1911 Donegal Vindicator.

Donegal Vindicator. 10th March 1911. LOCAL NOTES – By way of the coals of fire idea we mention that the Catch-my-Pals and friends are having a good concert in the Church School, on Thursday. 16th March, and if reports are true it promises to be a really good one. Mr Sealy Jeffares comes “with his name and fame” from Dublin. Mrs Lewis Lipsett is expected to make her debut, and rumour credits her with a really good voice. Mr Sparrow will sing, and many others coming with him commas ‘talented amateurs.’ Isn’t this nice of me? Maybe next time they will give me the eighteen pence for printing the posters. I want it badly. Then I’ve to complain that the managers of these affairs do not send the courtesy cards usual where civilization holds sway. Yet now and then reports of the proceedings are sent for publication. All of which, including the eighteen penny item, goes to prove that the bon ten of Ballyshannon are really very, very provincial, that they don’t know enough to go in when it rains.

I’m on this subject now. If they thought at all it would occur to these people and to others that where they are earning their bread and butter—some of them even get jam—is where they should leave any small dribs and drabs of cash they are bound to expend (note the ex).

I do not refer to ‘that awful crowd’ the Lipsett’ as their friends affectionately dub them. They are past praying for, but I do refer to otherwise thoughtful people, who should try, whether in a large way or a small way, to benefit the town, and enable it to keep its head above water. But they don’t. The printing is run mostly by Papists hence they must get good Protestant ink. It is very rubbishy, because the Papists eat Protestant loaves with a clear conscience— even in Lent.

Nor are the heretics only to blame. Every week considerable sums of money go away to Belfast, Dublin and elsewhere, money that could be left in town, but either from want of thought, or with deliberation, it is sent away at prices, in many instances, double what the work could be done for at home.

This may go on, I am powerless to prevent it, but it is not going on underground any longer. The people who are milking the town dry, and not even leaving the buttermilk in it, will have their services acknowledged, even if it is a benefit to them.

The Half-Holiday movement has extended to Ballyshannon, and a couple of meetings have been held on the subject. Unless it is gone about in the right way it will prove a pretty expensive business to make it compulsory. But by getting all the businesses to sign at the same time, and having only one set of advertisements and legal expenses, it can be worked out for a moderate sum. Anything less than compulsion is useless. There will always be a number of mean persons who otherwise would comply with the letter but breakthrough the spirit. Look at the holidays in the licensed trade for instance. All sign and put up shutters, but, with the exception of about half a dozen, trade goes on as usual. Let there be no loophole. A half-holiday for all or for none.

While in Bundoran on the look-out for an invitation to spend the first Sunday in April at the sea-side I dropped into Mr James Carroll’s and had a look at his newly got-up Skating Rink, It is a bit of all right. A splendid maple floor for skating, a room sixty feet long, lit by electricity. What could you wish for more? Adjoining is a fine billiard room, with a good table, and next door a commodious game room, where one may indulge in simple games, but not games of chance,—-just simple, childish games, the highest single stake allowed being a 1 penny. So that for a threepenny bit one can have a whole evening’s amusement. I’ve often had it too.

Donegal Vindicator Ballyshannon Friday June 16th 1911. The progress of Irish Industrial Development has been steady if not rapid. Year after year we have preached the doctrine but our voice was of one crying in the wilderness. But every good movement is sure to win in time and there are signs that the Industries of Ireland will receive a proper measure of support at, home, instead of having to look abroad for it. The importation of blouse lengths is now done almost surreptitiously by those ladies who believe that only, in Leeds can ‘style’ be discovered. Much, however yet remains to be done and not altogether by the purchaser. There are still too many shopkeepers who are afraid and more who are ashamed to push Irish made goods. Why this should be so is a mystery and a phase of Irish character not easily understood. The Irish made article is usually much better in quality—and since manufacturers have learned a little common sense,—it is generally as cheap, cheaper if we consider quality. To be sure the Sunlight myth is still all powerful, but there are no want of signs that as in the tobacco trade Ireland has stood up against an intolerable monopoly, so will it in the soap business. There is no superiority in the English made article over the Irish and if we went further we might not be afraid of being able to prove our statement. Irish housewives are to blame. They have the word in their months, they never take time to think and so it comes first to them, but if not, the grocer is only too willing to oblige. Let us each resolve to give our own country a chance and practise until we get it upon our tongues ‘Irish made, please.’ A branch of the Irish Industrial Association, should be formed in every town and village in Ireland. There are a sufficient number of earnest workers now in Ireland to carry them on. Three men in a town can work wonders when they set about it in earnest and all the average householder requires is to have the matter kept before him and repeated with sufficient persistency.

On Sunday Mr Walter Mitchell’s Pierrot crowd begin operations in Bundoran, and from appearances I would say they mean to make things hum. He has got together a galaxy of talent such as cannot be found many similar shows in Ireland, or perhaps out of it. I am asked to say that anyone may come without fear of vulgar songs offending the ear. That is good news.

There are sixteen policemen, several sergeants, sub-sergeants, and a handsome District Inspector in Ballyshannon, all for the purpose of keeping the inhabitants in order. Said inhabitants do not require such a large force or any force to compel them to keep the peace, but for an entire week two or three tramps—one a foul mouthed virago—have kept the two Ports in a turmoil but the police were conspicuously absent.

June 16th 1911. CO., FERMANAGH TRAGEDY. OLD MAN’S AWFUL FATE – BEATEN TO DEATH- TERRIBLE SCENE IN HOUSE. Lisnaskea, Friday. An appalling case of murder and attempted suicide has taken place near Lisnaskea, in an outlying mountain district. The police at Lisnaskea learned of the occurrence about nine o’clock last night.

The facts ascertained up to the present show that a man named Felix Scollan was living with, an old age pensioner named Owen Nolan, at Carrickawick, a townland about seven miles from Lisnaskea, in the direction of the mountains.

On Thursday a man named John Duffy was working at the house and in the evening the three men sat down to tea. The three men were sitting quietly in the kitchen having tea, when Scollan it is alleged suddenly and without             warning lifted a heavy stick from under the table, and commenced to attack the old man Nolan, belabouring him on the head. After several blows had been delivered Duffy tried to wrest the stick from Scollan but was unable to do so.

Duffy is an old man, and consequently his power to struggle with Scollan was ineffectual Scollan then procured a razor and attempted to commit suicide by cutting his throat. He inflicted a slight wound. Duffy proceeded to Lisnaskea and reported the matter to the police, a large party of whom arrived at the house with the greatest promptitude. Accompanying the police were Dr. Knox, a priest, the clerk of petty session and a magistrate, but on arrival at the scene they found Nolan had been some tine dead. Scollan was immediately arrested and conveyed to Lisnaskea Barracks.

June 16th 1911. GAELIC SPORTS IN BALLYSHANNON. The paths of the organiser of Sports in Ballyshannon is not strewn with roses, rather do his neighbours cart boulders to throw in the way. Last year when the Gaelic Sports were initiated by that most energetic of Irish athletes, Mr Toal, I R., his presumption was resented so fiercely that the Ballyshannon Brass Band refused to turn out on the occasion, but until we grow up to be a city this will probably continue to be our attitude towards any man who is not content to go to sleep with the rest of us.

The Aodh Ruadh Football and Hurling Club has made for itself a position that few similar organisations in the North-West occupy. Success has attended it at every turn, due entirely to steady perseverance and the keeping up in its ranks of a true sporting spirit. The football and hurling teams are popular wherever they go, and it may be added are usually successful. It was therefore only right that they should have real Irish athletic sports, and we have to congratulate them on the success which has met their efforts, modified as it was. Still there are signs that the Irish revival is taking hold, and we venture to predict that within a few years the event will become a regular Irish Carnival for the entire North-West.

Judges—Messrs J. J. Woods, James Daly, Cormac McGowan and M. D. Quigley.

Starters—F. G. Townsend, T J Kelly and J Kane.

DETAILS.

100 Yards—; 1. J. Gallagher; 2, H. Gallagher.

220 Yards Flat Handicap (open)—1. J E Irvine; 2, James Naughton; 3, D Dolan.

440 Yards Flat Handicap (open) — 1, H Gallagher; 2, James Naughton.

High Jump (open)—1, J E Irvine, 4ft. 10½ in. 2, James Naughton, 4ft. l0 in.

Schoolboy’s Race under 16 Years—1, Wm. Crawford; 2, B Dorian; 3, J. Lawn.

Half-Mile Championship (open); — 1, J Gallagher; 2, M Cleary; 2, Hugh Gallagher. Tie for second place.

Throwing the Weight, 161bs—1, E. Carbery; 2. F Dolan.

Sack Race—1, H Gallagher; 2, F Crawford.

One Mile Flat Handicap (open) — 1, M Cleary; 2, Patrick Crawford ; 2, J E, Irvine Tie for second place.

Slinging 581bs between legs without follow— 1. D J Crowley, I5ft. 1 in. 2, Edward Carbery; 3 James Naughton.

Egg and Spoon Race—1, Patrick Crawford; 2, T. J. Kelly.

Pucking Hurley Ball—1, James Daly; 2, J. Sheerin.

Marathon Race—1, Patrick Crawford; 2, J E Irvine; 3, John Sheerin. Time—Thirty minutes.

June 16th 1911. KING’S BAD QUARTER OF AN HOUR. COMES WHEN HE KISSES ‘MERE MEN’. AN EMPHATIC ROYAL OBJECTION. King George has a bad quarter of an hour in store at the Coronation It is when he has to submit to being kissed— not by the charming ladies of the aristocracy, but by quite a number of elderly male dignitaries. The performance will be commenced by the Archbishop of Canterbury, who will kneel at the King’s feet; place his hands between those of the King, and recite the time honoured formula of allegiance. Thereafter the Archbishop ‘kisseth the King’s left cheek.’

November 3rd 1911. Mr Frank Miller, Cycle Agent, Main Street, has removed to Market Street, as per announcement in another column.

During the week a Retreat was given to the children of Inismacsaint Parish, and was conducted by Father Doyle, of the Jesuit Order.

Mr Thomas. J. Kelly, Agent for the Pearl Life Assurance Company, at Ballyshannon, has been appointed Assistant Superintendent. He remains in Ballyshannon for the present to develop South Donegal. Mr William Ward, Bridge – End, Ballyshannon, succeeds him as Agent for the District.

Before purchasing your Winter Boots call at Munday & Co.’s East Port, Ballyshannon, where you can procure Footwear that will resist the excessive damp of the Winter months at lowest cash prices. Don’t forget to see the ‘Lee Boot.’ Special value in Men’s Nailed Derby’s at 8s 6d, wear guaranteed. Immense stock to select from. One price only. Exceptional Value in Blankets, Flannels, Hosiery, Shirts, at Munday & Co-’s, East, Port, Ballyshannon.

HOME RULE MEETING IN GARRISON. A SKETCH OF THE PROCEEDINGS. BY SEAGHAN. A Home Rule Meeting in Garrison is not an everyday occurrence, and, though the day was anything but a pleasant one, in company with a few friends,—Home Rulers,—I put in an appearance. The picturesque village, which is situate on the banks of the far-famed Melvin was, notwithstanding the moisture, in gala attire. The day being a Holiday (1st November) all the country folk crowded in,—not that I wish it to be understood that it was due to the fact of it being a day of rest that the multitude was so large, No ; these men,—and women, too—are always ready to answer the call of duty, and would surmount all obstacles to: further on the cause.

Almost all the surrounding towns sent contingents with bands and banners, and amongst the number I noticed the Erne ’98 Flute Band under the baton of Mr John Kane, the Cashelard Flute Band, and Belleek Flute Band. Several Divisions of the Ancient Order of Hibernians (B.O.E.) were present, and paraded the village immediately before the meeting was held.

There were a lot of people wearing temperance badges—and some few without them. However, on the whole, I think there was more tea than whisky drank on Wednesday.

Very Rev. Fr. McCleary, P.P., Garrison, was moved to the chair, and, after a short criticism of the Home Rule question, and having read statistics as to the loss the country sustained by emigration, introduced Canon Keown, P. P., Enniskillen whom he said, being a parishoner of their own, he was sure would receive a hearty welcome.

Canon Keown, P.P., familiar to every Lough Derg pilgrim, came to the front aud received a great ovation. ; He spoke in a clear, ringing tone, and is, what he looks, a born fighter. He said times were changed sinoe the last Home Rule Meeting was held in Garrison twenty- nine years ago. That meeting was proclaimed, and the village was iuvadad by Lancers from Dundalk, and a large force of police, and the people had to wade the Garrison river to receive William O’Brien. I . expeotad to hear some¬thing more about William but was disappointed. He roferfeclto English misriilo in Ireland, and spoke of the resources of the distriot,

The next speaker was Mr Wray, Eniiiskillsn,. and any person could see; lie was a lawyer-maa by the rapidity with which he turned orer bis notes. He hammered awav at the Lords amidstCanon Keown, P.P., familiar to every Lough Derg pilgrim, came to the front and received a great ovation. He spoke in a clear, ringing tone, and is, what he looks, a born fighter. He said times were changed since the last Home Rule Meeting was held in Garrison twenty- nine years ago. That meeting was proclaimed, and the village was invaded by Lancers from Dundalk, and a large force of police, and the people had to wade the Garrison River to receive William O’Brien. I expected to hear something more about William but was disappointed. He referred to English misrule in Ireland, and spoke of the resources of the district.

The next speaker was Mr Wray, Enniskillen, and any person could see he was a lawyer-man by the rapidity with which he turned over his notes. He hammered away at the Lords amidst cries of ‘Down with them.’ He said they had wrecked Gladstone’s and other great men’s efforts. He referred to the visit of the Lord and Lady Lieutenant to Enniskillen, and had a shie at the landlords en passant. One of the arguments he said that was brought against Home Rule was that they wanted Separation. Before they could have Separation they would have to destroy the Navy, and they all knew what that meant.

The Chairman then introduced Mr John Fitzgibbon, M P of Castlerea, A good-humoured gentleman with a goatee, and. wearing a tile hat, which he doffed before he made his bow. He is like a man that could hustle. I wonder if he is a cattle-driver? He owes the English Government a ‘wee’ grudge, having suffered imprisonment for the cause. There is one thing certain; he must have kissed the blarney stone. That was a well-timed piece of flattery when he said he wondered if Sir William Carson knew, when he was making use of all that bunkum about Ulster going to fight, if there was such fine-looking men and women in the province as he (Mr Fitzgibbon) saw before him. But it was true all the same, and I hae my doots if Maguire’s men would come out second best in the tussle. He advised them —and he felt sure every Nationalist would agree with him — to be tolerant to everybody who differed with them,—whether in politics or religion, and never be the first to start a quarrel. He related a jocular incident that took place between himself and Captain Craig, and said the Captain and he parted the best of friends. He spoke at length on the Home Rule question. He travelled all the way from the West to be present, and I am sure he was well pleased with the reception he got.

Mr Fitzgibbon proposed a vote of thanks to the Chairman, Rev Father McCleary, and said he hoped that when they next came together on that hillside Ireland would have regained its rights. Canon Keown seconded, and spoke of what Father McCleary had done in the way of wiping out landlordism. Father McCleary suitably responded and the meeting terminated.

November 3rd 1911. FUNERAL OF MR WILLIAM McVITTY, CASHEL, BALLYSHANNON. The funeral took place on Saturday last, to the family burying ground, Mullinashea, Cemetery, of the above gentleman. Deceased was one of the most respected inhabitants of the neighbourhood, a fact which was strikingly testified by the large numbers who attended at the obsequies. The chief mourners were—Mr Wm. McVitty, (nephew) and Mr W H Stack. Canon Holmes officiated at the graveside.

November 10th 1911.MRS WINIFRED GAVIGAN. At an advanced age the death took place on Tuesday .last of Mrs Winifred Gavigan, at the residence of her son, James Gavigan, Clyhore, Belleek. For some short time deceased had been ailing, being greatly affected at the departure of her favourite granddaughter for America recently, also a grandson who had recently visited her. By a strange coincidence it was only on the day of her demise a letter was received from her granddaughter from America asking her to cheer up. The Gavigan family are highly respected in the district, and deceased was one of the old inhabitants of Drimholme, the Travers family, a well-known Irish sept in the neighbourhood. As might be expected, on Tuesday the funeral was large and representative, St Patrick’s, Kilbarron, being crowded at the Requiem Mass solemnised by Rev C. Cunningham, C. C. The remains, in a brass mounted oak coffin, were borne to the hearse by immediate relatives after the service in the Church. The chief mourners were her sons, James and Hugh Gavigan; her daughter, Mrs Flynn. Other relatives, John, May, Kate, and James Gavigan; James Flynn, son-in-law; Hugh, John, James, Michael and Charles Flynn, Joseph, James and James Gavigan, junr.; Owen Gavigan, Edward Gallagher, James Cleary, Corner House, Belleek; John and Edward Cleary, Bridget, Michael, and E. J. Cleary, cousins to deceased. Rev C. Cunningham also officiated at the grave, and at his request prayers were offered for the repose of the soul of deceased.—R.I.P. Mr Edward Stephens had charge of the funeral arrangements.

November 10th 1911. DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MR JOHN F. TIMONEY. On October 30th, in the quiet little church- yard of Toura were laid to rest the mortal remains of Mr. John F Timoney, a well-known Dublin business-man, Mr Timoney started his commercial career twenty-five years ago as an apprentice to the late Mr .Robert Sweeny, Ballyshannon. Of a refined nature, good address and gentlemanly bearing, his promotion was rapid, and he passed on to some of the highest positions in the leading Cork and Dublin warehouses enjoying all the time the unbounded confidence of his employers, and the love and esteem of the hands under him. Amid the temptations and trials of city life his example, advice and purse were always available to the unfortunate youths who went under. Some eight years ago he started business on his own account, but a chill caught in crossing the Channel was followed by an attack of pleurisy, the effects of which have brought to a close at the early age of 43 years a career of great promise. Six months ago he bade farewell to city life and returned to his ancestral home to lay down life’s burden in the spot where he was born, and where the happy days of his childhood were spent. During his long illness no murmur or complaint did he utter. Perfectly conscious to the last moment, and fortified by the Rites of Holy Church, he calmly awaited the dread summons with a resignation, confidence and serenity which were not of this world. Of him it may be truly said, ‘As he lived so he died’—in peace. Rev P. A. McCleary, P. P. officiated at the graveside, and delivered an eloquent panegyric on the many good qualities of the deceased, and commending the example of his beautiful life.

The chief mourners were Messrs J Timoney, J P, sad P. Timoney, brothers; P Slavin, brother-in-law, J Flanagan, B Flanagan, J O’Dare, F O’Dare, J Flanagan, M Flanagan, B Flanagan, B Keown, P Keown, T B Feely, cousins. Amongst those present or represented in the immense funeral cortege were:—Dr Timoney, J. P., Rev G. C. O’Keefe, Dr. Kelly, M Cassidy, J. P., E Kelly, J P, J Dully, JP; J. O Reilly, J. P, E Kerr, J P; B Devine, Strabane; J McGonigle, Ballyshannon; J Beacom, T. Beacom, E. Daly, J. Daly, E Knox, M Knox, W Gallagher, S Moohan, J. Cleary, B. Cleary, J Gallagher, R. Donaldson, S. W. Donaldson, J McBrien, J Busbey, P Montgomery, F Slavin, J Gallagher, T Gallagher, R. Freeborn, J. Keown, J. Johnston, R. Elliott. J. Keown, P. Keown, R. J. Dick, N T; Wm Ferguson, J (D) Keown. J. (P) Keown, J Campbell, E. Campbell, J. Earls, P. Keown, W. Treacy, F. McBrien, J Flanagan, J. Duffy, D. Duffy, J. Kelly, R. W. Dundas, J. Campbell, P. Elliott, D. McGuinness, ? McGuinness, P. Elliott, B. O’Brien, E. J. Johnston, O. Mills, P. J. McBrien, R Morrow, J. Earls, J. Owens, J. Gallagher, J. Greene.

It might be mentioned the funeral was the largest to Toura graveyard for many years in fact since its dedication. The greatest sympathy goes out in the district to the family, as all admired John F Timoney.—R.I.P.

November 10th 1911. CHARLES GALLAGHER, DERRYNASEER, BALLYSHANNON. On Thursday last, in the family enclosure, The Rock Graveyard, Ballyshannon, were laid to rest the mortal remains of the late Charles Gallagher, Derrynaseer, Ballyshannon. The respect paid to the memory of deceased and his family was manifested by the large numbers attending the obsequies, including representatives from Counties Donegal, Leitrim, Sligo, and Fermanagh. At his demise he was over eighty years of age and his Christian and patriotic life was portrayed in a neat panegyric delivered by Rev M. Kelly, C. C., Kinlough, who officiated at the grave, and described deceased as a man who never neglected his duties to God, and who ever kept the end of life in view, resigning himself to the Will of the Almighty. He ever kept before him that ‘If man remembers his last end he shall never sin,’ Father Kelly then asked for the prayers of those present for the repose of deceased. The funeral, as mentioned, was very large, and the chief mourners were his sons, Hugh Michael, Francis and Thady Gallagher (sons); Patrick (grandson); Thady, Edward, and P Gallagher (nephew of deceased). At the grave the usual prayers were said, and a large number waited to see the last sod laid on Charles Gallagher. R.I.P.

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Donegal Vindicator (Ballyshannon 1911.

Donegal Vindicator, Ballyshannon Friday January 13th 1911. A Dance under the auspices of the Aodh Ruadh Hurling and Football Club will be held in the Rock Hall, Ballyshannon on Thursday 26th inst. An enjoyable night’s entertainment is anticipated. The date of the dance in connection with the Erne Football Club has been altered to Friday, 20th January, instead of the 18th, as previously arranged, owing to another function taking place on the latter date.

We will be pleased to have particulars from any farmers or others who have had unsatisfactory dealings with any of the much advertised Loan Banks. We may be in a position to give them useful information.

Labourers will be pleased to learn for once in a way that the Local Government Board is supreme. They have power to refuse to sanction the schedule of rents fixed by District Councils. As they have all along been in favour of lower rents than the Councils were inclined to fix, this, is good news for the labourers.

Please do not consider us impertinent but merely, anxious to bring forcibly before your Notice the finest Bread the World Produces. The World is a big high sounding word to use, but it is not too big nor too expressive in the case of Conlan’s Bread, for without question, and beyond all doubt, this is the absolute pinnacle of perfection. It is the richest, lightest,, most beautiful flavoured and wholesome Bread you ever tasted.. There is a subtle indefinable, something about it that charms the Palate. The freshness and rich full flavour of our special automatically papered and sealed Bread, embodies all that can be desired for the Breakfast Table, besides having the advantage of being protected against all impurities from handling or other causes prevalent in the ordinary Bread, and makes it more relished than ever.

DONEGAL VINDICATOR LEADER. With reference to our leader of last week and some comments that have reached us, we just want to ask one simple question—Is anybody or any authority doing anything to promote  trade or commerce in Ballyshannon? The only possible answer is an emphatic, – No,’ and that being so say that this is not right. Our population is dwindling and must grow smaller, there being no employment in the town or district. That being so are the people of the town prepared to look on placidly while the houses fall?

DEATH OF MR. MICHAEL MOLONEY, COACH SMITH, BALLYSHANNON.

The death took place, on Saturday last, at his residence, East Port Street, Ballyshannon, of one of the oldest and most respected inhabitants of the town, in the person of Mr Michael Moloney, Coachsmith. Deceased who has carried on business in Ballyshannon for many years, made for himself a wide circle of friends, by his kindly disposition and honesty in dealing. He retired some time ago as a superannuated member of the Amalgamated Society of Coachbuilders to enjoy a well-earned rest, but this was of very short duration, and his health suddenly broke down. Despite every attention he gradually became weaker, until the final end came as stated, on Saturday morning, when he passed peacefully away, fortified by the last rites of the Catholic Church, of which he was an earnest member, The news was learned with deep regret and the greatest possible sympathy is felt for his sorrowing wife in her sad bereavement at the loss of such a kind husband. The funeral took place to St. Joseph’s Cemetery, The Rock, on Monday, and was large and representative. The following relatives were chief mourners — John and Joseph Meehan, Patrick and John Quinn. Rev J. O’Daly, C.C., officiated in the Church, and at the graveside.—R.I.P.

DONEGAL VINDICATOR, BALLYSHANNON, FRIDAY, FEB. 3, 1911. Mr Alexander Anderson Ballinacarrick, intimates that the paragraph stating that he is  giving up his sire horse is entirely erroneous, that in fact he has not thought of so doing. This is pleasing intelligence, and we gladly make the correction. At the same time it is only right that Mr Anderson should know that the Department is under the impression that he is giving up the keeping of a sire horse, and he should take steps to put the matter straight.

Conlan’s Automatic Machine-Made Bread is, as its name implies, not an ordinary Bread. It is scientifically prepared by the newest machinery, under the supervision of an expert artisan who holds several Gold Medals for his productions, and who exercises the most scrupulous care in its manufacture. You cannot do better than make Conlan’s Bread the principal food of your household. It may save your family many times its cost in preserving and promoting good health, and preventing the many troubles caused by inferior food, especially in winter.

DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MRS THOS. ROONEY, BALLYSHANNON. On Monday last, the sad news was made known that Mrs Thomas Rooney had passed away at the Workhouse Hospital, The Rock, Ballyshannon, a victim of that dread disease, pneumonia. The news was learned with deep regret, as Mrs Rooney was snatched, almost, suddenly, from the enjoyment of perfect health to the sad and gloomy retirement of a deathbed, from which she never rose. Her few short days, spent in the hospital after the setting in of the illness, were made happy by the constant attendance; of her spiritual adviser, who prepared her for a happy death, and administered the last consolations of the Catholic Church, of which she was ever a devoted and earnest member. Deceased by her kind and genial disposition, made for herself a large circle of friends. The greatest sympathy is felt for her husband and children in their sad bereavement.

The funeral took place on Wednesday, to St. Joseph’s Cemetery, and the large concourse of people that filled the spacious Church, bore striking testimony of the esteem, in which deceased was held. The remains were laid on a catafalque before the High Altar, prior to interment, where the officiating clergyman, Rev J. O’Daly, C.C., preached a touching panegyric on the exemplary life of deceased, pointing: her out as a loving wife, a devoted mother, and courteous, trustworthy and painstaking in her capacity as caretaker of that Church. The sad procession then took place to the graveside, where the prayers of those present were offered up for the eternal repose of the soul of deceased. The chief mourners were-—Thomas Rooney, (husband); Richard Bromley, Patrick, James, Thomas, Michael, and John Rooney, (sons).—R.I.P.

FOOTBALL. CLIFFONY RANGERS v. DONEGAL CELTIC. Sunday last, at 3 o’clock, p.m., the Erne Park presented a scene of animation, the occasion being the much talked of contest for the four points in the Woods’ League Cup, to be played off by the above teams. Half-an-hour before that time appointed for the match a large crowd of spectators were on the ground.

The following are the teams:— Donegal Celtic —J. Farrell, B. McGinnity, W. McGlenaghy J. McGlenaghy, W. Crawford, C. Martin, E. Doherty, E. Cassidy. J. Brogan, P. McBrearty, P. McGowan.

Cliffoney Rangers—J. Murtagh, B. Curritt, P. Gallagher, Mayatt, Magee, Wyms. Oats, C. Gallagher, Carton, McGowan, J. Curritt. Duration of Game—Ninety minutes. Rangers won the toss, and elected to play with a slight breeze in their favour. The game commenced with Bangers charging into their opponent’s territory and dashing threateningly near their goal. This was repeated four or five times inside of twenty minutes, eventually ending in Rangers being awarded a penalty kick which was converted. They scored again before half-time Celtic also securing a goal. The second half of the game proved very interesting, finally concluding with Donegal coming away the victors by three goals to two. Referee — Mr John Curran, Bundoran. Linesmen—Messrs J. Kane, and W. Nicholl.

WOODS’ CUP COMPETITION. A meeting of the Council of above was held on Tuesday night, to decide a protest lodged by Belleek against Donegal, in a match played at Donegal, on Sunday, 22nd January. After hearing evidence it was agreed that both teams should come to an understanding, and play a game to decide the points. As a result of the draws, Ernes travel to Belleek on Sunday first.

HURLING. Aodh Ruadh (Ballyshannon) v. Shamrocks (Manorhamilton.) The Aodh Ruadh Hurling Club (Ballyshannon), which has been more or less inactive for the put few weeks, was up and doing on Sunday last. By a mutual agreement the Ballyshannon and Manorhamilton Gaels arranged to meet in Kiltyclogher to play an exhibition match, and, in conjunction to organise a Gaelic Club in the latter town. The Aodh Ruadh team travelled in its fall strength, and the journey was a pleasant one. The day being fine, and the roads in first-class condition, we enjoyed the breeze off Melvin’s Waters Blue immensely. The majority of the Manorhamilton boys, who had arrived in Kilty earlier in the day, walked about a quarter of a mile to meet us, and accorded us a hearty ‘cead mile failte.’ Mr Philip McGriskin was voted the dual honour of catering for both teams, and a right thoughtful host he proved himself. A large number of the townspeople came to witness the match, and, judging by their enthusiasm, seemed to enjoy it, some of those present remarking that they would assist in establishing a Gaelic Club in Kilty.

THE GAME. The match was one of the fastest I have seen since the inception of the Aodh Ruadh Club. I just witnessed one match which was almost as stiffly contested; the last game which was played in Kinlough between the Ballyshannon team and the Emmets. On Sunday both Clubs played well, and I won’t say that the score represented the game. From the start, till the whistle went for full time, the Shamrocks played with vigour and energy and they had hard luck in not putting on a few more points. They had some near things but always failed when they came in contact with those three redoubtable backs. M. D. Quigley, J. Laughlin and M. Munday. During the first half the play was rather one-sided, Aodh Ruadh pressing most of the time. The Manorhamilton backs, M. McLaughlin and F. Feely, gave a good exhibition of tackling, and the opposing forwards found their defence a somewhat difficult cordon to break through. The two Gallaghers (James and Hugh), Cecil Stephens, and Stephen Quinn gave the Manorhamilton goal-keeper plenty of trouble, and he saved some sweet shots. I made no mistake when I knighted Seamus Og O’Daly, as he wore his spurs with honour. I have another pair in stock yet, and if young Rutherford, of Manorhamilton, lives up to my expectations through the Assaroe Cup Tie, I will award him a knightship too. He is as fleet-footed as a deer, and has splendid staying powers. My compliments to ye, Bartley Laughlin! to be a recruit, you can handle a camán with extraordinary skill. You filled your position admirably, and I expect to hear of you making a name for yourself in the near future. The Manorhamilton backs played a capital game, and the fault was not theirs that their team was beaten. At half-time the game stood— Aodh Ruadh,         10 points – Manorhamilton, 3 points. On resuming, it looked as if the Leitrim boys meant to pull np for lost time, and overwhelm the Ballyshannon players, and for some time the ball hardly went away from the Aodh Ruadh quarters, but the Ballyshannon forwards again monopolised matters, and some fast shots emanated from J. McCormack and E. Cassidy. In the closing stages the Shamrocks pressed, T. Rutherford and P. Wilson being conspicuous, but though the Manorhamilton forwards put in all they knew they could not defeat the, Aodh Ruadh defence, P. O’Shea, E. Laughlin, P. Lally, and J, Drummond always being on the alert. At full time the score stood— Aodh Ruadh,       13 points Shamrocks,       10 points.

TEAMS. Ballyshannon—Goal, J. Downey ; backs, J. Loughlin, M. Munday, threequarters, M. D. Quigley, P. Lally, E. Laughlin; halves, P, O’Shea, J. Daly, J. Drummond, forwards, E. Cassidy. B. Laughlin, H. Gallagher, J. Gallagher. J. McCormack, S. Quinn, C. Stephens.

Manorhamilton— Goal. P. Kellegher; backs, M. McLaughlin, T, Feely; threequarters, J. Carney. J, Clancy, J. Wilson; halves, J. Laughlin, W. Ferguson, P. Wilson; forwards, P. Ferguson, T. Maguire, T. Rutherford, J. Clancy, P. Wilson, P. Rooney, P. McSherry, E. Harte. Referee—Mr. P. J. Sheridan.

GAELIC FOOTBALL. Owen Roe’s (Lisahully) v. Wolfe Tone’s) (Behey).

On Sunday the Lisahully Gaels travelled to Behey to play the local football team a friendly match. The day being fine, the field was in first- class condition. Owen Roe’s won the toss and played with a strong breeze in their favour. From the outset the travelling team had the best of the play, the ball being nearly all the time in the home team’s territory. At half- time the score stood—Lisahully, 5 points, Behey, nil. On the turn-over the home team made some strenuous efforts to regain lost ground, and equalise with their opponents. Their forwards made some determined dashes, but the Lisahully backs always proved too strong a barrier to get through. At full time the score stood—Lisahully, 5 points; Behey, nil.

DONEGAL RAILWAY, JOINT COMMITTEE. HALT AT CREEVY. We understand that at a recent meeting of the Donegal Railway Joint Committee it was decided to erect a Halt at Creevy, between Ballyshannon and Rossnowlagh. This will supply a long-felt want and will be a great boon to those in the neighbourhood and to all concerned. The late Donegal Railway Company had the matter under consideration some years ago but for some reason or other the project was dropped. Of late the question was raised afresh and taken up in an enthusiastic manner by Mr H. Likely, of Wardtown Castle, Ballyshannon. and who spared no efforts in bringing the negotiations to so successful an issue, A word of praise is also due to Mr Edwin A. Montgomery, the energetic and much esteemed local representative of the Midland Railway Company who was approached on the matter and whose influence and representations were very valuable in the bringing about of the now pleasing consummation of the agitation for this Halt. It is understood the erection of the Halt will be proceeded with as soon as possible.

BALLYSHANNON PETTY SESSIONS. These sessions were held yesterday, before Capt. Crosbie, R. M., presiding, Major White, J. S. Myles, and J. Daly, justices. The only business of importance before the court was the hearing of an application made by D. I. Hilderbrand, to have James Mulhern, Bundoran, described as an habitual drunkard, committed to an Inebriates Home. D. I. Hilderbrand, quoted the Act under which the application was made, and submitted the number of times defendant was fined in 1910. On being asked if he would care to have the matter decided by the magistrates present or a judge and jury, defendant preferred the latter and depositions were taken.

NEW ROADS IN BELLEEK DISTRICT. MEETING OF PROTEST. In connection with the proposals passed at recent meetings of Belleek District Council and sanctioned by Fermanagh County Council for a number of new roads, a meeting by way of protest was held in Belleek to-day (Friday). The meeting had been called by posters signed by many heavy ratepayers and extensively circulated. The meeting was held in the Court-house and there was a considerable attendance. It was at once seen that the proceedings would not be of the most harmonious description. On the motion of Mr James Earls, seconded by Mr Alexander Donaldson, Mr Edward Kerr took the chair. Mr Fred McBrien was elected secretary of the meeting.

The Chairman in stating the object of the meeting was subjected to considerable interruption. He read from the Co. Surveyor’s sheet the various roads proposed to be made. Mr P. Scott, Chairman Belleek District Council, also read the new roads and contended that the loan would not mean more than one penny in the £ on the rates. Mr Gallagher also spoke and said the meeting was a sham. The Chairman pointed out that the roads sanctioned amounted to £4,178 and that they were only installments, the County Surveyor’s estimate for their completion being £7,000, a total of £11,178. Amid great disorder a vote was taken on a resolution, disapproving of the making o£ the now roads, the chairman declared the motion carried by a majority of the ratepayers, while the opposition party representing the County and District Council claimed the vote was against the resolution. Subsequently the following committee was appointed – Mr Francis Flanagan, Roscor, to act on the Committee for Whealt, Launcelot Gormley, Leggs, Castlecaldwell; Edward Johnson, Tiranagher, Ardees; Patk McGrath, Brollagh; Thomas Scott. Garrison; Thomas Gallagher, Keenaghan; Edward McBrien, Ardees Lower; George Carson, Carron West; John Campbell, Corn; Alex Donaldson, Clyhore; James Doogan, Corry; P Duffy, Fassagh ; D Gilfedder, Drumanillar; J Dermott, Brollagh; J Teevan, Slavin; R Cowan, Ardees Pat McGourty, Monendogue; James Dundass, Manger; William McCowley, Commons; Wm Gallagher, Belleek; James Cleary, Belleek; Christopher Armstrong, Farrancassidy, Robt. Johnston, Fassagh, etc. with power to add to their number. After a vote of thanks, accompanied by a few appropriate words by Mr Flanagan had been passed to the Chairman this preliminary meeting adjourned.