May 1942.

DUTY OF PEDESTRIANS ON ROADS. INTERESTING POINT IN IRVINESTOWN PROSECUTION. Ought pedestrians obey the road code and walk on the right-hand side of the road, or follow the custom and walk on the left? This question was discussed at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on. Friday, when a motorist was summoned for driving without due care, etc., arising out of an accident in which the car, travelling in the black-out, knocked down a soldier. Major Dickie, R.M., said it was apparent that defendant did not see the soldiers until he was right on top of them. Everybody knew that soldiers were likely to be moving out of the town about that hour, and surely defendant should have driven in such a way that he would have stopped in time. He (the R.M.) recognised that army uniforms were difficult to see in the black-out. Mr. P. J. Flanagan, LL.B., solr., defending the car driver, said the same thing could be said of the soldier, who knew there was traffic on that road, and he should have kept in. His Worship pointed out that the law said pedestrians had a perfect right to be on the road, and there was no obligation on them to be struggling along on the grass verge. Mr. Flanagan said pedestrians had no right to be all over the road.

His Worship—I do not say for a minute they were all over the road. All the Crown witnesses agree the soldiers were not over the centre of the road. His Worship added that at the present time it was much safer on the right hand side of the road at night. Mr. Flanagan said he understood the Code specified that side for pedestrians, yet if it was used they would be deemed to be negligent.His Worship remarked that in the case of traffic approaching from the front the pedestrian would have to clear into the hedge, and people objected to that. The case in question was that in which Thomas McCrossan, Irvinestown, was summoned under the usual two counts for careless driving and for not having a. P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan was summoned for permitting the latter offence.

Gunner Kane gave evidence that when walking home from Irvines town on 21st March, at 11 p.m., he was on the outside of two other soldiers, with some soldiers in front and some behind. A car came up behind them, and knocked him down. He next found himself being attended by nurses in hospital. He was not seriously injured. Cross-examined, witness could not say why he did not hear the car before it struck him. They had been in Irvinestown for a night’s jollification. He did not remember sitting on a coat on the aide of the road and smoking a cigarette after the accident. Gunner Young said he saw the car go past with the last witness on the front of it between the mudguard and the bonnet. The car had no lights lit when it stopped. Gunner Haydon estimated the speed of the car at fifteen to twenty m.p.h. Gunner Wosley stated he saw Haydon pull the other two soldiers into the left as the car drew near.

Sergt. Kelly, R.U.C., gave evidence of finding the car without lights beyond the scene of the accident. The headlights were in order when switched on, and a side lamp had been broken off in the mishap. The road is 19 feet wide, at the spot where the accident happened. Thomas McCrossan swore he could not find his brother, who had contracted to bring three men out of the town, and he had to drive them, though not duty licensed for the. purpose. He was travelling on the centre of the road, and was just passing the soldiers when he heard the bump. When he stopped he switched off the lights. Later he found that the bulbs were blown. He had since taken out a P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan testified to his having arranged to drive three men home, but was unable to get out in time to do so. He did not authorise his brother to drive the car. His Worship said it was not a bad case but drivers ought to drive within the circle of their own lights. For driving without due care Thomas McCrossan-was fined 40/- and 6/- costs. The second summons concerning the licence was dealt with under the Probation of Offenders Act. The summons against Daniel McCrossan was dismissed on the merits.

16-5-1942. BICYCLE WHEEL THEFTS. A Kinawley Man’s Experience. Thefts of a particularly mean type, of which cyclists are the victims, are now, with the shortage of cycles and accessories, becoming prevalent. A young man who left his bicycle outside a hall while at a dance in the Arney district found his front wheel stolen when the dance was over. Another close by had the tyres and tubes of his bicycle stolen. But a Kinawley man’s experience was worst of all. He cycled across the Border to Swanlinbar and left his bicycle on the street while he visited a house. When he emerged after some time, both, wheels had been removed from, his machine and stolen. He had to walk back across the Border with the frame on his shoulder. R.U.C. men took him to the barracks on suspicion of smuggling the frame, but on telephoning the Swanlinbar Gardaí they confirmed the man’s story that his wheels had been stolen. He had to do the rest of the journey on foot, carrying the frame on his shoulder.

16-5-1942. IDENTITY CARDS. People without National Registration Identity Cards, or with Cards which are inaccurate, will find difficulty in Obtaining new Ration Books, when they are due for issue next month. Anyone who has lost his or her Identity Card, or whose Card is inaccurate, should call at once at the local National Registration Office, which is usually the Food Office, and have the matter rectified. Some local Food Offices (see advertisement pages), intend, opening sub-offices, it which the public will be able to obtain new Personal Ration Books and Clothing Cards on production of properly completed Identity Cards and Ration Books, with the Reference Leaves accurately completed.

16-5-1942. EXCESS FLOUR AND MEAL SUPPLIES. SELLING EGGS TO A NEIGHBOUR. CHARGES AT CASTLEDERG. Before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., at Castlederg Petty Sessions on Friday, Elizabeth Harkin, Garvetagh, was summoned for being in possession of an excess quantity of flour and oatmeal, Henry McAnea and Samuel Greer, both shopkeepers, Castlederg, were summoned for disposing of excess quantifies of flour and meal. Const. Wilson said he found two seven stone packs of flour and a ten-stone bag of meal in Harkin’s house on the 2nd March.. In. a statement she took full responsibility and said about six weeks ago she bought a bag of flour from McAnea and about two weeks later ordered another from him, as one bag had only lasted her six weeks. She also purchased the meal at McAnea’s about six weeks ago. – Witness interviewed McAnea, who said he only supplied Harkin with seven stones flour and ten stones meal. He had no hesitation in giving it as it was a long time since she had obtained any from him. Greer told witness that he supplied Harkin with seven stones flour on the 13th December. Witness seized eleven stones flour and 7½ stones meal. The R.M. said it was now permitted to buy any quantity of’ ‘points’ food legally acquired and a month’s supply of unrationed food. The R.M. applied the Probation of Offenders Act in all cases, and forfeited one sack of flour. The R.M. added that the prosecution was properly brought, and it was only the circumstances of the cases that caused him to deal leniently with them.

Robt. A. Scott, Drumclamph, was summoned for having an excess, quantity of flour, namely, 10 stones. Const. Irvine said on the 31st March he went to defendant’s place and was told by him that he received 3 or 4 bags of flour from his brother-in-law, Mr. Rosborough, Derry. Witness found five ten-stone bags. He seized three of them. There were five resident in the house and four full-time employees. In a statement he said while he was at Derry show, he called with his brother-in-law and told him, to send him some flour. He received eight bags of flax and five of flour. The supply would have lasted him two months. The R.M. applied the P.O. Act and forfeited two ten-stone bags.

John Love, Crewe, was summoned for selling eggs other than to a licensed collector. Jeannie Love, do., was summoned for selling eggs at a price other than at the maximum price, and for selling without a licence. James Donaghey, Faughan Bridge, Drumnahoe, Derry, was summoned for purchasing eggs otherwise than at the fixed price, for obtaining 1 lb. butter otherwise than according to the rationing regulations, and for having one lb. butter without authority. Annie O’Neill, Creeduff, was summoned for disposing of 1 lb. butter without authority.

PETROL SHORTAGE FOR AMBULANCES. SERIOUS COMPLAINT AT ENNISKILLEN. Difficulty in securing supplies of petrol for Enniskillen Union ambulances was referred to at the meeting of the Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry presiding. In a letter to the Board, Mr. John Cathcart, ambulance driver, said: “I beg to inform, you of the difficulties that exist in getting a. supply of petrol for the ambulances. When application, would be made for 140 units 80 would be supplied, and when application- for 80 was made 50 would be supplied. The number of coupons is insufficient to keep the ambulance service going, and on the 8th. inst. an inspector from the Petroleum Office called at the Workhouse and informed me it was illegal to obtain petrol without coupons from any trader. He also called with Messrs. Topping and Co. and told him he would hold him liable if he supplied petrol without coupons. I have eight gallons of petrol in stock, and when this amount is exhausted the ambulance will have to be refused for the want of petrol.”

The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) corroborated Mr. Cathcart’s remarks, and said he (the Clerk) told the Petroleum Board representative that ambulances were of more importance than any other vehicles on the road, and that the general public could not possibly be left without ambulances to convey the sick to hospital. He also told the official that they would get petrol for the ambulances whether by surrender of coupons or not. The official promised to explain the matter at his headquarters. Mr. A. Wilson—Did you not ask the Ministry?Mr. J. J. Coalter—Send that letter to the Ministry of Home Affairs and explain the difficulty.  Clerk — The petrol authorities must have got it into their heads we were using it ourselves. Mr. Coalter’s suggestion was unanimously approved of.

CONFIRMATION AT DEVENISH. St. Mary’s Church, Devenish, was thronged on Friday last when the Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, administered the Sacrament of Confirmation to upwards of 140 children and some adult converts. His Lordship was met at the church by Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, and proceeded through the sacred edifice with a procession of over twenty priests to the High Altar. Mass was celebrated by Rev. P. Monaghan, C.C. Addressing the children after Confirmation, his Lordship congratulated them on being enrolled as soldiers in the army of Christ. Until now they had few responsibilities, but from this hour onwards it would be their duty not only to defend the Kingdom of Christ, but to extend it, and to do this they would have to take an intelligent interest in all that pertains to their faith, and particularly in the liturgy and functions of the Church. It would be easy for them to remain faithful to their religion while they were at home in Catholic Ireland, but if some of them found their way to countries where the faith has grown cold and many people would sneer at their religion, there would be danger for them unless their lives were lived in accordance with the teaching of their faith. They had in the main the Ten Commandments of God to be the general outline of their lives, and they had an informed conscience to tell them what was right and what was wrong. They had a leader, Jesus Christ, and if they were to be enthusiastic about their faith they must always remember the beauty of their Leader, and be ready to sacrifice everything for Him.

During the month of May it is the wish of His Holiness the Pope that all children should pray for his intention, and peace is a necessary preliminary to the restoration of Christian virtue. After administering the Total Abstinence pledge to the children until they attain the age of twenty-one his Lordship said it used to be a mere formality in the past for girls to take the pledge, but times had changed, and there were grave temptations for young girls to take intoxicating drink, particularly in seaside towns during the holiday season. Sponsors were, Mr. Henry McGrath, Devenish; and Mrs. Dick, ex-P.E.T., Cornahilta. His Lordship was much impressed by the splendid new Parochial Hall at Devenish, which competent authorities say is one of the best of its kind in the North.

Confirmation in Cleenish and Derrygonnelly. Administering the Sacrament of Confirmation in St. Mary’s’ Church, Arney, to the children of the three districts of the Cleenish Parish (Arney, Mullaghdun and Belcoo) , Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, referred to the death of Dr. McKenna, late Bishop of Clogher, and expressed sympathy with the people of the diocese in their loss. The children confirmed numbered 130, and his Lordship, told them that the Sacrament strengthened their faith.

GREEN CROSS FUND. ENNISKILLEN I.N.F. CEILIDHE FOR GREEN CROSS. The Devenish (Enniskillen) Branch of the Irish National Foresters on Sunday held a most enjoyable and successful ceilidhe in the Foresters’ Hall, Enniskillen, in aid of the Green Cross Fund. (Ed. a fund to support the families of interned Republicans.)

A very large gathering of patrons assembled, drawn mainly from the surrounding districts, but also fairly representative of a much larger area, parties coming from Omagh, Clones and  other parts. To the excellent music of the Enniskillen St. Molaise Band, the dancers enjoyed a very large selection of Irish dances, these being participated in with the utmost pleasure. Never for a moment did the spirit of pleasure flag, and the dancers parted as they had kept happy dancing company, in the best of humour. Mr. Jim Sheridan, Lackaboy, was an efficient master of ceremonies, his dance announcements being made all in Irish. He was assisted by Mr. C. P. Drumm, secretary of Branch Devenish and organiser-in-chief of the ceilidhe. The proceedings concluded with the National Anthem, played by the band and sung by the large assembly, standing at attention.

OTHER SIMILAR FUNCTIONS. Largely contributing to the great improvement in the Ederney parish contribution to the Fund (already acknowledged) was a similar ceilidhe held in Ederney recently. It is to be hoped that other parishes will follow the Enniskillen and Ederney , examples and organise ceilidhthe or football matches in aid of the Fund apart from the ordinary parish collections.

IRVINESTOWN. The Irvinestown district collection of the Irvinestown Parish is complete, but the lodgement is being held over until the Coa and Whitehill areas have also had an opportunity to contribute to the parish total.

ARNEY. A meeting will be held on Sunday evening next, 17th inst., in the vicinity of St. Mary’s Church, Arney, after Devotions, to arrange for this year’s collection in that area. A large attendance is earnestly requested.

KNOCKNINNY. The parish collection is being taken up, and it is hoped that Teemore will also be organised shortly.

KILLESHER. The parish collection in Lower Killesher is well advanced. Nothing has as yet been done in Upper Killesher, but’ an effort is being made to organise that area.

KINAWLEY. The Kinawley collection is practically finished.

DEVENISH. Very Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, has forwarded to the County Secretary a cheque for £34 10s 0d, being the 1942 Devenish parish collection for the Fund. The total is an increase of about £5 on last year, and Devenish is to he heartily congratulated on its prompt and generous response to the appeal.

OTHER AREAS. Will other parishes or districts in which no effort has as yet been made please arrange to have the collection taken up as soon as possible. It is desired that the county’s total effort should be concluded within a reasonable time.

EDERNEY’S FINE EFFORT. Ederney Branch of the Green Cross Society has forwarded to Mr P. J. O’Hare, Co. Fermanagh secretary, the sum of £30 2s 8d, result of the 1942 collection in the parish. This amount exceeds by nearly £10 the 1941 total, and Ederney is to be congratulated on its prompt and successful effort. Ederney has been the first parish to complete the 1942 collection. Enniskillen is almost complete, but there are still a few books to come in.

23-5-1942. BELLEEK BREAD CASES. At Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Mrs. Margaret McMahon, Ballynadoghy Belleek, was charged with having, on 22nd November, 1941, without a licence granted by the Board of Trade acquired 16 2 lb. loaves, whereby the total quantity of bread in her possession or under her control, exceeded the normal quantity required by her. The following were similarly charged in  respect to the same date, Mrs. Margaret McCann, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Alice Greenan, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Annie McGroarty, Fassagh, for 6 2 lb. loaves; Miss Mary Somerville, Fassagh, 7 2 lb. loaves.

Patrick John McCart, Forthill, Irvinestown, was charged with having on November 22nd unlawfully disposed of a quantity of bread to the above mentioned defendants, knowing that by reason of such disposal the quantity of .bread which may be lawfully acquired by these persons would be exceeded. Head Constable Briggs, Belleek, said that on the 22nd. of November, he visited a number of houses in the Commons district. He went to McMahons and found 19 2lb. loaves in a cardboard box. When questioned Mrs. McMahon told him she was giving some of them to friends in the Free State and made a statement to that effect.

The statement was read by Sergeant Blevin. Continuing Head Constable Briggs said that in McCann’s he found six loaves in a coarse bag and four in a handbag hanging from the roof. There were also two other loaves in the house some homemade bread and 9 stone of flour. There were eight people living in the house. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin, Mrs. McCann said she got six of the loaves from Hughes bread van. Witness sized ten of the loaves. There were five children in McCann’s as well as the defendant and her husband. The bread van only came round twice a week—on Tuesdays and Saturdays. The house was about 250 yards from the village. Head Const. Brigg’s, continuing, said he went to Greenan’s and found 14 loaves there. There was also some homemade bread and 9 stones of flour. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin defendant said she got all the loaves except two from Hughes van.

Sergt. Blevin cross-examined said Mrs. Greenan made no statement concerning her brother-in-law wanting the bread for a dance he was having nor did she mention her sister in hospital. One of the children made some reference to McCabe later. Head Const. Briggs said that in connection with the affair he interviewed McCart, the driver of Hughes bread van, who said he only sold bread for the use of Northern people. He sold one doz.  to McMahons; ½ doz. to McCann’s; 1 doz. to Greenan’s, ½ doz. to Miss Somerville and 5 doz. to Mrs. McGroarty. McCart had one dozen loaves in the van when he was stopped in Garrison. Cross-examined by Mr. Flanagan witness said that when questioned McCart told everything. He had been selling bread in the district for some time.

Constable Green said that on Saturday, November 22, he visited McGroarty’s and saw 9 21b loaves on the table. There were two elderly, and two young people living in the house. Mrs. McGroarty said the loaves were for their own use. Cross-examined witness said the nearest shop was a quarter of a mile away. Mrs. McGroarty would get the same bread there on Monday and Tuesday as she would buy on Saturday. There was flour in the house. Constable Green said he asked Miss Somerville had she any bread in the house and she said she had only two loaves. In a large box he found seven loaves. There were three elderly people in the house. The house was 50 yards from the border. Cross-examined witness said Miss Somerville was an old infirm woman and her brother and the other occupant of the house was much the same.

THE DEFENCE Mr. Flanagan said that his client had been selling bread in the district for some time. He was changed with “knowing” or ‘that he ought reasonably expected to have known, that the amount disposed of was in excess of the quantity to which each person was entitled.” The defendant had no means of knowing how many people lived in each house. His job was to sell bread and like a good businessman he tried to increase his sales. His worship had mentioned, perhaps rightly, that when a poor man was summoned under the Food Order, there were people behind him, but in this case, the firm who employed McCart had nothing whatever to do with it. The defendant had been suspended for a while. He was a young married man with six children.

Capt. Ramage said that Mrs. McMahon had a brother living across the Border, to whom she gave some bread. There was no question of sale. Concerning McCanns there were five, children, two who were working, and the defendant and her husband. There was not an excessive quantity of bread, in the house to last that family from Saturday evening until Tuesday. In McGroartys 9 loaves for four people for three days was not excessive.. All the cases were border line ones.

Mrs. Greenan said she had a brother- in-law John McCabe. At that time her sister Miss Gallagher was in the hospital and, her brother went to see her on that day and the house was locked up. There were three men living in it. On Friday her brother told her to get the bread for him when he was away. Mrs. McCabe was also away seeing her sister and sent a message with witness’s daughter to get some bread as her husband (McCabe) was having a dance on Sunday night, and wanted the bread for the band. She bought six loaves for McCabe, four for her brother and four for herself. Cross-examined, witness said she told the Sergeant about McCabe. There were only seven and a half stones flower in the house. McCart was fined 15/- and 6/7 costs; Mrs. McMahon, 10/6, and Miss Somerville, 10/6. The summonses against the other defendants were dismissed.

HEATH FIRE Peter Maguire, Scribbagh, was fined 8s and 2s costs for displaying a heath fire in an open field. Constable McMullen, Garrison, was complainant.

CAVAN MAN FINED. FOUND WITH CYCLE TYRES AND TEA. CHARGE AT ENNISKILLEN. A young County Cavan man with an address at Lisnaskea—John Stephen J Brady, of Cootehill,—was at a Special court in Enniskillen on Thursday before Major Dickie, R.M., fined £6 4 0d (treble the value of the goods involved) for being on the previous day knowingly concerned in dealing in six cycle tyres and 3lbs, of tea with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereof. Mr. J. Cooper prosecuted, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) defended. Mr. Cooper said the defendant was met by Constable McKeown with a parcel in which the articles were found.

Constable McKeown said defendant went to Westville Terrace, Enniskillen, watched by witness, knocked at two doors, failing to gain admittance, and then went up the Hospital lane. Witness went up by the railway station and met Brady coming down. Asked what was in the parcel Brady said tyres. Witness put his hand in and found another parcel, which Sergt. Sherrard later at the barracks found to contain the tea. Brady had been working for some time in Fermanagh. A. Dickson, surveyor of Customs and Excise, said Brady made a statement to .him in which he said nothing he had was intended for export. Of the tyres two were intended for a man at Lisnaskea, two for a man at Enniskillen and two for himself. He had got them all in Irvinestown or vicinity, and there also, from a woman whose name he would not give, he had got the tea for his own use.

Mr. Herbert said defendant was married and had five children. He had been working in Fermanagh for some time and had been residing in Lisnaskea. At his work his way of subsistence was to take tea three times daily and this as well as the tea he got in Lisnaskea was more than the two-ounce ration would supply. Therefore he took the chance to get this extra tea for himself. In evidence, Brady bore out this, statement and also swore to the statements made to Mr. Dickson. When apprehended at Enniskillen he told Mr. Cooper he was coming from Irvinestown and going to Lisnaskea. He did not go in by train to Lisnaskea because he had a bus ticket. Constable McKeown, recalled, said at the time it was 9.5 p.m. and Brady was looking for lodgings in Enniskillen. Major Dickie — That rather upsets his story. The magistrate convicted and in addition to imposing the penalty ordered the goods to be forfeited.

23-5-1942. 14½-YEAR-OLD GIRL EARNING 35/ – WEEKLY AS CLERK. A fourteen-and-a-half years old girl is earning 35/- weekly as a clerical assistant in the office of the Clerk of Enniskillen Union. (Mr. J. Brown). Referring to the matter at the Board of Guardians’ meeting on Tuesday, Mr. W. A. Thornton, J. P., expressed this view: “If the wage was three times the amount there would be no question about it. It is too cheap, I think.”

The matter arose through a letter from the Ministry to the Board, in which it was stated that in the absence of full details of the qualifications possessed by Ethel Armstrong—(the child concerned) — and the other candidates for the position of assistant in the clerk’s office, they were not prepared to approve of the appointment to this position of a girl of such tender years and lack of experience, particularly at the comparatively high scale of remuneration proposed. The Ministry asked to be furnished with full particulars of the qualifications experience, etc., of the other candidates whom the Board considered eligible for appointment, and that the Board should forward at the same time the original applications of each. It was stated that the little girl was receiving 35/- weekly. Chairman (Hon. C. L. Corry) —What sort of work is she doing ? The Clerk — It is not very important, She is only 14½. Mr. D. Weir — Does she not do the work as well as an applicant of 20 years of age? Clerk — The Ministry say she is too young. Mr. Weir — It’s a good fault. Mr. Thornton then expressed the view j already quoted. It was decided to ask the Ministry to reconsider their decision and to allow the little girl to stay on.

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