesh at the age of 28 died as a result of a motor accident on Main St. Kesh.

20-12-52  Representatives from the ESB, Sligo, gave a lecture illustrated by lantern slides in St. Mary’s Hall, Pettigo and St. Patrick’s Hall, Lettercran. In both halls there was a representative attendance and canvassers were appointed to visit homes with a view to having electric light and power brought to the area.

20-12-52 The Lord Bishop of Derry, Rev. D. Farren, warns against, “Evil and contemptable influences” as he attends the Golden Jubilee function of the Ulster Herald series of newspapers. Despite the heaviest snowstorm in the area in two decades the function in the I. N. F Hall in Omagh was packed. “He paid an outstanding tribute to the Catholic Press of his Diocese, and declared it very necessary that Irish Catholics should have a strong virile press to counteract the evil influences of an insidious press that would stop at nothing to destroy National ideals and make little of our Irish people, and it was necessary that Irish Catholics should have their own papers to combat such evil influences.”

20-12-52  Woman caught pilfering in Lisnarick Orange Hall. Mary Henry, of Shaloney, Lisnarick, was charged with stealing 2s-3d from a coat in the hall. Sergeant Hadden of Irvinestown had placed some coins coated with an invisible powder in a lady’s coat pocket in the cloakroom following complaints of money being stolen. At 1.15 in the morning the Sergeant ordered all the doors of the hall closed and asked the men to stand by the wall. All the ladies were gathered in a circle in the middle and a basin of water was then brought around and they were asked to dip their hands into it. The defendant’s hands turned the water blue from the effects of the powder.