September 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

19-9-1942. 72 PACKS OF FLOUR. CUSTOMS CAPTURE AT NEWTOWNBUTLER. An Unusual Case. R.M, HOLDS GOODS LIABLE TO FORFEITURE. A most unusual Customs ease was heard at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major T. W. Dickie, R..M., when William P, Lucas, 15 Fade St., Dublin, and Matthew D. Rooney, 44 Temple Bar, Dublin, were charged in connection with 4 tons 4 cwts. 3 qrs. and 14 lbs. of flour, being goods of which, the export was prohibited, and which were found in the possession of the G.N.R, at Newtownbutler on April 14th, 1942 and in respect of which an order for forfeiture was sought. Mr. James Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted; Mr. J. Hanna, solicitor, appeared for the two defendants; Mr. M. E. Knight, solicitor, held a watching brief on behalf, of the G.N.R

Mr. Cooper said it was rather all unusual type of case. On April 3rd there arrived at Newtownbutler station 4 tons 4 cwts. 3 qrs. 14 lbs of white flour. This flour had been consigned by the Co. Derry Railway from ‘‘Eire” and was consigned to Dublin. The bags of flour were examined by Mr. Chapman, Officer of Customs. One bag was marked Belfast, another Australia, while the others were differently marked and appeared to have been taken out of the original, bags. The flour was put in a sealed waggon. Proceeding, Mr. Cooper said the Customs authorities, required the station master at Newtownbutler to furnish proof under Sec, 3 of the Customs Defence Act, 1939, as amended by the new regulation. Following the demand of proof from the stationmaster, word was received from the railway companies that this flour had been originally handed in at Stranorlar and that it was consigned from Stranorlar by a man named McFadden. The railway company also stated that Mr. McFadden had never sent any other flour by that route and appeared to be a small country shopkeeper who lived at Breena, about 20 miles from Letterkenny. The freight in sending it from Strabane to Stranorlar would be £1 16s per ton and to send it by Ballyshannon would he £2 Is per ton.

It was re-consigned from Ballyshannon by a man named J. McDonald. Nobody knew who McDonald was. The Customs authorities directed the flour to be seized. It was seized, and notice of the seizure was served on Rooney Bros., Dublin. Mr. Fitzpatrick, solicitor, gave formal .notice that Mr. Lucas claimed ownership, and also wrote on behalf of Rooney, who claimed two tons of the flour. The railway company then informed them part of this flour was first sent from Buncrana to Letterkenny by a man called W. Porter. A man named Bradley then came in and made a claim against the railway company for £228 for loss in respect of the flour. This flour was unobtainable at the time in the Free State and they suggested it was smuggled through the Customs somewhere about Strabane, because it would have to be unloaded and put on the train to have it sent down to Ballyshannon. In any case, it had no business to be exported from Northern Ireland at all.

19-9-1942. IRVINESTOWN PETTY SESSIONS. CYCLE LARCENY CHARGE. BICYCLE THEFT PRISON FOR SOLDIER. At Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., District-Inspector Walshe charged Private Kerrigan, Pioneer Corps, formerly of Boho, Co. Fermanagh with the larceny of a bicycle value £10, the property of Curry Beatty, Ballinamallard. Henry Armstrong, Coolisk, was charged with receiving the bicycle. Kerrigan stated that he was returning to England from leave, when he bought the bicycle from a man named O’Donnell, of Sligo, for £1 15s. He then sold the bicycle to Armstrong for £2 10s. A sentence of six months’ imprisonment was ordered. For Armstrong it was said that he was under the influence of drink when he bought the bicycle and the case was dismissed on the merits.

19-9-1942. £120 IN FINES CALEDON MAN MULCTED. At Dungannon Petty Sessions, Thomas A. Clark, Ballagh, Caledon, was prosecuted for dealing in the following prohibited goods—85 loaves of wheat flour bread, five -0-st. bags wheat flour 420 lb. candles, 446 packets and 14 lb. of soap flakes and soap powders, 3¾ cwt. soap, 24 lb. custard powder, one quarter and 2½ lb. cocoa, and 1 qr. 22 lb. coffee. On a second count he was prosecuted for having the following uncustomed goods—large iron kettle, one aluminium teapot, one enamel teapot, two enamel dishes, one enamel saucepan, and 38 dozen eggs. Mr. Long, R.M., said the Clarke family seemed to be engaged in the wholesale distribution of these prohibited articles Owing to defendant’s age and ill-health he would not send him to prison. In the first case he would be fined £115 12s 3d. For harbouring the uncustomed goods he was fined £5.

19-9-1942. REFUSED TO GIVE NAMES TO B SPECIALS. Five Men Before Trillick Court. At Trillick Petty Sessions on Monday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Francis Donnelly, Derrymacanna; Francis Woods, Moorfield, Trillick; John P. McGrade, Shanmullagh; Philip McGrade, Tallymacanna; and Frank McColgan, Stralongford were charged with disorderly conduct and refusing to give their names to members of a “B” patrol. S. D. Commandant Beattie, gave evidence that early on Monday morning, Aug.,

19-9-1942. £30 FINE ON IRVINESTOWN MOTORIST FAILURE TO TAX CAR. Daniel McCrossan, Main Street, Irvinestown, appeared at the local Petty Sessions last Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., to answer a summons brought against him for using a motor vehicle on the public road on 7th April last without a licence. The summons was brought by Fermanagh County Council per Herbert J. D. Moffitt, taxation officer.

Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, said that Constable Cander found defendant’s car on the public street on 7th April, 1942 without being licensed. The matter came before the County Council, and they decided to allow defendant off with a mitigated penalty of £1. Mr. Moffitt wrote to defendant on the 6th May informing him that proceedings would be stayed if he paid £1. No answer was received, and Mr. Moffitt again wrote, but no answer was received from defendant. Constable Cander gave evidence of finding a public service vehicle, the property of defendant, on the street on 7th April. It was not licensed. Defendant said “It was just an overlook at the time.” John Moffitt, who is employed in the taxation office, said the car was licensed at the present time. The annual duty was £10 a year. He sent a notice to defendant that the County Council had considered the matter, and that if he paid £1 proceedings would not be taken—if he took out a licence. There was no reply. Witness sent a further note on 7th July. Mr. Cooper—In this case the penalty is £20, or three times the amount of duty payable, whichever is the greater. The County Council I understand, have power to review it when it goes back to them. The greater penalty is £30. Defendant said that the car was out of order at the time, and he was looking for parts for it. His Worship — Why did you not answer the letter? I did not think the offence was very serious. Defendant added that if he did not tax the car he would get no petrol. His Worship imposed a penalty of £30, and £1 ls 9d costs, with a stay till next Court. Mr. Cooper — We want to get the penalty your Worship, to show these people they must pay attention to these things.

19-9-1942. TO STAND FOR STORMONT SEAT MR. EAMONN DONNELLY, Ex-T.D. Mr. Eamonn Donnelly, secretary of the Green Cross Fund, and formerly T.D. for Leix-Offaly, is to be a candidate for the Northern Ireland Parliamentary by-election for the. Falls Division, Belfast. He was also M.P. for South, Armagh from 1925 to 1929. Mr. Donnelly told a Press man that he had been asked by a number of representative men to stand for the Division in the interests of unity. His chief aims would be to try to bring together all sections of the minority. “I know,” he said, “there are many who will support the candidature of one espousing the principles that I would like to see established. We have been wandering more or less in a morass for the last, number of years, at sixes and sevens, with no definite guidance as to the ultimate realisation of the objective, that everyone cherishes dearly, namely, the unification of our country.

“I have always held, and still hold, that it is possible to re-unite our country by constitutional means. I believe the Irish people as a whole, given an opportunity, will stand for the bringing together again of the old Constituent Assembly, the first Dail under the aegis of which the advances were made which Southern Ireland today enjoys, but which do not apply to us.” “I assured the delegation,” he said, “ that my aim, if elected, would be to concentrate on the release of political internees. “There can be no peace while internment without trial exists. It is contrary to every principle of justice and citizenship, and certainly contrary to what the Allied. Powers profess to be fighting for. I have never compromised and never will on the unity of Ireland. I believe the unity of the country is more necessary to-day than ever, more particularly as its defence as a unit in the present world conflict should be the first consideration of every Irishman. I have no doubt as to the result in West Belfast. It often gave a lead before to Ireland, and God knows we want leadership now more than ever.”

19-9-1942. CHARM ING DERRY WEDDING. OMAGH POSTAL OFFICIAL WED. HYNES —YANNARELLI. A charming wedding took place on Thursday morning in St. Eugene’s Cathedral, Derry, with Nuptial Mass and Papal Blessing, when two well-known Derry and Tyrone families were united. The contracting parties were Mr. Patrick Hynes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hynes, of Campsie, Omagh, Co. Tyrone, and Miss Isabella Yannarelli, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Yannarelli, Strand Road, Derry City. Both bride and bridegroom, are well known and highly esteemed, the bridegroom being a very popular member of the clerical staff of Omagh Post Office, while the bride is prominent in local social circles. The ceremony was performed by Rev. T. Devine, C.C.. Castlefin, Donegal.

19-9-1942. ASSAULT CASE. DEFENDANT FINED AND REMOVED FROM COURT. IRVINESTOWN STORY. Summonses against father and son were heard at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when Thomas McLaughlin, Coolback, brought a summons against James Hamilton Martin (father), Cabragh, for defendant’s neglect to pay for trespass of his cattle on complainant’s land at Doogary on 3rd inst.; and also a summons against Ernest Martin (son), Cabragh, for assault. Mr. A. Herbert appeared for complainant, who gave evidence that he had taken part of a farm, the other, part being taken by the senior defendant; Plaintiff alleged that on the 3rd inst. Martin senior put, seven head of cattle on to the land he (plaintiff) had taken. Later, when plaintiff met defendant and his four sons defendant asked him did he drive the cattle off, and plaintiff replied in the affirmative. Plaintiff then described what followed, and said that Ernest Martin struck him on the mouth, which bled.

Francis McMulkin, owner of the farm gave evidence as to the letting. When he had finished his evidence there ensued an argument between the senior defendant and witness.       Sergeant M, Kelly said that when plaintiff called with him on 3rd inst. there was blood trickling from the side of his mouth, and his lip was slightly swollen. Defendant said that plaintiff made all shapes to stick, him with a pitchfork. One of his sons caught, the pitchfork, and whatever injury plaintiff got was in the wrangling over the pitchfork.

This man, declared defendant, “is a bad man—a dangerous man. Would you not know the look of him? Ernest Martin denied striking plaintiff. Plaintiff and his brother were wrestling for the pitch fork on one side of the road, and witness was standing on the other side of the road. Kenneth Martin said plaintiff followed them with a pitch fork and attempted to stab his father with it. Witness caught the pitch fork, and during the tussle plaintiff got a crack on the face.His Worship—How many of you were there? — We were going to our work, and there were five of us. Henry Emery also gave evidence.

His Warship held that Martin, Sen., was guilty of trespass, and that his son was guilty of an unprovoked assault. He fined the son 40/- and 4/- costs, and made an order for the trespass by scale, with £2 2s 0d costs. Addressing Martin, Senr., his Worship said that from his behaviour in Court, if he had any more trouble with him he would bind him over in heavy sureties to keep the peace. Defendant—I will appeal the case. His Worship then directed the police to remove defendant from Court.

19-9-1942. ROSSINVER PARISH COUNCIL. FARMERS’ GRIEVANCE. THE TEA SUPPLY. A meeting of Rossinver Parish. Council was held in St. Aiden’s Hall on Sunday, Rev. Father McPhillips, P. P. (chairman) presiding. Other members present included: Messrs. Michael Sheerin, V.C., John Gilligan, P.C.; Joseph Fox, James Connolly, Sean Eames, N.T. (secretary), and Padraic J. O’Rourke.

DRAINAGE. A deputation appeared before the meeting on behalf of farmers residing in the townlands of Corraleskin, Gortnaderry, Gubmanus, Lattoon and Cornagowna, whose lands have been flooded by the Kilcoo River. Mr. Patrick Meehan, Latloon, who acted as spokesman said that many farmers along the border from Kiltyclogher to Garrison had suffered great losses in hay crops and pasture for the past two months. The damage done had been unprecedented. Nine floods, coming in quick succession had effected the complete ruin of a huge amount of hay and oats. The floods had been the worst in living memory. A lake in the Six Counties had been drained a few years ago, and the extra water from this area was now coming into the border river, making the flooding much worse than it used to be. Rev. P. McPhillips- The people have been trying for the past 50 years to get the border river drained, and the removal of a narrow bed of rock from the river bed near Garrison would solve the whole difficulty at a very small cost. A. few sticks of gelignite would; do the whole thing.

Mr. O’Rourke—Farmers on both sides of the border are affected, and our Government were prepared to have the river drained four years ago provided the Six-County Government would co-operate. The required co-operation was not forthcoming, and so the scheme fell through.

Mr. Denis Keaney (a member of the deputation) stated that as all the good grazing lands, lay along the river the cattle had failed in milking since they were put on the hard hills, and farmers had lost from £5 to £10 in their creamery Cheques for the two months, and the flooded hay was likely to kill the cattle during the winter.

The following resolution, proposed by Mr. P. J. O’Rourke, seconded by Mr. M. Sheerin, was passed unanimously (copies to be forwarded to the Minister for Local Government and local T.D.s): “That we, the members of Rossinver Parish Council, request the Minister for Local Government to take into, consideration the serious losses in hay crops and pasture suffered by farmers living along the border river, particularly in the townlands of Corraleskin, Gortnaderry, Lattoon, Gubmanus and Cornagowna, and to grant them a rebate in the rates, for the coming year. Wo also consider it very necessary that immediate action be taken by the Government to have the rock at Cornagowna, which is the prime cause of the whole flooding, removed.” Mr. Sheerin—We want the T.D.s to back us up in this matter.

19-9-1942. BELLEEK SESSIONS. At Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday, Before Major Dickie, R.M., Eric Carson, Knocknashangan, Garrison, was fined 10s for failing to produce his identity card when asked to do so by an authorised person. Michael O’Shea, Drumanillar, Belleek, was summoned for leading two horses on the public highway during the hours of darkness without having a light in front of the animals. The case was dismissed.

19-9-1942. WAR DEPARTMENT PETROL. Thomas Gallagher, Aghoo, Garrison, was charged with having in his possession on 23rd July a quantity of petrol—5 gallons— the property of the War Department. (N.I.), which, he bought or received from a soldier or person, acting on his behalf. He was also charged with not being a servant of the Government acting in the course of his duty as such, or a person acting in accordance with the authority of a Government Department had in his possession a quantity of Government petroleum spirit contrary to the Emergency Powers Order. Constable McMullin, examined by D.I. Walshe who prosecuted, said that on 23rd July he stopped Gallagher, and subsequently went to inspect defendant’s garage, and found the petrol in a tins there. In a statement Gallagher said he got two gallons of petrol from a soldier on the road a few weeks previously. Sergt. Bailey gave evidence of testing the petrol, which he found reacted to the test for Army petrol and Cpl. Geelan said he dispatched a sample of the petrol to the public analyst at Belfast. D.I. Walshe said that owing to the enormous expense entailed they had not brought the analyst from Belfast, but had obtained his certificate. Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solr., Enniskillen, pleading guilty on behalf of his client, said that this was the type of offence any person, being human, would fall into. The defendant had acted with extrema foolishness, and he asked the Resident Magistrate to deal leniently with the matter. The R.M. said he could not treat the matter lightly, and imposed a fine of £93 on the second summons, the penalty to rule both charges. He allowed two months to pay.

CASE DISMISSED, George Connor, Aghoo, Garrison, was also charged with having army petrol in his possession. D.I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr, P. J. Flanagan defended.

19-9-1942. SIX COUNTY POTATO PRICES. MORE MONEY FOR GROWERS. (Ed. “Ware Potatoes” is a term mostly used within the potato industry. Sometimes, it is used in a generic sense for any potatoes destined for human consumption in potato form, as opposed to seed potatoes or potatoes that are primarily valued for the amount of starch that can be extracted from them for industrial processing.)

Growers’ prices for ware and seed potatoes of the 1942 crop as from 1st October have now been announced. The districts will be District 1—Counties Antrim., Down, Armagh (Newry No. 2 Rural District only), Tyrone (Strabane Rural District only) and Londonderry, and District 3—-Counties Fermanagh, Tyrone (except Strabane Rural District), Londonderry and Armagh (except Newry No. 2 Rural District).

In District I. the price of ware potatoes during October will be 90/- per ton tor the varieties Golden Wonder, King Edward, Red King and Gladstone; 75/- per ton for Kerr’s Pink, Redskin, Up-to-Date, Dunbar Standard, Arran Peak, Arran Victory and any other variety grown on red soil, and 70/- per ton for any other variety not grown on red soil. In District II. the price will be 5/- per ton less in each case. These are fixed prices for delivery f.o.r. grower’s railway station, or on buyer’s lorry at the farm.

Growers’ prices per ton for Class I. certified seed will be until further notice: Arran Crest, Catriona, Di Vernon, Doon Early, Immune Ash leaf, May Queen, Ninetyfold, Witchhill,  Ulster Chieftain, 205/-; Arran Pilot, Ballydoon, Duke of York. Ulster Monarch, Arran Scout, Sharpe’s Express, 155/-; Doon Pearl, Dunbar, Robar, Eclipse, Dargill Early, Suttin’s Abundance, Arran Signet, 140/ -; Ally, Alness, Arran Comrade, Arran Peak, Ben Lomond, British Queen, Dunbar Standard. Edzell Blue, Gladstone, Golden Wonder, King Edward VII, Red King, Beauty of Hebron, Herald, Bintze, (Muizen) – 120/-: Arran Banner, Arran Cairn, Arran Chief, Arran Consul, Arran Victory, Bishop, Champion, Doon Star, Dunbar Archer, Dunbar Cavalier, Field Marshall, Great Scot, Irish Queen, Kerr’s Pink, King George V., Majestic, President, Redskin, Rhoderick Dhu, Royal Kidney {Queen Mary), Tinwald Perfection. Up-to-Date, Baron, Arran Luxury, 110/-.

The price for Northern Ireland Report Certificate Seed will be 20/- per ton less in each case. A top riddle of and a bottom riddle of 1¼ will apply to all varieties of seed of the above classifications.

CONSUMER TO PAY LESS. A reduction in the maximum wholesale and retail prices for ware potatoes has been announced. To offset this reduction a subsidy will be paid to licensed “first buyers’ and in certain circumstances licensed grower-salesmen. The maximum wholesale price in District I. from 24th to 50th September will be 4/- per cwt. for Grade A and 3/6 per cwt. for Grade B. In District II the price will be 3d per cwt. less in each case. From 28th September to 3rd October the maximum retail price in both districts, will be 5d per half-stone for Grade A and 4½d per half-stone for Grade B.

19-9-1942. Department and Monaghan Appointment. At a meeting of the Co., Monaghan Vocational Education Committee, a letter was read from the Department intimating that the Ministry was not prepared to approve of the appointment of Miss M. Duffy, as commercial teacher in Monaghan Technical School. By 14 votes to 4, a resolution was carried requesting the Minister to sanction the appointment temporarily pending Miss Duffy securing certificate for instruction in typewriting.

19-9-1942. NOTICE TO FARMERS.  We wish to inform our customers and the general public that we have received a large consignment of Men’s, Women’s and Boys’ Kip Nailed Boots for the winter season. These are exceptionally good, reliable Boots, and up to pre-war standard. We would advise the early purchase of same, as we may not be able to repeat the superior quality of these lines. FLANAGAN’S, Enniskillen.

19-9-1942. DESERTED FROM TWO ARMIES. A stranger stopped by a policeman in Enniskillen was found to be a deserter from the Irish Army. It later transpired that the man had deserted from the British Army. The man, Michael D’Arcy, of the A.M.P.C., was charged with being a deserter at a special court before Mr. W. F. Dewane, J.P., and was ordered to be handed over to the military authorities.

19-9-1942. LISNASKEA ASSAULT CASE. When Mary Jane Melanophy, of Lisnaskea, summoned Margaret Burns, Erne Terrace. Lisnaskea, for assault, at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, plaintiff alleged that defendant threw two stones at her, one of them striking her on the ankle. Defendant, said she threw a stone at plaintiff, but she did not believe it hit her. She threw the stone in self-defence when plaintiff raised a broom over her head. Major Dickie, R.M., said he did not believe there was anything to choose between them from what he heard in Court. He imposed on Mrs. Burns a nominal penalty of 2/6, with £1 Is 0d costs, and advised the parties to try to live in peace.

26-9-1942. CONSTABLE SUMMONED AT LETTERBREEN. RECKLESS DRIVING CHARGE DISMISSED. Constable James Mulqueeny, formerly of Kinawley, Co. Fermanagh, and now of Bessbrook, Co. Armagh, appeared at Letterbreen Petty Sessions on 16th inst., before Major Dickie. R.M., on the usual three counts; the reckless driving of a motor car on 2nd May last at the cross roads at Florencecourt Creamery. Mr. P J. Flanagan, LL.B., defended. Two constables who had been with defendant in the car on the occasion gave evidence that on the way out from Enniskillen defendant mentioned about the steering of the car being stiff. About 50 yards from the creamery cross they passed another car. Defendant was driving on the left-hand side of the road at a speed of from 25-30 miles per hour, and in the words of one of the witnesses “all of a sudden the car just gave a ‘double’ on the road and struck the far ditch.” Keith Farlow, aged 13 who witnessed the accident, said he saw the car come round the cross and skid on the gravel. The car had been travelling at a medium speed.

Sergeants Ryan and Henderson also gave evidence, the latter, who is inspector of public service vehicles, describing the condition of the car following the accident, and said the right front wheel was buckled and the tyre burst. Defendant said that at the time of the accident was stationed at Kinawley, and was the driver of the Customs car.. The car in which he had the accident was his own, and his brother had been using it in the city. When it came back he noticed there was something wrong with the steering. Describing the accident, defendant said the steering seemed to lock. He put pressure on it, but could not get it straightened again. The steering did not answer at all, and he struck the bank. His Worship-—There are so many, theories one could advance of how this accident happened. I don’t know which to accept. I don’t think it is a case in which I ought to convict. He dismissed the case.

19-9-1942. WRONGFUL USE OF PETROL. LISNASKEA CASE. The first case of its kind in the district was heard at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when Imelda Evelyn Beggan, of Tattycam, Newtownbutler, was charged, with having used motor fuel on 3rd August at Kilygullion for a purpose other than that specified. Constable Kelly gave evidence of stopping a Ford motor car driven by defendant on 3rd August, and in reply to questions she said she was getting three gallons of petrol per month for going to Mass on Sundays, and bringing eggs to Lisnaskea market every Saturday and that she had been leaving her sister to the 5.30 p.m. train for Belfast. Mr. J. B. Murphy, defending, said that defendant lived six miles from a railway station and in one of the forms she stated that there was no public transport. He suggested that defendant was entitled to use the car to bring her sister, who worked, in a Government office, to the railway station in order to get back to work. His Worship—She is given this for certain purposes in strict law. He added that one thing that was wrong was the statement that there was no public transport.

Mr. Murphy—It is three miles away. He said that it was the first case of its kind, and he would ask his Worship to apply the Probation of Offenders Act. When applying for a renewal of the three gallons defendant could mention this journey. District Inspector Smyth said it was the first case in the district. They were going to delve into this business very carefully, and the prosecution had been brought to air activity in the matter. His Worship—I understand that if a person is convicted for improper use of petrol automatically the petroleum officer: will not give them any further supplies. District Inspector—They refer it to the police first and ask their opinion. Dealing with defendant under the Probation of Offenders Act on payment of costs of Court, his Worship said that did not mean that the next person would get the benefit of the Probation Act.

26-9-1942. FALSE REPRESENTATIONS CHARGE AT KESH. Thomas Duncan, Water Lane, Letterkeen, was charged at Kesh Petty Sessions an Tuesday with having on the 1st Jan., 1942, at Kesh, for the purpose of obtaining for himself a supplementary pension under the Unemployment Assistance Act, knowingly made a false representation that during the seven days up to and including, 1st January he had not earned more than 5s, whereas, during this period he was employed by Messrs. H. and J. Martin, Ltd., 163, Ormeau Road, Belfast, and in the week ended 31st December, 1941, earned 76/3d,: this sum being paid to him on 3rd Jan., 1942. There was a second charge against defendant of making a false representation, for the same purpose, for the week ending 8th January, the amount he was alleged to have earned  being 67/9d. Alan McCullagh, an official of the Assistance Board, gave evidence of receiving defendant’s application on 16th October last. Major Dickie, R.M. “(to defendant) — Have you any explanation to give? Defendant—I have not indeed. I know nothing about it. His Worship-—You knew enough to draw £3 16s.

James Weir, another official, gave evidence of filling up the application for defendant on 14th Oct. He read over the application to defendant and explained it to him and witnessed defendant’s mark. Another official, William Henry, Howe, told of interviewing defendant on 4th. Feb., and following caution, defendant said he had done “only an odd hour’s work inside, the last three years.” He denied having been fully employed. John L. Duffy, of the firm of Messrs. Martin, said that for the four weeks from 16th Dec.—10th January, defendant was paid 15s 6d, 75s, 76/3, and 67/9. Miss Mildred Thompson, postmistress, Kesh, said when defendant brought these paying, orders to her, she read them over to defendant and explained them to him. Sergt. Horgan said defendant was a labouring man of good character. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown solicitor, prosecuting—These cases are giving a lot of trouble. These men are drawing large sums of money and are getting this money at the same time. His Worship—I am afraid it is not a case in which there could be any possibility of a mistake. He would not send defendant to jail but imposed on the first charge a fine of £5 and 40s costs, and on the second charge 40s and 20s costs. In default, in the first case two months’ imprisonment and in the second case one month, to run consecutively. Addressing defendant, his Worship said —“That is a fairly substantial penalty, but I am afraid you deserve it.”

19-9-1942. ANTRIM MAN KILLED. TWO U.S. SOLDIERS IN CUSTODY. Soldierstown, Aghalee, South Antrim, has been the scene of a horrible crime which has resulted in the death of Edward Clenaghan, aged 46, who was found lying unconscious on the roadside about midnight on Monday and who died on Tuesday in Lurgan District Hospital. Two American soldiers; 20-year-old Embra H. Farley, from Arkansas, and 26-year-old Herbert Jacobs, from Kentucky, are being held by the U.S. military police in connection with the affair. At an inquest a verdict was returned that Clenaghan died from injuries caused by some person or persons. The dead man was an A.R.P. warden and was unmarried. He lived with his mother at Soldierstown and helped her to manage a public-house, he was a kinsman of the famous artist, Sir John Lavery under whom, he studied art for a time, and was a cousin of the late, Rt. Rev. Mgr. Canon Clenaghan, P.P., V.G., St. Malachy’s Church, Belfast, and of Rev, George Clenaghan, P. P., Armoy.

At the inquest, Dr. James O’Connell, R.M.O., Lurgan Hospital, said that deceased was admitted at 1.50 on Tuesday morning. He was unconscious on admission, and remained so until his death, about 7 o’clock that morning. He had a lacerated wound over the left eye, a lacerated wound on the left side of the chin, and bruising on the right side of the head. The cause of death was cerebral laceration following a fracture of the skull. James Joseph Clenaghan, farmer, a brother of the dead man, said that on Monday evening he was in the bar of his mother’s licensed premises. There were a number of U.S. soldiers there, and he particularly noticed two of them, who seemed to be in or about all afternoon.

All the soldiers left except the two. The soldier in command seemed to be more or less scared of these two but he eventually got them out. All the others left and witness got the bar closed.  About 9.20 p.m., he heard the sound of breaking glass and went out to the hall door and found that a pane of glass in the bar window was broken. He heard footsteps running and overtook two American soldiers. He tried to reason with them, but they started using filthy language and waving two beer bottles and insisted on having more drink. Witness refused, advising them to go on up the road and they might get another drink elsewhere. They still kept walking about on the road some twenty yards or so from the house. He went back home, and his brother, Edward, said he would go up and see the commanding officer of the camp.: He left on his bicycle about 9.30 or 9.45 p.m. About 12.15 a.m. in consequence of a message, he went along the road towards Aghalee, and about a quarter of a mile from home found his brother lying on the grass on the left-hand side of the road going towards Aghalee. He seemed to be in terrible pain and was unconscious. Witness obtained a motorcar and accompanied him to Lurgan Hospital.

26-9-1942. FEEDING STUFFS RATIONING Laggards Should Lodge Ration Books At Once. Livestock owners and farmers have now had their ration books for the fifth period under the feeding stuffs rationing scheme in their possession for three weeks, but, strange to say, many have not yet lodged the books with their chosen suppliers. The Ministry of Agriculture has issued to those who have not done so a timely warning that feeding stuffs cannot be allocated to them until their, suppliers have received their buying permits, and, of course, no supplier can obtain a buying permit until he has forwarded his customers’ nomination forms to the Ministry. If, therefore, you do not receive feeding stuffs because of your failure to lodge your ration book, do not blame your supplier, or the Ministry. Blame yourself because you will be the only person worthy of blame.

26-9-1942. UNSCUTCHED FLAX. MINISTER AND THE 1941 CROP. The proportion of the 1941 flax crop as yet unscutched is 472 acres, and everything possible is being done to assist in having these crops processed. This was stated by Lord Glentoran (Minister of Agriculture) in reply to Mr. Brown (South Down) at Stormont on Tuesday. Lord Glentoran said a survey of scutch mills had shown that in two areas facilities for handling the crop were inadequate. He was satisfied there would be adequate facilities for 1942 crop, and steps were being taken to ensure that any increase in the 1943 crop would dealt with.

26-9-1942. BREAD PRICES INCREASED ON BOTH SIDES OF BORDER. Britain’s bread is to be dearer, but potatoes cheaper, under a new order, which also affects the Six Counties. From Sunday, the 4lb. loaf went up from 8d to 9d, with the 21b. loaf up by a halfpenny. Potato prices will from September 28 be reduced to an average of 1d a lb. The price charges are part of the campaign to reduce bread and increase potato consumption in Britain. The British Food Ministry has kept the price of bread almost stable since the outbreak of war by subsidies costing some £80 000 a year. Increased bread prices came into effect in the Twenty-Six Counties on and from Monday last.

26-9-1942. TEACHERS’ DEMAND FOR WAR BONUS. QUESTION AT STORMONT. At Stormont on Tuesday, the Minister of Finance told Mr. J. Beattie (Lab., Pottinger) that a demand for a war bonus of £1 a week for all teachers had been received by the Ministry of Education. He was informed that in Britain the Burnham Committee has recommended that war bonuses for teachers should be increased as from the 1st July, 1942, the new rates being £45 per annum for men and £36 per annum, for women on the lower scales of salary, and £35 and £28 for men and women respectively on higher scales. Certain matters were at present under investigation by the Ministry of Education with a view to the application of these rates of bonus to teachers’ salaries in Northern Ireland, and, of course, as the member was aware the policy of their Government had been to give to Northern Ireland teachers the same war bonuses— and no more—as had been granted to their colleagues in Britain.

26-9-1942. MISUSE OF PETROL LISNASKEA MAN’S OFFENCE. Charles Magee, hackney car owner, of Lisnaskea, was, at Caledon Petty Sessions on Monday, fined 10/- for using petrol in his car for purposes other than intended. It was stated by the police that defendant was intercepted on a recent Sunday driving his wife and family to Newry to see friends. Mr. J. J. Rea, solicitor (for defendant) admitted defendant used the car to drive his family to Newry to see his mother-in-law, who was ill, and his client did not know it was an offence to use the car in this way.

26-9-1942. TRACTOR WITHOUT LICENCE KE$H COURT FlNE. When William J. Hamilton, Kilmore, was prosecuted at Kesh Petty Sessions on Tuesday for permitting a young boy to drive a tractor without a policy of insurance, Sergeant Bradley stated that the boy gave his age as 13 years and had no licence to drive. Hamilton said that the young lad had been pressing him to learn to drive and he yielded to the boy’s request. Hamilton was fined £3 and costs and a case against the boy was withdrawn. No order was made as to suspension.

26-9-1942. UNPRODUCED IDENTITY CARD. When Dorothy Grimsley, Feddans, Kesh, was charged with failing to produce her identity card to a police constable in uniform, it was stated that defendant elected to produce the card at Kesh but had not done so within the prescribed period. Defendant said she was sorry about the whole thing. Major Dickie, R.M. – You have given everybody a lot of trouble. I am afraid you will have to pay for it. Fined 5s.

26-9-1942. GAELIC SPEAKING PRIESTS. As a result of a motion by Riobard A. Bramharm (An Ard Craobh), adopted by the Dublin Executive of the Gaelic League, the Annual Congress is to be called on to request his Eminence Cardinal MacRory to ensure that at least one Gaelic-speaking priest be appointed to each church in Ireland, to attend to the spiritual needs of Gaels..

26-9-1942. FISHERY CASE AT KESH. Hamilton Shaw, jun., Ardshankill, Boa Island, was charged before Major Dickie, R; M., at Kesh Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, with having had an otter in his possession at Mullans, Boa Island, on 1st June last. Mr. J. Hanna appeared, for Enniskillen Fishery Board, and Mr. Murnaghan defended. William Irvine, water bailiff, gave evidence that when on the shore of Mullans Bay he observed two men fishing on the side of Lusty Beg. Later the boat headed for the Boa Island shore where the men got out. Witness took cover and saw a man—whom he failed to identify—walking from the boat. The other man (defendant) walked out of the boat with something under his arm and hid it in a whin bush. Defendant walked back to the boat, picked up some sticks, and headed off. Witness approached him then and asked him where he had got the fish and he did not give any definite answer. Witness searched the whin bush and found an otter and a line of flies in a wet condition. He followed defendant and took the fish from him. Defendant denied having had the otter. His Worship said he was afraid there was not much doubt about it and imposed a fine of 20s and £2 10s costs, with an order for the forfeiture of the otter and line.

26-9-1942. DISTRESSING FIVEMILETOWN AFFAIR CHILD LOSES LEGS. A distressing accident occurred during harvesting operations on Wednesday evening of last week, when a child aged two years, daughter of Bernard McMahon, Breakley, Fivemiletown, had both legs severed.  It appears the child crept into the corn and became entangled in the reaper. The child was immediately removed to Fermanagh County Hospital, where its condition is still regarded as rather critical.

26-9-1942. INFANTILE PARALYSIS OUTBREAK. Nine deaths from infantile paralysis have been reported since July 1, the Dublin Department of Local Government announced on Tuesday. Apart from the five cases in Dublin city during the week ended September 19, there were 26 cases in the rest of the country for that week. Every possible precaution against the spread of the disease is being taken, the Department adds.

26-9-1942. TWO £10 FINES AT KESH. James Brimstone, Pruckliss, was fined £10 at Kesh Petty Sessions on Tuesday, for knowingly harbouring one head of cattle. A similar charge against John Brimstone, Bannagh, Kesh, was dismissed. Wm. John Mulholland, Derrylougher was fined £l0 for importing or bringing one head of cattle into the United Kingdom.

26-9-1942. £275 AMBULANCE PRESENTED TO A.R.P. SERVICE. The new £275 ambulance provided by Enniskillen subscriptions was presented to the County Fermanagh Civil Defence authorities, on Monday evening by Mr. W. Maxwell, organiser of the committee (consisting of Messrs. J. Ryan Taylor, J. Lusted and D. Devine), who collected the subscriptions. Mr. Maxwell said the committee was formed about 12 months ago, and aimed to collect £250. They exceeded the total by £100. The ambulance cost approximately £275, which left a balance that the committee had decided to keep for running expenses. After the war it was intended to present the ambulance to the Co. Hospital. The Civil Defence authorities would have the use of it for the duration of the war. He thanked all who had assisted in making the project a success. They had a lady driver and lady attendant for the .ambulance—Miss Scott and Mrs. Clarke; and he would like other ladies to join the Civil Defence organisation. Senator G. Whaley, chairman of. Enniskillen U.D.C., receiving the vehicle on behalf of the Civil Defence authorities, said he hoped the ambulance would never. be required in the district for war casualties. There was a very small attendance at the ceremony on the Jail Square. Those present included Capt. Shutt, county organiser of Civil Defence, and Major Henderson; Enniskillen’s A.R.P. chief. The ambulance has accommodation for four stancher cases and is extremely well fitted.      ‘

26-9-1940. FATALITY NEAR BELLEEK. OCTOGENARIAN’S FATAL INJURIES.A fatal motor cycling accident at Brollagh Hill, Belleek on Tuesday of last week was investigated by Mr. G. Warren, coroner and a jury at an inquest on Wednesday. The deceased was Andrew Roohan, aged 86 of Brollagh, who died eight hours knocked down by a motor-cycle at Brollagh Hill at three o’clock approximately. Andrew Roohan, son gave evidence of identification and of seeing his father lying injured on the side of the road. To Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solicitor, for Peter Francis McGovern, Garrison, who was riding the motor cycle. Witness said his father could hear when the voice was raised a little.

Dr. George Kelly, Belleek, stated that he examined deceased on the roadside after the accident. Witness described deceased’s many wounds and gave his opinion that death was due to haemorrhage following injuries together with senility. Witness had treated deceased in the last six months for deafness. Mrs. Teresa Keown, Tullymore, gave evidence that when walking along the road with her daughter and with a baby in her arms, deceased overtook. They walked up the hill and her daughter warned them that a motor-cycle coming behind. Deceased, who was on the outside, looked round partly to his right and the next thing she saw was deceased lying on the road ten yards ahead. The motor-cycle was ridden by McGovern and he had a passenger on behind. To Mr. Flanagan, witness said her opinion was that the motor cyclist had plenty of room to pass on the right without hitting deceased.

Corpl. Francis Hugh Green, R.A.F., who was in the vicinity, stated he heard the sound of brakes being applied. Constable George S. Acheson, R.U.C. deposed to finding deceased lying on the side of the road. The road at the point of impact was eighteen feet wide with an 18-inch grass verge on either side. The motor cyclist (McGovern) pointed a spot five and a half feet from the right-hand side of the road as the point of impact. Witness put in a statement alleged to have been made by McGovern, who stated a pillion passenger and he were coming from Belleek. At Brollagh he saw the man, woman and child on the road in front. As he was about to pass them deceased, he alleged rushed straight to his right. He pulled the machine to the right in an effort to avoid deceased, but the front wheel struck him and deceased and the two men on the machine fell. The reason he did not sound a warning of approach was because he had no bell or horn on the motor cycle. He had two years’ experience of motor cycling. Hr could not have pulled to the left as it would thereby have endangered the lives of the woman and child. McGovern told the jury he had nothing to add to the statement. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony and the Coroner, Head-Constable Briggs and the foreman of the jury expressed sympathy with the relatives of the deceased.

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DUTY OF PEDESTRIANS ON ROADS. INTERESTING POINT IN IRVINESTOWN PROSECUTION. Ought pedestrians obey the road code and walk on the right-hand side of the road, or follow the custom and walk on the left? This question was discussed at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on. Friday, when a motorist was summoned for driving without due care, etc., arising out of an accident in which the car, travelling in the black-out, knocked down a soldier. Major Dickie, R.M., said it was apparent that defendant did not see the soldiers until he was right on top of them. Everybody knew that soldiers were likely to be moving out of the town about that hour, and surely defendant should have driven in such a way that he would have stopped in time. He (the R.M.) recognised that army uniforms were difficult to see in the black-out. Mr. P. J. Flanagan, LL.B., solr., defending the car driver, said the same thing could be said of the soldier, who knew there was traffic on that road, and he should have kept in. His Worship pointed out that the law said pedestrians had a perfect right to be on the road, and there was no obligation on them to be struggling along on the grass verge. Mr. Flanagan said pedestrians had no right to be all over the road.

His Worship—I do not say for a minute they were all over the road. All the Crown witnesses agree the soldiers were not over the centre of the road. His Worship added that at the present time it was much safer on the right hand side of the road at night. Mr. Flanagan said he understood the Code specified that side for pedestrians, yet if it was used they would be deemed to be negligent.His Worship remarked that in the case of traffic approaching from the front the pedestrian would have to clear into the hedge, and people objected to that. The case in question was that in which Thomas McCrossan, Irvinestown, was summoned under the usual two counts for careless driving and for not having a. P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan was summoned for permitting the latter offence.

Gunner Kane gave evidence that when walking home from Irvines town on 21st March, at 11 p.m., he was on the outside of two other soldiers, with some soldiers in front and some behind. A car came up behind them, and knocked him down. He next found himself being attended by nurses in hospital. He was not seriously injured. Cross-examined, witness could not say why he did not hear the car before it struck him. They had been in Irvinestown for a night’s jollification. He did not remember sitting on a coat on the aide of the road and smoking a cigarette after the accident. Gunner Young said he saw the car go past with the last witness on the front of it between the mudguard and the bonnet. The car had no lights lit when it stopped. Gunner Haydon estimated the speed of the car at fifteen to twenty m.p.h. Gunner Wosley stated he saw Haydon pull the other two soldiers into the left as the car drew near.

Sergt. Kelly, R.U.C., gave evidence of finding the car without lights beyond the scene of the accident. The headlights were in order when switched on, and a side lamp had been broken off in the mishap. The road is 19 feet wide, at the spot where the accident happened. Thomas McCrossan swore he could not find his brother, who had contracted to bring three men out of the town, and he had to drive them, though not duty licensed for the. purpose. He was travelling on the centre of the road, and was just passing the soldiers when he heard the bump. When he stopped he switched off the lights. Later he found that the bulbs were blown. He had since taken out a P.S.V. licence. Daniel McCrossan testified to his having arranged to drive three men home, but was unable to get out in time to do so. He did not authorise his brother to drive the car. His Worship said it was not a bad case but drivers ought to drive within the circle of their own lights. For driving without due care Thomas McCrossan-was fined 40/- and 6/- costs. The second summons concerning the licence was dealt with under the Probation of Offenders Act. The summons against Daniel McCrossan was dismissed on the merits.

16-5-1942. BICYCLE WHEEL THEFTS. A Kinawley Man’s Experience. Thefts of a particularly mean type, of which cyclists are the victims, are now, with the shortage of cycles and accessories, becoming prevalent. A young man who left his bicycle outside a hall while at a dance in the Arney district found his front wheel stolen when the dance was over. Another close by had the tyres and tubes of his bicycle stolen. But a Kinawley man’s experience was worst of all. He cycled across the Border to Swanlinbar and left his bicycle on the street while he visited a house. When he emerged after some time, both, wheels had been removed from, his machine and stolen. He had to walk back across the Border with the frame on his shoulder. R.U.C. men took him to the barracks on suspicion of smuggling the frame, but on telephoning the Swanlinbar Gardaí they confirmed the man’s story that his wheels had been stolen. He had to do the rest of the journey on foot, carrying the frame on his shoulder.

16-5-1942. IDENTITY CARDS. People without National Registration Identity Cards, or with Cards which are inaccurate, will find difficulty in Obtaining new Ration Books, when they are due for issue next month. Anyone who has lost his or her Identity Card, or whose Card is inaccurate, should call at once at the local National Registration Office, which is usually the Food Office, and have the matter rectified. Some local Food Offices (see advertisement pages), intend, opening sub-offices, it which the public will be able to obtain new Personal Ration Books and Clothing Cards on production of properly completed Identity Cards and Ration Books, with the Reference Leaves accurately completed.

16-5-1942. EXCESS FLOUR AND MEAL SUPPLIES. SELLING EGGS TO A NEIGHBOUR. CHARGES AT CASTLEDERG. Before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., at Castlederg Petty Sessions on Friday, Elizabeth Harkin, Garvetagh, was summoned for being in possession of an excess quantity of flour and oatmeal, Henry McAnea and Samuel Greer, both shopkeepers, Castlederg, were summoned for disposing of excess quantifies of flour and meal. Const. Wilson said he found two seven stone packs of flour and a ten-stone bag of meal in Harkin’s house on the 2nd March.. In. a statement she took full responsibility and said about six weeks ago she bought a bag of flour from McAnea and about two weeks later ordered another from him, as one bag had only lasted her six weeks. She also purchased the meal at McAnea’s about six weeks ago. – Witness interviewed McAnea, who said he only supplied Harkin with seven stones flour and ten stones meal. He had no hesitation in giving it as it was a long time since she had obtained any from him. Greer told witness that he supplied Harkin with seven stones flour on the 13th December. Witness seized eleven stones flour and 7½ stones meal. The R.M. said it was now permitted to buy any quantity of’ ‘points’ food legally acquired and a month’s supply of unrationed food. The R.M. applied the Probation of Offenders Act in all cases, and forfeited one sack of flour. The R.M. added that the prosecution was properly brought, and it was only the circumstances of the cases that caused him to deal leniently with them.

Robt. A. Scott, Drumclamph, was summoned for having an excess, quantity of flour, namely, 10 stones. Const. Irvine said on the 31st March he went to defendant’s place and was told by him that he received 3 or 4 bags of flour from his brother-in-law, Mr. Rosborough, Derry. Witness found five ten-stone bags. He seized three of them. There were five resident in the house and four full-time employees. In a statement he said while he was at Derry show, he called with his brother-in-law and told him, to send him some flour. He received eight bags of flax and five of flour. The supply would have lasted him two months. The R.M. applied the P.O. Act and forfeited two ten-stone bags.

John Love, Crewe, was summoned for selling eggs other than to a licensed collector. Jeannie Love, do., was summoned for selling eggs at a price other than at the maximum price, and for selling without a licence. James Donaghey, Faughan Bridge, Drumnahoe, Derry, was summoned for purchasing eggs otherwise than at the fixed price, for obtaining 1 lb. butter otherwise than according to the rationing regulations, and for having one lb. butter without authority. Annie O’Neill, Creeduff, was summoned for disposing of 1 lb. butter without authority.

PETROL SHORTAGE FOR AMBULANCES. SERIOUS COMPLAINT AT ENNISKILLEN. Difficulty in securing supplies of petrol for Enniskillen Union ambulances was referred to at the meeting of the Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry presiding. In a letter to the Board, Mr. John Cathcart, ambulance driver, said: “I beg to inform, you of the difficulties that exist in getting a. supply of petrol for the ambulances. When application, would be made for 140 units 80 would be supplied, and when application- for 80 was made 50 would be supplied. The number of coupons is insufficient to keep the ambulance service going, and on the 8th. inst. an inspector from the Petroleum Office called at the Workhouse and informed me it was illegal to obtain petrol without coupons from any trader. He also called with Messrs. Topping and Co. and told him he would hold him liable if he supplied petrol without coupons. I have eight gallons of petrol in stock, and when this amount is exhausted the ambulance will have to be refused for the want of petrol.”

The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) corroborated Mr. Cathcart’s remarks, and said he (the Clerk) told the Petroleum Board representative that ambulances were of more importance than any other vehicles on the road, and that the general public could not possibly be left without ambulances to convey the sick to hospital. He also told the official that they would get petrol for the ambulances whether by surrender of coupons or not. The official promised to explain the matter at his headquarters. Mr. A. Wilson—Did you not ask the Ministry?Mr. J. J. Coalter—Send that letter to the Ministry of Home Affairs and explain the difficulty.  Clerk — The petrol authorities must have got it into their heads we were using it ourselves. Mr. Coalter’s suggestion was unanimously approved of.

CONFIRMATION AT DEVENISH. St. Mary’s Church, Devenish, was thronged on Friday last when the Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, administered the Sacrament of Confirmation to upwards of 140 children and some adult converts. His Lordship was met at the church by Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, and proceeded through the sacred edifice with a procession of over twenty priests to the High Altar. Mass was celebrated by Rev. P. Monaghan, C.C. Addressing the children after Confirmation, his Lordship congratulated them on being enrolled as soldiers in the army of Christ. Until now they had few responsibilities, but from this hour onwards it would be their duty not only to defend the Kingdom of Christ, but to extend it, and to do this they would have to take an intelligent interest in all that pertains to their faith, and particularly in the liturgy and functions of the Church. It would be easy for them to remain faithful to their religion while they were at home in Catholic Ireland, but if some of them found their way to countries where the faith has grown cold and many people would sneer at their religion, there would be danger for them unless their lives were lived in accordance with the teaching of their faith. They had in the main the Ten Commandments of God to be the general outline of their lives, and they had an informed conscience to tell them what was right and what was wrong. They had a leader, Jesus Christ, and if they were to be enthusiastic about their faith they must always remember the beauty of their Leader, and be ready to sacrifice everything for Him.

During the month of May it is the wish of His Holiness the Pope that all children should pray for his intention, and peace is a necessary preliminary to the restoration of Christian virtue. After administering the Total Abstinence pledge to the children until they attain the age of twenty-one his Lordship said it used to be a mere formality in the past for girls to take the pledge, but times had changed, and there were grave temptations for young girls to take intoxicating drink, particularly in seaside towns during the holiday season. Sponsors were, Mr. Henry McGrath, Devenish; and Mrs. Dick, ex-P.E.T., Cornahilta. His Lordship was much impressed by the splendid new Parochial Hall at Devenish, which competent authorities say is one of the best of its kind in the North.

Confirmation in Cleenish and Derrygonnelly. Administering the Sacrament of Confirmation in St. Mary’s’ Church, Arney, to the children of the three districts of the Cleenish Parish (Arney, Mullaghdun and Belcoo) , Most Rev. Dr. Farren, Lord Bishop of Derry, referred to the death of Dr. McKenna, late Bishop of Clogher, and expressed sympathy with the people of the diocese in their loss. The children confirmed numbered 130, and his Lordship, told them that the Sacrament strengthened their faith.

GREEN CROSS FUND. ENNISKILLEN I.N.F. CEILIDHE FOR GREEN CROSS. The Devenish (Enniskillen) Branch of the Irish National Foresters on Sunday held a most enjoyable and successful ceilidhe in the Foresters’ Hall, Enniskillen, in aid of the Green Cross Fund. (Ed. a fund to support the families of interned Republicans.)

A very large gathering of patrons assembled, drawn mainly from the surrounding districts, but also fairly representative of a much larger area, parties coming from Omagh, Clones and  other parts. To the excellent music of the Enniskillen St. Molaise Band, the dancers enjoyed a very large selection of Irish dances, these being participated in with the utmost pleasure. Never for a moment did the spirit of pleasure flag, and the dancers parted as they had kept happy dancing company, in the best of humour. Mr. Jim Sheridan, Lackaboy, was an efficient master of ceremonies, his dance announcements being made all in Irish. He was assisted by Mr. C. P. Drumm, secretary of Branch Devenish and organiser-in-chief of the ceilidhe. The proceedings concluded with the National Anthem, played by the band and sung by the large assembly, standing at attention.

OTHER SIMILAR FUNCTIONS. Largely contributing to the great improvement in the Ederney parish contribution to the Fund (already acknowledged) was a similar ceilidhe held in Ederney recently. It is to be hoped that other parishes will follow the Enniskillen and Ederney , examples and organise ceilidhthe or football matches in aid of the Fund apart from the ordinary parish collections.

IRVINESTOWN. The Irvinestown district collection of the Irvinestown Parish is complete, but the lodgement is being held over until the Coa and Whitehill areas have also had an opportunity to contribute to the parish total.

ARNEY. A meeting will be held on Sunday evening next, 17th inst., in the vicinity of St. Mary’s Church, Arney, after Devotions, to arrange for this year’s collection in that area. A large attendance is earnestly requested.

KNOCKNINNY. The parish collection is being taken up, and it is hoped that Teemore will also be organised shortly.

KILLESHER. The parish collection in Lower Killesher is well advanced. Nothing has as yet been done in Upper Killesher, but’ an effort is being made to organise that area.

KINAWLEY. The Kinawley collection is practically finished.

DEVENISH. Very Rev. E. Coyle, P.P., Devenish, has forwarded to the County Secretary a cheque for £34 10s 0d, being the 1942 Devenish parish collection for the Fund. The total is an increase of about £5 on last year, and Devenish is to he heartily congratulated on its prompt and generous response to the appeal.

OTHER AREAS. Will other parishes or districts in which no effort has as yet been made please arrange to have the collection taken up as soon as possible. It is desired that the county’s total effort should be concluded within a reasonable time.

EDERNEY’S FINE EFFORT. Ederney Branch of the Green Cross Society has forwarded to Mr P. J. O’Hare, Co. Fermanagh secretary, the sum of £30 2s 8d, result of the 1942 collection in the parish. This amount exceeds by nearly £10 the 1941 total, and Ederney is to be congratulated on its prompt and successful effort. Ederney has been the first parish to complete the 1942 collection. Enniskillen is almost complete, but there are still a few books to come in.

23-5-1942. BELLEEK BREAD CASES. At Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Mrs. Margaret McMahon, Ballynadoghy Belleek, was charged with having, on 22nd November, 1941, without a licence granted by the Board of Trade acquired 16 2 lb. loaves, whereby the total quantity of bread in her possession or under her control, exceeded the normal quantity required by her. The following were similarly charged in  respect to the same date, Mrs. Margaret McCann, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Alice Greenan, Commons, Belleek, for 10 2 lb. loaves; Mrs. Annie McGroarty, Fassagh, for 6 2 lb. loaves; Miss Mary Somerville, Fassagh, 7 2 lb. loaves.

Patrick John McCart, Forthill, Irvinestown, was charged with having on November 22nd unlawfully disposed of a quantity of bread to the above mentioned defendants, knowing that by reason of such disposal the quantity of .bread which may be lawfully acquired by these persons would be exceeded. Head Constable Briggs, Belleek, said that on the 22nd. of November, he visited a number of houses in the Commons district. He went to McMahons and found 19 2lb. loaves in a cardboard box. When questioned Mrs. McMahon told him she was giving some of them to friends in the Free State and made a statement to that effect.

The statement was read by Sergeant Blevin. Continuing Head Constable Briggs said that in McCann’s he found six loaves in a coarse bag and four in a handbag hanging from the roof. There were also two other loaves in the house some homemade bread and 9 stone of flour. There were eight people living in the house. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin, Mrs. McCann said she got six of the loaves from Hughes bread van. Witness sized ten of the loaves. There were five children in McCann’s as well as the defendant and her husband. The bread van only came round twice a week—on Tuesdays and Saturdays. The house was about 250 yards from the village. Head Const. Brigg’s, continuing, said he went to Greenan’s and found 14 loaves there. There was also some homemade bread and 9 stones of flour. In a statement, read by Sergt. Blevin defendant said she got all the loaves except two from Hughes van.

Sergt. Blevin cross-examined said Mrs. Greenan made no statement concerning her brother-in-law wanting the bread for a dance he was having nor did she mention her sister in hospital. One of the children made some reference to McCabe later. Head Const. Briggs said that in connection with the affair he interviewed McCart, the driver of Hughes bread van, who said he only sold bread for the use of Northern people. He sold one doz.  to McMahons; ½ doz. to McCann’s; 1 doz. to Greenan’s, ½ doz. to Miss Somerville and 5 doz. to Mrs. McGroarty. McCart had one dozen loaves in the van when he was stopped in Garrison. Cross-examined by Mr. Flanagan witness said that when questioned McCart told everything. He had been selling bread in the district for some time.

Constable Green said that on Saturday, November 22, he visited McGroarty’s and saw 9 21b loaves on the table. There were two elderly, and two young people living in the house. Mrs. McGroarty said the loaves were for their own use. Cross-examined witness said the nearest shop was a quarter of a mile away. Mrs. McGroarty would get the same bread there on Monday and Tuesday as she would buy on Saturday. There was flour in the house. Constable Green said he asked Miss Somerville had she any bread in the house and she said she had only two loaves. In a large box he found seven loaves. There were three elderly people in the house. The house was 50 yards from the border. Cross-examined witness said Miss Somerville was an old infirm woman and her brother and the other occupant of the house was much the same.

THE DEFENCE Mr. Flanagan said that his client had been selling bread in the district for some time. He was changed with “knowing” or ‘that he ought reasonably expected to have known, that the amount disposed of was in excess of the quantity to which each person was entitled.” The defendant had no means of knowing how many people lived in each house. His job was to sell bread and like a good businessman he tried to increase his sales. His worship had mentioned, perhaps rightly, that when a poor man was summoned under the Food Order, there were people behind him, but in this case, the firm who employed McCart had nothing whatever to do with it. The defendant had been suspended for a while. He was a young married man with six children.

Capt. Ramage said that Mrs. McMahon had a brother living across the Border, to whom she gave some bread. There was no question of sale. Concerning McCanns there were five, children, two who were working, and the defendant and her husband. There was not an excessive quantity of bread, in the house to last that family from Saturday evening until Tuesday. In McGroartys 9 loaves for four people for three days was not excessive.. All the cases were border line ones.

Mrs. Greenan said she had a brother- in-law John McCabe. At that time her sister Miss Gallagher was in the hospital and, her brother went to see her on that day and the house was locked up. There were three men living in it. On Friday her brother told her to get the bread for him when he was away. Mrs. McCabe was also away seeing her sister and sent a message with witness’s daughter to get some bread as her husband (McCabe) was having a dance on Sunday night, and wanted the bread for the band. She bought six loaves for McCabe, four for her brother and four for herself. Cross-examined, witness said she told the Sergeant about McCabe. There were only seven and a half stones flower in the house. McCart was fined 15/- and 6/7 costs; Mrs. McMahon, 10/6, and Miss Somerville, 10/6. The summonses against the other defendants were dismissed.

HEATH FIRE Peter Maguire, Scribbagh, was fined 8s and 2s costs for displaying a heath fire in an open field. Constable McMullen, Garrison, was complainant.

CAVAN MAN FINED. FOUND WITH CYCLE TYRES AND TEA. CHARGE AT ENNISKILLEN. A young County Cavan man with an address at Lisnaskea—John Stephen J Brady, of Cootehill,—was at a Special court in Enniskillen on Thursday before Major Dickie, R.M., fined £6 4 0d (treble the value of the goods involved) for being on the previous day knowingly concerned in dealing in six cycle tyres and 3lbs, of tea with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereof. Mr. J. Cooper prosecuted, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) defended. Mr. Cooper said the defendant was met by Constable McKeown with a parcel in which the articles were found.

Constable McKeown said defendant went to Westville Terrace, Enniskillen, watched by witness, knocked at two doors, failing to gain admittance, and then went up the Hospital lane. Witness went up by the railway station and met Brady coming down. Asked what was in the parcel Brady said tyres. Witness put his hand in and found another parcel, which Sergt. Sherrard later at the barracks found to contain the tea. Brady had been working for some time in Fermanagh. A. Dickson, surveyor of Customs and Excise, said Brady made a statement to .him in which he said nothing he had was intended for export. Of the tyres two were intended for a man at Lisnaskea, two for a man at Enniskillen and two for himself. He had got them all in Irvinestown or vicinity, and there also, from a woman whose name he would not give, he had got the tea for his own use.

Mr. Herbert said defendant was married and had five children. He had been working in Fermanagh for some time and had been residing in Lisnaskea. At his work his way of subsistence was to take tea three times daily and this as well as the tea he got in Lisnaskea was more than the two-ounce ration would supply. Therefore he took the chance to get this extra tea for himself. In evidence, Brady bore out this, statement and also swore to the statements made to Mr. Dickson. When apprehended at Enniskillen he told Mr. Cooper he was coming from Irvinestown and going to Lisnaskea. He did not go in by train to Lisnaskea because he had a bus ticket. Constable McKeown, recalled, said at the time it was 9.5 p.m. and Brady was looking for lodgings in Enniskillen. Major Dickie — That rather upsets his story. The magistrate convicted and in addition to imposing the penalty ordered the goods to be forfeited.

23-5-1942. 14½-YEAR-OLD GIRL EARNING 35/ – WEEKLY AS CLERK. A fourteen-and-a-half years old girl is earning 35/- weekly as a clerical assistant in the office of the Clerk of Enniskillen Union. (Mr. J. Brown). Referring to the matter at the Board of Guardians’ meeting on Tuesday, Mr. W. A. Thornton, J. P., expressed this view: “If the wage was three times the amount there would be no question about it. It is too cheap, I think.”

The matter arose through a letter from the Ministry to the Board, in which it was stated that in the absence of full details of the qualifications possessed by Ethel Armstrong—(the child concerned) — and the other candidates for the position of assistant in the clerk’s office, they were not prepared to approve of the appointment to this position of a girl of such tender years and lack of experience, particularly at the comparatively high scale of remuneration proposed. The Ministry asked to be furnished with full particulars of the qualifications experience, etc., of the other candidates whom the Board considered eligible for appointment, and that the Board should forward at the same time the original applications of each. It was stated that the little girl was receiving 35/- weekly. Chairman (Hon. C. L. Corry) —What sort of work is she doing ? The Clerk — It is not very important, She is only 14½. Mr. D. Weir — Does she not do the work as well as an applicant of 20 years of age? Clerk — The Ministry say she is too young. Mr. Weir — It’s a good fault. Mr. Thornton then expressed the view j already quoted. It was decided to ask the Ministry to reconsider their decision and to allow the little girl to stay on.

1942. Smuggling etc.

Fermanagh Herald 1942.

ENNISKILLEN PUBLICAN SUMMONED. CASE AT PETTY SESSIONS. Mrs. Catherine McNulty, publican, The Brook, Enniskillen, was summoned at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., for unreasonable delay in admitting police to licensed premises.

Sergeant Torrens gave evidence that on Sunday, 7th December, he had been on plain clothes duty in the Brook with Constable Bates, and saw four people come down over the West Bridge and knock at the defendant’s licensed premises, but they left when the door was not opened to them. The constable and witness went round to the back and stood at the back gate, and when there heard a man’s voice and somebody came out and flashed a torch on them. They went round to the front again and witness knocked at the door, it being then 8-36 p.m., and shouted that they were police on public-house duty. There was a terrible scurrying of feet as if people were running all over the place. Witness heard a woman say to open the door. Witness knocked six times in all, and the door was opened at 8-45 p.m. by a daughter-in-law of the licensee, who said that she heard the knock but thought that one of the men of the family had opened the door. Witness searched the premises, and in the room on the left found a male visitor with a young lady, but they were quite satisfied as he was in the habit of visiting in the house. In the old kitchen or cellar under the bar they found a young man (charged with being on the premises) standing with his back against the wall as if hiding. He said he had been over helping Anthony, a son of the licensee, to put tyres on his car. Witness did not see Anthony in the house at that time, and  later when he saw Anthony he said he had not seen the man since that afternoon.

To .Mr. G. E. Warren (for defendant), witness said that Anthony came in after he had sent for him. Actually he had the keys of the bar. — Yes, the bar was locked. And everything was in order ? —Yes. Witness added that there was no sign of drink. The case was dismissed on. the merits.

The man found on the premises said he was down in the yard before he heard the knock at the door, and when he heard the policeman he thought it better to hide. His Worship said he would give him the benefit of the doubt this time and dismissed the case,

CARBIDE IN LARGE QUANTITIES NEAR BORDER. MINISTRY’S CONCERN

It has been brought to notice that exceptionally large quantities of carbide of calcium, are at present stored in various places convenient to the border, stated the Ministry of Home Affairs in a letter to Enniskillen Urban Council on Monday, adding that the presumption was that it was being so stored to facilitate it’s being smuggled into the Twenty-Six Counties. It was essential, stated the Ministry, that this illegal traffic should be stopped, and they asked the Council, as licensing authority, to co-operate by ensuring that no licence-holders in its district were authorised to maintain stocks of carbide of calcium in excess of the quantities stored by them prior to the outbreak of the present war.

Information as to the stocks in Enniskillen was given by the Town Clerk (Mr. A. W. G. Ritchie, M.A.), who stated that in l958-’59 there were 8 license-holders storing in all 6,816 lbs. of carbide; in 1939-’40 eight licence-holders storing 5,576 lbs; in 1940-‘41 eight licence-holders storing 5,576 lbs., and in 1941-’42 ten licence-holders to store 9,912 lbs. Richardson and Clingan, successors to Lemon, who had a licence) sought to store 560 lbs. for the present year. The firm of J. Lendrum, who had a licence for 1,000 lbs. had not taken out a licence for .this year. Stevenson’s, who had a licence for 224 lbs., had also ceased to hold a licence. In the following there was no change in the amount of carbide during the four years up to the present:—Breen and Ternan, 560 lbs.; Devine, 224 lbs.; Nethercott, 672 lbs. Jeffers were down to 1,000 lbs. from 2,240 lbs. four years ago. Increases sought were Cathcart (a new firm, seeking a new licence), 1,000 lbs.; Anderson, from 1,000 lbs. during previous years to 5,000 lbs.; Dickie, from 896 lbs. to 2,500 lbs. It was decided to supply this information to the police authorities, with whom the Ministry asked the Council to co-operate in preventing possible smuggling.

JANUARY 10, 1942. TWO MEN CHARGED! WEARING ARMY CLOTHES

JAIL SENTENCES AT ENNISKILLEN. APPEAL LODGED. Two young men appeared before Mr. J. 0. H. Long, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, in connection with military apparel they were found to have been wearing. They were Wm. John Corrigan, rabbit trapper, of Magheradunbar, Enniskillen, and John Charles Connor, also of Magheradunbar.

Connor was charged with stealing a pair of army trousers, value £1 0s 6d, and on a second charge it was alleged he had the trousers and a military blouse belonging to H.M. Forces and under the care of the Secretary of State, such articles of clothing being reasonably suspected of having been stolen or unlawfully obtained. Corrigan was charged with the larceny of a pair of army trousers and also for being in possession of the trousers and a service-pullover, reasonably suspected of having been stolen or unlawfully obtained.

Head Constable F. Thornton, who also prosecuted, said that in response to a message from the military he went to an army camp on 11th December and found the two accused detained there. Witness brought them, to the R.U.C. Barracks in Enniskillen, where Corrigan said he found the khaki trousers he was wearing in the field known as the “Cottage Nose ” on the 7th December. Defendant alleged he found the trousers rolled up and .hidden in the mouth of a rabbit burrow. He did not give witness any information about the jersey, which witness pointed out to him, bore an army mark. Connor, who had a complete suit of military uniform, said he found the trousers in the field opposite Captain Teele’s gate, in which his (defendant’s) house was situated. The jacket or blouse had been given to him by a soldier who had been stationed in Enniskillen several months ago, and in return witness gave him a couple of rabbits. Replying to Mr. Herbert, witness stated he was not prepared to swear that these articles had been abandoned.

A Quartermaster from a military unit said the trousers cost £1 0s 6d to replace, the blouse £1 2s 6d, and the jersey 6/9. He did not consider the trousers had been abandoned. All military clothes did not bear-personal identification marks. Corrigan swore he found the trousers in a rabbit burrow half a mile from a military camp. They were very dirty, and as clothing was so scarce and he thought they had been discarded, he took them home and had them washed. He got the pullover fourteen months ago from the late Mr. Edward McNulty. Mr. Herbert said one of the McNulty family had been in the last war driving horses. Holding up the pullover, the Head Constable asked witness did he mean to ask his Worship to hold that it had been through the last war. Defendant—No.

Connor, in evidence, swore he found the trousers in the field beside his house and, thinking they were no use, he brought them home and boiled them to get the oil and dirt out of them. The jacket had been given to him by a soldier. Mr. Herbert commented that no soldier would dare go out with the blouse in that condition, the sleeve torn and buttons off and the trousers torn and dirty.

FATALITY AT THRESHING OPERATION. BROOKEBORO’ FARMER’S SAD FATE

William Ernest Cecil Johnston a farmer aged 37, residing at Gola House, Brookeborough died in Fermanagh County Hospital on Monday night as a result of the injuries received when the drum of his threshing machine exploded.  At an inquest held by Mr. G.  Warren, Coroner, a verdict was returned that death he was due to shock and hemorrhage following fracture of the school and laceration of the brain.  Thomas Alan Kettyle, farm labourer employed by deceased, said that shortly after 1.00 pm. on Monday January 5th he went with the deceased to the thresher where they were getting it ready to thresh in the afternoon.  They set it up and about 3.00 pm deceased started the engine which was let on for some time and it worked all right.  About 4.00 pm deceased lifted a sheaf of corn to put on the thresher and before he reached the drum the drum exploded with a crash.  Witness saw part of the drum hit deceased on the head and he fell.  Deceased did not speak and witness stretched him out; his head was bleeding.  Deceased was removed to the hospital shortly afterwards.  Dr. Thomas J.  Hagan, house surgeon in the County Hospital said deceased was unconscious when admitted to the hospital.  An operation was performed to relieve pressure on the brain but deceased died at 10.00 pm without regaining consciousness.

SHOTS FIRED BY “B” SPECIALS.  EVIDENCE IN DERRYLIN CASE.  At a special court in Derrylin Sean McGovern, merchant, Derrylin and a youth named Farrelly were charged with attempting to export 13 hundredweight of flour, loaves, margarine and other goods into the 26-Counties.  Sergeant A.  Sheridan, “B” Specials stated that while on duty that morning at 3.30 beside the Ballyconnell border a lorry came from Derrylin direction; he ordered the driver to halt and the machines slowed down but as he was about to step on the running board it dashed off again; witness and another constable then opened fire but the rear of the vertical was protected with bags of sulphate of ammonia and the lorry past into the 26 -Counties; just then another lorry came along was stopped and in it they found defendants who admitted they were taking the goods to the 26-Counties.  Major Dickie, RM said the defendants would have to remain in prison until the Petty Sessions next month.  Mr. Herbert, solicitor, for the defendants, appealed for bail as it was Christmas Time.  Eventually when McGovern’s father lodged  £84 in court bail was allowed defendants to appear at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on January 5th.

TWO GARRISON MEN HAD 3.600 LBS. OF CANDLES. POLICE SEIZURE IN TYRONE. “Would Supply All Fermanagh,” Says R.M. DEFENDANTS FINED AT OMAGH. The seizure by police of a lorry carrying 3,800 lbs. of candles, in a yard at Ballygawley on the night of the 2nd Oct. led to the appearance at Omagh Court on Monday, before Mr. Mark, R.M., of two Fermanagh men—Patrick Carty, Garrison, and Patrick F. McGovern, do.–charged with being knowingly concerned in dealing in and attempting to export the candles. Each of defendants was fined £20 and the lorry which belonged to Carty, with the candles, was forfeited. Notice of appeal was lodged.

Capt. Fyffe was for the Customs Authorities, and Mr. G. Grant, B.L. (instructed by Mr. P. J. Flanigan, LL.B.) defended. Constable Gordon stated that on the 2nd October at 8.35 p.m. he visited a yard attached to licensed premises in Ballygawley where he round three men standing beside a lorry on which there were thirty cases of candles. Witness asked them to produce dockets relating to the candles but they were unable to do so nor could they state where in Belfast they had purchased them. Sergt. Spratt said the men were brought to the barracks by Constable Gordon where Doherty in a statement said he brought the candles from Belfast in the lorry. McGovern refused to make a statement.

Cross-examined, witness said Doherty told him that he was employed as a driver by Carty and that on the 1st Oct. Carty told him to take the lorry to Belfast for candles and that he would be accompanied by McGovern, who would direct him where to go. Doherty also told witness that they left Garrison for Belfast at 7 a.m. When they were returning home they were delayed by a punctured wheel and the lights gave out at Ballygawley where they decided to remain for the night and had arranged for lodgings.

At this stage Mr. Grant said the explanation as to why there were no .dockets in existence in relation to the transaction was, because payment was made in cash. Sergt. Porter, Garrison, said he took statements from the defendants. McGovern said that he, Carty and others were discussing the great shortage of candles on the 1st Oct. and he told them where they could be procured in Belfast. It was arranged that he should purchase 72 cases.

LOADED ON LORRY. Thomas Lundy, Cromac St., Belfast, said on the 2nd Oct. he had been asked by a man called Bateman if he could get some candles for defendants. Witness agreed to do so and purchased the candles from a merchant in King Street at £262 l0s. The candles were brought to May’s Market where they were loaded on Carty’s lorry. Witness made about 12/6 per case on the transaction, Bateman receiving part of the profit. Witness was paid in cash.

Farming Society’s Bad Times. Fermanagh Farming Society – due to a cessation of its activities caused by the war – has fallen on hard times. The Society sought at Enniskillen Urban Council on Monday to have removed a debt of £17 1s 0d (Year’s rent) and £5 2s 1d (Half Year’s rates) due by the Society to the Council in respect of the Broadmeadow.

1911 Donegal Vindicator.

Donegal Vindicator. 10th March 1911. LOCAL NOTES – By way of the coals of fire idea we mention that the Catch-my-Pals and friends are having a good concert in the Church School, on Thursday. 16th March, and if reports are true it promises to be a really good one. Mr Sealy Jeffares comes “with his name and fame” from Dublin. Mrs Lewis Lipsett is expected to make her debut, and rumour credits her with a really good voice. Mr Sparrow will sing, and many others coming with him commas ‘talented amateurs.’ Isn’t this nice of me? Maybe next time they will give me the eighteen pence for printing the posters. I want it badly. Then I’ve to complain that the managers of these affairs do not send the courtesy cards usual where civilization holds sway. Yet now and then reports of the proceedings are sent for publication. All of which, including the eighteen penny item, goes to prove that the bon ten of Ballyshannon are really very, very provincial, that they don’t know enough to go in when it rains.

I’m on this subject now. If they thought at all it would occur to these people and to others that where they are earning their bread and butter—some of them even get jam—is where they should leave any small dribs and drabs of cash they are bound to expend (note the ex).

I do not refer to ‘that awful crowd’ the Lipsett’ as their friends affectionately dub them. They are past praying for, but I do refer to otherwise thoughtful people, who should try, whether in a large way or a small way, to benefit the town, and enable it to keep its head above water. But they don’t. The printing is run mostly by Papists hence they must get good Protestant ink. It is very rubbishy, because the Papists eat Protestant loaves with a clear conscience— even in Lent.

Nor are the heretics only to blame. Every week considerable sums of money go away to Belfast, Dublin and elsewhere, money that could be left in town, but either from want of thought, or with deliberation, it is sent away at prices, in many instances, double what the work could be done for at home.

This may go on, I am powerless to prevent it, but it is not going on underground any longer. The people who are milking the town dry, and not even leaving the buttermilk in it, will have their services acknowledged, even if it is a benefit to them.

The Half-Holiday movement has extended to Ballyshannon, and a couple of meetings have been held on the subject. Unless it is gone about in the right way it will prove a pretty expensive business to make it compulsory. But by getting all the businesses to sign at the same time, and having only one set of advertisements and legal expenses, it can be worked out for a moderate sum. Anything less than compulsion is useless. There will always be a number of mean persons who otherwise would comply with the letter but breakthrough the spirit. Look at the holidays in the licensed trade for instance. All sign and put up shutters, but, with the exception of about half a dozen, trade goes on as usual. Let there be no loophole. A half-holiday for all or for none.

While in Bundoran on the look-out for an invitation to spend the first Sunday in April at the sea-side I dropped into Mr James Carroll’s and had a look at his newly got-up Skating Rink, It is a bit of all right. A splendid maple floor for skating, a room sixty feet long, lit by electricity. What could you wish for more? Adjoining is a fine billiard room, with a good table, and next door a commodious game room, where one may indulge in simple games, but not games of chance,—-just simple, childish games, the highest single stake allowed being a 1 penny. So that for a threepenny bit one can have a whole evening’s amusement. I’ve often had it too.

Donegal Vindicator Ballyshannon Friday June 16th 1911. The progress of Irish Industrial Development has been steady if not rapid. Year after year we have preached the doctrine but our voice was of one crying in the wilderness. But every good movement is sure to win in time and there are signs that the Industries of Ireland will receive a proper measure of support at, home, instead of having to look abroad for it. The importation of blouse lengths is now done almost surreptitiously by those ladies who believe that only, in Leeds can ‘style’ be discovered. Much, however yet remains to be done and not altogether by the purchaser. There are still too many shopkeepers who are afraid and more who are ashamed to push Irish made goods. Why this should be so is a mystery and a phase of Irish character not easily understood. The Irish made article is usually much better in quality—and since manufacturers have learned a little common sense,—it is generally as cheap, cheaper if we consider quality. To be sure the Sunlight myth is still all powerful, but there are no want of signs that as in the tobacco trade Ireland has stood up against an intolerable monopoly, so will it in the soap business. There is no superiority in the English made article over the Irish and if we went further we might not be afraid of being able to prove our statement. Irish housewives are to blame. They have the word in their months, they never take time to think and so it comes first to them, but if not, the grocer is only too willing to oblige. Let us each resolve to give our own country a chance and practise until we get it upon our tongues ‘Irish made, please.’ A branch of the Irish Industrial Association, should be formed in every town and village in Ireland. There are a sufficient number of earnest workers now in Ireland to carry them on. Three men in a town can work wonders when they set about it in earnest and all the average householder requires is to have the matter kept before him and repeated with sufficient persistency.

On Sunday Mr Walter Mitchell’s Pierrot crowd begin operations in Bundoran, and from appearances I would say they mean to make things hum. He has got together a galaxy of talent such as cannot be found many similar shows in Ireland, or perhaps out of it. I am asked to say that anyone may come without fear of vulgar songs offending the ear. That is good news.

There are sixteen policemen, several sergeants, sub-sergeants, and a handsome District Inspector in Ballyshannon, all for the purpose of keeping the inhabitants in order. Said inhabitants do not require such a large force or any force to compel them to keep the peace, but for an entire week two or three tramps—one a foul mouthed virago—have kept the two Ports in a turmoil but the police were conspicuously absent.

June 16th 1911. CO., FERMANAGH TRAGEDY. OLD MAN’S AWFUL FATE – BEATEN TO DEATH- TERRIBLE SCENE IN HOUSE. Lisnaskea, Friday. An appalling case of murder and attempted suicide has taken place near Lisnaskea, in an outlying mountain district. The police at Lisnaskea learned of the occurrence about nine o’clock last night.

The facts ascertained up to the present show that a man named Felix Scollan was living with, an old age pensioner named Owen Nolan, at Carrickawick, a townland about seven miles from Lisnaskea, in the direction of the mountains.

On Thursday a man named John Duffy was working at the house and in the evening the three men sat down to tea. The three men were sitting quietly in the kitchen having tea, when Scollan it is alleged suddenly and without             warning lifted a heavy stick from under the table, and commenced to attack the old man Nolan, belabouring him on the head. After several blows had been delivered Duffy tried to wrest the stick from Scollan but was unable to do so.

Duffy is an old man, and consequently his power to struggle with Scollan was ineffectual Scollan then procured a razor and attempted to commit suicide by cutting his throat. He inflicted a slight wound. Duffy proceeded to Lisnaskea and reported the matter to the police, a large party of whom arrived at the house with the greatest promptitude. Accompanying the police were Dr. Knox, a priest, the clerk of petty session and a magistrate, but on arrival at the scene they found Nolan had been some tine dead. Scollan was immediately arrested and conveyed to Lisnaskea Barracks.

June 16th 1911. GAELIC SPORTS IN BALLYSHANNON. The paths of the organiser of Sports in Ballyshannon is not strewn with roses, rather do his neighbours cart boulders to throw in the way. Last year when the Gaelic Sports were initiated by that most energetic of Irish athletes, Mr Toal, I R., his presumption was resented so fiercely that the Ballyshannon Brass Band refused to turn out on the occasion, but until we grow up to be a city this will probably continue to be our attitude towards any man who is not content to go to sleep with the rest of us.

The Aodh Ruadh Football and Hurling Club has made for itself a position that few similar organisations in the North-West occupy. Success has attended it at every turn, due entirely to steady perseverance and the keeping up in its ranks of a true sporting spirit. The football and hurling teams are popular wherever they go, and it may be added are usually successful. It was therefore only right that they should have real Irish athletic sports, and we have to congratulate them on the success which has met their efforts, modified as it was. Still there are signs that the Irish revival is taking hold, and we venture to predict that within a few years the event will become a regular Irish Carnival for the entire North-West.

Judges—Messrs J. J. Woods, James Daly, Cormac McGowan and M. D. Quigley.

Starters—F. G. Townsend, T J Kelly and J Kane.

DETAILS.

100 Yards—; 1. J. Gallagher; 2, H. Gallagher.

220 Yards Flat Handicap (open)—1. J E Irvine; 2, James Naughton; 3, D Dolan.

440 Yards Flat Handicap (open) — 1, H Gallagher; 2, James Naughton.

High Jump (open)—1, J E Irvine, 4ft. 10½ in. 2, James Naughton, 4ft. l0 in.

Schoolboy’s Race under 16 Years—1, Wm. Crawford; 2, B Dorian; 3, J. Lawn.

Half-Mile Championship (open); — 1, J Gallagher; 2, M Cleary; 2, Hugh Gallagher. Tie for second place.

Throwing the Weight, 161bs—1, E. Carbery; 2. F Dolan.

Sack Race—1, H Gallagher; 2, F Crawford.

One Mile Flat Handicap (open) — 1, M Cleary; 2, Patrick Crawford ; 2, J E, Irvine Tie for second place.

Slinging 581bs between legs without follow— 1. D J Crowley, I5ft. 1 in. 2, Edward Carbery; 3 James Naughton.

Egg and Spoon Race—1, Patrick Crawford; 2, T. J. Kelly.

Pucking Hurley Ball—1, James Daly; 2, J. Sheerin.

Marathon Race—1, Patrick Crawford; 2, J E Irvine; 3, John Sheerin. Time—Thirty minutes.

June 16th 1911. KING’S BAD QUARTER OF AN HOUR. COMES WHEN HE KISSES ‘MERE MEN’. AN EMPHATIC ROYAL OBJECTION. King George has a bad quarter of an hour in store at the Coronation It is when he has to submit to being kissed— not by the charming ladies of the aristocracy, but by quite a number of elderly male dignitaries. The performance will be commenced by the Archbishop of Canterbury, who will kneel at the King’s feet; place his hands between those of the King, and recite the time honoured formula of allegiance. Thereafter the Archbishop ‘kisseth the King’s left cheek.’

November 3rd 1911. Mr Frank Miller, Cycle Agent, Main Street, has removed to Market Street, as per announcement in another column.

During the week a Retreat was given to the children of Inismacsaint Parish, and was conducted by Father Doyle, of the Jesuit Order.

Mr Thomas. J. Kelly, Agent for the Pearl Life Assurance Company, at Ballyshannon, has been appointed Assistant Superintendent. He remains in Ballyshannon for the present to develop South Donegal. Mr William Ward, Bridge – End, Ballyshannon, succeeds him as Agent for the District.

Before purchasing your Winter Boots call at Munday & Co.’s East Port, Ballyshannon, where you can procure Footwear that will resist the excessive damp of the Winter months at lowest cash prices. Don’t forget to see the ‘Lee Boot.’ Special value in Men’s Nailed Derby’s at 8s 6d, wear guaranteed. Immense stock to select from. One price only. Exceptional Value in Blankets, Flannels, Hosiery, Shirts, at Munday & Co-’s, East, Port, Ballyshannon.

HOME RULE MEETING IN GARRISON. A SKETCH OF THE PROCEEDINGS. BY SEAGHAN. A Home Rule Meeting in Garrison is not an everyday occurrence, and, though the day was anything but a pleasant one, in company with a few friends,—Home Rulers,—I put in an appearance. The picturesque village, which is situate on the banks of the far-famed Melvin was, notwithstanding the moisture, in gala attire. The day being a Holiday (1st November) all the country folk crowded in,—not that I wish it to be understood that it was due to the fact of it being a day of rest that the multitude was so large, No ; these men,—and women, too—are always ready to answer the call of duty, and would surmount all obstacles to: further on the cause.

Almost all the surrounding towns sent contingents with bands and banners, and amongst the number I noticed the Erne ’98 Flute Band under the baton of Mr John Kane, the Cashelard Flute Band, and Belleek Flute Band. Several Divisions of the Ancient Order of Hibernians (B.O.E.) were present, and paraded the village immediately before the meeting was held.

There were a lot of people wearing temperance badges—and some few without them. However, on the whole, I think there was more tea than whisky drank on Wednesday.

Very Rev. Fr. McCleary, P.P., Garrison, was moved to the chair, and, after a short criticism of the Home Rule question, and having read statistics as to the loss the country sustained by emigration, introduced Canon Keown, P. P., Enniskillen whom he said, being a parishoner of their own, he was sure would receive a hearty welcome.

Canon Keown, P.P., familiar to every Lough Derg pilgrim, came to the front aud received a great ovation. ; He spoke in a clear, ringing tone, and is, what he looks, a born fighter. He said times were changed sinoe the last Home Rule Meeting was held in Garrison twenty- nine years ago. That meeting was proclaimed, and the village was iuvadad by Lancers from Dundalk, and a large force of police, and the people had to wade the Garrison river to receive William O’Brien. I . expeotad to hear some¬thing more about William but was disappointed. He roferfeclto English misriilo in Ireland, and spoke of the resources of the distriot,

The next speaker was Mr Wray, Eniiiskillsn,. and any person could see; lie was a lawyer-maa by the rapidity with which he turned orer bis notes. He hammered awav at the Lords amidstCanon Keown, P.P., familiar to every Lough Derg pilgrim, came to the front and received a great ovation. He spoke in a clear, ringing tone, and is, what he looks, a born fighter. He said times were changed since the last Home Rule Meeting was held in Garrison twenty- nine years ago. That meeting was proclaimed, and the village was invaded by Lancers from Dundalk, and a large force of police, and the people had to wade the Garrison River to receive William O’Brien. I expected to hear something more about William but was disappointed. He referred to English misrule in Ireland, and spoke of the resources of the district.

The next speaker was Mr Wray, Enniskillen, and any person could see he was a lawyer-man by the rapidity with which he turned over his notes. He hammered away at the Lords amidst cries of ‘Down with them.’ He said they had wrecked Gladstone’s and other great men’s efforts. He referred to the visit of the Lord and Lady Lieutenant to Enniskillen, and had a shie at the landlords en passant. One of the arguments he said that was brought against Home Rule was that they wanted Separation. Before they could have Separation they would have to destroy the Navy, and they all knew what that meant.

The Chairman then introduced Mr John Fitzgibbon, M P of Castlerea, A good-humoured gentleman with a goatee, and. wearing a tile hat, which he doffed before he made his bow. He is like a man that could hustle. I wonder if he is a cattle-driver? He owes the English Government a ‘wee’ grudge, having suffered imprisonment for the cause. There is one thing certain; he must have kissed the blarney stone. That was a well-timed piece of flattery when he said he wondered if Sir William Carson knew, when he was making use of all that bunkum about Ulster going to fight, if there was such fine-looking men and women in the province as he (Mr Fitzgibbon) saw before him. But it was true all the same, and I hae my doots if Maguire’s men would come out second best in the tussle. He advised them —and he felt sure every Nationalist would agree with him — to be tolerant to everybody who differed with them,—whether in politics or religion, and never be the first to start a quarrel. He related a jocular incident that took place between himself and Captain Craig, and said the Captain and he parted the best of friends. He spoke at length on the Home Rule question. He travelled all the way from the West to be present, and I am sure he was well pleased with the reception he got.

Mr Fitzgibbon proposed a vote of thanks to the Chairman, Rev Father McCleary, and said he hoped that when they next came together on that hillside Ireland would have regained its rights. Canon Keown seconded, and spoke of what Father McCleary had done in the way of wiping out landlordism. Father McCleary suitably responded and the meeting terminated.

November 3rd 1911. FUNERAL OF MR WILLIAM McVITTY, CASHEL, BALLYSHANNON. The funeral took place on Saturday last, to the family burying ground, Mullinashea, Cemetery, of the above gentleman. Deceased was one of the most respected inhabitants of the neighbourhood, a fact which was strikingly testified by the large numbers who attended at the obsequies. The chief mourners were—Mr Wm. McVitty, (nephew) and Mr W H Stack. Canon Holmes officiated at the graveside.

November 10th 1911.MRS WINIFRED GAVIGAN. At an advanced age the death took place on Tuesday .last of Mrs Winifred Gavigan, at the residence of her son, James Gavigan, Clyhore, Belleek. For some short time deceased had been ailing, being greatly affected at the departure of her favourite granddaughter for America recently, also a grandson who had recently visited her. By a strange coincidence it was only on the day of her demise a letter was received from her granddaughter from America asking her to cheer up. The Gavigan family are highly respected in the district, and deceased was one of the old inhabitants of Drimholme, the Travers family, a well-known Irish sept in the neighbourhood. As might be expected, on Tuesday the funeral was large and representative, St Patrick’s, Kilbarron, being crowded at the Requiem Mass solemnised by Rev C. Cunningham, C. C. The remains, in a brass mounted oak coffin, were borne to the hearse by immediate relatives after the service in the Church. The chief mourners were her sons, James and Hugh Gavigan; her daughter, Mrs Flynn. Other relatives, John, May, Kate, and James Gavigan; James Flynn, son-in-law; Hugh, John, James, Michael and Charles Flynn, Joseph, James and James Gavigan, junr.; Owen Gavigan, Edward Gallagher, James Cleary, Corner House, Belleek; John and Edward Cleary, Bridget, Michael, and E. J. Cleary, cousins to deceased. Rev C. Cunningham also officiated at the grave, and at his request prayers were offered for the repose of the soul of deceased.—R.I.P. Mr Edward Stephens had charge of the funeral arrangements.

November 10th 1911. DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MR JOHN F. TIMONEY. On October 30th, in the quiet little church- yard of Toura were laid to rest the mortal remains of Mr. John F Timoney, a well-known Dublin business-man, Mr Timoney started his commercial career twenty-five years ago as an apprentice to the late Mr .Robert Sweeny, Ballyshannon. Of a refined nature, good address and gentlemanly bearing, his promotion was rapid, and he passed on to some of the highest positions in the leading Cork and Dublin warehouses enjoying all the time the unbounded confidence of his employers, and the love and esteem of the hands under him. Amid the temptations and trials of city life his example, advice and purse were always available to the unfortunate youths who went under. Some eight years ago he started business on his own account, but a chill caught in crossing the Channel was followed by an attack of pleurisy, the effects of which have brought to a close at the early age of 43 years a career of great promise. Six months ago he bade farewell to city life and returned to his ancestral home to lay down life’s burden in the spot where he was born, and where the happy days of his childhood were spent. During his long illness no murmur or complaint did he utter. Perfectly conscious to the last moment, and fortified by the Rites of Holy Church, he calmly awaited the dread summons with a resignation, confidence and serenity which were not of this world. Of him it may be truly said, ‘As he lived so he died’—in peace. Rev P. A. McCleary, P. P. officiated at the graveside, and delivered an eloquent panegyric on the many good qualities of the deceased, and commending the example of his beautiful life.

The chief mourners were Messrs J Timoney, J P, sad P. Timoney, brothers; P Slavin, brother-in-law, J Flanagan, B Flanagan, J O’Dare, F O’Dare, J Flanagan, M Flanagan, B Flanagan, B Keown, P Keown, T B Feely, cousins. Amongst those present or represented in the immense funeral cortege were:—Dr Timoney, J. P., Rev G. C. O’Keefe, Dr. Kelly, M Cassidy, J. P., E Kelly, J P, J Dully, JP; J. O Reilly, J. P, E Kerr, J P; B Devine, Strabane; J McGonigle, Ballyshannon; J Beacom, T. Beacom, E. Daly, J. Daly, E Knox, M Knox, W Gallagher, S Moohan, J. Cleary, B. Cleary, J Gallagher, R. Donaldson, S. W. Donaldson, J McBrien, J Busbey, P Montgomery, F Slavin, J Gallagher, T Gallagher, R. Freeborn, J. Keown, J. Johnston, R. Elliott. J. Keown, P. Keown, R. J. Dick, N T; Wm Ferguson, J (D) Keown. J. (P) Keown, J Campbell, E. Campbell, J. Earls, P. Keown, W. Treacy, F. McBrien, J Flanagan, J. Duffy, D. Duffy, J. Kelly, R. W. Dundas, J. Campbell, P. Elliott, D. McGuinness, ? McGuinness, P. Elliott, B. O’Brien, E. J. Johnston, O. Mills, P. J. McBrien, R Morrow, J. Earls, J. Owens, J. Gallagher, J. Greene.

It might be mentioned the funeral was the largest to Toura graveyard for many years in fact since its dedication. The greatest sympathy goes out in the district to the family, as all admired John F Timoney.—R.I.P.

November 10th 1911. CHARLES GALLAGHER, DERRYNASEER, BALLYSHANNON. On Thursday last, in the family enclosure, The Rock Graveyard, Ballyshannon, were laid to rest the mortal remains of the late Charles Gallagher, Derrynaseer, Ballyshannon. The respect paid to the memory of deceased and his family was manifested by the large numbers attending the obsequies, including representatives from Counties Donegal, Leitrim, Sligo, and Fermanagh. At his demise he was over eighty years of age and his Christian and patriotic life was portrayed in a neat panegyric delivered by Rev M. Kelly, C. C., Kinlough, who officiated at the grave, and described deceased as a man who never neglected his duties to God, and who ever kept the end of life in view, resigning himself to the Will of the Almighty. He ever kept before him that ‘If man remembers his last end he shall never sin,’ Father Kelly then asked for the prayers of those present for the repose of deceased. The funeral, as mentioned, was very large, and the chief mourners were his sons, Hugh Michael, Francis and Thady Gallagher (sons); Patrick (grandson); Thady, Edward, and P Gallagher (nephew of deceased). At the grave the usual prayers were said, and a large number waited to see the last sod laid on Charles Gallagher. R.I.P.

1954 January to June.

National Events.

The Flags and Emblems Act in Northern Ireland (6 April) bans interference with the Union Jack and effectively prohibits the public or private display of the tricolour
Michael Manning (aged 25) becomes the last man to be executed by the state in the Republic of Ireland: he is hanged on 20 April at Mountjoy jail, Dublin, for the murder of a nurse
General election in the Republic (18 May): a second coalition government takes office on 2 June with John A. Costello as Taoiseach
The IRA raids Gough military barracks, Armagh (12 June)
Brendan Behan’s The Quare Fellow opens at the Pike Theatre, Dublin (19 November)
A four-month bank dispute commences in the Republic (4 December)
The last issue of The Bell appears
Christy Brown’s My Left Foot is published
A record 84,856 people watch Cork beat Wexford in the All-Ireland hurling final at Croke Park

Births.

Jimmy Barry Murphy (hurler and Gaelic footballer) in Cork (22/8)
Ollie Campbell (rugby player) in Dublin (3/3)
Maud Cotter (stained-glass artist)
Síle de Valera (Fianna Fáil politician) in Dublin
Bob Geldof (rock musician, charity organizer) in Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin (5/10)
Richard Kearney (philosopher and writer) in Cork
Ger Loughnane (Clare hurler and manager)
Thomas McCarthy (poet) in Cappoquin, Co. Waterford
Kevin Moran (Dublin Gaelic footballer; Manchester United, Sporting Gijon, Blackburn Rovers and Republic of Ireland footballer) in Dublin (29/4)
Brian Mullins (Dublin Gaelic footballer) in Dublin (27/9)
Éilís Ní Dhuibhne (writer and lecturer) in Dublin
Julie O’Callaghan (poet) in Chicago
Mary O’Donnell (writer and broadcaster) in Monaghan
Dennis O’Driscoll (poet) in Thurles, Co. Tipperary
Bobby Sands (IRA member and hunger striker) in Belfast
Mikey Sheehy (Kerry Gaelic footballer) in Co. Kerry (28/7)

Deaths.

John Collins
Margaret Cousins
James Green Douglas
Denis Fahey
Henry Harrison
Elinor Price
Robert Smyllie.

Local Events.

2-1-54 Enniskillen new Fire Station, now completed, will be opened shortly. The brigade consists of 20 members under section leader Robert McCutcheon.

2-1-54 There is no need for alarm in Fermanagh says Dr. Brian Moore, Chief Medical Officer for the County, speaking about the four cases of infantile paralysis reported in Fermanagh in the past month.

2-1-54 A youth named Patrick Barron of Derryrona, Leggs PO, Belleek is in Fermanagh County Hospital suffering from head injuries suffered on Christmas Day while riding a motor cycle.

2-1-54 A Donegal youth, Johnston Morrow of Derrybrick, Clonelly was sentenced to one month imprisonment for driving a tractor while disqualified and without insurance or licence and also for obtaining a license while disqualified. He had been employed by David George Noble of Derrybrick.

9-1-54  St. Mary’s Hall, Devenish, was packed for “The Message of Fatima,” Pageant by the local school children. An enthralled audience drawn from four counties saw unfold scene by scene the wonderful miracle which shook the world only thirty six years ago. I take of my hat to Fr. Marron and his brilliant galaxy of juvenile stars and I think it only fair to hand a special bouquet to little Nuala Gilbride of Rosinver, who played the part of Our Lady of Fatima in a manner worthy of the highest commendation. The parts of the children to whom the apparition appeared were played by Bridie Neilan, Agnes Burns and M. J. Flanagan.

16-1-54 Irvinestown’s unbelievable plight to end soon. For years past they have had the water turned on for only two hours per day and only one hour in the Summer. In January they are to join up to the huge Lough Braden water network.

16-1-54 An application to have the Ballinamallard – Mossfield – Sydare closed for the annual “Enniskillen 100” motor cycle race this year was granted by Fermanagh County Council. Owing to a late application last year there was no race – the first occasion this happened since the war.

16-1-54  Lawyer and cattle dealer summonsed at Belleek as a result of accidents at a bad bend at Keenaghan, Belleek within five days of each other. The defendants were cattle dealer Maurice Leonard, Pettigo and Thomas T. Montague, LLB, Irvinestown. Leonard’s cattle lorry demolished a length of stone wall and had the front axle torn from the vehicle was fined £1 for driving without due care and 10s for not producing his insurance within five days. Evidence was given that the front tyres of the lorry were smooth. In his own defence Montague said that there was no evidence that he was driving without due care and that the skid marks and damage to the wall were just as likely to have been those caused by the lorry. Case dismissed for insufficient evidence.

16-1-54 In a sequel to a row over admission to a dance hall at Brollagh, Frederick Brock was fined £1 and bound over for a year on his own bail of £5. Sydney Brock who was trying to take his brother from the police was fined £3 for obstruction, £3 for disorderly behaviour and bound over for a year for £5. John Dolan was fined £3 for disorderly behaviour and £1 for obstruction and also bound over and Thomas Murphy was fined £1.

16-1-54 It was with regret that his many friends heard of the death of Mr. Patrick Eves, Kesh, one of the oldest and most respected residents of Kesh. Until he retired from business due to failing health he had carried on a long and successful business as a spirit merchant and farmer and had earned a fine reputation as a man of sound judgment, a good counselor and neighbour and the respect of men of all creeds.

23-1-54  Mrs Mary Mc Garrity, (49) wife of John Mc Garrity, tenant of apartments in the old Workhouse, Townhill, Irvinestown, gave her life on Friday night in an effort to save her two daughters, Josie (24) and Veronica (19) who were returning from the cinema at 11.00 when they became entangled in a live electricity cable in the darkness of an enclosed yard in front of their dwelling place. The wire had been broken in the storm. Hearing their screams their parents rushed down to help them and were aided by Samuel Gillespie, an electrician, who helped the father and two daughters get clear. Unfortunately Mrs Mc Garrity was fatally shocked and died on her way to hospital.

23-1-54  Garda William Melly, Dublin Metropolitan Police has retired after 39 year’s service from 1st January 1954. He was stationed all his time in Dublin and was attached to the Dublin District Courts for over 30 years. He served through all the troubled years in the city during his service. He was a native of Castle Caldwell, County Fermanagh.

23-1-54  It was with regret that the people of Devenish heard of the death of Mrs Ellen Feely on January 5th. She had been a member of the Total Abstinence Association since 1911.

6-2-54  Mr. S. Hernon, Secretary of Devenish GAA Club said in his report that last year was not an outstanding success although the Minor team had got to the County final only to be defeated by a very good Lisnaskea team.

13-2-54 The Annual Fermanagh County GAA Convention was held in Enniskillen on the last Sunday in January with 74 delegates present, the greatest ever number. Not counted were Mr. Denis Hogan and Denis Leonard of the newly formed Knocks club who were not allowed to vote since their team did not compete in the last championship in 1953. All three nominees for chairman were unwilling to put their names forward but this was not accepted and Mr. Thomas Campbell, Belleek, was retained in office for a fourth time. The most far-reaching motion to be decided was to reduce the number of players on Senior teams from 15 to 13. This probably suits most Fermanagh pitches better and should lead to a more open brand of football.

27-2-54 Lack Farmer, 54 year old, Francis Mc Cusker, Largy, Lack, was killed while loading trees on to a lorry from an embankment on his farm. A verdict of accidental death was returned at the inquest. He was a brother of Nurse McCusker, Ederney.

27-2-54 Regret has been occasioned by the death of Mrs F. Campbell, wife of Mr. Francis Campbell, Aghoo, Devenish, after a long illness.

6-3-54 A fine of £3 was imposed on Bernard Mc Kenna, Ardees, Roscor, Belleek for stealing an Exide battery from a motor cycle parked at Mahoo. District Inspector Wolseley said that the defendant had previously been convicted of stealing cattle.

6-3-54 The Belleek V Enniskillen Gaels football match was abandoned at half time due to snow with the score Belleek 0-4, Enniskillen 0-1.

6-3-54  Death of Leitrim-Born Christian Brother, founder of Australia’s Boy’s Town. Regret is felt in Kiltyclogher and district by the death of Rev. Bro. Paul Francis Keaney, which occurred suddenly at his Christian Brothers College, Perth, Australia last Friday, 28th February. Known all over the great Australian Continent as the founder of Australia’s Boy’s Town and beloved for his charity and kindness towards the flotsam and jetsam of humanity with whom his social activities brought him into contact. His death is mourned by hundreds of orphaned and abandoned boys who owing to Br Paul’s noble work are today happy and prosperous citizens.  He was born on a small farm at Corraleskin, Kiltyclogher in 1888 he was one of a family of nine of whom seven still survive. He joined the RIC in 1909 and served two years before emigrating. He received the OBE in the Coronation honours list. When he decided recently to return to Ireland after an absence of 42 years he was presented with a cheque for £1,500 by the Australian Prime Minister, Mr. Menzies, on behalf of a group of businessmen as a tribute to his services. However his return to Ireland was not to be. (Another view from the Internet)

Brother Kearney, of Bindoon notoriety, was a saint to the Catholic Church and a monster to the boys placed in his “care”. The Catholic Church erected a huge statue of him at Bindoon. In a case of typical Aussie larrikinism, former boys at the Home knocked its head off one day. Reports indicate that they were observed attempting to use it as a football.

One of the six Royal Commissioners, former Senator for Western Australia, Andrew Murray, once described Kearney as “a sadist who indulged in criminal assault and who knowingly protected rings of predatory Brothers engaged in systemic, long-term sexual assault on defenceless children (Hansard 2001, p.27275 – Matter of Public Interest). Presumably, Mr. Murray will be eager to revisit the matter during the course of the Royal Commission.

Former inmates of Bindoon also pull no punches with regard to “The Orphans’ Friend” (as the plaque on his statue reads) Kearney, an abuser who stood 6ft. tall and weighed 17 stone. Laurie Humphreys says that “I guess you could call him a sadist”. John Hennessy, also from Bindoon, speaks with a stutter which he says is a legacy of being stripped naked and publicly flogged by Kearney. He notes that “At Bindoon, the threat of violence was ever present. The Brothers carried a strap consisting of leather stitched together and a metal weight.”

In a glowing tribute to Kearney, even the Christian Brothers had to acknowledge that “Conversely, some former inmates remember him as a brutal disciplinarian with an ungovernable temper, who neglected their education, exploited their labour and turned a blind eye to sexual abuse of them by other members of the staff.” Note the use of “some” rather than “all” in that statement. The paragraph concludes, for some reason, with the statement that “An enthusiast, Keaney was easily depressed by criticism.”

The 2001 Australian Senate Community Affairs and References Committee Report, titled “Lost Innocents: Righting the Record – Report on Child Migration”, detailed evidence which revealed the “depraved, violent and abusive nature” of Brother Keaney and his role in the “systematic abuse of children under his care”. In submissions to the Committee report, individuals who had been abused by Keaney described his brutality; “I lost my teeth at Bindoon – my face kicked repeatedly by Brother Keaney”. Similarly – “Br. Keaney was a very sadistic, perverted and deviant paedophile. He abused many of the boys… in his care. Tragically, there was just no one that we victims could go to for help. Who would have believed us anyway?”

Another former Bindoon resident stated that “The Christian Brothers used to walk around with a thick 18in leather strap hanging from the waist of their long, black outfits, and they’d give you a wallop at the slightest opportunity. They’d hit you wherever they could – be it on the backside or sole of the foot – and boy, did it hurt. Once I was on the receiving end of a real hiding from one of them. He was giving a younger lad a hard time and I must have said something under my breath. He lashed out with his strap and put in his boot. I ended up cowering under my bed, trying to escape him, and was left covered in bruises.”

Yet another noted that “He liked to prod us with a walking stick, and was one of the cruelest people I’ve ever met.”

A secret church report about Christian Brothers’ institutions such as Bindoon in Western Australia from the mid-30s right up to the mid-60s refers to:

  • brothers who were “odd or mentally unstable”,
  • of a “sex underworld”
  • of brothers who “shared boys” for sexual purposes
  • and that often the church hierarchy knew of the abuse and did nothing about it.

Kearney’s Bindoon was billed as an educational institution, but as one former resident claimed, “There was no teaching at Bindoon, and I know of several former inmates who still cannot read or write.” Another reported that “there wasn’t much in the way of schooling. I’d always been good at school in England but it pretty much ended overnight. A lot of the boys at Bindoon never learnt how to read or write.”

A CBS Television documentary aired in the U.S. claimed that, at Bindoon, “The priority was construction. Brother Francis Keaney, an imposing, white-haired Irishman who ran the place, was obsessed with building the largest Catholic institution in Western Australia. He used his charges as labor. From sunrise to sunset, the boys built Brother Keaney’s shrine, with no shoes, and no questions asked.”

When the Christian Brothers arrived in 1939 with the first group of seven boy labourers, the only building on the property was a mud-brick homestead which became their home. After the work of a generation of boys, the facility is grandiose and has been listed by the West Australian Government as a heritage-listed property.  The “Statement of Significance” refers to “The design, use of local materials, use of child labour, relationships of the buildings, and period during which they were constructed, make the places exceptionally significant, both individually and in their precinct setting. The place has an exceptional ‘sense of place’ for the ‘boys’, and their families.”

When Kearney arrived in 1940, with another eight boys, foundations were dug and one wing of the first building, the dormitory block now known as Edmund House, was officially opened by 1941. Most of the building work was completed by 1953. During construction, two boys died in accidents and a third died from an undefined cause. They are buried in simple graves on the site, while Br. Kearney’s grave has a large marble headstone, and, of course, a (headless) statue.

Not only did Kearney use forced child labour to build his edifice, he treated the boys badly in ways other than sexual abuse and violence. One of his slaves remembered that, on arrival, “We were immediately put to work. I learnt how to milk a cow within a week, and then we began constructing a new building. By the time I was 14, I was driving a truck. We’d work, sleep and eat. That was it.”

He also reported that “We slept on open verandas all-year round – and when a wind blew up, it got pretty cold. Foodwise, we’d get crushed wheat or porridge for breakfast, followed by bread in dripping (cow fat). The rest of the meals were similarly plain: we seemed to subsist on a diet of swedes and turnips.”

For his efforts, Kearney received Imperial Honours awards, known as an MBE and ISO. Despite all of the evidence of his unworthiness for such prestigious awards, attempts by many people to have the awards rescinded have, so far, been unsuccessful.

6-3-54 A Chemist Shop is now open at Mill Street, Pettigo under the management of M. T. Egan, M.P.S.I.

13-3-54 During the weekend telephone engineers started to erect telephone poles from Pettigo village to Tievemore Post Office where a Post Office telephone is being installed.

27-3-54 The Belleek Erne Drainage Strike over the sacking of a fitter who complained about their conditions of employment especially at the Marion crane at which he worked.

27-3-54 Devenish Pioneer Social on Sunday last in St. Mary’s Hall was a great success. The Sligo Pantomime Players provided the entertainment. Rev. Fr. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo was the guest of honour and was welcomed by Rev. Canon Coyle, a member of the Association for 33 years. The Association was first set up in the parish in 1945 and three Councils were established at Cashel, Toura and Devenish. The parish now has 242 Pioneers and 105 probationers and the juvenile section is being especially catered for in the schools.

27-3-54 The residents of Pettigo village and district deeply regret the transfer of Sergeant M. J. Mc Donagh, Garda Siochana, from Pettigo to Newtowncunningham during the week. Sergeant Mc Donagh was a very popular member of the Garda and for his brief stay in Pettigo village had endeared himself to everyone. Of a retiring disposition he was genial and had a most efficient manner in the discharge of his various duties. During his term as Sergeant in charge of Pettigo Garda Station lawlessness had completely disappeared in the area.

27-3-54 During blasting operations in a quarry at Cashelinney a small piece of rock from the quarry travelled 500 yards landing on the roof of Lettercran School and broke a few slates.

3-4-54 The opening of the Adelphi Cinema, Irvinestown on April 5th with the first film “Ivanhoe” with Robert and Elizabeth Taylor. Telephone Irvinestown 242.

3-4-54  Donegal defeat Fermanagh at Glenties. The ex-Fermanagh player Matt Regan (Belleek) was in sparkling form against his old colleagues. Many strange decisions by the referee almost led to the Fermanagh team leaving the field on several occasions in the second half. Sean Gonigle (Belleek) was the best player on the Fermanagh team.

17-4-54 Garrison man, Thomas Murphy, of Knockaraven, was fined £2 for assaulting another youth, Walter George Carson on March 14th. Murphy had caught hold of Carson’s bicycle by the carrier and bounced it up and down several times.

17-4-54 Very Rev. E. Canon Coyle, PP, Devenish paid tribute to the Anti-Partition League after an anti-Partition film show, concert and meeting in St., Mary’s Hall, Devenish on Sunday night. After thanking the speakers, Mr. Cahir Healy and P. J. O’Hare he said, “No other movement is doing anything only talking.”

24-4-54 Junior Football League – Holywell 2-11 – Devenish 1-7.

24-4-54 Garrison Publican, Patrick Casey, of Casey’s Hotel, was fined £1 for allowing the consumption of intoxicating drink on his licensed premises and his wife Margaret was fined £1 for aiding and abetting. Four persons found on the premises were each found 8 shillings. They had drink on the counter in front of them when the police entered at 10.00 p.m.

24-4-54 The O’Donnell Rally opens in Ballyshannon with glorious weather for a memorable occasion. It was attended by Mr. Aiken, Minister of External Affairs, Count O’Donnell and The O’Donnell.

24-4-54 Ballyshannon Notes. The town was gaily decorated with flags and bunting during the Easter weekend. This was to celebrate the opening of An Tostal and the O’Donnell Clan Rally. The Power House was illuminated with bright yellow lights, and viewed from the bridge, was an inspiring sight.

1-5-54 On Friday morning when travelling to her place of employment at Waterfoot, Pettigo, Miss Maggie Mc Caffrey, Mullinagoad, heard a fox barking and on investigation found a young fox which she promptly killed with a stick from the roadside.

1-5-54 Tievemore Post Office was on Thursday officially opened as a telephone call office.

1-5-54 The cuckoo was heard for the first time in the Pettigo area during the weekend, and also the corncrake, which is late compared with previous years.

1-5-54 The “Robe” at the Regal Cinema, Enniskillen. Enniskillen is this week enjoying its most stupendous cinematic treat. And when I say “stupendous” I know I am employing one of the superlatives that Hollywood blurbs have largely made meaningless. But using it with a due sense of proportion, one can only say of the magnificent drama, “The Robe” brought to the Regal, Enniskillen this week, in the new screen medium, cinemascope, that it is a stupendous achievement. Many feel that a wonderful religious performance like “The Robe” should finish only with a suitable religious air at the conclusion. There are three performances daily – Balcony 2/-, stalls 1/-.

1-5-54 In the Junior League Derrygonnelly defeated Devenish by 3-3 to 1-2. Devenish had a grand full back in J. Mulrone, who gave a sound display while others to impress were P. Keown, R, Mc Dermott and J. Treacy.

8-5-54 Enniskillen Unionist majority on the Town Improvements Committee which has Council powers in the allocation of houses voted to give four new Council houses in Derrychara to Protestants. This makes a total of 77 houses let at Derrychara, all to Protestants. There are 18 left to be let.

8-5-54 On Wednesday morning the wedding took place at St. Patrick’s Church Belleek of Mr. George Johnston, Pettigo and Miss Molly Monaghan, daughter of Mr and Mrs Edward Monaghan, Aghafoy, Pettigo. Mr. Edward Monaghan, brother of the bride was best man and Miss Mona Flood, “The Hotel” Pettigo was bridesmaid. Afterwards the happy couple set off for Bundoran for their honeymoon.

8-5-54 The wedding took place of Mr. John J. McGurl, Farrancassidy and Miss Maureen Doogan, Corry, Belleek.

8-5-54 The death is reported of Mr. John Dolan, Drumnasrene who was one of the most respected residents of Devenish Parish.

15-5-54 Ballyshannon’s new GAA Park opens with a Donegal win over Armagh in a challenge game.

5-6-54  The death is announced of Mr. James Maguire, Seemuldoon, building contractor, responsible for the erection (and of the design) of many fine schools, halls, churches and buildings. He had erected the curates house and Ederney Hall in his own parish.

5-6-54 A 22 mile dash by Enniskillen fire brigade saved the world-famous Belleek Pottery from possible destruction on Sunday. They reached Belleek in a record time of half an hour. Workmen and others, including police under Sergeant John Mc Michael, formed a bucket chain which confined the flames to a limited area of the kiln polishing room where the outbreak started. Fire fighting units from Ballyshannon also attended the blaze and Customs formalities were waived as they crossed the Border.

12-6-54 By attaching a wooden frame behind his motorbike, Mr. John O’Connor, Mulleek, was able to “top” two acres of potato drills in a few hours. When done by hand this usually took several days. Miss Rita Dolan, a nurse, of Killybig, Garison, was fined £2 for allowing a juvenile to drive her car without being properly licensed, and covered by the insurance, and she was disqualified for driving for a year. The RM suggested an early application be made to the court for the removal of the disqualification on Miss Dolan.

19-6-54  Daring Raid on Armagh military barracks. Fifteen khaki-clad men seize 700 guns from the Armory. Officers held up at pistol point.

19-6-54 For the second time in a fortnight the River Erne between Belleek and Roscor will be drained of all water.

19-6-54  Juvenile Football League. Ederney’s Grand Win over Gaels by 4-13 to 1-1. Ederney proved to be far too good for Gaels Juveniles. It was a pleasure to watch the Ederney team and especially their grand nippy forwards with their well-worked and constructive moves, and their beautiful finishing. Practice, training and constructive coaching were apparent in every movement. All were splendid but M. Maguire, Joe Turner, J. Moohan and especially A. Mc Grath, a grand little player with a great “pick-up” and a delightful body swerve merit special mention. J Wylie, N. McClurg, H. Herbert, V. Henderson and Nolan in goals were best for Gaels.

19-6-54  Mr E. Thompson, Castle Caldwell had a narrow escape from injury when, swerving to avoid an auto-cyclist, his car mounted a ditch and overturned. After treatment for injuries he was able to resume his journey in a friend’s car.

19-6-54 Senior Football Championship. Enniskillen Gaels qualified for the Divisional Final with a narrow victory over Ederney by 4-2 to 3-4. Best for Ederney were Jim Eves, B. Sheridan, B. Mc Hugh and the McKervey brothers. The stewards had the excellent idea of clearing the goal lines before the game started, thus leaving the two umpires at each goals free to carry out their duties more efficiently. Referee Mr. Bill Thompson.

26-6-54 In the league Irvinestown 1-4, Belleek 1-4. Best for the home team were O’Hanlon, Charlton, McGrory, Lennon (Joe who played for Down) Mahon, Maguire and Hegarty. The visitors were well served by McCann, Gonigle, Rooney, and Tinney. The match was refereed by Fr. Tom Marron, Ederney.

26-6-54  On next Sunday, June 27th, Pettigo village will be en fete for the annual Memorial celebrations which it is hoped will be a success. There will be a fancy dress parade led by Ederney and Irvinestown Bands to the new Memorial Park, where many football teams will compete for the Memorial Cup.

26-6-54 Irvinestown mid-week Tournament, 13-a-side for wristlet watches valued at £120 at St., Molaise Park, Irvinestown. Fixtures include Pettigo V Derrygonnelly Thursday 24th June and Trillick V Ederney Thursday 22nd July.

1953 July to December.

25-7-53 Ederney Parochial Sports. Teams from Pettigo, Dromore, Ederney and Trillick took part with Pettigo and Dromore reaching the finals by defeating respectively, Trilliok and Ederney. The final was not played owing to the rain and Pettigo won the tournament on a toss.

25-7-53 Weeping mothers and sweethearts crowded the GNR terminus at Great Victoria Street as more than 100 young men and women left by train for Cobh on their way to Canada. This was the 4th Emigrant Special to leave Belfast in the last six months and contained many families and Queen’s University graduates. The front of the train was decorated with the head of a giant Elk’s head. They will join the Cunard liner, “Georgic” at Cobh. Already on board from Southampton are 36 members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police who have been attending the Coronation ceremonies.

15-8-53 At Belleek Court, Francis Devanney of Forkhill Park, Irvinestown was fined £3 with costs and bound him to keep the peace for twelve months on his own bail of £5 plus one surety of £5 for striking James Burns, Brollagh, Belleek on 30th June. Devanney, who has a family of 10, came out of a pub convenient to the Cementation Works yard and struck Burns in the face for being unwilling to go on strike. The R.M. said he would have sent Devanney to jail only that he had a large family. Devanney has a long list of previous convictions for similar offences.

22-8-53 After the unveiling ceremony in Pettigo on Saturday members of “C” Company, headed by their pipe band paraded to what was formerly the RIC barracks in Pettigo. (Currently in 2002, the Priest’s House) and observed 2 minutes silence in memory of the late Commandant P. Breen, who was in charge of taking the barracks in 1921. Afterwards the band played, “The Minstrel Boy,” which was Comdt. Breen’s favourite tune. (Unveiling of Pettigo 1922 memorial.)

22-8-53   Donkey owner fined at Belleek. Susan Johnston, Commons, Belleek was summonsed for allowing her donkey to wander on the road. Seamus O’Connor, a driver employed by the Cementation Company said that the donkey wandered out in front of him. He did the donkey little harm but the front of his car was smashed in. The defendant said that the donkey must have jumped over the ditch and that on the evening in question all the animals were being annoyed by flies. She was fined 7/6 with 18/- costs.

22-8-53 Enniskillen child drowned. Inquest on Lough Erne fatality. Gerald Divine, Darling St., Enniskillen, aged 6 years drowned on the afternoon of the 8th while playing at the Round “O,” Enniskillen.

22-8-53 Enniskillen Convent’s great achievement. Every one of the 28 pupils entered for the Senior Certificate Examination passed.

22-8-53  Northern Patriots remembered in Impressive Ceremony. War of Independence Recalled at the Unveiling of Pettigo Memorial. The names on the Memorial are Patrick Flood (Pettigo), William Kearney and Bernard Mc Canny (Drumquin) and William Deasley, (Dromore, Co., Tyrone). The commemorative Mass was said by Rev. A. Slowey, C. C., Belleek and an FCA Guard of Honour, under Lieutenant L. Emerson, Ballyshannon, rendered Compliments at the Consecration. Minister of Defence, General Sean Mc Keown attended. Mr. Oscar Traynor made the oration at the unveiling of the statue commemorating the invasion of Pettigo on June 4th, 1922.

29-8-53   Irish-Ireland Activities in Devenish. Children’s classes attended by almost 60 children of the Parish up to the age of 14 years. The classes have been enthusiastically attended and supported by the children on three nights weekly, and lessons have been given in Irish Prayers, conversational Irish, Irish singing, dancing and history. There have been lessons in etiquette and a football team of juveniles chosen from the boys has been established and has proved a match for the best in three counties. The season closed on the 15th of August with a Ceilidh in St. Mary’s Hall. Among the prize winners were: – Best mannered child, Mary Flanagan, Corramore. Irish Prayers, Eileen Burns, Cashel. Exercise Books, J. J. Carty, Knockaraven. Accordion 1. J. J. Carty, Knockaraven; 2. Gerald Feely, Knockaraven.

29-8-53 Lord Bishop’s Regulations – Dances must end at Midnight. The Lord Bishop of Clogher, Most Rev. Eugene O’Callaghan, D. D. has issued regulations governing the organisation and attendance of Catholics of the Diocese at dances which continue until after midnight. The regulations are to come into force on September 1st. All Cross-roads, open air and dancing decks are to close before lighting-up time, All Parochial Halls and halls controlled by Catholics are to close not later than 10 o’clock midnight – old time. In addition I forbid Catholics of this Diocese to attend any public dance which is to continue to a late hour. These regulations bind in conscience i.e. under pain of sin from 1st September. Priests are to exert vigilance to see that the Diocesan Law for the conclusion of all public dances is strictly observed.

5-9-53 Newtownbutler are new County Champions after beating Irvinestown in a grueling final by 0-6 to 0-4. The game was played in Gaelic Park, Enniskillen through terrific downpours but the large crowd cheered on while sheltering under trees. Billy Charlton was at the centre of an almost impregnable full back line for Irvinestown. Kevin McCann (Belleek) was a scrupulously fair referee whose handling of the game was beyond criticism.

12-9-53 Garrison Man Unconscious for Seven Days. William George Acheson of Gorteen, Garrison, was unconscious for 7 days and in hospital for a month after cycling into the side of a shooting-brake. As he had suffered a lot through his own negligence he was only fined 5 shillings.

19-9-53 A fine of 15 shillings plus costs was imposed on John Murphy, Stranlongford at Irvinestown Court on Friday for being drunk in charge of a bicycle twice. His wife appeared in his stead and said he was ill and asked for a month to pay the fine.

19-9-53  Ederney drew with Irvinestown 3-3 to 1-9 although the league points were of little interest to either in this local derby. In the juvenile match before Irvinestown easily defeated a much lighter Ederney team. Most promising for Ederney were Manus and Martin Maguire, Sean and Joe Rolston, Joe Turner, Tony Maguire and Tony McGrath. In goals for Ederney Seamus Milligan made several fine saves including two penalties.

19-9-53 On Tuesday morning after 11 o’clock Mass in St. Mary’s Church, Pettigo, His Lordship, Most Rev. Dr. O’Callaghan, Lord Bishop of Clogher, blessed and opened St. Mary’s new national school at Pettigo. At the blessing ceremony a guard of honour was provided by the school children under their teachers Master B. Egan, B.A., N.T., Mrs T. Bradley, N.T. and Miss Mc Fadden, N.T. The minister of Education was represented by Mr. Joseph Brennan, T.D. who in a short address said Pettigo people should be proud of their beautiful new school, which had been such a necessity for the past 30 years. The building, he said, was a credit to the contractor, Mr. Geo. Irwin, Donegal, and his staff of tradesmen and workers. Thanks was expressed to the Rev. priests, Very Rev. P. Dempsey P.P., Rev. Jas. F. Brennan, C.C. and Rev. A. Slowey, C.C. for their unfailing efforts and constant attention until the beautiful building was completed. To Fr. Jas. F. Brennan alone the parish are deeply indebted for all his work for both the welfare of his parishioners and for the churches and schools in both Pettigo and Lettercran, and it is hoped that he will remain many long years in the parish so as to reap the reward of his zeal. His Lordship also blessed the twelve new houses erected in the village under the housing scheme. The choir with Miss Dora Mc Neill at the organ rendered sacred music during the Mass.

19-9-53 Pettigo Girl’s Licence Suspended at Belleek. Kathleen Monaghan, Ballymacavanney, Lough Derg, was fined £2-2-6 with costs and disqualified from driving for a year in N. Ireland, for driving without due care, and without a licence, insurance and tail lights. She admitted all offences. Constable Bell who stopped her said she came into the town from the Ballyshannon direction on the wrong side of the white line and swerved up the Main Street. She said she was learning to drive.

26-9-53 Omagh, St. Enda’s win Irvinestown Tourney Final by defeating Lisnaskea by 5-8 to 2-7. The fifteen wristlet watches were presented to the Omagh players afterwards by Rev. J. Mc Kenna, P.P., Irvinestown. Omagh opened the scoring with two goals. The 13 a-side format suited Omagh.

3-10-53 All the residents allotted new houses in Pettigo have taken up their residence during the weekend and are delighted with such splendid houses with every modern convenience.

3-10-53 Armagh gallant in defeat as they fail in the All Ireland final to Kerry by 0-13 to 1-6. Armagh missed a penalty and squandered chances to win. The official attendance of 85,155 and receipts of £10,904-9-1 constitute a record and an additional 7,000 got into the ground without paying.

3-10-53 During Monday’s floods Mr. P. Halpin, Customs Officer, Pettigo, performed a plucky act when he rescued four sheep from the Termon River as they were being swept away. He waded waist deep into the fast flowing river to rescue them.

3-10-53  Marian Year Proclaimed. The Pope has proclaimed 1954 as Marian Year in celebration of the centenary of  the definition of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception by Pope Pius X1 on December 8th 1854. The Pope ordered the World’s 400 million Catholics to concentrate on Our Lady’s intercession for three objects:- The Unity of the Church, The Peace of the World and The Church of Silence – 60 million Catholics behind the Iron Curtain.

3-10-53 Mr. Cahir Healy, M.P., again unanimously chosen at the Nationalist Convention to run as an anti-partition candidate in South Fermanagh. It was decided not to run in Enniskillen or Lisnaskea (where the Prime minister held) as these areas had been gerrymandered to return two Unionist candidates although Fermanagh had a Nationalist majority.

10-10-53 Cost of Dying Rising Too. Enniskillen Rural District Council is losing £300 to £400 per year in running Brendrum Cemetery. Increases are to be made in the burial and grave charges.

10-10-53 Fermanagh give grand display in losing to Derry by 9 points to 6 points. Following a draw with Tyrone it seems that a corner has been turned in Fermanagh’s fortunes since they were last a team to be feared in 1935. “P. Rooney was sound enough … Matt Regan, a supposedly volatile footballer, was as sound as a bell, brilliant in placing, deadly in tackling and as clean a player as was on a clean field. More performances like this and Matt will have beaten the best of his past  …. Gonigle was a good plodding midfielder, with a flash of brilliance in him quite often … J. P. McCann seemed a grand player playing with the foot brake partly on.

10-10-53 Mrs Brigid Maguire, relict of Mr. Peter Maguire, died at her home at Knockaraven, Devenish on Tuesday 15th September.

10-10-53 On Sunday evening Pettigo village was en fete with bonfires and cheering crowds when the residents learned that their Junior team were victors in the County Final against the Doe team at Ballybofey.

10-10-53 On Wednesday of last week torrential rain fell in the district for twenty-four hours continuously causing the most devastating floods ever remembered in the district. In Cortness (Gortanessy?)district a bridge connecting the farm of J. Fletcher, with the leading Pettigo to Castlederg road was swept away, nothing being left on the iron girders. The village street was flooded to a depth of two feet from the Diamond to the railway station. Pedestrians had to wade to the railway station in their bare feet. Ricks of hay and corn were swept away and in the mountain district sheep were swept away. Roads were also torn. The Pettigo to Castlederg road was under water for three miles at Lettercran.

17-10-53 Ceilidhe Mhor in St. Joseph’s Hall, Cashel, on Sunday 18th, October. Music by McCusker Bros. Ceilidhe band (first visit to Cashel. Dancing 8 o’clock, Admission 3s-6d.

17-10-53 Dance in Mc Cabe’s Hall, Belleek, Friday 23rd October with music by Derrylin Starlight Band. Admission 4 shillings.

17-10-53 On Friday night Pettigo GFC held a victory ceilidh in St. Mary’s Hall, Pettigo, to celebrate victory over St. Michael’s (Doe) at Ballybofey the previous Sunday in the junior County Final. The cup was carried in procession through the village by the team headed by the captain. The hall was packed by patrons from both north and south of the Border. The dance which was from 8 to 12 concluded with the National Anthem.

17-10-53 Tully’s High St. Enniskillen – Special Coat Display – Lady’s Gabardine Coat in popular new colours for 6 ½ guineas.

31-10-53 At Kesh court, Pettigo man, Thomas Reilly of Mill St. was fined 40s and had his licence suspended for 12 months for driving a car without insurance and 10s for driving without a licence. William Elliott of Killsmollen was fined 8s for carrying two passengers on a goods vehicle without a licence, Grace Elliott, Tulnagin, Ederney and Patrick Meehan, Largy, Lack who were both fined 2s-6d. Hugh McGrath, Ednaveigh was fined 8s for allowing three heifers to wander on the road. For allowing four animals to wander on the road William R. Johnston, Lack was fined 6s. John A. Harron, Gubbaroe, was fined 5s for throwing fireworks in Kesh. Thomas Mc Clelland, Feddans, Kesh was fined 20s for using a goods vehicle without a licence and Edward Maguire, Main St. Ederney was fined 3s for having no reflective mirror on a motor vehicle, and 5s, for having no horn.

31-10-53 Ballinamallard Couple’s claim against Kesh man. Charles Leonard and his wife Kathleen of Coolgarron, Ballinamallard sued Malcolm Turner of Tievaveeney, Kesh for £50 and breach of contract. They alleged that the defendant had invited them to live with him and that he would transfer his lands to Kathleen. They took up residence and put in two acres of potatoes and one of corn but the plaintiff refused to complete the contract or allow them to take away the crops. The defendant claimed that they had ordered £25 of groceries from Blakley McCartney of Kesh in his name and used them solely for themselves and family. The Judge granted £10 to the plaintiffs and allowed the defendant to keep the crops.

31-10-53 Enniskillen Fishery Board member disqualified for six months and fined £7 and costs after a fishery prosecution in Derrygonnelly. He was Mr John Maguire, Boa Island, a fisherman and his partner Edward Cassidy who was fined £4 and costs. Evidence was given that they had failed to stop their boat when challenged by the police launch, were fishing with worms with long lines and had undersized eels in their possession.

31-10-53  Fermanaghman to share in the residue of a ten million pound estate. One of two brothers who will share in the residue of the estate of the Duke of Westminster, Britain’s richest landowner, after many legacies and annuities to members of the family, friends and servants is Lieutenant Colonel Robert George Grosvenor, Ely Lodge, Enniskillen. The Duke died last July aged 74. He came to Fermanagh in 1951 when he bought the Ely Estate from Mr. Cathcart. He and his brother are cousins of the late Duke.

31-10-53  Old Character Passes. An old man of the roads, Bob Davitt, died in Ballyshannon. He was almost 80 years old and had been known to generations of families in the North-West as a gentle, kindly, old man who moved from place to place with his familiar, “bundle on his shoulder.” Youngsters delighted in letting imagination work on the mysteries of the great bag, which was opened occasionally to show the small articles that Bob would sell. He had great dignity and would only condescend to take a meal at some houses, and indeed to call only in some. He slept in haysheds or at the foot of haystacks; he was loved by children of several generations. By his passing a link has been broken of Ireland’s “men of the road.” He had a considerable sum of money when he died.

31-10-53  The sudden death took place at Killybeg, Belleek, of Mrs Jane Keown, wife of Mr. Patrick Keown. She had been in indifferent health for some time past.

7-11-53 A decree of £3 was awarded against Thomas Duffy, Commons, Belleek, for trespass by his cattle on lands at Rathmore, Belleek. The action was taken by John Mc Elroy, Auctioneer, Belleek who had the setting of the land. He claimed that the land was worth £20 per annum but Duffy would only offer £12 which was refused.

7-11-53 Inquest on Ballyshannon woman adjourned. Mrs Agnes White (49), widow of James White, one of the leading merchants of the district in his time was found dead in the attic of her home on Tuesday of last week. She was suffering from heart trouble for a number of years and was inclined to excessive worry. She was found lying in the attic with a rug under her head as a pillow. He found a cup and a small glass beside the body. Guard Flynn gave evidence of finding traces of vomiting and two partly dissolved capsules of a purplish colour. Dr. Patrick Daly gave his opinion that the capsules could not have caused her death.

7-11-53 Mr. S. McGinley is appointed secretary of Pettigo GAA Club. (John McGinley, Customs Officer and father of Sean McGinley, noted Irish actor.)

7-11-53 Storm over Fermanagh – Torrential rain all over the county during Sunday caused the most serious and extensive flooding in years. The Belleek to Letter Road was impassable at Rosscreenagh, where water poured down from the hills and covered the entire valley.

7-11-53 The case was dismissed against Joseph McDermott, Corry, Belleek, for riding his bicycle without due care and attention. He had been badly injured when struck by a lorry while cycling from his farm at Brollagh. He had spent 15 days in the Shiel Hospital, Ballyshannon, with severe head and arm injuries. A similar case against the lorry driver was adjourned.

14-11-53 The death has occurred of Rev. W. Babbington Steele, Castletown, Monea, retired minister of the Episcopalian Church of Ireland. He was born in 1865 and was the son of Rev. William Steele, headmaster of Portora from 1857 to 1891.He was the brother of  the convert, Rev. John Haughton Steele, born 1850, who had been minister at Deryvore, Co., Fermanagh, incumbent of Trinity Church, Crom, Newtownbutler for 27 years, before becoming a priest in 1912. Fr. Steele died on March 17th, 1920 and is interred in the grounds of Cavan Cathedral.

14-11-53 The death of Mr. James Cleary, Donegal House, Bundoran. He was a native of Lissan, Garvery, Enniskillen and had spent his early years in America returning in 1925 to set up a successful business in Bundoran. He had been on his way to Benediction on Monday evening when he died.

21-11-53 A fire broke out in the roof of Letterkeen School, Kesh, on Wednesday 11th. The 40 children were removed by their teacher Miss Mary I. Stephenson. Two sections of Enniskillen Fire brigade arrived within a half an hour, making the 18 mile journey in record time. They were able to put out the fire before any serious damage was done.

21-11-53  Opening Announcement – Radio and Television Service of Thomas P. Gannon, 37 East Bridge Street, Enniskillen opposite the GPO. Leading makes of radio and television stocked, batteries, valves and all radio components, sheet music and gramophone records, complete repair service, batteries charged.

21-11-53 Two men drowned in shocking Belleek tragedy. Both were employees of the Cementation Company. The dead men are Jack Lawler, Athy, Co., Kildare and Jack Mc Grath, Lisnarick. Edwards, J. Maguire of Boa Island was rescued. Mc Grath’s body has not yet been discovered despite search parties of up to 50 people searching the banks of the river. Mr. Maguire gave a graphic description of what happened to members of the Press.

28-11-53  Border fireworks. Guard James Dowd summonsed James McInern (18) of Bannaghbeg, Clonelly, Co., Fermanagh for exploding squibs in Main St. Pettigo and then running into the North out of the jurisdiction. McInern was caught but another youth escaped. The case was adjourned as McInern’s sister had rung in to say he was ill and unable to attend. Daniel McGrory was fined 10/- each for being lying down drunk on the road and having no light on his bicycle.

5-12-53 The minor Football Championship between Lisnaskea and Garrison was a very one sided affair with Lisnaskea having an easy win Garrison conceding two very soft goals at the beginning.

12-12-53 Ending of the Marian Year in a three day ceremony. Overflowing crowds at all Masses. “The cry for a new Redemption, a Redemption coming through Mary, has been answered.” Said at a ceremony at the Graan.

19-12-53 The longest ever Ballyshannon inquest lasting 3½ hours was resumed on the 9th on Mrs Agnes Fyffe White, proprietoress of the well-known business bearing her name, at the Mall, Ballyshannon, whose body was found in the attic of her home on 28th of October.

26-12-53  Inquest into Belleek tragedy. Accidental drowning verdicts were returned on John Lawlor (39) Athy, County Kildare and John McGrath, Rossgweer, Lisnarick, employees on the Erne Scheme at Belleek who lost their lives on the 16th November, when their boat was swept away after their engine had failed. The inquest on Lawlor was held in Belleek Courthouse and a jury of which Christopher Ross was foreman. John Maguire, Boa Island, the boatman gave evidence. The engine died out and they missed the first safety rope because the boat passed over it. They caught hold of the second but it sagged leaving them under the water. He let go and was swept through the open sluice gates. Below Belleek Bridge and the eel weir he caught up with the overturned boat and it took him to the bank where he clung to a tree until rescued. Like Lawlor he was wearing a life jacket but Lawlor’s head struck the sluice-gates and he was drowned. McGrath had no life jacket and his body was not found for days after. As his body was found on the Eire side of the Border an inquest was conducted in Ballyshannon. Frank McCauley found McGrath’s body having searched each day for it.

1953 January to June.

1953.

 National Events.

27 people die when a BEA Viking aircraft crashes at Belfast Airport (Nutt’s Corner) on 5 January
Samuel Beckett’s En Attendant Godot (Waiting for Godot) is first performed at the Théâtre Babylone, Paris on 5 January
The ferry Princess Victoria capsizes off the coast of County Down: 133 people die (31 January)
Insured workers in the Republic become eligible for medical benefit
The library of Alfred Chester Beatty, containing his unique collection of oriental manuscripts, opens in Dublin (8 August)
The Health Act provides for a free mother-and-child healthcare scheme in the Republic (29 October)
Michael Scott’s acclaimed Busaras (central bus station) is built in Dublin
The last Blasket Islanders are resettled on the mainland
John Bernal is awarded the Lenin Peace Prize.

Births.

Raymond Deane (composer, pianist and novelist) on Achill Island, Co. Mayo
Theo Dorgan (poet) in Cork
Hugo Hamilton (fiction writer) in Berlin
Mary Harney (politician; leader of the Progressive Democrats and Tánaiste) in Ballinasloe, Co. Galway (11/3)
Garry Hynes (theatre director) in Roscommon (10/6)
Rita Kelly (poet) in Galway
Frank McGuinness (playwright) in Buncrana, Co. Donegal (?/7)
Liam Neeson (film actor) in Ballymena, Co. Antrim
Patricia O’Donovan (trade unionist) in Cork
John Rocha (fashion designer, based mainly in Dublin since 1978) in Hong Kong (23/8)
Ronan Sheehan (fiction writer) in Dublin

Deaths.

Sir Arnold Bax
Henry Dixon
Richard Downey
F.L. Green
Beatrice Grimshaw
James Hamilton (3rd Duke of Abercorn)
Grace Henry
Maud Gonne MacBride
Alice Milligan
Eugene O’Neill
Joseph O’Neill
T.F. O’Rahilly
Robert Lloyd Praeger
James Scullin

Local Events.

3-1-53 Blackbog Parochial Bazaar in St. Joseph’s Hall, Ederney 4th-11th January in aid of a new church.

3-1-53 During the past week the most severe frost remembered for 15 years has held the Pettigo district in its grip. Lakes and rivers in the area were frozen over. The accompanying cold was intense as a result of which many people were confined to bed with influenza.

3-1-53 Kinlough. On Christmas Eve the countryside was illuminated by the Christmas Candles which lit up every house. Churches were crowded for Midnight Mass at which large numbers of the faithful received Holy Communion.

3-1-53 Regret has been occasioned in the Devenish district by the death of Mrs E. J. Mc Guinness, Corramore.

3-1-53.The death is reported at a comparatively early age of Mrs D. Duffy, Fassagh, mother of John and Joseph Duffy.

3-1-53 The inaugural meeting of the Clogher Historical Society was held on December 28th in St. Macartan’s Seminary, Monaghan, with Bishop O’Callaghan presiding. It is to produce an annual journal recording the religious, social, economic and political history of the Diocese of Clogher.

3-1-53 Two gypsies, Martin Ward and Bernard Reilly, were found guilty of breaking open the poor boxes at the Graan, Enniskillen and stealing the contents. The two who were at a gipsy encampment at Rossory, Enniskillen were jailed for six months each.

10-1-53 Thirteen men, who attended Mass for 35 minutes on the morning of New Year’s Day, were dismissed from the Winter Relief Scheme by Enniskillen Borough Council.

17-1-53 Regret has been occasioned by the death of Mr. Bernard Flanagan, Devenish, a member of an old respected family.

17-1-53 Successful Devenish Play. An audience of over 600 people packed into St. Mary’s Hall, Devenish to see the wonderfully realistic Nativity play presented by the children of the parish. A high tribute is due to Rev. Victor Marron C.C. and the teachers for the careful and diligent training that they gave to the children which resulted in the presentation of such an awe inspiring spectacle.

24-1-53  Dublin Dance aids Pettigo Memorial. A very successful dance was held on January 6th, in St. Peter’s Hall, Phibsborough, Dublin, in aid of the Pettigo Memorial Fund. The monument which will be in the shape of an Irish Volunteer on the march is being executed by a famous Dublin sculptor. It is hoped it will be ready to be unveiled early in June of this year. The Dublin Committee intend to issue a booklet containing an account of “The Battle of Pettigo.” It will also contain an account of the efforts made by successive British Governments from 1912 onwards to ensure for Britain a permanent hold on Northern Ireland.

24-1-53 The Pettigo 1922 Memorial Committee received £200 from the Pettigo Men’s Committee in New York also over £100 from members of the Old IRA in Dublin.

24-1-53 Writing in the Eire Society Bulletin of Boston USA, Miss Mary Frances Fox, one of the founders of, “The American League for an Undivided Ireland,” recalls her last visit to Garrison last year. Her mother was a native of Devenish Parish. She believes that “Garrison” is a name best forgotten and a return to the name of Devenish West. She applauds the efforts made in this direction by Rev. Canon Coyle, “patriot priest in the great Irish tradition, jailed during the fight for freedom, and now in the 52nd year of his priesthood.”

31-1-53 A total of £170 in fines was imposed at Kesh Court on five Dromore women who were stopped in a taxi coming from Pettigo smuggling cigarettes and tobacco on 30th August 1952. Rose Mc Cann was fined £20, Mary Donnelly £30, Sarah Donnelly £40, Rose Mc Caffrey (with a previous conviction) £50 and Jenny Gallagher £30. They were given three months to pay.

31-1-53 Bid to save Cloy School near Lack and avoid the bussing of the 18 pupils to Lack Primary School. Mr. Cahir Healy M.P. believed in the retention of small rural schools as it was a hardship for children to travel long distances to school which involved early rising and waiting on the roadside under trees in wet weather waiting for buses.

31-1-53 Fermanagh Conference agrees on the idea of a new abattoir. The present Enniskillen abattoir is out of date and the lease almost ended. Mr. Harry West proposed the export of meat from the new abattoir via St. Angelo Airdrome. Enniskillen Rural District Council is to give £5,000 to the new project.

31-1-53 Fermanagh widow, Mrs. Sarah Jane Elliott of Lisbellaw and her five children are granted £1,500 for the loss of her husband in a car accident. She was also granted an additional £400 on account of her own personal injuries arising from the collision with, Gerald McGrath, Post Office worker and Union official of Station Rd., Randallstown. The accident occurred on October 25th, 1950.

7-2-53 Corporal Tom Harte, of the US Army, arrived home on Christmas Eve after serving two years in Korea, giving his parents of Raheelan, Kiltyclogher a wonderful Christmas surprise. He brought home with him some beautiful examples of Japanese and Korean art and craft. He has returned to America last Friday to resume work with the Edison Company with whom he had been employed before enlisting.

7-2-53 Heavy loss of life as motor-vessel founders. Larne-Stranraer boat sinks in a gale. The Princess Victoria sank in a raging sea five miles off the County Down coast on Saturday afternoon on the way from Stranraer to Larne. There were only 44 survivors, 128 people drowned and 65 are still missing.

7-2-53 More than 1,000 people are feared drowned in extensive floods in south-east England and the Low Countries in a weekend of sea-driven floods. One hundred people are drowned and 400 missing on Canvey Island in the Thames estuary when a 17th century sea wall was breached. Bodies have been found on the tops of houses with water lapping at their feet and others entangled in the branches of trees.

7-2-53 The death is announced of Mrs Kate Gallagher of Tullygravarth, Cashelnadrea, Devenish in the Erne Hospital, Enniskillen at the advanced age of 71.

7-2-53 Thomas O’Reilly of Coramore, Lisnaskea was sentenced at Lisnaskea Court to a month’s imprisonment with hard labour for stealing 9 hens valued at £6-15-0 from Miss Bridget Mc Brien, Drumlone, Newtownbutler.

14-2-53 Kesh Boy’s Sad Fate. James Joseph Douglas, aged 18 ½ of Gortnagullion, Kesh, had been missing since Christmas Day, and his body was discovered drowned in Lough Erne between Portinode Bridge and Hare Island on 5th February. His bicycle, overcoat and army cap had been found on Portinode Bridge on Christmas Day. At the inquest in Kesh on Monday held by Mr. George Warren, coroner, a verdict of suicide was returned.

19-2-53 Belleek Property Sale has Court Sequel. Decree of £25 made against an Enniskillen auctioneer re the sale of No. 7 Rathmore Terrace, Belleek. Mr. Edward Ellis of Main St. Belleek was plaintiff and the defendants were Dr. Rollins of Croydon, Surrey administrator of the estate of Charlotte Emily Rollins, and Walter Brown of East Bridge St., Enniskillen. The houses in the row had been sold for £800 or £80 each. Mr Ellis had bought No 7 for £300 but had not been able to obtain possession. The houses had been advertised as freehold and turned out to be only leasehold with only 18 years left on the leases.

21-2-53 From Bishop O’Callaghan’s Lenten Pastoral. Seminary for Enniskillen. We have to provide a minor seminary in the Six County portion of the diocese for those boys who wish to follow the Northern Ireland Grammar School Course. We have already secured a suitable site at Enniskillen and hope to have the building commenced as soon as the permit from the Northern Ireland Government is obtained. I appeal to all who are in a position to make bequests for religious or charitable purposes to remember the new seminary.

14-3-53 At the AGM of St. Mary’s GFC the secretary Mr. P. Keown, expressed the view that efforts should be made to reunite Cashelnadrea area to the club so that a strong Parish Club be formed. He paid tribute to the help from the Cashel boys during 1952.

14-3-53 Cavanacross travelled to Devenish on Sunday for their first Junior League game and emerged victors after a gruelling hours’ football. Played in brilliant sunshine on an ideal pitch the game was keenly contested right to the end. The closeness of the scores is indication of the eveness of these two teams both of which can be commended for the clean sporting manner in which the game was played. The scoring opened after about 10 minutes play when J. Cassidy had a point for Cavanacross followed about five minutes later by a point for Devenish leaving the score at half time at 1 point each. After the interval Cavanacross had a further two points leaving the final score 0-1 to 0-3 in favour of the visitors. Mr. J. P. Meehan was a strict and impartial referee.

14-3-53 The newly formed Cashelnarea Club wish to remain independent and not sink their individuality by playing for another team.

21-3-53 “The Quiet Man” led to trouble at the cinema. The manager of the Regal Cinema, Enniskillen was “warned and severely reprimanded” for alleged overcrowding and obstruction of the passageways at a showing of this popular film.

21-3-53 At Belleek Court on Tuesday James Mc Laughlin, Corrakeel, Belleek was fined 8 shillings with costs for being drunk in charge of a pedal cycle.

21-3-53  Garrison Farmer’s Union meeting ends in disorder after a meeting in McGovern’s Hall on March 3rd. Mr. White, General Organiser, presided at the election of officers after Mr. Grogan, J.P. declined re-election as Chairman. He welcomed the huge attendance and stressed the motto of the Farmer’s Union “Defence and not Defiance,” and stressed that the organisation was non-political and non-sectarian. Mr. Wesley Acheson, vice chairman was proposed as chairman and Mr. Francis Timoney was also proposed. Without a vote Mr. White went on to ask for proposals for a vice-chairman. When challenged by Mr. Benny Dolan, Mr. White said he was not going to be dictated to and that only members could vote. Mr Dolan said he was a member and had paid his fee of 10s and  held his membership card which he had got a month ago from Mr McGee, the secretary. After examination Mr White said the card was invalid as it had not been signed by the Group Secretary, Mr. Armstrong.

In a heated discussion Mr. Joe Elliott said that the Garrison branch was a private branch where everything was done behind closed doors and Mr. Dolan said that there never was a meeting except at Christmas, that the secretary had no list of members nor had he any minutes of the last meeting. A voice in the body of the hall observed that the Chairman has no land and Mr White said he was going ahead with the election of officers. He then asked Mr Dolan and Mr. Elliott how much land they had and they replied respectively 110 and 180 acres. Mr. White said he was going on with the meeting and that that they would obey him or leave the room to which Mr. Dolan replied that they would stay and he would leave. Loud cheering drowned out Mr. White as he tried to proceed and he threatened to fetch the police to which Mr. Elliott said that they were not afraid of the police to more cheers.

Mr White told the meeting that if they would not submit to him he would have to wipe Garrison off the map and said he had come from Belfast not knowing the difference between farmer and farmer and said he detested the spirit that had been revealed at the meeting. When he again called for a vice-chairman he was told from the audience he would get no vice-chairman and he said he regretted having to close the branch. He then left the hall.

28-3-53 An Eire Customs Patrol under Mr. M. Dawson, P.O. seized a lorry and 50 small pigs which were being taken from Eire to Northern Ireland. The seized bonhams were later sold in Pettigo and the vehicle removed to Custom’s Headquarters. The value of the pigs is about £350.

28-3-53 The death is announced of Mr. J. P. Dunne, P.T., Teemore, has robbed the GAA in Fermanagh of one of the best known and respected members of the Association. He was playing for the County team when he was sixteen and after gaining every honour a Fermanagh player could he went on to serve his county with the same ability and loyalty in the Council chamber. He became chairman of the Co., Board at a time when its very existence was threatened by financial troubles and internal distension. Thanks to his energetic efforts and his wide guidance a healthy organisation and a respectable credit balance in cash made the way easier for his successor in 1943 when he decided to retire from what had been a most tiring and exhausting office.

28-3-53 Enniskillen’s last thatched house in a blaze. The two story five room house of Mr. Thomas Maguire, The Orchard, Enniskillen was gutted by fire recently. It was the last thatched house in Enniskillen. Mr. Maguire, aged 83, is organist in St. Michael’s Church, Enniskillen.

4-4-53 Cashelnadrea V Cavanacross played in a gale force wind ended with a win for the Cavanacross visitors by 1-2 to 1-1. Packy and Richard Tracey scored a goal and a point respectively for Cashelnadrea.

4-4-53 Despite a gale force wind Belleek and Irvinestown produced many fine passages of football in a close game in Irvinestown which ended 1-3 each. Sean Mc Caffrey fisted to the net for Belleek and John Doogan levelled the scoring with the last kick of the game.

4-4-53 These people can see through you. X-Ray Mobile Unit for Enniskillen. Have you got T.B.? The chances are about 100 to 1 against but if you happened to be the unlucky one you would be foolish not to learn about it so that you may be cured in a short time. Anyone above the age of 13 is entitled to a free x-ray at the Minor Townhall, Enniskillen.

11-4-53  Enniskillen’s new bridge joining the town to the Cornagrade Estate is to be called The Johnston Bridge in recognition of the part played by the Mayor of Enniskillen Ald. W. E. Johnston in getting approval from the Government for its construction.

11-4-53  In the new English Sewing Cotton Company’s factory over 300 are to be employed in Lisnaskea.

18-4-53  At a challenge football match between Pettigo and Belleek on Sunday at the football grounds, Pettigo were winners.

18-4-53 At Belleek Court Henry Acheson, Kevin McSherry both of Gurteen, Garrison and Andrew Sweeny of Kilcoo, were summonsed for disorderly behaviour in the public house of George Mc Manus, Belleek on 17th of February. Sergeant T. Cordner gave evidence of separating the three men struggling in a passage which led to the kitchen. He put Acheson out but later found that he had returned and had the proprietor by the throat and put him out again. McSherry questioned the authority of the Sergeant and said “there would be no peace until the green, white and gold is flying here.”  He also said to the publican and his two daughters that they were fine neighbours for phoning the police to which they replied that if they had not they would have wrecked the place. Mc Sherry was fined £1, Sweeny £2 and bound to the peace for a year and Acheson fined £4. Only McSherry appeared at the court.

18-4-53  Judge Troy at Ederney. Great Welcome for American friend of Ireland. Judge Mathew Troy, chief of the Irish-American, “Minute Men,” accompanied by Senator J. G. Lennon, was met by St. Joseph’s Band, Ederney and escorted to the Hall where he addressed the crowd. Rev. Fr. Mc Kenna P.P. praised him for the great work he was doing in the United States for a united Ireland. About 30 police were on duty in the vicinity.

18-4-53  Mary O’Reilly, a tinker was sentenced to two months in prison for stealing money on two occasions from Mrs Ellen Treacy, Fossagh. She had arrived pedalling her wares and snatched the money from the table. She was caught on the second occasion. The sentence will not take effect if she leaves Northern Ireland immediately. Aged 17, she was married since she was 15.

18-4-53  The death is announced of Dr. Alice Milligan, noted Irish Nationalist, poetess, essayist and dramatist at Lislap, Omagh, where she was born 80 years ago.

18-4-53  Bundoran’s An Tostal Attraction. On next Sunday a record off-season crowd for the Dr. Mc Kenna Cup game Donegal V Armagh at the Gaelic Park, Bundoran. This fixture, which is billed as a Tostal event of importance is arousing considerable interest and special trains and busses will bring their complement to the seaside on that day. Everyone who witnessed last season’s National League game between the same counties at Ballybay and the replay at Clones, when Donegal qualified for the semi-final, and won their first Lagan Cup, will agree if the same fare is provided, we are assured of a close and exciting hour of football. Donegal, with a home venue, will field a strong fifteen, which included a few young and promising stars, but will have a hard nut to crack in this experienced and well-balanced Armagh team.

18-4-53  Fermanagh Health Committee is pleased that at long last the Northern Ireland X-Ray Unit has visited the county. It was officially welcomed by Enniskillen Major Ald. W. E. Johnston, J.P. Some 300 people were x-rayed at the first session.

18-4-53  The introduction of Summer Time always brings with it a certain amount of confusion with it regarding the time of games. Next Sunday all games will begin at 4.00 p.m.

25-4-53  Devenish. Almost £200 worth of sheep and lambs have been destroyed by a dog on Kilea Mountain. If the animal is not traced and destroyed the sheep will have to be brought to the lowlands for safety.

25-4-53 The sympathy of a wide circle of friends is extended to Miss Briget Keenan and Mr. P. F. Keenan on the regretted death of their mother Mrs. P. Keenan.

2-5-53 On April 20th, Pettigo GAA Club purchased a large field which they are converting into an Athletics Park, from Mr. William Porter of Kimmid at the sum of £500.

9-5-53 At a football match between Pettigo and Donegal teams at Rosefield Park, on Sunday, after a well-played and strenuous game, Pettigo was the winner by two points. The recently formed Pettigo youthful team is showing great promise and if the spirit continues they should be able to make a name for themselves in the football field.

16-5-53 Devenish. The death of Mr. Thomas Johnston, Devenish, which occurred suddenly while he was carting on his farm is deeply regretted.

16-5-53 First in the Cashelnadrea district to have turf saved is Mr. Thos. Treacy, Woodvale House, Kilcoo.

16-5-53 Obituary of Mr. F. Keogh of Drumadravey, Lisnarick, electrician at RAF Station, Castle Archdale. He was disconnecting low tension wires when he was electrocuted. He is survived by his wife Veronica and sons Brendan, Peter and Desmond. He played goals for St. Molaise, Football Club, Irvinestown, for several years.

16-5-53   Regret is felt in the Lettercran district at the death of Mr. J. Mc Kenna, Proughlish, near Drumquinn aged 79 years. He was well known in the Lettercran district and was husband of Brigid Mc Kenna, a native of Lettercrann. He was father of Mrs John Sweeny, The Rock, Ballyshannon and of Mrs J. White, East Port, Ballyshannon. Internment took place in Longfield Cemetery.

23-5-53 John Tracy, Corramore, Garrison, Co., Fermanagh was fined £5 with £5-18-1 costs and expenses at Belleek Court for falsely claiming a grant of £1-4-6 towards the cost of fertilizers purchased from Belleek Cooperative Agricultural and Dairy Society.

23-5-53  Mr Vincent Keown, Killybig, had a narrow escape when he fell into the Erne at Belleek where he is employed  on the Erne Development Drainage Scheme. The presence of mind of a fellow worker Mr. Cyril Gibson saved him from possible drowning. Using a piece of wood on which there was a bent nail, he succeeded in hooking the nail in Keown’s clothing and pulling him to safety.

23-5-53 On Sunday matches were played in Rosefield Park between Pettigo and Barnesmore Minors and Juniors. The games which were played under very unfavourable conditions owing to a strong south-westerly wind were keenly contested. Barnesmore won the minor game and the most promising players for Pettigo were, Vincent Egan, Vincent McCrea, Joseph Moss and Joe Mc Fadden. Pettigo were the winners in the Junior match and in this game Vincent Egan, B. Maloney, J. Moss and Tony Mc Grath were always in the right place at the right time. Another promising player is Josie Mc Fadden. Mr. F. Muldoon refereed.

23-5-53 St. Mary’s Pipe Band has been equipped with new instruments. An interesting visitor to Devenish on Sunday was Senator Lennon, who was the guest of Mr. Fogarty, Cardiff, at the Melvin Hotel.

23-5-53 Success of Devenish Sports held in St. Mary’s Gaelic Park on Sunday 10th inst were an outstanding success and a crowd of several hundreds were drawn from Fermanagh, Leitrim and Donegal. They were delighted by the fine demonstration of athletics given by the schoolchildren of the parish in conjunction with the exquisite music provided by St. Mary’s Pipe Band. The tastefully dressed members of the children’s Irish Class gave a figure drill display under the direction of Miss Gilbride, Rosinver, and also gave displays of Irish dancing the music for which was provided by two talented young accordion players, J. J. Carty and P. Feehily. The latter is the son of Mr. P. Fehily, the well-known traditional fiddler. We congratulate Re. Victor Marron C.C. who was chief organiser of the event and marvel at the success of his efforts to give the children of Devenish a real Irish Ireland outlook. Without compulsion these children are as enthusiastic to learn the Irish language as Fr. Marron is to teach it. Mr. O’Donoghue, Ballyshannon, teaches them Irish dancing and Irish music and there is in this outpost of occupied Ireland we find youth enthusiastically embracing the culture that was the treasured possession of our forefathers and which has entirely disappeared from many parishes in the Republic of Ireland. I only pray that God may give to other parts of Ireland prototypes of Fr. Marron so that the spirit of real sincerity may be infused into the real Irish Ireland Revival Movement. In the football match which was between Belleek and Ballaghameehan St. Aiden’s the latter lead the heavier Belleek team by a point but Belleek with the aid of the wind in the second half won by 2-6 to 0-5 with Fr. Marron C.C. as referee.

23-5-53 Religious Profession of former Devenish Playright. Some years ago the name of Alfred G. Mc Govern, Aghoo, Tullyrossmearn, Devenish was known from end to end of Ireland as the author of several popular and  successful plays including, “Smuggling on the Border,” which had a great run in the Midlands and South: “Paddy Reilly from Ballyjamesduff,” a play founded on the popular song “Come back Paddy Reilly,” and “I will repay,” a historical play representing the life and times of Fr. Sheehy which may well be regarded as the masterpiece of this gifted son of Fermanagh. Your correspondent had the honour to be present at the first productions of all these plays, and reviewed them in turn. Brother Peter is a brother of Messrs. Francis J. Mc Govern, monumental sculptor, Kiltyclogher and of Mr. Leo Mc Govern, postmaster, American House, Bundoran and cousin of Rev. Patrick Stewart, S.M.A., Nigeria, and of Mr. John Sweeny, prominent New York businessman, and Mr. P. Mc Govern, P.C., Curran House, Kiltyclogher, and Mr. J. Sweeny, Latoon. He was reared within a mile of Kiltyclogher. A former playing member of Cashelnadrea Gaelic Football team he was also a gifted musician and his violin selections of traditional dance tunes and airs were frequently heard on concert platforms and Feiseanna all over the North-West. Six years ago Mr. Mc Govern decided to leave the world behind and entered religion as a novice at the Cistercian Monastery, Roscrea, Co., Tipperary. On Wednesday of last week he made his final profession at an impressive ceremony in the Monastery, taking the name in religion of Brother Peter, son of the late Mr. and Mrs John Mc Govern, Aghoo, Cashelnadrea.

30-5-53 A verdict of suicide whilst of unsound mind was returned at an inquest in Ballyshannon on Monday on Edmond P. Condon (44) solicitor, who was found hanging in an out office of Mall House, Ballyshannon, his late mother’s residence, on Thursday evening. He was a former chairman of Ballyshannon Town Commissioners and had been missing since Sunday. Sergt. P. Flynn, who made the discovery, said that Condon seemed to be worried and had been unusually quiet recently.

30-5-53 Enniskillen Rural Council’s Victory over Lonely Spinster. Sheriff’s bailiffs Henry Coalter, Chanterhill, Enniskillen and Thomas Higgins, Enniskillen accompanied by Mr. A.W. Dinnen, Assistant Welfare Officer for Fermanagh, and two policemen, Sergeant Calderwood, Florencecourt and a constable evicted Margaret Nolan of Toneyloman, Belnaleck at 11 am on Tuesday. She was removed from the house built for her father the late John Nolan and had tried in vain to hold on to this family home in the 17 months since he died.

30-5-53 Only six months in existence the Ballyshannon Musical Society has taken a big step in arranging a concert at which the Radio Eireann Light Orchestra of 40 pieces will be guest artistes along with the eminent American mezzo-soprano, Patricia Thomas fresh from the New York Metropolitan Operatic Society, and Liam Arches, wizard of the accordion. This is the first time that the Radio Eireann Light Orchestra has come so far north, and the announcement of their visit has excited considerable interest all over the North-West. It will be the biggest musical event ever held in the North-West, a fact which is indicated by the steady demand for tickets.

30-5-53 Sunday’s memorable close to Irvinestown Carnival. Four thousand spectators thronged the streets for the fancy dress parade in which 100 children and 150 adults took part. In the children’s section the most original prize went to Edward, Stephen and Colum Mc Garrity as a Mau Mau Gang.

6-6-53 A continual downpour of rain which lasted practically all day marred Cashelnadrea’s annual sports which were held in St. Joseph’s Park. The rain partly nullified the efforts of Rev. Fr. Victor Marron, C.C. and his energetic helpers to make it a memorable success. St Mary’s Pipe Band woke the echoes amidst the mist obscured hills of historic Cashel and a number of events were run off including a juvenile match despite the sodden condition of the Park. A huge crowd of patrons danced at the sports ceilidhe to the music of Malachy Sweeny’s Ceilidhe Band, all the way from Armagh.

6-6-53  Belleek beat Irvinestown last Sunday by 2-4 to 0-7. Jim Diver, in goals for Irvinestown, was caught napping for Belleek’s simple first goal. Hughie Connors is the latest of our retired players to come out of retirement. The ex-Mulleek forward still knows where the posts are as he notched 1-2 against Irvinestown.

6-6-53  Cardinal D’Alton’s hope for Ireland during new British reign. In a statement he said, “I am sure that Irishmen of all shades of opinion, with their innate sense of chivalry, will join in good wishes to the young Queen who was called to the throne in circumstances of great personal sorrow. It is my earnest prayer that God may protect and guide her in her exalted office and that he reign may be the opening of a new era of prosperity for her people. All of us who love the old historic Ireland sincerely hope that during it we may see our country restored to its natural unity.

6-6-53 Everest has been conquered by 34 year old New Zealander E. P. Hilary and a Sherpa guide. The expedition was led by Colonel John Hunt.

6-6-53 Mr De Valera and his ministers refuse to attend the British Minister’s Garden Party on Coronation Day. No films of the Coronation will be shown in Dublin Cinemas as a result of threats from Sinn Fein.

6-6-53  Police are maintaining a 24 hour a day watch on the labourer’s cottage at Toneyloman, Belnaleck, from which the 47 year old spinster Margaret Nolan was evicted by bailiffs on a Court Order by Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday last. A Protestant tenant was selected for it 17 months ago has been given another house in the meantime although he lived in a better house when he made his first application than hundreds of Catholics today.

6-6-53 The world’s longest strike ended on Saturday. It lasted from March 6th, 1939 and for the first time since no pickets marched up and down past the 30ft frontage of Mr James Downey’s public house in Dun Laoghaire since James (78) is now dead. Fourteen years ago he sacked one of the barmen and the Irish National Union of Grocers, Vintners and Allied Trades Assistants demanded his reinstatement. The union withdrew the other barmen and James advertised for non-union men and got 400 replies. Down the years it is estimated that the pickets walked about 41,000 miles and it cost the union £8,500 in strike pay. Some of the original pickets died and others moved away or took other jobs but the union kept sending new pickets. Every night as James locked up he bade the union men good night as he went home and hired a sweeper whenever it snowed to make life easier for the pickets to walk. He was very particular about their punctuality and if there was no pickets present when he opened in the morning he rang the union to demand to know why they were not there and on each 6th of March he held an anniversary party, with drinks on the house to celebrate the strike. The faded “Strike on here” placards have been folded up as the pickets withdrew.

13-6-53  Looking forward to the League Final between Belleek and Lisnaskea there are several surprises in the Belleek line-up not the least being the choice of Brendan Faughnan as goalie. He was an outstanding centre forward until his retirement two seasons ago. Patsy Rooney at corner back is another surprise. He has not played a lot of late but he is such an accomplished player that he would be an automatic choice at centre half for most teams.

13-6-53 The death is announced of Mr. Mary A. Gallagher, Fassagh, Belleek, relict of Mr. John Gallagher.

13-6-53 Monster Sports Meeting to be held at St. Joseph’s Park, Cashel on June 21st. Football challenge for a set of medals, Ballyshannon V Belcoo/Cashel/Devenish selection. Admission 1/6, children 6 pence.

13-6-53   After extensive repairs the Erne Hospital, Enniskillen, was re-opened by Dame Dehra Parker, Minister of Health and Local Government in Northern Ireland. The work had changed the whole character and appearance of the hospital from the dull, gloomy character of the former Workhouse. The Hospitals Authority had wonderful plans for a new hospital which would mean sixth new beds in Fermanagh.

13-6-53 Bishop Eugene O’Callaghan, visits Black Bog Parish, Ederney, to decide, from four sites proposed, where Ederney’s new Church is to be built. He addressed several hundred parishioners in St. Joseph’s Hall, Ederney and introduced Mr. Padraic Gregory, Belfast, who will design the new church and supervise its erection. The present St. Joseph’s Church is 200 years old and is of the cruciform style typical of the post Penal Days with rows of seats in front and on both sides of the altar and with galleries above. It has stood the tests of two centuries and is a remarkable tribute to its builders. Very Rev. Felix Mc Kenna, Blackbog, began to build up a fund for its replacement four years ago and a substantial sum has already been collected. The Bishop remarked that it was a long time since a Church had been erected in Fermanagh. Mr. John Monaghan, R.D.C, expressed thanks, on behalf of the people, to His Lordship, Monsignor Gannon and Fr. Mc Kenna of Irvinestown, for having come to assist in this important selection.

13-6-53 Fermanagh Senior League Final was poor. Belleek defeated Lisnaskea by 1-9 to 1-2 in St. Molaise Park, Irvinestown in what must have been one of the poorest exhibitions of its class ever played in the county. J. P. Mc Cann at centre-field completely dominated the sector for the entire match. It was quarter way through the second half before Lisnaskea made their second serious attack of the game. Rooney starred for Belleek in a grand solid line at the back. Belleek last won this title in 1949.

13-6-53 John Magee, Derryrona, Leggs, Belleek was fined a total of 33 shillings plus costs at Belleek Court for being drunk in charge of a bicycle and £4-8-2 compensation for damaging Constable McCutcheon’s uniform. The constable was bringing him to the barrack when he began to resist and both fell on the ground damaging the constable’s waterproof coat, his trousers and lanyard. Two other constables assisted in taking the defendant to the barrack. He was fined 10s for being drunk in charge, 10s for assaulting the constable, 10s for damaging his clothes and 3s for having no lights or front brake.

13-6-53 Laurence Spratt, aged 19, of Bunaninver, Lisnarick, was charged before Mr. Justice Curran, with forging a £5 note and attempting to pass it to an Enniskillen shop assistant. He was said not to be leading a natural life for a boy as he spent most of his time at home reading and did not engage in sport as most other boys of his age did. A sample of his unusual reading material was a book on psychology in six easy lessons. As his parents were hardworking, honest people the judge imposed a suspended sentence of six months jail.

13-6-53 Senator O’Hare raised matters in connection with the Erne Scheme at Belleek which were annoying local farmers and others in the locality. As the dredging machinery operated day and night the waters of the Erne were constantly dirty and unsuitable for the farmers’ cattle to drink. Blasting was throwing large boulders into farmer’s fields which were an obstacle in making hay and this blasting also affected the livelihood of farmer/anglers who took guests out to fish on the Broad Lough.

13-6-53   “It is outrageous and ridiculous” said Mr. J. Coffey at Lisnaskea Rural Council on Saturday when the Council decided to accept by 11 votes to 5 the tender of John Mc Carron to act as caretaker of Derrylin urinal for £1 per week. He thought the urinal should be cleaned when necessary and added that the Lisnaskea caretaker was doing far more for far less.

20-6-53  Cardinal D’Alton blessed and opened the new £70,000 GAA stadium dedicated to Roger Casement in Andersonstown, a suburb of Belfast. He addressed 25,000 people inside the stadium and told them that he regarded the park as a sample of their patriotism and of the indestructible spirit of the Irish nation.

20-6-53 Michael Tate (32) of Bridgend, Ballyshannon, who had been in Crumlin Jail, Belfast, since 1st June for having had in his possession in Belleek one .45 bullet. He was fined £5 at Enniskillen Court. The defendant is believed to be originally from Co., Tipperary and resident in Ballyshannon for the past three or four years.

20-6-53 Mr. Robert Loane, of Rushindoo, Pettigo, has 100 ricks of hay saved.

20-6-53 Owners to blame for the Princess Victoria disaster. The Princess Victoria was unseaworthy when she sailed from Stranraer to Larne on the morning of January 31st to meet disaster in the Irish Sea. This was the verdict of the enquiry which investigated the loss of the ship with 133 lives.

20-6-53 Suspensions imposed at Fermanagh County Board include Seamus O’Connor, Belleek, one months and Sean Mc Caffrey, twelve months. Mc Caffrey’s case is to be appealed to the Ulster Council. Patsy Keown, formerly secretary of the Devenish Club, reported that the old Devenish Club had been disbanded and a new one formed. A minor team was being entered for competition in place of the Junior team. The SFL final between Belleek and Lisnaskea was fixed for 12th July at Irvinestown.

20-6-53 The death took place on Thursday of last week at Lettercran, Pettigo, of Mrs Catherine Haughey aged 88. In August of 1913 two of her children were accidentally drowned in a lake near her home. She was predeceased many years ago by her husband.

20-6-53 William Mc Mahon, Belleek was given the benefit of the Probation Act at Belleek Court for being drunk in charge of a bicycle.

20-6-53 A Garrison cattle dealer, Thomas Allingham, was fined £2 with costs for driving in such a manner as to prevent Henry Acheson, Gurteen, Garrison, from passing his cattle lorry.

27-6-53 In a Junior Football match Knocks defeated Kesh by 2-1 to 1-4. Kesh were best served by the goalie T. Maguire, full-back J. Montgomery, Clifford at centre field and Mc Mahon, left full forward. The referee was Mr. B. Mc Elroy.

27-6-53 In their first season in Senior Football, Derrygonnelly Harps oust the newly crowned Senior League Champions, Belleek, by 3-6 to 1-4. It was a hard tackling, fast encounter with keen marking and many bone-shaking clashes. On a slippery pitch with a greasy ball, Derrygonnelly lead by 3-3 to 0-3 at half time. Best for Belleek were M. Regan, J. P. Mc Cann, J. and M. Tunney and E. and P. Mc Caffrey. Mr. M. Cullen controlled the game admirably.

27-6-53 On Tuesday night heavy rainfall was experienced in the Pettigo area, continuing until mid-day on Wednesday. Not for 40 years did such flooding occur. Meadows of hay on the banks of the Termon River were swept away. Mr. Wm. Leonard, (cattle dealer), had almost 20 ricks of hay taken away by the flood.

27-6-53 The wedding took place recently in St. Mary’s Church, Devenish, between Mr. Michael H. Gilligan, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Gilligan, Cow Park, and Miss Elizabeth Dolan, second daughter of Mrs T. Dolan, Knockaraven. Mr. P. F. Gilligan, brother of the groom was best man. The bride was attended by her niece, Miss Marie Timoney. The honeymoon is being spent in the south of Ireland.

27-6-53 Two cases of infantile paralysis in Ballinamallard were reported to Fermanagh Health Committee.