Pettigo Remeniscences of the 1880s

21-4-1951. PETTIGO REMINISCENCES OF 70 YEARS AGO. (1880s)

FERMANAGH HERALD. WE are privileged to publish this article, from the pen of J. T. LAWTON, who, at the age of ninety-one, is still hale and hearty in his home in Newfoundland. Mr. Lawton, as he relates, was a teacher, seventy years ago, in Pettigo, and his reminiscences will be read with deep interest. In a covering letter to the Editor, Mr. Lawton writes: “I am always glad to have an opportunity to say something about Pettigo and Ireland for, in my home in Newfoundland, my father, who was from Youghal, used to gather the exiled Irishmen around him on Sunday evenings, and read “The Nation,” then conducted by Charles Gavan Duffy, A. M. Sullivan and T D Sullivan. My chums and I got back by the dresser and played dominoes while the men of ’98 cursed William of the Boyne, Oliver Cromwell and the English.” On his approaching birthday, we add our congratulations to the many Mr. Lawton will be receiving, and wish him many more years of happy retirement.

DEAR MR. EDITOR — You expressed a desire some time ago to a former pupil of mine that I write a few reminiscences of Pettigo. They may perhaps  be interesting, for the past has a glamour of its own that somehow invests the most trivial incidents with interest. None of us will hesitate to read of the romantic doings between Lord Byron and Lady Caroline Lamb, or what Napoleon the Third said to the Countess Montijo that evening in the Tulleries when he asked her to marry him, or what the thoughts of the Emperor Henry IV were during the three days and nights he stood barefoot in Canossa Castle grounds waiting for Pope Gregory VII to lift his excommunication sentence. Though in the present instance there are no such high personages involved, the historical incidents may be of interest.

I WENT to Pettigo to teach school in the autumn of 1882. I was then 22 years of age. Three years previously I had left my native country—Newfoundland—to follow a profession which I later did not find congenial. As my going to Pettigo changed the whole course of my life, I must first introduce the man who was responsible for it. He was the Rev. John Canon McKenna, Parish Priest of Belleek. He was a stocky, loud-voiced choleric man, over-bearing with inferiors but had a generous heart underneath it all. He was a friend to me. When I was leaving him—nine years later —he showed undisguised regret. I revere his memory.

Up to 1882 there had been no Catholic school in Pettigo. The Catholic children of the town went to the Protestant school. Canon McKenna had been trying for years to get a plot of ground whereon to build a school. He could not succeed. Every obstacle was put in his way by the Ascendant party. They objected to a Catholic school. Finally by a mere chance the Canon secured a small plot. There was a small piece of waste boggy land, adjoining a tenancy held by a Catholic, Barney Wiley—which the landlord, not getting any rental from, decided to sell to Wiley. Wiley bought it. A few months afterwards Wiley’s mother died and as he was unmarried he decided to surrender his tenancy and go to Australia, where he had a brother living. Canon McKenna bought this piece of waste land from him. It was about a mile from Pettigo and near Lough Erne.

SECTARIAN ANIMOSITY. The purchase of this land by Canon McKenna was the signal for an outburst of sectarian criticism and violent abuse; but the Canon who at this time lived at Belleek and had no house at Pettigo started to build. When the school was ready for occupation I received my first lesson in Irish bigotry. I had not been prepared for it. I had never seen anything of this intense hatred between religious sects in my country. There may be amongst the uneducated very poor an undercurrent of mutual suspicion; but it is never shown. Parishioners of the various sets help one another in their church buildings and social functions. The word “Protestant” is seldom used and is considered a breach of good breeding. The various religious sects are referred to as Roman Catholic. Church of England, United Church, and so on. The sectarian animosity of Pettigo grated on me intensely. It was a state of open warfare between the pupils of both schools from the beginning. They attacked each other going and returning from school. The Protestant teachers of Pettigo offered every inducement and threat to Catholic parents to keep their children at their school. There were hints that the landlord would interfere if Catholic parents sent their children to the Catholic School.

A SURLY HENCHMAN. For the first month I had only about fifteen pupils. The fighting between the pupils continued. On my way from the town to the school I had to pass by the Glebe fields. This was potato digging time. The incumbent—Mr. Davies —had a surly looking henchman digging his potatoes, and every morning he made it a point to send his dog through the hedge at me. One morning I was so fiercely attacked by the dog that a woman assistant digger had to come to my rescue. I can explain my non-retaliation to these savage reprisals only on the facts that I was young and totally unprepared for such boorish onslaughts and was mentally occupied in devising some plan for getting rid of the locality altogether.

SCHOOL CONCERT. IT must be remembered that the Catholic feeling toward Protestants was hostile. The following incident will show this. During the winter, in order to popularize the school I organized a school concert. It was certainly ambitious. The programme consisted of a Soiree, a lecture by Canon McKenna, a magic lantern show and a concert. I forget now whether the audience got home before midnight. I slump in my chair now when I look back on my audacity and my inexperience. But I thought I had a good show. I had been teaching the older boys the violin and their selection would make a hit. Then there was the lantern show with sleeping giants eating rats and other quadrupeds. The Canon’s description of his travels in Italy would be a change from his weekly talk about dues and oats collections.

But though the programme was wide enough to please the most covetous, I struck a few snags. I dealt for my household grocery supplies with a Protestant shopkeeper. Quite naturally I ordered the pastry and other eatables for the soiree from the same man. The eatables arrived early in the evening and I had them arranged very tastefully on the tables. The soiree was the first item on the programme. About twenty minutes before it was to open the housekeeper came to the schoolroom with two assistants, gathered up everything that was on the tables and threw it into the turf box in the porch. The housekeeper would brook no expostulation; there was a Catholic baker in the town and there was no need to take cakes or bread from a Protestant one.

“SIT DOWN, JOHNNY.” With some of my enthusiasm quenched, I had to send another order immediately to the Catholic baker. But the show finally got under way. In manipulating the lantern I accidentally burnt two of my fingers dead black. This was the most exciting part of the programme. Some of the audience were standing up in order to get a better view of the pictures. Those behind objected to this and caused no little turmoil. I heard one irate spinster call out:—

“ Sit down, Johnny Malrone, damn you sit down, isn’t my shillin’ as good as yours? ”

The proceeds of the concert were intended to go towards purchasing turf for the school fire but by the time the two bakers’ orders were paid for there was little left. The incident gives an idea of the intensity of sectarian feeling that existed in the community. One wonders what improvement or progress was possible where such antagonistic attitudes existed.

GRINDING SYSTEM OF EDUCATION. But incidents such as the foregoing were only bubbles on the surface. It is necessary to explain.The National system of Education , in Ireland under Castle government seventy years ago was one of the most grinding and impoverishing systems that could be devised. The system was called “ The Results System.” Half the teacher’s salary depended on the results of the inspector’s examination of the pupils. The School Inspector set a day each year for the inspection of a school. Beforehand, he sent a “form” on which the teacher filled in the names of his pupils who had attended 100 days during the year. Any child who did not attend school for 100 days was not examined. When the inspector came he examined every pupil individually, in every subject of the school syllabus. If a pupil passed in a subject he got an “X ” opposite his name; if he failed, he received an “O.” The teacher was paid graded amounts for all the passes according to classes, ranging from a shilling for spelling to two shillings for arithmetic. A 3rd grade teacher’s salary was £27.10s. A teacher with a small school may add ten or twelve pounds to his salary a year by “Results Pees.” The pay of such a teacher would be approximately two shillings a day.

FEAR KEPT CATHOLICS AWAY. BUT the most nerve-racking and degrading part of this system was the “Quarterly Attendance.” You could not get any salary at all unless your quarterly attendance had attained at least 30 pupils. I have already described the efforts of the Protestant teachers to retain their Catholic pupils. A large number of Catholic parents in opposition to the repeated insistence of Canon McKenna that they send their children to their own school, refused to do so. Their argument was (undoubtedly influenced by fear) that “they did not care to take them from the other teachers after being so long with them.” The problem seemed to have become embedded in a state of inertia and deadlock that I finally saw that unless matters began to change for the better I must quit. But under Canon McKenna’s urgent wishes, when the average for the first three months October- December did not come up to 308 I consented to hold on for another quarter. Hope is one of the strongest impulses of the human mind. The next three months might be better.

LIVING ON THREEPENCE A DAY. At the end of the March quarter the average was still below 30. Things were becoming desperate for me. According to the Central Board of Education’s rule I could get no salary. What was to be done ? I had no money. I was living on one shilling and nine pence s week or three pence a day. Where could I go? I did not have money enough to take me anywhere. I was in a strange country without relations, two thousand miles from my own home. To shorten the story Canon McKenna asked me how much money I wanted, I told him I had been living on three pence a day for the past six months and I could do it again, and I would not take more. He gave me what I asked. From the altar on Sundays he berated the parents who refused to take their children from the Protestant school. The luke-warmness of the Catholic parents in this matter, was undoubtedly due to the fact that he lived at Belleek—8 miles away, and did not see much of “his” Pettigo parishioners during the week except on Sundays? But some months after completing the school, he started the building of parochial house and was then a daily visitor to Pettigo. There-after school matters began to change for the better. At the end if the third quarter the average was slightly above 30. and there was an ample prospect of it continuing so. There was jubilation. It was one more illustration to the “stick-at-it ” moralists to put in their “self-help” books. After my “ Returns ” went on to the Education Board I received a cheque for nine months’ salary.

WATCHING THE INSPECTOR. I was aware that I could have done as I had known one or two other teachers were doing, namely falsifying the school records. I knew one teacher who had imported a young nephew of his to watch outside the schoolroom for the possible approach of the Inspector. The school was very conveniently situated for this proceeding in an elevated mountain district. The nephew lolled lazily in a comfortable chair by the schoolroom door and watched for the Inspector. The Inspector was liable to make a visit at any time. If the nephew saw the inspector coming he rushed to acquaint the teacher. The teacher hurriedly marked down the number of his pupils present. If the Inspector did not put in an appearance that day, the teacher after school hours made sure that he had at least 30 pupils present. The rule regarding dally registration was that only the pupils present at 11 o’clock were to be registered. Omitting the registration till after 11 o’clock was liable to bring a severe reprimand from the Education Board and a punitive reduction in the amount of “Results Fees” payable to the teacher. False registration was a risky and self-penalising business. If the register showed that a pupil had attended school 100 days he went in for examination. But by false registration he may have attended school only 60 or 70 days. What chance was there for him to pass the examination ? If he failed his failure brought complaints from the parents to which the teacher had to submit with a wry face.

LIVING ON OATMEAL AND MILK. I HAD taught school for nine months without receiving any salary. Have you heard of any workman in any part of the world who worked for nine months without pay? I did it. I could have got help from my friends in Newfoundland, but as I had disappointed them in giving up the profession they wished me to follow, I preferred to keep my wherebouts unknown to them. I was compelled to live on 6 cents (three pence) a day. My menu was oat meal, rice and milk. No tea, coffee meat, fish or vegetables. Two meals a day. You are wondering if I became a Communist. Well, the term Communist was not in vogue then. But I became something similar. Night after night I sat at my lodgings wondering, wondering if this society in which I was living had no brighter outlook. Every morning I met on the road to my school poor, unkempt haggard men who asked me for a “copper.” I had no more coppers than themselves. The pleasure I felt strolling by the Irish honey-suckle hedges (there are none in Newfoundland) was suddenly blasted when a poor under-privileged outcast asked me for a “copper?’ I felt a shriveling sensation when I had to say “none.” They were probably uneducated and could not demand much from society; I was educated. but financially on their level.

ASCENDANCY ATTITUDE. Then again the class distinctions grated on me. I need not tell an Irish editor the attitude of the Ascendancy class towards the Irish poor or middle class. They seemed to me to consider themselves superior beings. I had never seen anything like it before and I could not suffer it. Was this extreme poverty and rabid class distinction to last for ever?

STORY OF A PAMPHLET. DAY and night these problems of class distinction and grinding poverty occupied my mind. A London publishing house —The Modem Press—was issuing pamphlets on working class problems. I put my solution for the world’s maladjustments into shape and sent the manuscript to these publishers. I labelled it “The Nationalisation of Society.” I wanted them to buy it from me. They would not do this. I would have to pay part of the printing and they would pay me so much for every thousand copies sold. As I was not receiving any salary at the time, this arrangement was out of the question just then and my manuscript had come back. But when I did get money I adopted it. With that naivete which is so characteristic of youth I imagined that I was laying the foundation of the world’s regeneration.

Although I knew nothing then about Karl Marx’s theories, my pamphlet was thoroughly Marxian. It called for the nationalisation of all the means of production and distribution. No person could start a business of any kind without permission of the Government. As inventions threw people out of employment, inventions were to become a State property to be used for the welfare of the workers. I gave a copy of the pamphlet to Canon McKenna. I was blissfully ignorant of the fact that the theories expressed in it were anathema to the Church and that I might be liable to excommunication if I were to stubbornly maintain them. The following Sunday the Canon preached a long sermon on the Italian and French secret societies that were trying to destroy the Church. I knew the sermon was directed against my pamphlet, but he never referred to it afterwards, and the incident did not alter our friendly relations in the least. I may say I never received a half-penny from the Modern Press publishers since.

Sectarian hatred was like a poisonous miasma soaking unobtrusively through all phases of the community. I had been asked by a lady president of a charitable organisation to take part in a concert in aid of the organisation, presumably because I was known to be in favour of more toleration between the two sections of the town. A friend cautioned me. He said: “You better consult the Canon.” Amused I asked “ Why?” He replied “ He may not like for one of his teachers to be taking part in a Protestant concert.” Whimsically interested in what the Canon would say, I mentioned the matter to him. He sternly objected. It was not a part of my duty he said to patronise “these people” or help in supporting “their conventicles.”

ORANGE ARCHES. One disagreeable effect of. this absurd feeling was the likelihood of being brought into bad terms with Protestant neighbours without being in the least responsible for It. As a member of the chapel choir I organised a day’s outing to Bundoran. I hired 10 cars for the drive. It was the week after the 12th of July and Orange lilies still hung over the roads. They hung in a very drooping dilapidated condition and the drivers pulled some of them off as we drove along. The incident was so trivial and accidental that none of us made any remark about it. When we were returning at night fall the ditches on both sides of the road for a considerable distance, were lined with members of the Orange Association, ready, I presume to attack us if any attempt was made to interfere with the arches. Their demonstration seemed so childish and uncalled for that Father Kelly who accompanied us reported the matter to Police Headquarters at Enniskillen. A few days later, the Inspector of Police called upon me to ascertain the facts. The simple incident created much local gossip and had the effect ot embroiling me in unfavourable criticism as the leader of the excursion party. In my country no society would dream of putting aches across the street for other societies to pass under, and even if they were so boorish to do so, the others would pass it by unheeded. The only remark I could make to the Inspector was that I thought there were a lot of people in Ireland who needed a little more commonsense.

EFFECT OF THE TWELFTH. This undercurrent of sectarian feeling had its amusing side also for me. I lived about 100 feet from a neighbour—Mrs. Stewart. She was one of the kindest woman alive. There was nothing she would not do for you in case of an emergency. She was a daily visitor to my house. Her only son—a good fellow, too—was a member of the Loyal Orange Association. His mother apparently shared his prejudices. For about three days before the 12th of July she never came near the house. If she happened to be outside feeding her hens when I came in sight she darted inside suddenly, and did not come out till I had passed. This continued for about three days after the 12th when our relations became friendly as usual. In my short revisit to Pettigo 18 years ago 1 looked with sad recollections to her little, cottage which had been de-roofed and shattered in the revolution of 1916.

THE CAUSE. THE above incident showed me at the time that if the ruling class, who for political and other reasons, kept alive the embers of a centuries-old feud, would cease their nefarious propaganda, this sectarian hostility would not be apparent. What struck me was the bizarre phenomenon of a minority ostentatiously parading its prejudices and endeavouring to impose on a majority with confident impunity knowing they had the backing of the ruling class.

THE PASTOR AND THE CARETAKER. On the same visit I saw the parochial house and the little bit of boggy ground the Canon had struggled and fought to get. The house was in ruins. Just a short 50 years before, he had laid the first stone of it. Now, silence surrounded both him and the house. I dropped a tear in his memory. He had his faults, but also his good points. He had a brow-beating temper but there was one whom he never subdued. She was Miss Rorke—caretaker of the chapel. She was a woman of stern visage, self-contained. Her aspiring nose and tightly knobbed hair warned off any undue congeniality. She never answered a question at first offer, but had to say “Eh.” I remember one Saturday evening she was dusting the seats in the Chapel. The Canon who had been busy with some parish affairs was hurrying back to catch the train to Belleek “What time does the train leave”? he asked Miss Rorke.

“ Eh ”? she said. He repeated On the same visit I saw the parochial house and the little bit of boggy ground the Canon had straggled and fought to get. The house was in l’uins. Just a short 50 years before, he had aid the first stone of it. Now. silence surrounded both him and the house. I dropped a tear in his memory. He had his faults; but also his good points. He had a brow-beating temper; but there was one whom he never subdued. She was Miss Rorke—caretaker of the chapel. She was a woman of stem visage, self-contained. Her aspiring nose and tightly knobbed hair warned off any undue con-geniality. She never answered a question at first offer, but had to say “Eh.” I remember one Saturday evening she was dusting the seats in the Chapel. The Canon who had been busy with some parish affairs was hurrying back to catch the train to Belleek. “What time does the train leave”? he asked Miss Rorke. “Eh”? she said. He repeated the question. “The train,” she replied. “don’t be askin’ me about trains, I was never in a train in me life.” This reply seemed to nettle him and he vented his ill humour by reprimanding her sharply for putting some vestments in the wrong drawer. She attempted to explain “Hold your tongue woman,’’ he stormed, “wait till I’m done talking,’’ “Ah, ” she blurted out, ’’in the name of God when would you be done talkin.”

PETTIGO’S FIRST PHOTOGRAPHER. AFTER boarding for a year in a farmhouse I moved to the town. There had never been any resident photographer in Pettigo, and I fancied that as a pioneer photographer I could make some money on the side. So I purchased a camera and commenced learning. It was the days of the slow glass plate. You couldn’t take a photo of a street if there were any people walking about because a few seconds at least was needed for exposure, and the image would be blurred. The only feasible time was in the morning before people were about. I was up early sketching the streets. No one was about except Adam Reid. He was a retired old gentleman. He always was amused at me with my head covered with a black cloth and stood still while I photographed. When I strode away he usually made some jocose remark. I heard him say one morning to another bystander: “That fellow is cracked.’’

THE SIGNBOARD CAME DOWN. I developed my pictures in my bedroom. Owing to technical defects I could not get good pictures but I was so anxious to get the business on a paying basis that I hung out my signboard with prints that were far below the photographic standard. I had taken a number of free snaps for the sake of advertisement. One afternoon I passed through Flood’s shop where a few cronies were drinking in a side room. I heard one of them ask the others: “Boys, did ye see the picture the Master took of Barney D. Barney D was a shaggy, unkempt knockabout, but was not altogether bad-looking. “No, the others replied. ” Well, if ye ever see the divil— He did not complete the sentence, but I felt that Barney’s picture was not a boosting advertisement and I withdrew it, and later took down my signboard. Anyway I had the honour of being the first to start a “studio” in Pettigo.

PIANO FOR £3. When I imported a piano, I was told I was the first to introduce that instrument to that town but that was incorrect. I was the second. After giving up the photography I had some spare time and I decided to buy a piano. But what about the money? One could not get a piano for nothing. Recklessly I sent a note to Pohlmann and Co., of Grafton Street, Dublin, saying I wanted a piano and would offer £3 for one. Three pounds for a piano I I could hear the manager laughing. Believe it or not, I received a letter a few days later couched in the following words; “Dear sir: Your offer is ridiculously small; but we have a piano we can give you for £3 that may suit you.” I sent the £3 and received the piano. It was a heavy cumbersome affair, over six feet long. I had lodgings in an upstairs room of Mr. Michael Doherty’s at this time. The piano was unpacked in the street. With the help of the neighbours I tried to get it upstairs. The stairs was narrow and had a turn in it. The piano got jammed and would go neither up nor down. Everybody became a boss and the broadcasting of orders raised such a commotion that hundreds of spectators were lined up on the other side of the street. Finally, the piano was brought back to the street. The only way to get it to my upstairs room was through the window. Out came the window. Planks were laid against the window-sill and with four men upstairs with ropes and an unknown number below pushing the piano reached its appointed quarters.

THOUGH it is 60 years since I left it, there will always be a warm, bright spot in my heart for Pettigo. I often look back with happy memories of the mornings before school that I spent rowing on Lough Erne, my Saturday afternoons at Bundoran where I met other teachers—Brown of Mulleek, McGovern of Belleek, McGovern of Cornatressy, Lane of Lettercran and Reid of Kimmid. I suffered much there but there were compensations. It was there I married a girl from Keady. Two of my children now living beside me, were born there. From inquiries I learn that all these teachers are dead. I have a photograph of my pupils taken a short time before I left Pettigo. So far as I can learn, there are only a few of them alive. I still correspond with three of them— John Bannon of Pettigo, John Fogarty of Cardiff and John McCaffrey of Montreal. They love to talk about the old school days, and in a few months time I will be receiving their congratulations as usual on my birthday—my ninety-first.

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1951.

CHRISTMAS IN FERMANAGH COUNTY HOSPITAL.

CHRISTMAS is always a very happy time in Fermanagh County Hospital, where Miss McWilliam and her excellent nursing staff so well succeed in bringing an atmosphere of home and good cheer to the patients. As usual, the wards were delightfully decorated, streamers of holly and bunting and a profusion of flowers giving an appropriate effect of joy and happiness. Surgeon Fleming, Doctors Forester and Hamilton joined with Matron and nursing staff in dispelling the “away-from-home-for-Christmas feeling that patients might have had; and a happy, homely spirit made staff and patients one big happy family during the festival time.

A large Christmas tree was erected in the Children’s Ward, and this was laden with gifts and gaily coloured lights. The little ones entered into the spirit of the celebrations and, in a “ home-from-home ” atmosphere, enjoyed themselves immensely. An anonymous donor sent to Sister M. Maye, of the Children’s Ward, a parcel of gifts, “for some poor child” in the ward. These, and the other gifts, were distributed amongst the happy little ones, who quite correctly believe that for such as they, who are away from home for Christmas, Santa Claus has a special love and generosity. Other donors were generous in their supplies of holly, books, papers and toys. The Fermanagh. Male Voice Choir and the Methodist Church Choir visited the hospital before Christmas and provided nice selections of appropriate music.

ERNE HOSPITAL.

Masses of holly and bunting, used tastefully to provide an effect of beauty and gaiety, struck a happy note in the Erne Hospital, where almost, a hundred patients spent a very happy time during Christmas. Special Christmas fare was provided, Sisters Donaghy, Condell and Murphy joining with the Matron, Miss McKay, and the other members of the nursing staff to lighten the burden of illness with which the patients faced the festive season. Presents were sent in by kindly people and these were distributed Carol singers and choirs supplied an enjoyable programme of music in the days leading up to the Feast. Dr. M. E. McBrien and other helpers from outside the hospital assisted the nursing staff in making the patients’ Christmas time a happy one.

27-1-1951. PETTIGO. Pettigo monthly fair on Saturday was small but the demand for all classes, of cattle had improved from the previous fair and prices showed a marked increase. Springer cows sold from £29 10s to £36 10s each; three-year-old heifers sold from £27 10s to £34 10s each; two-year-old heifers sold from £21 10s to £27 10s each; fat bullocks sold from £29 10s to £32 10s each; year-old calves sold from £10 10s to £11 15s each; dropped calves sold from £1 to £1 5s each; young pigs sold from £5 to £7 5s each; farming horses were unsaleable.;

Sympathy is extended from the residents of his native Grouselodge to the brothers and relatives and to the clergy of the diocese of Clogher on the death of the Very Rev. Denis Canon McGrath, P.P., of Bundoran, last week. The late Canon McGrath was beloved by the people of Grouselodge in which townland he was born and reared.

On Friday night a well attended dance was held in St. Mary’s Hall, Pettigo, the proceeds being in aid of the poor and needy of the district, The function was generously supported by all the business people of Pettigo village.

On Saturday Sergeant M. McCabe, from Dublin, took up duty as sergeant in charge of Pettigo Garda station which had been vacant since the transfer of Sergt. Dominic Noone a few weeks ago.

During the past week all the schools in Pettigo village and surrounding districts have been‘closed owing to the flue epidemic which is raging in the area. Many of the business houses in the village are carrying on with depleted staffs. A few cases of pneumonia are reported in the area.

During the past week-end there was heavy flooding in the Lettercran, Cashelinney and Tullylark districts of Pettigo as a result of the long, wished for thaw which set in on Wednesday. In many parts of the district, roads were impassable for motor traffic owing to the floods.

Mr. Andrew Gallagher, of Grouselodge, is the first farmer in the district to have the ground ready for this Season’s potato crop.

3-2-1951. PETTIGO. On Monday a pretty wedding took place in St. Mary’s Church, Pettigo, the contracting parties being Mr. Michael McCrudden, youngest son of the late Patrick and Margaret McCrudden, of Woodlands, Dooish, Ballybofey, and Miss Rosaleen Hilley, third daughter of Patrick and Alice Hilley, of Lettercran, Pettigo. Margaret Hilley (sister of the bride), was bridesmaid, and Mr. Joseph Hilley (brother of the bride), was best man at the ceremony with Nuptial Mass. Rev. J. F. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo, officiated.

The epidemic of flu is still claiming many victims both in Pettigo village and the surrounding districts. In many areas whole families are confined to bed. All schools in the district have been closed as a precaution.

On Wednesday morning the death took place at her daughter’s residence, Main St., Pettigo, of Mrs. Catherine Geelan (75). Deceased was widow of Sergt. Edward Geelan, R.I.C., who prior to his marriage was stationed in Pettigo. At the funeral on Friday to St. Mary’s Cemetery, Pettigo, the chief mourner were—Mrs. J. Egan, Mrs. A. Cox, Pettigo. Mrs. Jim Gallagher. Newcastle (daughters); Eddie Geelan, Coventry, Jim Geelan, Donegal (sons); John Egan, G. Dorrian. J. Gallagher, A. Cox, (sons-in-law); John, Vincent, Seamus, Desmond, Dermot and Monica Egan; Liam, Andrew, Eamon and Maureen Cox, Alan, Dorrian, Jim, Eamon, Kathleen, Bernadette, Anne, Breda, Gertie and Marie Gallagher (grand-children); J. Fogarty, Cardiff (brother); Mrs. P. J. Flood, Pettigo (niece); Mr. John Watters (nephew). Rev. Jas. F. Brennan, C.C., gave an eloquent panegyric and celebrated Requiem Mass and recited the last prayers at the grave-side.

FERMANAGH S MINOR TEAM. John O’Neill (Lisnaskea); Owen Clerkin, (Roslea), Patrick Murphy, (Kinawley), Tom Callaghan (Roslea), Tom McManus (Kinawley), Paddy McComb (Lisnaskea), Jas. O’Hanlon (Newtownbutler), Sean Gonnigle (Belleek), Eamon O’Grady (Gaels), Tommy Devanney, (Irvinestown), Paddy Casey (Devenish), John Maguire (Ederney), Brendan Shannon (Newtownbutler), Tommy McDermott, (Roslea), Peter Murray, Roslea.

Subs. – Liam Slevin (Belleek), Thomas Donohue, Terry Donegan, (Newtownbutler), Hugh Maguire, (Irvinestown) and Kevin Donnelly and Bennie Fitzpatrick (Gaels).

17-2-1951. Tempo.

A MEETING of Fermanagh Co. Board. G.A.A., will be held in Parochial Rooms, Enniskillen, on FRIDAY, 16th FEBRUARY, at 8 p.m. sharp. All Clubs are requested to be represented.

TEMPO SYMPATHY. At a meeting of the Tempo G.F.C. on Tuesday night, a vote of sympathy was passed to the relatives and friends of the late Fr. D. McCaffrey, C.C.

CHANGES IN TEMPO TEAM? The year 1951 is expected to bring about changes on the Tempo team, as the better of the 1950 minors are anxious to fill the positions of their predecessors: These young players together with the remaining members of last years team should build up a fair defence and produce some good football:

Although Tempo. is officially a senior team, it would be unfair to grade them senior, as the result would prove to be a fiasco, and moreover, injuries which would be likely to occur would be the first step towards breaking up the team, which is beginning to prove its worth on the sports field.

The committee for the year 1951 is probably one of the largest of its kind in the county. Men who have hung up their boots are still in co-operation with the G.A.A. and devote, many of their spare hours in the club’s affairs. The officials are:—Eddie Connors (chairman); T. Doherty (vice-chairman), Phil McCarron (treasurer), and Hugh McCaffrey (secretary).

17-2-1951. PETTIGO. The death took, place at Tamlaght, Pettigo, on Tuesday after a prolonged illness of Mrs. Catherine Friel (82). At the funeral on Thursday to Carn cemetery the chief mourners were: James Dowd, Thomas Friel, Glasgow. Bernard Friel, do. (sons); Miss Mary A. Friel, Mrs. Catherine Simmons, Mrs. Winnie Friel (daughters); P. G. Simmons, James Friel (sons-in-law): Mrs. Thos. Friel, Glasgow (daughter-in-law); Thomas Herby, George, Cathleen, Maisie and Winifred Simmons (grandchildren). Rev. Fr. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo, celebrated Requiem Mass and officiated at the graveside.

On Monday night the last dance of the season was held in Cashelinney Hall, the proceeds being in aid of the hall repair fund. Mr. John J. Johnston, Skea, was fear a’ toighe.

Kesh monthly fair on Monday was very small, with practically no buyers in attendance; animals offered for sale were hard to cash.

The death took place at Montiaugh of Patrick McGoldrick (79), formerly a resident of Crilly, Pettigo. At the funeral on Friday morning to Lettercran, the chief mourners were Frank, Owen and James McGoldrick (brothers); Ellen Monaghan, The Cross (sister); Eddie Monaghan, Owne, Jas. J., Eugene and Jim McGoldrick (nephews). Rev. Fr. McKenna celebrated Requiem Mass and recited the last prayers at the grave-side.

On Monday of last week the heaviest snowfall of the season was experienced in the Pettigo district, where snow fell to a depth of 12 inches in a few hours. Many roads in the area are still unfit for vehicular traffic owing to drifts and ice.

On Ash Wednesday, February 7th, the Rev. James F. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo, distributed the ashes and recited the Rosary in Saint Mary’s Parish Church, Pettigo, and in Saint Patrick’s Church, Lettercran.

On Wednesday the death took place suddenly at Killeter of Thos. Irvine (57). The funeral took place to Killeter cemetery.

The flu is still claiming many victims in the Pettigo district.

Repair work by the Irish Land Commission on a bog road in the Grouselodge district had to be abandoned during the week owing to the heavy snowfall in the district.

24-3-1951. PETTIGO. The death took place at Ballymacavanny, Pettigo of Mrs C. Rooney (80). At the funeral to Pettigo Cemetery, the chief mourners were- Kathleen Rooney, Mrs. J Mulrine. Mrs. Mary J. Ward (daughters); Mr. J. Mulrine, Mr. Ward (sons-in-law); Miss Mary Mulrine (grandchild).

Prices at Pettigo monthly fair on Tuesday were—Springer cows, £35 to £39; three year old heifers, £31 to £34; two- year old heifers, £22 to £26; fat bullocks, £29 to £32; year old calves, £11 to £13 10s; dropped calves, 10s to 21s; young pigs, £5 to £7.

The death took place of William Vartue, of High Street, Pettigo (72). He was also well known to pilgrims to Lough Derg. At the funeral to Pettigo the chief mourners were; Mrs. Cochrane (sister); Henry and Geo. Morrow, Rebecca and Susan Morrow (cousins).

On St. Patrick’s Pay the annual pilgrimage took place to St. Patrick’s Well, Magherakeel. Almost 400 took part in the traditional station. The Rosary was recited by Very Rev. P. McGlinchey, P.P.

During the past week there have been losses of both cattle and horses in the Pettigo and Mullinmeen districts. It is believed that the shortage of fodder in. the district is the cause.

On Saturday the death took place at Belault South, Pettigo, after a short Illness, of John Martin (75). At the funeral to St. Mary’s Cemetery, Pettigo, chief mourners were: Thomas and Jas. Martin (sons,; Mrs. Catherine Martin (widow); Mrs. Mary MacMahon, Mrs. Peggy Ginn, Mrs. Jennie Wheatley (daughters); Patrick Martin (brother); John MacMahon, Bert Wheatley (sons-in-law); Phyllis, Marie, Kathleen, Margaret and Ann MacMahon (grandchildren); Wm. and Thos. Reilly (brothers-in-law); Mrs. W. Reilly, (sister-in-law); Thomas Reilly and John Reilly, (nephews) Mrs. P. Monaghan, Pettigo (niece); P. Monaghan, J. Friel (relatives).

Donegal Co. Council workmen are employed widening and paving the main Pettigo to Castlederg road at Grouselodge.

The death took place at her brother’s residence, Gortnessy, Pettigo, of Miss Fanny Porter, who had lived in the U.S.A., where she had spent her youth. The funeral took place on Thursday to Pettigo Cemetery; chief mourners being Bob and Willie Porter (brothers); Mrs. B. Porter (sister-in-law).

Fermanagh 1951.

21-7-51. Cashel GFC Sports. Cashel defeated Enniskillen Gaels in a Junior League match. The old age pensioner’s race was won by Jas. Gallagher with Michael Kelly second.

21-7-51. Fermanagh beaten at the post Cavan 3-5 Fermanagh 1-9 in the Ulster Minor Football Final.

28-7-51 Belleek defeat Enniskillen Gaels 1-1 to 3 points in the County Minor Championship. Near the end Shea scored the winning goal for Belleek. Enniskillen have appealed. Malachy Mahon proved an efficient referee though some of his decisions were very open to criticism. “I was shocked to see both Casey and Gonigle revert to unsporting tactics. I saw at least four fouls committed by these Belleek stars yet they were not penalised. Whether or no the referee seen this or not is the big question. Because Casey and Gonigle are county stars is no reason why the referee should be lenient with them.

4-8-51 Fermanagh’s gallant bid for victory at Clones fails – Armagh are Ulster Minor Football Champions by a score of  1-8 to 1-3. Pat Casey, star of the team unable to play due to being confined to bed with a heavy cold. S. Gonigle, Belleek on the team.

4-8-51  Franciscan Monastery nears completion at Rossnowlagh.

25-8-51 Belleek to meet the winners of Roslea and Lisnaskea in Minor Football Championship. Garrison defeat Derrygonnelly 2-5 to 10 points in the final of the Junior Championship. The Garrison team was P. Nealon, M. McGee, Phil Keown, J. P. O’Brien, J. Dolan, P. Dolan, J. Mc Coll, ? Gallagher, P. Casey, M. J. O’Brien, P. Keown, D McGee, Peter Dolan (on for Keenan)

8-9-51 Pettigo GAA Sports at Mullingoad. Ederney Pipe Band was in attendance. Prize winners – Donkey Derby – Mr. P. Gallagher, Mulleek. Cycle race, 1. Jim Mc Caffrey, Ballymacavanney; 2. John Mc Andrews, Billary. Mountcharles football team won the 7 a side.

22-9-51. Fermanagh go down to Derry by 5-6 to 3-5 but give a good performance. Day excursion tickets to the All Ireland final in Croke Park Sunday 23rd September. Adults £1, children half price departing Belleek 5.59 am returning from Dublin at 6.45 pm.

13-10-51 Ederney defeat Derrylin in the final of the Fermanagh Junior championship by 3-2 to 1-4. Derrylin has done well to reach the final in their first year. Ederney and Kinawley will now play Senior football next year.

13-10-51 Fermanagh Senior Championship Final unfinished between Belleek and Lisnaskea. The match took place in Irvinestown under ideal conditions. Lisnaskea, already League Champions, fell behind by six points after a bright start by Belleek. Approaching half time Lisnaskea were back within two points of Belleek when blows were exchanged between two players who were ordered to the sideline by the referee Johnny Monaghan of Ederney. During the interval the crowd, as is usual, entered the playing pitch. Over-excited supporters of the rival teams became embroiled in arguments which unfortunately developed and the referee called the game off.

13-10-51  Future of Railway to Bundoran and Pettigo in doubt. The policy in Belfast at the moment seems to be to abandon the railways in favour of transport by road.

13-10-51 The dance of the season in Mc Cabe’s Hall, Belleek, on Thursday 18th October. Dancing 10-3. First engagement in Northern Ireland of, Al Allen and his Dublin orchestra (late Embassy Ballroom, Dublin), featuring Carlton McKenzie, coloured saxophonist and vocalist.

27-10-51 Mr. Joseph Mc Grath, Rogagh has died at a comparatively early age. The following marriages have taken place; Patrick Mc Manus Molleybreen, Belleek to Miss Kathleen Mc Manus, Moonendoogue, Garrison. Mr. Bernard Keown, Devenish and Miss Kathleen Feehily, Glen West. In Ballyshannon, Mr. Patrick J. Treacy, Knockaraven to Miss Sheila A. Mc Cauley, Newtown House, Lisahully.

3-11-51  Almost a thousand patrons were attracted to Irvinestown to the replay of the Fermanagh Senior Championship final between Belleek and Lisnaskea. It was difficult to control the greasy ball on a treacherous pitch. The game was played in a sporting spirit contrasting with some of the unfortunate scenes of the previous abandoned meeting; not one regrettable incident occurring. “Sonny” Gunn was Lisnaskea’s star and Sean Gonnigle likewise starred for Belleek. Final score 4 points each. Replay next Sunday in Irvinestown.

3-11-51 Funeral of Mrs Ellen Foy, Devenish Villa, Garrison who died in the Shiel Hospital after a short illness. She maintained a thriving guesthouse in Bundoran until a few years ago which she ran since her husband’s death 30 years previously.

3-11-51 Mr. T. J. Keenan of Gortnalee had his pony bolt when being loaded with turf in Cornahilta Bog. It galloped for a distance of three miles before being overtaken by men on bicycles.

3-11-51 Still going strong is Mr John Mc Garrigle who is almost 90 and the oldest man in the Garrison district. He was for many years a member of Belleek Creamery Committee. He takes a keen interest in political matters and hopes to see Partition ended.

10-11-51 In the Garrison area the deaths of Mr. Denis O’Brien, Dernamew and Mr. Andrew Breen, Leigheid, has occurred.

10-11-51 Lisnaskea defeated Belleek in the County Championship final by 1-6 to 1-3. Forty eight hours of rain had left the Irvinestown pitch waterlogged and the goals Belleek defended in the first half was flooded to a depth of 6 inches. Lisnaskea’s fouls were mostly holding and tripping designed to save a goal at the expense of a free while Belleek’s infringements were mainly pushing or back-charging especially in midfield or among the forwards. The Belleek team was only a point behind with five minutes to go and shot a large number of wides towards the end of the game.

24 11 51  Congratulations to Master J. J. Mc Dermott, Devenish on winning the Ulster Championship in dancing. He is a son of Mr. John Mc Dermott, merchant tailor and brother of Miss Jenny Mc Dermott, Irish dancing teacher. A talented young Devenish musician is Master James J. Carty whose accordion playing has an almost professional touch.

24 11 51 Miss Rose A Duffy of Aghoo, Cashelnadrea has gone to England to enter the Novitiate of the Sisters of Perpetual Adoration.

24 11 51 The Bannagh Players (Kesh) entertained a packed house in St. Mary’s Hall Garrison. Other items were supplied by local musicians. The proceeds were expected to pay off the last of the debt incurred in equipping the local band.

24 11 51 When spotted by a Garrison RUC patrol a young man abandoned his bicycle and a parcel containing 21 lbs of tobacco.

01 12 51 According to a newspaper correspondent Lisnaskea Emmetts Club was founded in 1905. In the first round of the Championship they defeated Donagh Sons of Erin and remained undefeated until the final against Teemore. They were leading 1-1 to nil when a dispute arose and the game was abandoned. Teemore won the replay by 2 points to 1. Lisnaskea did not win a Championship until 1928.

01 12 51 Monsignor Gannon PP, Enniskillen performed the opening ceremony for Cashel new hall. It has been built through the initiative of Rev. Eugene Canon Coyle PP. The hall has a capacity of 400 and was designed by Mr. O’Doherty, Ballintra and built by Messrs Timony and Duffy, Cashel. Mr. O’Doherty’s wife, Miss Costello of Lisnaskea, is a niece of the late Monsignor Tierney PP, Enniskillen. (Later to teach in Belleek National School.) In his speech Monsignor Gannon said that with a beautiful church with central heating and electric light, a comfortable school and a new hall Cashel had everything they could possibly want. He deplored the current emphasis on the use of halls almost exclusively for dancing. He cited Enniskillen as bringing in a cross Channel band which he was told cost as much as £200 plus the cost of a relief band as this band did not play the whole night. Mr. Cahir Healy M.P. said that it was hardly a secret that Canon Coyle had given his life savings towards the erection of the two halls in Devenish West Parish.

22 12 51. Education. In the Fermanagh Education Office there are 15 officials at pretty large salaries. No Catholic was appointed.

22 12 51.  The funeral of Mr. John Ward, Editor “Donegal Vindicator” who died in Dublin took place last week. He was a deeply religious man who visited the church twice each day and was a daily communicant.

 

1951 to June. National & International.

 

The Northern and Southern governments agree on the running of the Great Northern Railway (9 January)
Ian Paisley co-founds the Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster (11 March)
On 23 March, Shannon Airport is the base for a rescue operation after a USAF C124 aircraft crashes into the sea – some wreckage is found 450 miles off the west coast, but all 53 people on board are lost
The Catholic hierarchy condemns the ‘Mother and Child’ scheme (4 April); Dr Noel Browne, Minister for Health, resigns; the scheme is abandoned on 6 April
A census (8 April) shows the population of the Republic to be 2,960,593; that of Northern Ireland on the same day is 1,370,921
The first demonstration of television in Ireland is held at the Spring Show in the RDS, Dublin (30 April)
The Arts Council is founded in the Republic (8 May)
Fianna Fáil regains power in a general election (30 May); Eamon de Valera becomes Taoiseach on 13 June
The Abbey Theatre, Dublin is destroyed by fire (18 July)
Ernest Walton of Trinity College Dublin is jointly awarded the Nobel prize for physics with Sir John Cockcroft
Liam and Josephine Miller found the Dolmen Press
T. J. Walsh establishes the Wexford Opera Festival
Samuel Beckett’s novels Molloy and Malone Dies, and Sam Hanna Bell’s novel December Bride, are published.

Births

Bertie Ahern (Fianna Fáil leader and Taoiseach) in Dublin
John Buckley (composer and teacher) in Co. Limerick
Dana (pseudonym of Rosemary Brown, singer) in Derry/Londonderry (30/8)
Peter Fallon (poet, founder of Gallery Press) in Osnabrück, Germany
Bill Graham (rock journalist and author) in Belfast (29/8)
Fred Johnston (poet and novelist) in Belfast
Paul McGuinness (manager of U2) near Hanover
Brian Maguire (painter) in Wicklow
Patrick Mason (theatre director)
John O’Keeffe (Kerry Gaelic footballer) (15/4)
Alan Shatter (Fine Gael politician) in Dublin (14/2)
Niall Stokes (founder and publisher of Hot Press magazine) in Dublin.

Deaths

Sir James Andrews
Daisy Bates
Joseph Warwick Bigger
Peter Cheyney
Joseph Chifley
Sir Ernest Clark
Louis D’Alton
Aodh de Blacam
George Gavan Duffy
Robert Flaherty
M. J. MacManus
Henry de Vere Stackpoole.

Local Events

13-1-1951. Death of Mr. Patrick Magee, Garrison, at an advanced age. Very Rev. Canon Coyle officiated.

27-1-1951. Sympathy is extended from the residents of his native Grouselodge to the brothers and relatives and to the clergy of the Diocese of Clogher on the death of the Very Rev. Denis Canon Mc Grath, P.P. of Bundoran last week. The late Canon Mc Grath was beloved by the people of Grouselodge in which townland he was born and reared.

3-2-1951. “You have often passed through a Woolworth store and marvelled how such a large staff can be maintained and goods sold so cheaply – or apparently so. In 1950 the firm set a new profit record of £5,355, 272.

3-2-1951. Much debate was occasioned at the County GAA Convention on the state of Gaelic Park and criticism of Enniskillen Gaels re state of Gaelic Games in the town and especially the Enniskillen pitch. Mr Jim Brady of Enniskillen excused the unplayable state of the pitch on account of a circus having been there for some time or perhaps because of the rising level of water from the adjoining Erne. Mr. Fee, County Secretary interjected, “It was because it was full of holes.” Mr. Fee welcomed the re-affiliation of Ederney and Kinawley to the association.

3-2-1951. Omagh man Mr. Maurice J. Hackett of Kevlin Road, Omagh, has bought six occupied dwelling houses at Prospect Terrace, Omagh for £80. The price represents the most astonishing bargain in house property. The former owner was Miss Louisa Crawford, Omagh.

3-2-1951. Enniskillen grocers request their customers to bring shopping baskets with them for general groceries, bread etc. and containers for potatoes owing to the increased cost of wrapping paper, paper bags and twine. Co-operation in this matter is urgently requested.

17-2-1951. The oldest inhabitant of Devenish has passed away in the person of James Mc Grath, 96, Rogagh, Cashelnadrea whose death occurred on Friday last. Also the death of Thomas Melaniphy, Frevagh, Devenish and of Mrs. M. Cassidy, wife of Mr. Michael Cassidy, Rossinuremore.

17-2-1951. Wedding bells for Tracey and Kelly at the Cathedral, Sligo. Miss Agnes Tracey, “Woodvale,” Kilcoo, Garrison to Gerald Kelly, Kiltimagh, County Mayo.

17-2-1951. Customs Fines at Belleek. Michael Ferguson, Drumbadreevagh, prosecuted for having in his possession a smuggled bicycle. He claimed he had got the bicycle from his brother-in law, Michael Gallagher, Rockfield, Ballyshannon to go to work on the Erne Scheme.

10-3-1951. An Ellen Donohue was fined £5 at Derrylin Court for concealment of 9 turkeys. She was suspected of having smuggled then by boat across a border river as tracks led from the river to the house of a friend.

10-3-1951. The death is announced of ex-senator John Mc Hugh of Pettigo at the venerable age of 92. He was chairman of Fermanagh Council from its inception in 1898 until it was dissolved by the Six County Government in 1922. He was one of two Nationalist M. Ps for County Fermanagh until the “gerrymander” of 1929 rearranged the boundaries to give two Unionist and one Nationalist M.P for a county which had a Nationalist majority.

10-3-1951. Lord Bishop of Clogher on the dangers of the Dance Craze. He wants amusements curtailed and the closing of all halls by midnight. He made a special appeal for prayer especially the Rosary.

17-3-1951.  Rabbits are not pests on Sunday. With an all-out war being waged on the rabbit pest it is, nevertheless, an offence in the Six Counties to kill rabbits on a Sunday. This was made very clear at Rathfriland Court when Patrick Travers, Lassize, was fined 10 shillings for the offence, and Kevin Travers, Lurgancahone, fined 20 shillings for using a net, “to kill rabbits on a Sunday.”

24-3-1951. Death of Master Ted Feely, Knockaraven, Garrison, aged 9. His coffin was carried on the shoulders of his classmates to his last resting place.

24-3-1951. Death of Mrs Maguire, ex-PT, Corgra House, Belleek. She retired last December after 44 years of service in Cornahilta School. Unfortunately she has passed away before the presentation organised for her by the local people. Two of her daughters are Sisters of Mercy.

31-3-1951. Tempo had an unexpected victory over Belleek in the Senior League by 2-5 to 1-4.

31-3-1951. The Ulster Farmer’s mart in Enniskillen celebrates its first birthday. Initially there were grave doubts in the minds of farmers as to whether the weekly sales would be a success but their fears proved unfounded. During the past 12 months 27,776 animals and total receipts for the period amounted to £672,147. The Farmers’ Mart Co. had helped put Fermanagh on the map as a centre for cattle sales.

7-4-1951. Fermanagh defeated in the Ulster Junior Championship by Donegal by 2-12 to 0-4.

14-4-1951. Death of Mr. John Flanagan, Glen West, Devenish. He had a long and trying illness.

14-4-1951. Derry defeat Fermanagh in the Dr. Mc Kenna Cup by 3-11 to 2-5. Playing for Fermanagh were M. McGurren, M. Regan, and J. Connors of Belleek.

14-4-1951.  E. F. Fairbairn, Ltd., Ireland’s best chicks. Accredited eggs only at Portadown, Enniskillen, Larne, Coleraine and Belfast. Pullets are dispatched in boxes bearing the name of the firm and marked, “Pullets.”

14-4-1951.  Ederney defeat Cashel 2-2 to 1-1. For Cashel best of a well-balanced defence was Timoney, Mc Garrigle and Ferguson. Of the forwards McGovern and Maguire were always dangerous and took careful watching. Despite the inclement conditions it was a good match. Ederney’s well merited win was mainly due to a very strong defence in which Kelly making his debut in goals made some really fine saves. F. Mc Hugh at centre back, the Lunny brothers and Durnian all played a major part. The forwards made good use of their scoring chances and had in B. Mc Hugh the outstanding player afield. Mc Carron also had a good game at right full forward. Scorers Ederney, Murphy (1-1), McKervey (1-0), Cassidy (0-1). Cashel, Maguire (1-0), McGovern (0-1).

14-4-1951. Opening Announcement. Funeral Undertaking. Messrs Magee and O’Connor, Mulleek, County Fermanagh wish to announce that they are in a position to supply, coffins, shrouds, wreathes etc. Modern Dodge motor hearse. Distance no object. Charges moderate. Phone Leggs No 1 or Ballyshannon 41 (Day or Night)

14-4-1951. YP Pools. Total Dividend for Saturday 7th April £8,112-12-6. There were two winners of the First Dividend with 23 goals each.

28-4-1951. Devenish defeated Enniskillen Gaels in Enniskillen by 5-1 to 3-4. The chief player responsible was Dan Magee, former stalwart of the Gaels team.

5-5-1951. Fermanagh Senior League Tie. Belleek defeat Irvinestown by 4-7 to 0-4 dispelling the fears that Gaelic football was on the decline in the area. A feature of the game was the sparkling display given by the homesters full forward P. Cox whose hat trick of three goals surely establishes a record among Fermanagh front line attackers.

5-5-1951. Tempo calling. Tempo calling, Tempo Calling. Old customers please bring in your ration books to be registered for meat. New customers invited Hugh Tunney, Tempo Established 1879.

19-5-1951. Irvinestown defeat Belleek by 1-4 to 6 points.

9-6-1951. The last County Board meeting was largely taken up with a debate about the result of the recent match between Belleek and Irvinestown. Irvinestown said that after the match the referee said that Irvinestown had won by a point while the official report sent in said that the match was a draw. The report has been sent back to the referee.

16-6-1951.In a challenge match Pettigo defeated Bannagh by 1-4 to 1-1. A fine match played in a splendid spirit was that between Pettigo and Bannagh, at Bannagh, on Sunday, refereed by Mr. Patrick Maye. The new Bannagh team formed as a result of the enthusiasm and organisational ability of Mr. Packy Calgy is serving up splendid football and promises to be heard of soon in prominent headlines. Scorers for Bannagh were Frank Armstrong (goal), and P. Mc Gibney (point), and for Pettigo P. Gallagher (4 points), and M. Reid (goal) Gallagher and Reid were outstanding for Pettigo and Nugent brothers, Keown brothers and Calgy for Bannagh.

23-6-1951. Fermanagh Minors best against Monaghan by 2-7 to 0-7. S. Gonigle, Belleek and P. Casey, Devenish played.

23-6-1951. Very Rev. Dr. P.J. McLaughlin, Professor of Experimental Physics at Maynooth is to be the next President of the college. He is a native of Ballyshannon.

30-6-1951. After an absence of some years, Seemuldoon, one time Fermanagh County Champions, made a reappearance on the field at Ederney on Wednesday evening winning by 3-3 to 1-2. By their superb display of good football despite the difficult playing conditions due to the wet evening, the young Seemuldoon team proved themselves no mean successors of the earlier players, and capable of giving a very necessary fillip to the game in NW Fermanagh if the difficulty attending the formation of a team drawn partly from an area partly in County Fermanagh and partly in County Tyrone could be overcome.

30-6-1951. Cashelnadrea, County Fermanagh is very much in the news, reason being that electric light has come to the district. Your correspondent had the pleasure of switching on the light in the spacious premises of Mr. John Mc Gowan, Cashel House, on June 29th. Mr Mc Gowan has got the first connection but in a short time the Catholic Church, the new hall and the school will be lit up, and after that the wants of the entire district will be attended to.

30-6-1951. Death of Lady Gallagher is announced. She was the widow of Sir James Gallagher a native of Aghavanny, Kiltyclogher who became a Dublin Alderman and later Lord Mayor of Dublin. He was knighted by King Edward V11. He was apprenticed to a tobacconist and ended owning several tobacconist shops.

30-6-1951. Speaking on Monday at the annual distribution of prizes at Maynooth, Most Rev. Dr. D’Alton, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All-Ireland explained why the Hierarchy intervened in the Mother and Child Scheme.