Fermanagh Junior Football 1942.

FERMANAGH JUNIOR LEAGUE. MULLEEK’S WIN OVER CASHEL. Mulleek 6-2. Cashel 0-3. There was a good attendance at Cashel Gaelic Park on Sunday, when Cashel and Mulleek teams met in the Junior League competition. Mulleek started with a slight breeze in their favour. From the throw-in they broke away bombarding the Cashel goals, but Leonard  (the goalie) did some splendid saving. For the first ten minutes Cashel defence held good. A determined rush by Mulleek forwards resulted in a goal per H. McGauran. Despite some fine Cashel clearances, Mulleek had another major per H. McGauran. Inside of a few minutes Pat McGauran again raised the red flag for the visitors. At this stage play waxed very rough, and one of the Cashel, players had to retire owing to severe head injuries. Fisticuffs were indulged in and it was only by exercising great tact that the referee settled the fracas. In the last five minutes of this moiety Mulleek added two goals per H. McGauran and P. McCaffrey and 2 points per P. McCaffrey arid Sean McCaffrey. Half-time score Mulleek, 5 goals 2 pts.; Cashel, nil. No sooner had the game resumed than Cashel went to the attack but the Mulleek defence was impregnable. Play veered from one side to the other, and several Mulleek shots went wide. A determined Cashel rush resulted in 3 points scored in quick succession by Frank Gallagher, Alfie McGovern and P. McGee. Frayed tempers resulted in further incidents. Mulleek had the last score of the match— a goal per Sean McCaffery. Cashel had much, lighter team than Mulleek, who also showed superior training in catching and combination. Mr, J. Daly, Belleek, refereed.

DEVENISH V. DRUMAVANTY. Before a large attendance of spectators the above teams met at Drumavanty on, Sunday. The game which was one of the closest and best contests ever witnessed at Drumavanty was an exhibition of good football of high standard played in a sporting manner and spectators were kept at a pitch of excitement with not a dull, moment from the throw-in to the final whistle. The final scores were:—Drumavanty, 0 goals 6 points; Devenish, 1 goal 2 pts. Rev. Brother Gilleece, Ballyshannon, was a very efficient referee.

As a prelude to the junior game a minor match was played between Ballyshannon and Devenish, which proved very interesting. In this game Ballyshannon, who were faster and better trained than their rivals, emerged victorious by the score of 3 goals 2 points for Ballyshannon; 1 goal 3 points for Devenish. Rev. J. Burns, C.C., refereed.

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1954 January to June.

National Events.

The Flags and Emblems Act in Northern Ireland (6 April) bans interference with the Union Jack and effectively prohibits the public or private display of the tricolour
Michael Manning (aged 25) becomes the last man to be executed by the state in the Republic of Ireland: he is hanged on 20 April at Mountjoy jail, Dublin, for the murder of a nurse
General election in the Republic (18 May): a second coalition government takes office on 2 June with John A. Costello as Taoiseach
The IRA raids Gough military barracks, Armagh (12 June)
Brendan Behan’s The Quare Fellow opens at the Pike Theatre, Dublin (19 November)
A four-month bank dispute commences in the Republic (4 December)
The last issue of The Bell appears
Christy Brown’s My Left Foot is published
A record 84,856 people watch Cork beat Wexford in the All-Ireland hurling final at Croke Park

Births.

Jimmy Barry Murphy (hurler and Gaelic footballer) in Cork (22/8)
Ollie Campbell (rugby player) in Dublin (3/3)
Maud Cotter (stained-glass artist)
Síle de Valera (Fianna Fáil politician) in Dublin
Bob Geldof (rock musician, charity organizer) in Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin (5/10)
Richard Kearney (philosopher and writer) in Cork
Ger Loughnane (Clare hurler and manager)
Thomas McCarthy (poet) in Cappoquin, Co. Waterford
Kevin Moran (Dublin Gaelic footballer; Manchester United, Sporting Gijon, Blackburn Rovers and Republic of Ireland footballer) in Dublin (29/4)
Brian Mullins (Dublin Gaelic footballer) in Dublin (27/9)
Éilís Ní Dhuibhne (writer and lecturer) in Dublin
Julie O’Callaghan (poet) in Chicago
Mary O’Donnell (writer and broadcaster) in Monaghan
Dennis O’Driscoll (poet) in Thurles, Co. Tipperary
Bobby Sands (IRA member and hunger striker) in Belfast
Mikey Sheehy (Kerry Gaelic footballer) in Co. Kerry (28/7)

Deaths.

John Collins
Margaret Cousins
James Green Douglas
Denis Fahey
Henry Harrison
Elinor Price
Robert Smyllie.

Local Events.

2-1-54 Enniskillen new Fire Station, now completed, will be opened shortly. The brigade consists of 20 members under section leader Robert McCutcheon.

2-1-54 There is no need for alarm in Fermanagh says Dr. Brian Moore, Chief Medical Officer for the County, speaking about the four cases of infantile paralysis reported in Fermanagh in the past month.

2-1-54 A youth named Patrick Barron of Derryrona, Leggs PO, Belleek is in Fermanagh County Hospital suffering from head injuries suffered on Christmas Day while riding a motor cycle.

2-1-54 A Donegal youth, Johnston Morrow of Derrybrick, Clonelly was sentenced to one month imprisonment for driving a tractor while disqualified and without insurance or licence and also for obtaining a license while disqualified. He had been employed by David George Noble of Derrybrick.

9-1-54  St. Mary’s Hall, Devenish, was packed for “The Message of Fatima,” Pageant by the local school children. An enthralled audience drawn from four counties saw unfold scene by scene the wonderful miracle which shook the world only thirty six years ago. I take of my hat to Fr. Marron and his brilliant galaxy of juvenile stars and I think it only fair to hand a special bouquet to little Nuala Gilbride of Rosinver, who played the part of Our Lady of Fatima in a manner worthy of the highest commendation. The parts of the children to whom the apparition appeared were played by Bridie Neilan, Agnes Burns and M. J. Flanagan.

16-1-54 Irvinestown’s unbelievable plight to end soon. For years past they have had the water turned on for only two hours per day and only one hour in the Summer. In January they are to join up to the huge Lough Braden water network.

16-1-54 An application to have the Ballinamallard – Mossfield – Sydare closed for the annual “Enniskillen 100” motor cycle race this year was granted by Fermanagh County Council. Owing to a late application last year there was no race – the first occasion this happened since the war.

16-1-54  Lawyer and cattle dealer summonsed at Belleek as a result of accidents at a bad bend at Keenaghan, Belleek within five days of each other. The defendants were cattle dealer Maurice Leonard, Pettigo and Thomas T. Montague, LLB, Irvinestown. Leonard’s cattle lorry demolished a length of stone wall and had the front axle torn from the vehicle was fined £1 for driving without due care and 10s for not producing his insurance within five days. Evidence was given that the front tyres of the lorry were smooth. In his own defence Montague said that there was no evidence that he was driving without due care and that the skid marks and damage to the wall were just as likely to have been those caused by the lorry. Case dismissed for insufficient evidence.

16-1-54 In a sequel to a row over admission to a dance hall at Brollagh, Frederick Brock was fined £1 and bound over for a year on his own bail of £5. Sydney Brock who was trying to take his brother from the police was fined £3 for obstruction, £3 for disorderly behaviour and bound over for a year for £5. John Dolan was fined £3 for disorderly behaviour and £1 for obstruction and also bound over and Thomas Murphy was fined £1.

16-1-54 It was with regret that his many friends heard of the death of Mr. Patrick Eves, Kesh, one of the oldest and most respected residents of Kesh. Until he retired from business due to failing health he had carried on a long and successful business as a spirit merchant and farmer and had earned a fine reputation as a man of sound judgment, a good counselor and neighbour and the respect of men of all creeds.

23-1-54  Mrs Mary Mc Garrity, (49) wife of John Mc Garrity, tenant of apartments in the old Workhouse, Townhill, Irvinestown, gave her life on Friday night in an effort to save her two daughters, Josie (24) and Veronica (19) who were returning from the cinema at 11.00 when they became entangled in a live electricity cable in the darkness of an enclosed yard in front of their dwelling place. The wire had been broken in the storm. Hearing their screams their parents rushed down to help them and were aided by Samuel Gillespie, an electrician, who helped the father and two daughters get clear. Unfortunately Mrs Mc Garrity was fatally shocked and died on her way to hospital.

23-1-54  Garda William Melly, Dublin Metropolitan Police has retired after 39 year’s service from 1st January 1954. He was stationed all his time in Dublin and was attached to the Dublin District Courts for over 30 years. He served through all the troubled years in the city during his service. He was a native of Castle Caldwell, County Fermanagh.

23-1-54  It was with regret that the people of Devenish heard of the death of Mrs Ellen Feely on January 5th. She had been a member of the Total Abstinence Association since 1911.

6-2-54  Mr. S. Hernon, Secretary of Devenish GAA Club said in his report that last year was not an outstanding success although the Minor team had got to the County final only to be defeated by a very good Lisnaskea team.

13-2-54 The Annual Fermanagh County GAA Convention was held in Enniskillen on the last Sunday in January with 74 delegates present, the greatest ever number. Not counted were Mr. Denis Hogan and Denis Leonard of the newly formed Knocks club who were not allowed to vote since their team did not compete in the last championship in 1953. All three nominees for chairman were unwilling to put their names forward but this was not accepted and Mr. Thomas Campbell, Belleek, was retained in office for a fourth time. The most far-reaching motion to be decided was to reduce the number of players on Senior teams from 15 to 13. This probably suits most Fermanagh pitches better and should lead to a more open brand of football.

27-2-54 Lack Farmer, 54 year old, Francis Mc Cusker, Largy, Lack, was killed while loading trees on to a lorry from an embankment on his farm. A verdict of accidental death was returned at the inquest. He was a brother of Nurse McCusker, Ederney.

27-2-54 Regret has been occasioned by the death of Mrs F. Campbell, wife of Mr. Francis Campbell, Aghoo, Devenish, after a long illness.

6-3-54 A fine of £3 was imposed on Bernard Mc Kenna, Ardees, Roscor, Belleek for stealing an Exide battery from a motor cycle parked at Mahoo. District Inspector Wolseley said that the defendant had previously been convicted of stealing cattle.

6-3-54 The Belleek V Enniskillen Gaels football match was abandoned at half time due to snow with the score Belleek 0-4, Enniskillen 0-1.

6-3-54  Death of Leitrim-Born Christian Brother, founder of Australia’s Boy’s Town. Regret is felt in Kiltyclogher and district by the death of Rev. Bro. Paul Francis Keaney, which occurred suddenly at his Christian Brothers College, Perth, Australia last Friday, 28th February. Known all over the great Australian Continent as the founder of Australia’s Boy’s Town and beloved for his charity and kindness towards the flotsam and jetsam of humanity with whom his social activities brought him into contact. His death is mourned by hundreds of orphaned and abandoned boys who owing to Br Paul’s noble work are today happy and prosperous citizens.  He was born on a small farm at Corraleskin, Kiltyclogher in 1888 he was one of a family of nine of whom seven still survive. He joined the RIC in 1909 and served two years before emigrating. He received the OBE in the Coronation honours list. When he decided recently to return to Ireland after an absence of 42 years he was presented with a cheque for £1,500 by the Australian Prime Minister, Mr. Menzies, on behalf of a group of businessmen as a tribute to his services. However his return to Ireland was not to be. (Another view from the Internet)

Brother Kearney, of Bindoon notoriety, was a saint to the Catholic Church and a monster to the boys placed in his “care”. The Catholic Church erected a huge statue of him at Bindoon. In a case of typical Aussie larrikinism, former boys at the Home knocked its head off one day. Reports indicate that they were observed attempting to use it as a football.

One of the six Royal Commissioners, former Senator for Western Australia, Andrew Murray, once described Kearney as “a sadist who indulged in criminal assault and who knowingly protected rings of predatory Brothers engaged in systemic, long-term sexual assault on defenceless children (Hansard 2001, p.27275 – Matter of Public Interest). Presumably, Mr. Murray will be eager to revisit the matter during the course of the Royal Commission.

Former inmates of Bindoon also pull no punches with regard to “The Orphans’ Friend” (as the plaque on his statue reads) Kearney, an abuser who stood 6ft. tall and weighed 17 stone. Laurie Humphreys says that “I guess you could call him a sadist”. John Hennessy, also from Bindoon, speaks with a stutter which he says is a legacy of being stripped naked and publicly flogged by Kearney. He notes that “At Bindoon, the threat of violence was ever present. The Brothers carried a strap consisting of leather stitched together and a metal weight.”

In a glowing tribute to Kearney, even the Christian Brothers had to acknowledge that “Conversely, some former inmates remember him as a brutal disciplinarian with an ungovernable temper, who neglected their education, exploited their labour and turned a blind eye to sexual abuse of them by other members of the staff.” Note the use of “some” rather than “all” in that statement. The paragraph concludes, for some reason, with the statement that “An enthusiast, Keaney was easily depressed by criticism.”

The 2001 Australian Senate Community Affairs and References Committee Report, titled “Lost Innocents: Righting the Record – Report on Child Migration”, detailed evidence which revealed the “depraved, violent and abusive nature” of Brother Keaney and his role in the “systematic abuse of children under his care”. In submissions to the Committee report, individuals who had been abused by Keaney described his brutality; “I lost my teeth at Bindoon – my face kicked repeatedly by Brother Keaney”. Similarly – “Br. Keaney was a very sadistic, perverted and deviant paedophile. He abused many of the boys… in his care. Tragically, there was just no one that we victims could go to for help. Who would have believed us anyway?”

Another former Bindoon resident stated that “The Christian Brothers used to walk around with a thick 18in leather strap hanging from the waist of their long, black outfits, and they’d give you a wallop at the slightest opportunity. They’d hit you wherever they could – be it on the backside or sole of the foot – and boy, did it hurt. Once I was on the receiving end of a real hiding from one of them. He was giving a younger lad a hard time and I must have said something under my breath. He lashed out with his strap and put in his boot. I ended up cowering under my bed, trying to escape him, and was left covered in bruises.”

Yet another noted that “He liked to prod us with a walking stick, and was one of the cruelest people I’ve ever met.”

A secret church report about Christian Brothers’ institutions such as Bindoon in Western Australia from the mid-30s right up to the mid-60s refers to:

  • brothers who were “odd or mentally unstable”,
  • of a “sex underworld”
  • of brothers who “shared boys” for sexual purposes
  • and that often the church hierarchy knew of the abuse and did nothing about it.

Kearney’s Bindoon was billed as an educational institution, but as one former resident claimed, “There was no teaching at Bindoon, and I know of several former inmates who still cannot read or write.” Another reported that “there wasn’t much in the way of schooling. I’d always been good at school in England but it pretty much ended overnight. A lot of the boys at Bindoon never learnt how to read or write.”

A CBS Television documentary aired in the U.S. claimed that, at Bindoon, “The priority was construction. Brother Francis Keaney, an imposing, white-haired Irishman who ran the place, was obsessed with building the largest Catholic institution in Western Australia. He used his charges as labor. From sunrise to sunset, the boys built Brother Keaney’s shrine, with no shoes, and no questions asked.”

When the Christian Brothers arrived in 1939 with the first group of seven boy labourers, the only building on the property was a mud-brick homestead which became their home. After the work of a generation of boys, the facility is grandiose and has been listed by the West Australian Government as a heritage-listed property.  The “Statement of Significance” refers to “The design, use of local materials, use of child labour, relationships of the buildings, and period during which they were constructed, make the places exceptionally significant, both individually and in their precinct setting. The place has an exceptional ‘sense of place’ for the ‘boys’, and their families.”

When Kearney arrived in 1940, with another eight boys, foundations were dug and one wing of the first building, the dormitory block now known as Edmund House, was officially opened by 1941. Most of the building work was completed by 1953. During construction, two boys died in accidents and a third died from an undefined cause. They are buried in simple graves on the site, while Br. Kearney’s grave has a large marble headstone, and, of course, a (headless) statue.

Not only did Kearney use forced child labour to build his edifice, he treated the boys badly in ways other than sexual abuse and violence. One of his slaves remembered that, on arrival, “We were immediately put to work. I learnt how to milk a cow within a week, and then we began constructing a new building. By the time I was 14, I was driving a truck. We’d work, sleep and eat. That was it.”

He also reported that “We slept on open verandas all-year round – and when a wind blew up, it got pretty cold. Foodwise, we’d get crushed wheat or porridge for breakfast, followed by bread in dripping (cow fat). The rest of the meals were similarly plain: we seemed to subsist on a diet of swedes and turnips.”

For his efforts, Kearney received Imperial Honours awards, known as an MBE and ISO. Despite all of the evidence of his unworthiness for such prestigious awards, attempts by many people to have the awards rescinded have, so far, been unsuccessful.

6-3-54 A Chemist Shop is now open at Mill Street, Pettigo under the management of M. T. Egan, M.P.S.I.

13-3-54 During the weekend telephone engineers started to erect telephone poles from Pettigo village to Tievemore Post Office where a Post Office telephone is being installed.

27-3-54 The Belleek Erne Drainage Strike over the sacking of a fitter who complained about their conditions of employment especially at the Marion crane at which he worked.

27-3-54 Devenish Pioneer Social on Sunday last in St. Mary’s Hall was a great success. The Sligo Pantomime Players provided the entertainment. Rev. Fr. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo was the guest of honour and was welcomed by Rev. Canon Coyle, a member of the Association for 33 years. The Association was first set up in the parish in 1945 and three Councils were established at Cashel, Toura and Devenish. The parish now has 242 Pioneers and 105 probationers and the juvenile section is being especially catered for in the schools.

27-3-54 The residents of Pettigo village and district deeply regret the transfer of Sergeant M. J. Mc Donagh, Garda Siochana, from Pettigo to Newtowncunningham during the week. Sergeant Mc Donagh was a very popular member of the Garda and for his brief stay in Pettigo village had endeared himself to everyone. Of a retiring disposition he was genial and had a most efficient manner in the discharge of his various duties. During his term as Sergeant in charge of Pettigo Garda Station lawlessness had completely disappeared in the area.

27-3-54 During blasting operations in a quarry at Cashelinney a small piece of rock from the quarry travelled 500 yards landing on the roof of Lettercran School and broke a few slates.

3-4-54 The opening of the Adelphi Cinema, Irvinestown on April 5th with the first film “Ivanhoe” with Robert and Elizabeth Taylor. Telephone Irvinestown 242.

3-4-54  Donegal defeat Fermanagh at Glenties. The ex-Fermanagh player Matt Regan (Belleek) was in sparkling form against his old colleagues. Many strange decisions by the referee almost led to the Fermanagh team leaving the field on several occasions in the second half. Sean Gonigle (Belleek) was the best player on the Fermanagh team.

17-4-54 Garrison man, Thomas Murphy, of Knockaraven, was fined £2 for assaulting another youth, Walter George Carson on March 14th. Murphy had caught hold of Carson’s bicycle by the carrier and bounced it up and down several times.

17-4-54 Very Rev. E. Canon Coyle, PP, Devenish paid tribute to the Anti-Partition League after an anti-Partition film show, concert and meeting in St., Mary’s Hall, Devenish on Sunday night. After thanking the speakers, Mr. Cahir Healy and P. J. O’Hare he said, “No other movement is doing anything only talking.”

24-4-54 Junior Football League – Holywell 2-11 – Devenish 1-7.

24-4-54 Garrison Publican, Patrick Casey, of Casey’s Hotel, was fined £1 for allowing the consumption of intoxicating drink on his licensed premises and his wife Margaret was fined £1 for aiding and abetting. Four persons found on the premises were each found 8 shillings. They had drink on the counter in front of them when the police entered at 10.00 p.m.

24-4-54 The O’Donnell Rally opens in Ballyshannon with glorious weather for a memorable occasion. It was attended by Mr. Aiken, Minister of External Affairs, Count O’Donnell and The O’Donnell.

24-4-54 Ballyshannon Notes. The town was gaily decorated with flags and bunting during the Easter weekend. This was to celebrate the opening of An Tostal and the O’Donnell Clan Rally. The Power House was illuminated with bright yellow lights, and viewed from the bridge, was an inspiring sight.

1-5-54 On Friday morning when travelling to her place of employment at Waterfoot, Pettigo, Miss Maggie Mc Caffrey, Mullinagoad, heard a fox barking and on investigation found a young fox which she promptly killed with a stick from the roadside.

1-5-54 Tievemore Post Office was on Thursday officially opened as a telephone call office.

1-5-54 The cuckoo was heard for the first time in the Pettigo area during the weekend, and also the corncrake, which is late compared with previous years.

1-5-54 The “Robe” at the Regal Cinema, Enniskillen. Enniskillen is this week enjoying its most stupendous cinematic treat. And when I say “stupendous” I know I am employing one of the superlatives that Hollywood blurbs have largely made meaningless. But using it with a due sense of proportion, one can only say of the magnificent drama, “The Robe” brought to the Regal, Enniskillen this week, in the new screen medium, cinemascope, that it is a stupendous achievement. Many feel that a wonderful religious performance like “The Robe” should finish only with a suitable religious air at the conclusion. There are three performances daily – Balcony 2/-, stalls 1/-.

1-5-54 In the Junior League Derrygonnelly defeated Devenish by 3-3 to 1-2. Devenish had a grand full back in J. Mulrone, who gave a sound display while others to impress were P. Keown, R, Mc Dermott and J. Treacy.

8-5-54 Enniskillen Unionist majority on the Town Improvements Committee which has Council powers in the allocation of houses voted to give four new Council houses in Derrychara to Protestants. This makes a total of 77 houses let at Derrychara, all to Protestants. There are 18 left to be let.

8-5-54 On Wednesday morning the wedding took place at St. Patrick’s Church Belleek of Mr. George Johnston, Pettigo and Miss Molly Monaghan, daughter of Mr and Mrs Edward Monaghan, Aghafoy, Pettigo. Mr. Edward Monaghan, brother of the bride was best man and Miss Mona Flood, “The Hotel” Pettigo was bridesmaid. Afterwards the happy couple set off for Bundoran for their honeymoon.

8-5-54 The wedding took place of Mr. John J. McGurl, Farrancassidy and Miss Maureen Doogan, Corry, Belleek.

8-5-54 The death is reported of Mr. John Dolan, Drumnasrene who was one of the most respected residents of Devenish Parish.

15-5-54 Ballyshannon’s new GAA Park opens with a Donegal win over Armagh in a challenge game.

5-6-54  The death is announced of Mr. James Maguire, Seemuldoon, building contractor, responsible for the erection (and of the design) of many fine schools, halls, churches and buildings. He had erected the curates house and Ederney Hall in his own parish.

5-6-54 A 22 mile dash by Enniskillen fire brigade saved the world-famous Belleek Pottery from possible destruction on Sunday. They reached Belleek in a record time of half an hour. Workmen and others, including police under Sergeant John Mc Michael, formed a bucket chain which confined the flames to a limited area of the kiln polishing room where the outbreak started. Fire fighting units from Ballyshannon also attended the blaze and Customs formalities were waived as they crossed the Border.

12-6-54 By attaching a wooden frame behind his motorbike, Mr. John O’Connor, Mulleek, was able to “top” two acres of potato drills in a few hours. When done by hand this usually took several days. Miss Rita Dolan, a nurse, of Killybig, Garison, was fined £2 for allowing a juvenile to drive her car without being properly licensed, and covered by the insurance, and she was disqualified for driving for a year. The RM suggested an early application be made to the court for the removal of the disqualification on Miss Dolan.

19-6-54  Daring Raid on Armagh military barracks. Fifteen khaki-clad men seize 700 guns from the Armory. Officers held up at pistol point.

19-6-54 For the second time in a fortnight the River Erne between Belleek and Roscor will be drained of all water.

19-6-54  Juvenile Football League. Ederney’s Grand Win over Gaels by 4-13 to 1-1. Ederney proved to be far too good for Gaels Juveniles. It was a pleasure to watch the Ederney team and especially their grand nippy forwards with their well-worked and constructive moves, and their beautiful finishing. Practice, training and constructive coaching were apparent in every movement. All were splendid but M. Maguire, Joe Turner, J. Moohan and especially A. Mc Grath, a grand little player with a great “pick-up” and a delightful body swerve merit special mention. J Wylie, N. McClurg, H. Herbert, V. Henderson and Nolan in goals were best for Gaels.

19-6-54  Mr E. Thompson, Castle Caldwell had a narrow escape from injury when, swerving to avoid an auto-cyclist, his car mounted a ditch and overturned. After treatment for injuries he was able to resume his journey in a friend’s car.

19-6-54 Senior Football Championship. Enniskillen Gaels qualified for the Divisional Final with a narrow victory over Ederney by 4-2 to 3-4. Best for Ederney were Jim Eves, B. Sheridan, B. Mc Hugh and the McKervey brothers. The stewards had the excellent idea of clearing the goal lines before the game started, thus leaving the two umpires at each goals free to carry out their duties more efficiently. Referee Mr. Bill Thompson.

26-6-54 In the league Irvinestown 1-4, Belleek 1-4. Best for the home team were O’Hanlon, Charlton, McGrory, Lennon (Joe who played for Down) Mahon, Maguire and Hegarty. The visitors were well served by McCann, Gonigle, Rooney, and Tinney. The match was refereed by Fr. Tom Marron, Ederney.

26-6-54  On next Sunday, June 27th, Pettigo village will be en fete for the annual Memorial celebrations which it is hoped will be a success. There will be a fancy dress parade led by Ederney and Irvinestown Bands to the new Memorial Park, where many football teams will compete for the Memorial Cup.

26-6-54 Irvinestown mid-week Tournament, 13-a-side for wristlet watches valued at £120 at St., Molaise Park, Irvinestown. Fixtures include Pettigo V Derrygonnelly Thursday 24th June and Trillick V Ederney Thursday 22nd July.

1951 to June. National & International.

 

The Northern and Southern governments agree on the running of the Great Northern Railway (9 January)
Ian Paisley co-founds the Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster (11 March)
On 23 March, Shannon Airport is the base for a rescue operation after a USAF C124 aircraft crashes into the sea – some wreckage is found 450 miles off the west coast, but all 53 people on board are lost
The Catholic hierarchy condemns the ‘Mother and Child’ scheme (4 April); Dr Noel Browne, Minister for Health, resigns; the scheme is abandoned on 6 April
A census (8 April) shows the population of the Republic to be 2,960,593; that of Northern Ireland on the same day is 1,370,921
The first demonstration of television in Ireland is held at the Spring Show in the RDS, Dublin (30 April)
The Arts Council is founded in the Republic (8 May)
Fianna Fáil regains power in a general election (30 May); Eamon de Valera becomes Taoiseach on 13 June
The Abbey Theatre, Dublin is destroyed by fire (18 July)
Ernest Walton of Trinity College Dublin is jointly awarded the Nobel prize for physics with Sir John Cockcroft
Liam and Josephine Miller found the Dolmen Press
T. J. Walsh establishes the Wexford Opera Festival
Samuel Beckett’s novels Molloy and Malone Dies, and Sam Hanna Bell’s novel December Bride, are published.

Births

Bertie Ahern (Fianna Fáil leader and Taoiseach) in Dublin
John Buckley (composer and teacher) in Co. Limerick
Dana (pseudonym of Rosemary Brown, singer) in Derry/Londonderry (30/8)
Peter Fallon (poet, founder of Gallery Press) in Osnabrück, Germany
Bill Graham (rock journalist and author) in Belfast (29/8)
Fred Johnston (poet and novelist) in Belfast
Paul McGuinness (manager of U2) near Hanover
Brian Maguire (painter) in Wicklow
Patrick Mason (theatre director)
John O’Keeffe (Kerry Gaelic footballer) (15/4)
Alan Shatter (Fine Gael politician) in Dublin (14/2)
Niall Stokes (founder and publisher of Hot Press magazine) in Dublin.

Deaths

Sir James Andrews
Daisy Bates
Joseph Warwick Bigger
Peter Cheyney
Joseph Chifley
Sir Ernest Clark
Louis D’Alton
Aodh de Blacam
George Gavan Duffy
Robert Flaherty
M. J. MacManus
Henry de Vere Stackpoole.

Local Events

13-1-1951. Death of Mr. Patrick Magee, Garrison, at an advanced age. Very Rev. Canon Coyle officiated.

27-1-1951. Sympathy is extended from the residents of his native Grouselodge to the brothers and relatives and to the clergy of the Diocese of Clogher on the death of the Very Rev. Denis Canon Mc Grath, P.P. of Bundoran last week. The late Canon Mc Grath was beloved by the people of Grouselodge in which townland he was born and reared.

3-2-1951. “You have often passed through a Woolworth store and marvelled how such a large staff can be maintained and goods sold so cheaply – or apparently so. In 1950 the firm set a new profit record of £5,355, 272.

3-2-1951. Much debate was occasioned at the County GAA Convention on the state of Gaelic Park and criticism of Enniskillen Gaels re state of Gaelic Games in the town and especially the Enniskillen pitch. Mr Jim Brady of Enniskillen excused the unplayable state of the pitch on account of a circus having been there for some time or perhaps because of the rising level of water from the adjoining Erne. Mr. Fee, County Secretary interjected, “It was because it was full of holes.” Mr. Fee welcomed the re-affiliation of Ederney and Kinawley to the association.

3-2-1951. Omagh man Mr. Maurice J. Hackett of Kevlin Road, Omagh, has bought six occupied dwelling houses at Prospect Terrace, Omagh for £80. The price represents the most astonishing bargain in house property. The former owner was Miss Louisa Crawford, Omagh.

3-2-1951. Enniskillen grocers request their customers to bring shopping baskets with them for general groceries, bread etc. and containers for potatoes owing to the increased cost of wrapping paper, paper bags and twine. Co-operation in this matter is urgently requested.

17-2-1951. The oldest inhabitant of Devenish has passed away in the person of James Mc Grath, 96, Rogagh, Cashelnadrea whose death occurred on Friday last. Also the death of Thomas Melaniphy, Frevagh, Devenish and of Mrs. M. Cassidy, wife of Mr. Michael Cassidy, Rossinuremore.

17-2-1951. Wedding bells for Tracey and Kelly at the Cathedral, Sligo. Miss Agnes Tracey, “Woodvale,” Kilcoo, Garrison to Gerald Kelly, Kiltimagh, County Mayo.

17-2-1951. Customs Fines at Belleek. Michael Ferguson, Drumbadreevagh, prosecuted for having in his possession a smuggled bicycle. He claimed he had got the bicycle from his brother-in law, Michael Gallagher, Rockfield, Ballyshannon to go to work on the Erne Scheme.

10-3-1951. An Ellen Donohue was fined £5 at Derrylin Court for concealment of 9 turkeys. She was suspected of having smuggled then by boat across a border river as tracks led from the river to the house of a friend.

10-3-1951. The death is announced of ex-senator John Mc Hugh of Pettigo at the venerable age of 92. He was chairman of Fermanagh Council from its inception in 1898 until it was dissolved by the Six County Government in 1922. He was one of two Nationalist M. Ps for County Fermanagh until the “gerrymander” of 1929 rearranged the boundaries to give two Unionist and one Nationalist M.P for a county which had a Nationalist majority.

10-3-1951. Lord Bishop of Clogher on the dangers of the Dance Craze. He wants amusements curtailed and the closing of all halls by midnight. He made a special appeal for prayer especially the Rosary.

17-3-1951.  Rabbits are not pests on Sunday. With an all-out war being waged on the rabbit pest it is, nevertheless, an offence in the Six Counties to kill rabbits on a Sunday. This was made very clear at Rathfriland Court when Patrick Travers, Lassize, was fined 10 shillings for the offence, and Kevin Travers, Lurgancahone, fined 20 shillings for using a net, “to kill rabbits on a Sunday.”

24-3-1951. Death of Master Ted Feely, Knockaraven, Garrison, aged 9. His coffin was carried on the shoulders of his classmates to his last resting place.

24-3-1951. Death of Mrs Maguire, ex-PT, Corgra House, Belleek. She retired last December after 44 years of service in Cornahilta School. Unfortunately she has passed away before the presentation organised for her by the local people. Two of her daughters are Sisters of Mercy.

31-3-1951. Tempo had an unexpected victory over Belleek in the Senior League by 2-5 to 1-4.

31-3-1951. The Ulster Farmer’s mart in Enniskillen celebrates its first birthday. Initially there were grave doubts in the minds of farmers as to whether the weekly sales would be a success but their fears proved unfounded. During the past 12 months 27,776 animals and total receipts for the period amounted to £672,147. The Farmers’ Mart Co. had helped put Fermanagh on the map as a centre for cattle sales.

7-4-1951. Fermanagh defeated in the Ulster Junior Championship by Donegal by 2-12 to 0-4.

14-4-1951. Death of Mr. John Flanagan, Glen West, Devenish. He had a long and trying illness.

14-4-1951. Derry defeat Fermanagh in the Dr. Mc Kenna Cup by 3-11 to 2-5. Playing for Fermanagh were M. McGurren, M. Regan, and J. Connors of Belleek.

14-4-1951.  E. F. Fairbairn, Ltd., Ireland’s best chicks. Accredited eggs only at Portadown, Enniskillen, Larne, Coleraine and Belfast. Pullets are dispatched in boxes bearing the name of the firm and marked, “Pullets.”

14-4-1951.  Ederney defeat Cashel 2-2 to 1-1. For Cashel best of a well-balanced defence was Timoney, Mc Garrigle and Ferguson. Of the forwards McGovern and Maguire were always dangerous and took careful watching. Despite the inclement conditions it was a good match. Ederney’s well merited win was mainly due to a very strong defence in which Kelly making his debut in goals made some really fine saves. F. Mc Hugh at centre back, the Lunny brothers and Durnian all played a major part. The forwards made good use of their scoring chances and had in B. Mc Hugh the outstanding player afield. Mc Carron also had a good game at right full forward. Scorers Ederney, Murphy (1-1), McKervey (1-0), Cassidy (0-1). Cashel, Maguire (1-0), McGovern (0-1).

14-4-1951. Opening Announcement. Funeral Undertaking. Messrs Magee and O’Connor, Mulleek, County Fermanagh wish to announce that they are in a position to supply, coffins, shrouds, wreathes etc. Modern Dodge motor hearse. Distance no object. Charges moderate. Phone Leggs No 1 or Ballyshannon 41 (Day or Night)

14-4-1951. YP Pools. Total Dividend for Saturday 7th April £8,112-12-6. There were two winners of the First Dividend with 23 goals each.

28-4-1951. Devenish defeated Enniskillen Gaels in Enniskillen by 5-1 to 3-4. The chief player responsible was Dan Magee, former stalwart of the Gaels team.

5-5-1951. Fermanagh Senior League Tie. Belleek defeat Irvinestown by 4-7 to 0-4 dispelling the fears that Gaelic football was on the decline in the area. A feature of the game was the sparkling display given by the homesters full forward P. Cox whose hat trick of three goals surely establishes a record among Fermanagh front line attackers.

5-5-1951. Tempo calling. Tempo calling, Tempo Calling. Old customers please bring in your ration books to be registered for meat. New customers invited Hugh Tunney, Tempo Established 1879.

19-5-1951. Irvinestown defeat Belleek by 1-4 to 6 points.

9-6-1951. The last County Board meeting was largely taken up with a debate about the result of the recent match between Belleek and Irvinestown. Irvinestown said that after the match the referee said that Irvinestown had won by a point while the official report sent in said that the match was a draw. The report has been sent back to the referee.

16-6-1951.In a challenge match Pettigo defeated Bannagh by 1-4 to 1-1. A fine match played in a splendid spirit was that between Pettigo and Bannagh, at Bannagh, on Sunday, refereed by Mr. Patrick Maye. The new Bannagh team formed as a result of the enthusiasm and organisational ability of Mr. Packy Calgy is serving up splendid football and promises to be heard of soon in prominent headlines. Scorers for Bannagh were Frank Armstrong (goal), and P. Mc Gibney (point), and for Pettigo P. Gallagher (4 points), and M. Reid (goal) Gallagher and Reid were outstanding for Pettigo and Nugent brothers, Keown brothers and Calgy for Bannagh.

23-6-1951. Fermanagh Minors best against Monaghan by 2-7 to 0-7. S. Gonigle, Belleek and P. Casey, Devenish played.

23-6-1951. Very Rev. Dr. P.J. McLaughlin, Professor of Experimental Physics at Maynooth is to be the next President of the college. He is a native of Ballyshannon.

30-6-1951. After an absence of some years, Seemuldoon, one time Fermanagh County Champions, made a reappearance on the field at Ederney on Wednesday evening winning by 3-3 to 1-2. By their superb display of good football despite the difficult playing conditions due to the wet evening, the young Seemuldoon team proved themselves no mean successors of the earlier players, and capable of giving a very necessary fillip to the game in NW Fermanagh if the difficulty attending the formation of a team drawn partly from an area partly in County Fermanagh and partly in County Tyrone could be overcome.

30-6-1951. Cashelnadrea, County Fermanagh is very much in the news, reason being that electric light has come to the district. Your correspondent had the pleasure of switching on the light in the spacious premises of Mr. John Mc Gowan, Cashel House, on June 29th. Mr Mc Gowan has got the first connection but in a short time the Catholic Church, the new hall and the school will be lit up, and after that the wants of the entire district will be attended to.

30-6-1951. Death of Lady Gallagher is announced. She was the widow of Sir James Gallagher a native of Aghavanny, Kiltyclogher who became a Dublin Alderman and later Lord Mayor of Dublin. He was knighted by King Edward V11. He was apprenticed to a tobacconist and ended owning several tobacconist shops.

30-6-1951. Speaking on Monday at the annual distribution of prizes at Maynooth, Most Rev. Dr. D’Alton, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All-Ireland explained why the Hierarchy intervened in the Mother and Child Scheme.

1950 May to August.

6-5-1950. Advertisement – For Springtime – Rabbit dishes. Delicately appetising for warmer days, rabbit is really nourishing too. Easy to get now, inexpensive, and one rabbit gives big helpings for four to six people. Here is an easy to do suggestion. Rabbit stew: With a little bacon, a touch of onion, seasoning to taste, and cooked, dried or canned peas added before serving.

6-5-1950. Advertisement. Have you got your new Ration Book? Some people haven’t got their new Ration Books yet! Are you one of these? If so don’t leave it any longer. Get your new book right away please – you will need it from 21st May.

6-5-1950. Devenish girl, Miss Bridget Agnes Feely of Glen West, Garrison, receives the holy habit at Franciscan Hope Castle, Castleblayney, County Monaghan. Her sister is a member of the Little Sisters of the Poor in France.

6-5-1950. Widespread sympathy has been evoked in Dromore, County Tyrone and Mulleek, County Fermanagh by the sudden demise due to a railway accident at an early age of Patrick O’Connor, Garvary, Leggs, County Fermanagh. He was secretary and playing member of Mulleek and a member of the Mulleek branch of the Anti-Partition League. His loss to the community is a great one but greatest of all to his sorrowing mother, brothers and sister.

13-5-1950.  Cashel and Ederney draw. Ederney travelled to Cashel on Sunday last to fulfil their Junior League fixture. This was Ederney’s first appearance in Fermanagh fixtures from 1947. Considering that this is practically a new look team Ederney gave a grand display to hold Cashel to a draw. The final score was Cashel 3-3, Ederney 2-6. The scorers for Cashel were Tracey, Leonard, Gallagher and Mc Laughlin and for Ederney, Monaghan, Mc Hugh, Murphy, Maguire and Lunny.

13-5-1950. Fermanagh Woman’s tragic fate at Bundoran. Inquest verdict of accidental death. The body of Mrs Ellen Hennessy sister of Charles Reilly of Drumbinnis, Kinawley was found on the rocks of Rogey, Bundoran.

13-5-1950. Harnessing the Erne for Hydro-Electrification. Dublin and Belfast agree on joint plan to drain Lough Erne Area. The total cost of both schemes will be £1,090,000 of which the government of the Republic will pay £750,000 and the Six Counties £350,000. The river will be deepened from Roscor to Belleek where a new bridge will be built. The new river channel will have a capacity of 660,000 cubic feet per minute. The prospect of hydro-electrification of Donegal are now very bright. This may mean that not a single area in the scattered county will be omitted from the benefits of rural electrification.

20-5-1950. The change over from hand passing to boxing the ball has caused some players a lot of difficulty. At one match on the first Sunday in May, it was amusing to watch the despairing gestures of one player who realised that little bit too late that flicked passes were banned. He was not so resourceful as his colleague who erred against the new rule, but carried on as if everything were normal and scored a goal. He was lucky the referee (who shall be nameless) had forgotten also.

20-5-1950. Until recently only one Fermanagh referee has been entrusted with a whistle outside the county, Jimmy Kelly, Farnamullan, Lisbellaw. Lately Ederney’s popular Johnny Monaghan’s worth has been recognised and his name is down several times in this year’s inter-county fixture list.

27-5-1950. Green is definitely first choice with Fermanagh teams when choosing jerseys. All four teams in Division A of the Junior League favoured the National colour, Cashel’s jersey having a white stripe added, while Derrygonnelly, Ederney and Devenish sported green and orange. The similarity of the jerseys caused great confusion in all the matches in this division. Derrygonnelly have now secured a new outfit which, as far as it can be ascertained will clash with no other club’s colours.

10-6-1950. Fatal Ballyshannon Shooting Accident. Seamus Gordon, a 25 year old fitter’s helper of the Abbey, Ballyshannon was the victim of a tragic shooting affair when the rifle he was carrying on a fox hunting expedition went off, apparently as he was crossing a stone ditch and the bullet entered his head.

1-7-1950. Early on Sunday morning the Russian sponsored North Korean Government invaded South Korea following a declaration of war. On Tuesday President Truman ordered US air and naval forces into action into Korea and instructed the Seventh Fleet to prevent any attack on Formosa.

8-7-1950. Belleek Young Emmetts per Mr. T. Campbell have subscribed £35 to the County Minor Training. Contingents of players arrived in Irvinestown on Monday and Tuesday to begin training under the famous Cavan footballer, Tony Tighe. On Monday night the boys were provided with a cinema entertainment in Irvinestown.

1-7-1950. Fermanagh Minors for the next round of the Championship defeating Tyrone by 1-1 to 3 points. Throne had appealed the match on the grounds that Billy Charlton of Fermanagh had taken a penalty which struck the crossbar and he had collected the rebound and scored a goal. Tyrone appealed to the Ulster Council and quoted the rule that another player had to touch the ball before the taker could play it again. The appeal was turned down. This was the only part of the meeting conducted in English the rest being in Irish.

15-7-1950. Cashel Annual Sports held were attended by almost 1,000 people. In the match between Cashelnadrea and Kiltyclogher the ball was thrown in by the newly ordained Fr. Sean McKeaney, OMI.

15-7-1950. Fermanagh Minors train for Ulster Minor Championship v Armagh. Under Tony Tighe, trainer and Malachy Mahon assistant the boys are going through a thorough training programme which fills their days and which is having many obviously good effects. Accommodated on 22 beds in St. Molaise Hall they have a portable wireless set and a gramophone and at their disposal two billiard tables. Rising daily at 7.30 am the boys have a cup of tea and a couple of miles walk before breakfast at 9.00. They have physical exercises, ball practice and tactics before having a light lunch at 1.30. Between then and 4.30 when they have a cup of tea they have more ball practice, tactics, and a football match between fifteen of the players and the remainder strengthened by local St. Molaise players. Finally they have after tea, physical training, long distance running and sprinting, followed by a mile walk and then before 10 o’clock to bed.

15-7-1950. Newly ordained Garrison priest at Oblate College, Piltown, County Kilkenny, Rev John J McKeaney. Son of Michael McKeaney, Scribbagh, Garrison and the late Mrs McKeaney. He has two sisters nuns.

22-7-1950. Death of Mrs Mary Quinn, Teebunion, Cashel on June 30th, 1950.

22-7-1950. Fermanagh heavily defeated by Armagh 5-5 to 4 points in the Ulster Minor Championship. Sean Gonnigle of Belleek on the team, John Maguire of Ederney and Pat Casey of Garrison.

22-7-1950. Kesh Bank cashier gets four years. Samuel H. Henderson of the Belfast Banking Company, Kesh, aged 47 married with one child pleaded guilty to stealing c £9000. He had been a faultless employee for 30 years and will lose a pension of £500 p.a. He had been asked to reduce his overdraft by the bank and turned to moneylenders to do this and then to gambling money from accounts in sums of £40 and £50 on football pools. His local stature was such that when he was bailed his bailsmen were people from whose accounts he had taken money.

29-7-1950. Armagh wins first Ulster Senior GAA title for 47 years to record their third victory. They beat Cavan.

12-8-1950. Belleek Man Sells a Rat – Mr. Bill Thornton, Belleek, who lives alone in a house with about 30 rats, sold one a few days ago to an Omagh publican for 8/6. So enamoured was the customer with his bargain that he paid a second visit to Mr. Thornton to make a second purchase, but Mr. Thornton refused to part with another of his pets. Mr. Thornton feeds the rats and looks after them as people do of more normal pets. They swarm around him at feeding time and he can fondle them and handle them without the slightest danger of being bitten.

12-8-1950. The new teams of 1950, Ederney, Cashel and Kinawley are engaged in a special competition for new teams. The trophy for this competition will be the old Championship cup which is being replaced as Senior Championship trophy for the county by the beautiful Gold Cup presented to the Fermanagh GAA by the Fermanagh Men’s Association in New York.

12-8-1950. Tommy Gallagher, Belleek, who emigrated last week, was one of the best men of the New York team that conquered Cavan recently at Croke Park and won the National League. At centre full he had the measure of O’Donoghue and Mick Higgins and completely subdued both. This played a big part in the victory.

12-8-1950. Trout fishing on Lough Melvin. Trout fishing has vastly improved on Lough Melvin as a result of the recent heavy rains and consequent flooding of rivers. Professor Marshall of Derry caught 21 trout in a few hours fishing during the weekend and had catches of 16 and 17 trout last week. Other anglers had catches of a dozen each.

 

Fermanagh Times December 2nd 1915.  PEACE.  ENNISKILLEN PRESBYTERIAN DIFFERENCES SETTLED.  HAPPY ENDING TO THEIR QUARREL.  We are extremely pleased to be able to announce that the differences which arose in the Enniskillen Presbyterian Church over the appointment of a successor to the late Rev. S. C. Mitchell have been amicably settled and the congregation will consequently now revert to its former strength, which was seriously depleted by the abstention from attendance of the dissenting members, who numbered one third of the whole.

Throughout the entire controversy, which has now existed for some months, the Fermanagh Times was the only newspaper in the County which give a true or correct report of the state of things actually existing and was the only newspaper to urge on every possible occasion a reconciliation between the opposing factions.  Happily this has now come about, and the final proceedings at which this happy ending of the trouble was reached justified in every detail the attitude adopted by us from the beginning.  The matter came before a meeting of the Clogher Presbytery in Maguiresbridge last week as result of a memorial received from the minority, and certain members of the Presbytery were then appointed to meet representatives of the minority in Enniskillen on Monday last, and discuss the whole situation.  This meeting duly took place and after a lengthy sitting, lasting nearly three hours, a document was drawn up and signed by the representatives of both parties expressing regret for any heat which had been displayed in the past, and a mutual wish for the future welfare and progress of the congregation.  The minority made it quite clear that it had not been to Rev. A. J. Jenkins, personally, they had objected, but to what they termed the questionable and objectionable methods adopted by one or two of his more prominent supporters during the progress of the election.

 

Fermanagh Times December 2nd 1915.  RECRUITING AND THE POPULATION. FACTS ABOUT FERMANAGH.  In a letter from Pro Patria dated from County Fermanagh in the Irish Times it states: –  In the first place, I may state that the farmers sons show no willingness to join the Army.  Their father say that they are needed at home, but I fear that this is due not only to the natural affection they have for them, but also – and, perhaps, principally – to the money the farmers have been making since the war began, very little of which has found its way into the War Loan.  With their sons help, they hope further to fatten on the needs of others.  The utter selfishness of this class of the community constitutes one of the chief obstacles to recruiting from this source, and has a reflex action upon other sources – namely the labouring class.  The labourers say:  “While should we go when men like the farmers who have their farms to fight for, won’t go?”  Though they say this yet probably as a class they have done better for the King and country than any others – with the possible exception of the county families.

In the next place –and here politics and religion, which, like the poor, are ever with us, come in – the Unionist young men say that they are quite willing to enlist if the Nationalist also enlist; for it is a notorious fact that very few of the latter have done so from here since the present crisis arose.  The proportion of recruits from a population almost equally divided religiously and politically is heavily in favour of the Unionist side – in the ratio of 30 to 1 or even higher.

 

Impartial Reporter.  December 2nd 1915.  A FERMANAGH SENSATION AS THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNTY COUNCIL IS SUSPENDED FROM THE MAGISTRACY.  The announcement of the suspension from the Magistry of Mr. John McHugh, Pettigo will cause a profound sensation in County Fermanagh.  Mr. McHugh is the Chairman of the Fermanagh County Council.  He has been for a number of year’s Justice of the Peace for County Fermanagh and sat on the bench for the Lack and Kesh districts.  As chairman of the County Council Mr. McHugh has influence on other county committees of which he was ex-officio a member.  He is also the Chairman of the County Fermanagh Old Age Pensions Committee.  On the bench Mr. McHugh was a good Magistrate –very much better than, and indeed an example to, a large number of the present magistrates in the county.  His removal from the Bench was nothing to do with his conduct as a magistrate, but as a public man holding public office on behalf of the ratepayers.

THE CAUSE OF HIS SUSPENSION.  Mr. McHugh is an auctioneer in business and so keen was the competition in his part of the county that he wrote letters to farmers canvassing for the sale of their farms.  It was in this that he proved most improper.  In one letter that he wrote –and it is alleged that several were written in a similar strain –Mr. McHugh promised a farmer, in return for giving him the sale to procure for him the old age pension as he had great influence with the Old Age Pension Committee.  The letter was handed over to the Crown authorities.  The incriminating document in due course was brought before the Lord Chancellor, Right Hon.  Ignatius O’Brien, who wrote to Mr. McHugh for any explanation he had to make.  That explanation evidently was not satisfactory and accordingly a writ of supersedeas was issued on the 23rd.  As to the public positions Mr. McHugh holds the Local Government Board control them and it remains to be seen if that Board will take any action.

 

Impartial Reporter.  December 2nd 1915.  VARIOUS.  500 recruits per day is the very loyal response of South Africa to the appealed for more men.  Australia is sending 50,000 more soldiers.

A parade of a rebel Sinn Feiners was held in Cork on Sunday when Anti –British speeches were made and congratulations offered to the R. C.  Bishop of Limerick on his extraordinary letter.

The Orange and Protestant Friendly Society Pettigo branch will hold a general meeting in Dernasesk Orange Hall on Saturday evening December 4 at 7.00 to elect officers and Committee for 1916.  J.  Johnston, Sec.

 

Fermanagh Times December 9th 1915.  The announcement made by Mr. Asquith that the British casualties have passed the half a million mark comes home to us all.  In the wars of the past there is nothing to compare with this, for hitherto we had always been accustomed to fight battles with small forces of professionals, and, since the idea of a nation in arms became a reality, our insular position has saved us from being entangled in European conflicts.  At any other period in English history no Government would have admitted such losses without the risk of an upheaval that would have endanger the whole fabric of the state.

Fermanagh Times December 9th 1915.  There is one other way in which the Irish Nationalists might do an immense service to recruiting in Ireland – by appealing to the Roman Catholic Church to alter its attitude.  It is the universal testimony of all recruiting officers that one of the greatest obstacles is for them conviction that the Church is against it.  Every Irishman knows the power of the Church over her people, how they are in absolute subjection to her commands, how they cannot for the most part even form an opinion, or still act, without the  Church’s knowledge and consent.  When, therefore, the members of the Church form, as he certainly has done, a firm opinion that the Church does not look favourably upon enlisting, what a poor chance and there must be for the recruiting sergeant.

 

Fermanagh Times December 9th 1915.  THE 11TH BATTALION.  MUD 3 FEET DEEP.  PROSPEROUS ORANGE LODGE IN THE REGIMENT.  HUNDREDS OF PLUM PUDDINGS DISPATCHED.  Rain and cold and mud everywhere, is the story told by practically all the boys in the 11th Battalion, who have written during the past week.  One correspondent, as will be seen below, speaks of mud in the trenches 3 feet deep, and what this means to the unfortunate young lads compelled to remain there for days at a time we, at home, cannot however adequately realise.  The boys, however, continue in excellent spirits and enjoy good health, and that is after all the main thing.

 

Fermanagh Times December 9th 1915.  MARRIAGE OF CAPTAIN PORTER, BELLEISLE.  The marriage of Captain John Grey Porter, D. S. O., (Queen’s Royal) Lancers, eldest son of Mr. John Porter–Porter, D. L., Belleisle, County Fermanagh, who is home from the front on leave, and Miss Enid Mary Duff–Assheton–Smith, only daughter of the late Mr. George William Duff–Assheton-Smith, of Vaynol, Carnarvon, and Mrs. Holdsworth, wife of Colonel George Holdsworth, 7th Hussars, took place on Monday at Saint George’s, Hanover Square, very quietly owing to the war.  The function which was distinctly a war wedding, came as a surprise to all but intimate friends, for news of the short engagement had been imparted only to the family circle.

 

Fermanagh Times December 9th 1915.  LOCAL MILITARY NEWS.  OLD FERMANAGH FAMILY BEREAVED.  CAPTAIN.  V. L. Y. DANE KILLED .  The death has been officially reported of Captain             Victor Dane 22nd Punjabia, Indian Army.  Captain Dane was one of a considerable number of Anglo-Indian officers who fell in the fighting near Baghdad prior to the British retirement on Kulel-Mara.  He was the second son of the late Colonel Arthur Henry Cole Dane, M. D. Indian Medical Service, grandson of the late Richard Dane M. D., C. B., Inspector–General of Hospitals, who died in 1901, and great grandson of the late Mr. Richard Martin Dane, D. L., Killyhevlin, Fermanagh, the former High Sheriff of that county.  Captain Dane was educated at Sandhurst and joined the Scottish Rifles in 1905, transferring to the Indian Army in 1906, and received his captaincy last year.  His father spent most of his life in India, where two of his brothers have served the State in High offices, one, Sir Louis W.  Dane, K. C. I. E., C. S. I., having been Lieutenant Governor of the Punjab from 1908 to 1913 and the other, Sir Richard Maurice Dane, K. C. I.E., having been Inspector–General of Excise and Salt in India 1907 to 1909 in addition having held other important offices in the Indian Civil Service. The late County Court Judge Dane, who was M.P. for North Fermanagh 1892 to 1898, was a nephew of Richard Martin Dane, M. D., C. B., already referred to and the present head of the family is Mr. James Whiteside Dane, Bonniebrooke, Co., Fermanagh, and Castle Warden, Co., Kildare, of which county he is Clerk of the Crown and Peace.  The Danes have been connected with Fermanagh since 1667, when John Dane settled at Enniskillen.  His eldest son, Paul Dane, of Killyhevlin was Provost of Enniskillen 1687 to 1689, and was present at the battle of the Boyne.  The only brother of the deceased is in the navy.  Every member of the Dane family is either in the Army or the Navy, except one engaged in munition work.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 11 1915.  The Post Office issues the following: – No postage stamps issued during Queen Victorious reign are now valid.  All the adhesive and impressed stamps of those issues which had up to that time remained valid were, in accordance with the announcement made in May last, invalidated after the end of June.  The public are reminded that no application to exchange any of the invalidated stamps for current stamps of equivalent value can be entertained unless made on or before the 31st of this month, at the Inland Revenue Offices, in London, Dublin, for Edinburgh.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 11 1915.  THE FIRST WIRELESS MESSAGE.  Maestro Rudolfe Ferrari, who in his picturesque fashion is now conducting the Chicago Opera orchestra and in his time has directed performances at Milan, Rome, Vienna, Madrid, Berlin, New York and Buenos Aires and singers such as Caruso, Tamagno, Calve, Chaliapin, and Titta Ruffo, likes to remember that Marconi when 11 years old was a pupil of his.

Marconi never took kindly to the piano.  He was a boy in Bologna, and one day he arrived for his lessons with grimy hands and a couple of boxes about a foot square.  “I was ordered,” says Ferrari, “to take one of them to a high hill while the lad went to the roof of my house with the other.  He gave me a pistol and told me if I heard a suspicious clicking to fire it.  I had half an idea that the box was an infernal machine, but I out his instructions – the boy’s enthusiasm was so beautiful –and toiled up that hill.  I sat down and opened the box.

“By and by I heard a click, and then a series of clicks.  I let off the pistol, and presently up ran Marconi, hatless and coatless, wildly excited.  ‘You heard?  You heard?’  I responded that I had.  It was the first wireless event ever sent.  What was the message?  I asked him, and he answered with a smile, “There is music in the air!  Ferrari’s efforts on Marconi’s musical education were not altogether wasted.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 11 1915.  OPENING OF SAINT MARY’S NEW SCHOOL DERRYHALLOW MULEEK.  On last Wednesday, the 1st of December Saint Mary’s National School, Derryhallow, in the Mulleek District of Pettigo parish, was opened for the admission of almost 50 pupils.  On the previous day the Feast of Saint Andrew, this beautiful school that has cost over £500 was blessed by the manager Very Rev. George Canon McMeel D.D., P.P., Pettigo, who at the same time installed Mr. John Kane as its principal teacher.  Owing to landlord intolerance in the past no suitable site could be procured for love or money for the building of a school for the Catholics on this estate, with the result that the present teacher as well as his late respected father were obliged to hold forth the lamp of learning to these downtrodden and persecuted people for upwards of half a century in a thatched cabin that was little better than a hovel.

As the mill of the Lord grinds slowly but surely, these tyrannical laws were at last swept away by the fierce agitation that has been carried on for the past 35 years by Messrs. Parnell and Redmond with the other members of the Irish Parliamentary Party, backed up by the ever loyal priests and the warm-hearted catholic people of Ireland.

When at the present energetic parish priest Dr. McMeel came to Pettigo parish he made up his mind to make the unfortunate tenants on this estate the owners of the land they tilled, and at once took steps through the Estates Commissioners to buy out their farms.  In this he succeeded admirably, so that at present their annuities are not  40 per cent of their former rack-rents.  Moreover, he succeeded in getting about 400 acres of the richest lands in demesne that surrounds the Bloomfield castle split up into reasonably sized plots, which were mostly allocated to the holders of uneconomic farms in the district; and by means of which these poor people are able to raise sufficient hay to feed their cattle during the winter.  It is unnecessary to give all the details of this purchase, including the troublesome question of turbary, which always gives great annoyance in the sale of any estate.  On this estate, however, the turbary question was settled satisfactorily by the tenants, who are assured of a plentiful supply of turf for centuries to come.

The landlord’s prohibitive power being now cleared away, the question of acquiring a suitable site was rendered comparatively easily.  When Mr. William N. Monaghan, Derryhallow, was approached, for a site, he, at once consented to give for the, on reasonably fair terms, a site which is most centrally situated for the children of this wide locality.  The obtaining of the usual grant from the Board of Works was a matter of great difficulty, which after years of persevering was at length overcome.  The plans and specifications having been drawn up, and a competent contractor having been selected, the work went ahead until the long wished for end was accomplished, and the splendid school with all its modern and up-to-date improvements has been thrown open amidst the joy and jubilation of the people.  To make the opening of the school a red letter day, the ladies of the neighbourhood provided a plentiful supply of tea, cakes, and apples for the youngsters, which they heartily enjoyed.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 11 1915.  THE SAD DEATH OF A YOUNG FERMANAGH MAN IN MANCHESTER.  With feelings of deep sorrow the relatives and friends of the late Mr. Lawrence Keon learned of his untimely demise at a hospital in Manchester, as a result of an accident. Deceased, who was a son of Mr. John Keon, D.C., Cornahilta, Belleek, was employed at the Oldham Road, Manchester, goods station, and on October 30th, after returning from his tea, when passing between two wagons was accidentally knocked down by one of them, the wheels of the wagon crushing his leg in such a manner as to necessitate his removal to hospital, where despite everything that medical science could do to prolong his life, septic poisoning developed, and he passed peacefully away fortified by the rites of the Catholic Church, of which he was an exemplary member.

 

Fermanagh Times December16th 1915.  GALLANT STAND OF THE INNISKILLINGS FACING OVERWHELMING ODDS AND HARDLY A MAN ESCAPES.  ANXIETY IN FERMANAGH.  No details have yet to come to hand of the casualties suffered by two companies of the Inniskilling Fusiliers, who in the face of overwhelming odds held a ridge in Macedonia the other day for several hours, thus checking the Bulgarians advance and giving the remainder of the British and French troops a valuable opportunity to withdraw and complete their defensive positions further in the rear.  All we do know is that according to the reports sent by the Press Association “hardly a man escaped.”  We have been informed that already at least two Enniskillen families have received notices from the War Office of the death of members of the household in this particular engagement, but this statement we have, so far, been unable to verify.  Why the superb courage of the men of our Territorial regiments were not mentioned in the official dispatches is one of those mysteries of the war, which only the General responsible, or the Censor, can elucidate.  One thing is certain, however, that such omissions or eliminations do not tend to encourage recruiting in the districts concerned.

Fermanagh Times December16th 1915.  ENNISKILLEN SOLICITOR BEREAVED.  Very much sympathy will be felt throughout Fermanagh with Mr. George Atkinson, solicitor, on account of the death of his son Mr. Andrew George Atkinson, who succumbed on the 27th of November in hospital in Alexandria, to wounds received at the Dardanelles on the 29th of October.  Mr. Andrew Atkinson who would have been 24 years of age on the fourth of the present month went to Australia four years ago.  In November, 1914, he joined the Australian Contingent with which he was drafted to the Dardanelles in early summer last.  He was at the landing at Suvla Bay, and took part in practically all the subsequent operations in that part of the peninsula.  On the 29th of October he was very badly wounded, his skull being fractured.  From the first there was but little hope of his recovery, but a owing to his wonderful vitality and the remarkably skilful treatment he received in hospital his life was prolonged for a month all but a few days.  The surgeon, who treated him said he had never operated on a more healthy man.  Deceased was 6 feet high, was built in proportion and was one of the picked Australians.  He was most popular with all who knew him in Enniskillen and district, and his death will be felt with very much sorrow.  He was educated at Lisgoole Abbey and at Conway College, England. Two other sons of Mr. Atkinson’s are with the colours.  His eldest son, Captain John Atkinson, of the West Riding Yorkshire Regiment, and who has been several years in the Army, has been in the trenches in France for some time.  The other son, now in the army, is William Claude Hamilton Atkinson who came over with the Canadian Contingent and is undergoing training prior to being sent to the front.

 

Fermanagh Times December16th 1915.  ENNISKILLEN SOLDIER’S SUICIDE.  INVALIDED HOME FROM THE FRONT AND CUTS HIS THROAT WITH THE RAZOR.  A GHASTLY AFFAIR AT OMAGH.  Word reached Enniskillen yesterday of a shocking case of suicide which occurred at Omagh that morning, the victim being Private Henry Gallagher belonging to the Inniskilling Fusiliers.  Gallacher is a native of Enniskillen where, we are informed, he the tenant of a house, and was here for some time recently after returning from the front.  He was afterwards sent to the Depot at Omagh, where he was found in the military barracks yesterday morning quite dead with his throat cut and a razor in his hand.  At an inquest held later in the day the jury brought in a verdict of suicide while temporarily insane and expressed the opinion that this was probably the result of depression caused by his experiences in the war.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 18th 1915.  A FARMER’S TRAGIC MISTAKE.  HE DRANK POISON FOR RUM.  A SAD OCCURRENCE NEAR IRVINESTOWN.  An inquest was held at Dullaghan, near Dromore, on Tuesday evening touching the death of a farmer named John McCarron.  Patrick McCarron, Dullaghan, deceased’s cousin, gave evidence that on the 8th of December deceased called at his house on his way home from Irvinestown fair, and he told witness that he drank portion of the contents of a bottle, now produced.  He said he had drunk it in mistake for rum, a naggin of which he had in his pocket and he afterwards drunk a quantity of water from a bog hole, and did his best to vomit off the fluid which he had drunk in mistake for the rum.  While he was in witness’s house, witness gave him a little soft water and mustard and he vomited.  He was put to bed, and he remained there until Friday, vomiting at intervals during that period.  He complained his throat and breast were burning.  Deceased was about 42 years of age and unmarried he had drunk a portion of the contents of a bottle which was labelled “Poison” and marked “Ringworm Wash.”

 

Fermanagh Herald December 18th 1915.  MR. CARSON AND EGGS.  There is something in the spirit of Christmastide which stimulates the descendants of the great Mr. Bumble to acts of pompous, uncharitable valour which arouse nothing but intense loathing in all generous hearted mortals.  This year some of the Enniskillen Bumbles have a new weapon ready to their hands.  We are at war and economy has become a national virtue, nay, an urgent necessity, therefore let us insist, to some extent, upon those who are looking after the ratepayers interests being economical.  Mr. Bumble was ever valorous in the public welfare at the cost of someone else’s happiness, and such folk as the anti-egg majority on the Enniskillen Board of Guardians wear his mantle with distinction.  Mr. Crumley, M.P. it was, I believe, who first secured the officials an egg each every day, and at the last meeting of the Guardians the valorous Mr. Carson made a desperate attempt to do away with the officials eggs in the interest of economy.  Good gracious!  On that great day of reckoning when Mr. Carson’s grandchildren shall ask him what he did for his country in the Great War?  He will say proudly, “I initiated the fight against luxury, by endeavouring to stop the officials’ eggs!  I do not think the children of the future will be edified by the announcement.  Petty tyrannies are repugnant to children and all healthy youngsters despise meanness.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 18th 1915.  JOTTINGS. Under the Allies Restriction Order, Mrs Gallagher, lodging-house keeper, Head St., Enniskillen, was at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday fined 2s 6d for failing to register a Pole named Slakeman who resided in her house for one night.

That the present three shillings and sixpence in the pound on unearned incomes will be raised to five shillings in the pound and the lower rates of income tax in proportion is the general opinion of the next Budget in April, according to the London correspondent of the Yorkshire Post.

The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Dick, principles of Roscor and Cornahilta National Schools, Belleek, will be pleased to hear that they have been awarded by the Commissioners of National Education triennial increments of good service salary of £10 each, dating from the first of April last.  This recognition speaks volumes for the efficiency of the schools in their charge.

Captain R. B. Burgess, Royal Engineers who has died in France of wounds received on the 9th inst., was the only son of Mr. H. G. Burgess, manager in Ireland for the London and North Western Railway Company.  He was educated at Portora Royal School, Enniskillen and Dublin University and last year left a growing practice at the Irish Bar to join the Army Service Corps, from which he was transferred on promotion to the Royal Engineers.  He was a man of splendid physique and a noted Rugby football forward.

Private E.  G.E. Stewart, Irish Guards, brother of Dr. Stuart, J.  P., Belturbet, has died of his wounds in London.

Mr. George Atkinson, solicitor, and coroner for North Fermanagh, Skea Hall, Enniskillen, has received word that his third son, Mr. Andrew George Atkinson, aged 22, had died of wounds in Alexandria Hospital.  The deceased emigrated to Australia four years ago and came over to the Dardanelles with the Australian contingent.  He was at the landing at Suvla Bay and was afterwards very severely wounded at the back of the head.  Mr. Atkinson has two other sons in the Army, Captain John Atkinson, the West Riding Yorkshire Regiment at present in the trenches in France, and Mr. William Claude Hamilton.?

 

Fermanagh Herald December 18th 1915.  BRITISH AIR RAID.  The following telegraphic dispatch has been received from General Headquarters.  On the eighth six Dean of her aeroplanes bombed a store death four at Marymount and an aerodrome at heavily.  This attack was carried out in a highly westerly when it’s made a flying difficult.  All the machines returned safely, and considerable damage is believed to have been done to both objectives.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 18th 1915.  INNISKILLINGS AND GALLANT STAND.  HARDLY A MAN ESCAPED.  The magnificent work of the Irish in saving the French and British forces from being cut off retreat to Greece from Serbia is the subject of enthusiastic commendation not only in Ireland but throughout to the British dominions.  In the British communique published on Monday the Connaughts, the Munsters and the Dublins were especially marked out for praise and now the Inniskillings are mentioned as having behaved with magnificent bravery, hardly one of them now remaining.  The London newspaper suggests that the Irish regiments who took part in the action should be thanked by a special vote of thanks passed simultaneously in both Houses of Parliament.  The Bulgar’s attempt to break through the British line was rendered fruitless by the bravery of the Irish and although the engagement resulted in retirement, the enemy was made to appreciate the qualities of the foe to which he is now opposed.  Not only were they outnumbered by about 10 to 1 by the enemy who was abundantly provided with field and mountain artillery and machine guns.  The Bulgarian attack began at 3.00 on Monday morning and a tremendous hail of lead poured upon our trenches which also suffered from whistling fragments of stone, the Bulgarian high explosive shells splintering the rocks and sending fragments in all directions, was greatly intensifying the effect of their fire.

Two companies of the Inniskillings held on to the ridge known as Kevis Crest, and kept back the Bulgarians practically the whole morning, although they were backed only by rifle fire.  Hardly a man escaped, but their stand impressed and delayed the Bulgars, thus giving much needed time to complete our defensive dispositions on our third line, where the Bulgarians were finally held up.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915. THE GALLANT INNISKILLINGS.  STORY OF A GREAT SACRIFICE.  CRAWLING THROUGH A SEA OF MUD SHOULDER TO SHOULDER WITH THE DEAD.  The Daily News says: – The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who sacrificed two whole companies in the rear-guard action in Macedonia, are never spoken of by their full title in the army, but they are invariably described by themselves as well as by their comrades as “The Skins.”  We have been allowed to learn how, by sacrificing one half of its personnel, one battalion of the Inniskillings secured the retreat of the British forces in Macedonia; but no official story has been published of the great feat achieved by the 2nd battalion of this gallant regiment at Festubert.  Yet it was only the enterprise and daring of the 2nd “Skins” that made possible the success of the – – Division.

One attack against the German trenches had been made and had failed, and the ground between the opposing lines was strewn with the dead of both sides.  A second attack was ordered.  The 2nd Inniskillings were to lead the van in the principal sector, and the attack was to be made under cover of darkness.  The space between the trenches was about 200 yards and in spite of the pitch blackness of the night it was certain that the German machine guns and rifles would take a heavy toll before the trenches were reached.  But the Inniskillings mix brains with their bravery.  So soon after night fell, about eight p.m., they crept over the parapet, one by one they squirmed on their stomachs towards the German trenches.  Slowly and painfully they crawled through a sea of mud, from dead man to dead man, lying quite still whenever a star shell lighted up No Man’s Land.  By this method platoon after platoon had spread itself over the corpse strewn field, until the leaders were within a few yards of the German parapet.  Then came the hardest task of all to lie shoulder to shoulder with the dead until at midnight a flare give the signal to charge.  But the “Skins” held on through all the alarms of the night.  Occasionally bullets whistled across the waste, and some who had imitated death needed to pretend no longer.  But the toll was not heavy; it was infinitesimal by comparison with the cost of a charge from their own trenches.  When at last the flash lifted the suspense the leading platoons were in the German trenches before the occupants had time to lift their rifles.  They caught them in many cases actually asleep and because of their cuteness the Inniskillings paid less for the capture of the first and second lines of trenches than they might have done for the first alone.  The same cuteness made it possible for the whole division to sweep on and to score a victory where another division had previously found defeat.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915.  DANCE IN BELLEISLE.  On Friday night a very enjoyable dance was given by Captain Porter to the tenants and employee’s at Belle Isle.  Some 50 couples were present and dancing started at 9.00.  Captain Porter and his bride were given a most rousing reception as they entered the room, which was beautifully decorated.  Mrs. Porter was introduced to everyone present and she and her husband took part in the first couple of dances.  Mr. O’Keeffe was M. C., and the refreshments were looked after by Mrs. McDowell and Messrs. Shanks and Porter.  At supper the health of Captain and Mrs. Porter was duly proposed and heartily responded to.  Dancing was kept up till early morning and after a hearty vote of thanks had been returned to the gallant Captain the proceedings terminated by the singing of Auld Lang Syne followed by God Save the King.  The music was supplied by Mr. W. Scott, Enniskillen, assisted at intervals by Mr. Cathcart, Killygowan.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915.  CHRISTMAS 1915.  It is with a diffidence easily understood that we wish our readers the compliments of the season.  Old prescriptive usage scarcely justifies it in this year of grace of 1915.  “Peace on Earth; Goodwill towards Men” –how fall of emptiness, worse even how full of irony sounds the phrase when the most fertile and populous parts of the earth are covered with woe and desolation.  The crash of armed men, the rush of battle, the roar of mighty guns, the cry of strong men in their agony are a terrible, a sinister, forbidding echo to the wish, “A Merry Xmas and a Happy New Year.”

Never in the whole Christian era has there been a period of tragedy comparable to the present.  Ruin and devastation widespread, the loss of millions of human lives, the mutilation and crippling of other millions are features of the passing time that even the most thoughtless and careless cannot contemplate without almost the blackness of despair.  The record of  events throughout the whole theatre of war are absolutely appalling.

When will it end?  We know not.  To what good does it tend?  Writers treatise dissertations on the purifying influences and ennobling results of war.  The dreaming of visionaries!  The whole world cannot be turned into a hell and only virtue and its attributes to emerge from the fierce cauldron of brutality, massacre and tribulation.  The prospect is deplorable.  In the surrounding gloom we see not a ray of hope for the near future.  If German autocrats are responsible for the outbreak of the war plague, if to them primarily is due the awful affliction, the indescribable sorrow, the ravages and miseries that it has brought about, to British politicians, to their narrowness of view, their lack of vigour and intellectual and selfish infirmities must be attributed much of its prolongation and not a little of the waste and horrors of bloodshed and death by which it has been accompanied.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915.  BRITISH LEAVE THE DARDANELLES!  TROOPS, GUNS AND STORES REMOVED.

From http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/evacuation_dec15.htmBattles – The Evacuation of Anzac Cove, Suvla Bay and Helles, 1915-16. Preparing for the Allied evacuation of Suvla Bay, Gallipoli In the wake of the failure of the Allied attacks at Scimitar Hill and Hill 60 beginning 21 August 1915, intended to link the two Allied sectors of Anzac Cove and Suvla Bay, Mediterranean Commander-in-Chief Sir Ian Hamilton telegraphed London in a state of increasing despondency. In his telegram Hamilton requested a further 95,000 reinforcements from British war minister Lord Kitchener.  He was offered barely a quarter, 25,000.  Confidence in the Gallipoli operation in London and Paris was dwindling.  While former First Lord of the Admiralty and architect of the operation Winston Churchill pressed both governments to provide continued support, French General Maurice Sarrail suggested a combined offensive against the Asian coast, a proposal rapidly over-turned by his Commander-in-Chief Joseph Joffre, who insisted upon retaining French focus on the Western Front.

Affairs outside of Gallipoli began to intrude upon strategy in the region.  The invasion of Serbia and plans for an extensive landing at Salonika exhausted resources from both French and British governments, with the latter offering to provide up to 125,000 troops (much against Kitchener’s inclination). Such were the demands for men intended for Salonika that forces were diverted away from Hamilton in Gallipoli, to the latter’s great dismay.  As it was Hamilton was facing increasing criticism from London as grim news of the expedition reached home, along with complaints of his mismanagement of the campaign (from the Australian journalist Keith Murdoch among others).

Thus with the possibility of further reinforcements to the region seemingly ruled out, Hamilton received word on 11 October 1915 of a proposal to evacuate the peninsula.  He responded in anger by estimating that casualties of such an evacuation would run at up to 50%: a startlingly high figure. The tide was clearly moving against Hamilton.  His belief in what was widely viewed as an unacceptable casualty rate in the event of evacuation resulted in his removal as Commander-in-Chief and recall to London at a meeting of the Dardanelles Committee on 14 October. Hamilton was replaced by Sir Charles Monro.  Monro lost no time in touring Helles, Suvla Bay and Anzac Cove upon his arrival on the peninsula on 28 October.  His recommendation was prompt: evacuation.  This did not however meet with Kitchener’s approval.  He travelled to the region to see the state of affairs for himself. Upon his arrival however he quickly reversed his thinking upon seeing the conditions facing the Allied force and recommended evacuation on 15 November 1915, overriding arguments by senior naval figures Sir Roger Keyes and Rosslyn Wemyss to attempt a naval seizure once again. The British government, having prevaricated for several weeks, finally sanctioned an evacuation on 7 December.  Unfortunately by this stage a heavy blizzard had set in making such an operation hazardous.  Nevertheless the evacuation of 105,000 men and 300 guns from Anzac Cove and Suvla Bay was successfully conducted from 10-20 December 1915.  The evacuation of Helles was conducted – comprising 35,000 men – from late December until 9 January 1916. The evacuation operation was easily the most successful element of the entire campaign, with casualty figures significantly lower than Hamilton had predicted (official figures quote just three casualties). Painstaking efforts had been made to deceive the 100,000 watching Turkish troops into believing that the movement of Allied forces did not constitute a withdrawal. Winston Churchill however viewed Monro’s achievement with a somewhat jaundiced eye: “he came, he saw, he capitulated” he wrote of Monro, and the sneer has remained through the years to blight Monro’s correct decision and remarkable follow-through.

480,000 Allied troops had participated in the Gallipoli campaign which comprised the Turkish Army’s most significant success of the war.  Of this figure 252,000 suffered casualties (of these 48,000 were fatalities).  One-third of the 33,600 Anzac casualties comprised fatalities. Turkish casualties have been estimated at 250,000, of which at least 65,000 are believed to be fatalities.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915.  MR. REDMOND AS USUAL POLITICAL CLEVERNESS MUST HAVE DESERTED HIM SADLY when he allowed to be published Mr. Asquith’s letter regarding the 16th Division.  We now have it on the very highest authority that only two of the three brigades in this much advertised Irish Division are up to strength, and that there seems so little prospect of the remaining brigade filling up at a reasonably early date that the division will have to go on active service without it.  What a remarkable comment this is upon the thousands of Irish Nationalists who are alleged to have joined the army!

The excuse given for the failure only makes matters worse.  We are told that 1,200 men had to be drafted from the 16th Division to fill up the Tenth, or else it too could not have gone on service when it did, so that this division also did not fill even though although a whole English regiment, the Hampshires, was brought in, as well as hundreds of other English recruits to complete the Leinsters and the, Connaughts.  It is also worth mentioning that men were taken from the Ulster regiments in the 16th Division and sent to the Munsters and, Connaughts in the 10th division.  Thus once more Ulster supplied the men for which other parts of Ireland claimed the credit.

As a matter of fact in the entire 10th division when it went to Gallipoli only about 20 per cent of the men where Irish Roman Catholics, though the Nationalists claim 100 per cent of the credit, and the numbers have not increased since.  And yet the Irish Nationalists, who from the whole of Ireland have not been able to raise a single division of their own, were never tired of sneering at the Ulster Division, the only genuine “all Irish” division from its commanding officer downwards, for it had not to be completed for service by drafts from any other division or from England, and whose success has only emphasized the failure of the other so-called Irish divisions.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915.  FORD’S FOLLY.  A CHRISTMAS BURLESQUE.  NO RECEPTION IN EUROPE.  Surprized and considerably disconcerted at the lack of even the semblance of an official welcome to Norway, Mr. Henry Ford and his quarrelsome crew of Peace Pilgrims arrived at Christiania, on Sunday morning in the liner Oscar 11 from New York.  There was not a single Scandinavian pacifist at the docks to greet the remarkable conglomeration of –the-war cranks, whose members have for two weeks been fighting among themselves on the Atlantic.  Christiania seems coldly indifferent to the visit of these deluded pro-German propagandists.  Mr. Ford’s menagerie of misguided Peace soldiers arrived on European soil in as aimless a condition as that in which they left the United States.  Internal dissensions are as widespread and bitter as they were the day following the mutiny on the high seas, which was precipitated when an attempt was made to coerce befuddled delegates into signing a declaration censuring President Wilson for his “preparedness” program.  There is no disguising the fact that the majority of the Pilgrims now realise that they’re out on a fool’s errand.  As an insurgent expressed it in mixed Yankee metaphor “We have jumped the switch and are busted.  We have as much chance of getting away with one stunt as a snowball has of freezing in the hell.”  There is an overwhelming feeling of depression in the party.  At least a dozen delegates intend to desert before they make themselves more ridiculous.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 25th 1915.  JOTTINGS.  The flax markets remain as strong as ever.  Prices of Russian flax are steadily rising and there is still an absence of advice of new arrivals.  However the Belfast spinners are fairly well off for some time to come.

Dr. T.  Knox reported to the Lisnaskea Guardians on Saturday last that a further outbreak of smallpox had occurred involving three persons, who came from the same house, as the two cases previously reported.

The report that Anton Lang, who took the part of “Christus” a number of times at Oberammergau over the years has been killed in the war, which was first published in America, has been contradicted in America.  It is now announced by the German papers that the report was correct.

The farmers in Newcastle, Co., Down, are deriving phenomenal profits on flax during the present season.  The produce on an Irish acre of land in Legananny near Castlewellan, scutched during the week at Mr. McAnulty’s mill in Leitrim, yielded 104 ½ stone, which were sold at 22s 6d per stone, and realized £117 11s 3d.

Mrs. Alicia Adelaide Needham, the famous Irish composer, of Clapham Park, London S.W. is collecting and buying all kinds of comforts including woollens, tobacco, etc., for the Irish troops at the front.  She will gratefully acknowledge contributions received and for any money donated forwarded to her for this purpose she will send one of her autographed songs.

When a verdict of “Accidental death” was returned at an inquest on the charred remains of Fleming Wilson which were found in his barn, which was burned, at Ranelly, near Omagh, his widow stated that on the day of the tragedy he returned from Omagh with a large quantity of whisky and porter and toys for children.  He then left to go to his brother’s house and the short time afterwards the barn and was found to be in flames.

Mrs. Joseph Carson, egg and poultry merchant, Killeshandra, purchased a turkey cock, one of this season’s birds, from a farmer named Keith, which weighed 30lbs.  Mr. Keith was paid 1s per pound, which amounted to £1 10s for his bird.

 

Fermanagh Times December 30th 1915.  SANTA CLAUS IN ENNISKILLEN.  It will be remembered that a new departure was inaugurated last year by Rev A. J.  Jenkins in presenting gifts “from Santa Clause” to the poor children of our back streets.  This was repeated this Christmas with even more gratifying success.  As before an appeal was made to the families of all denominations to send in older toys to be renewed and made acceptable by the little-often-forgotten-ones.  The response was splendid from all sources with the result that some 400 toys, together with a large number of books, were brought to the homes of our poor, and each child in every household was made by the happy recipient of a little train that actually moved, or a pretty doll which actually closed its eyes, or a nice book with lovely pictures.  For some time before the distribution a number of ladies from the various Churches met together, renovated any of the toys which required the application of their deft fingers to make them as good as ever and packed them neatly.  The gifts brought a real and genuine joy to the little boys and girls and all thanked from the bottom of their warm throbbing little hearts the great kindness of “dear old Santa Claus.”

 

Fermanagh Times December 30th 1915.  MILITARY NOTES.  Private J. E. Johnston, 19th Battalion, Royal Canadian Grenadiers (Queen’s Own), has arrived home at Ballinamallard on sick leave from a military hospital in Sheffield.  Private Johnston was only out a few weeks at the Western front, when he was wounded, sustaining a fractured ankle.  He was formerly in the employ of Messrs. John Lemon and Sons, Enniskillen.

 

Fermanagh Times December 30th 1915.  ENNISKILLEN BOYS IN THE BALKANS.  SOME NARROW ESCAPES AT THE DARDANELLES.  An Enniskillen man writing from “Somewhere in Servia” to a friend at home gives the following graphic description of his experiences since he left of the ancient borough.  After a stay of a week at Lemnos we shipped for the scene of action where we arrived on the morning of the 7th of August the task before us being the forcing of a new landing at Suvla Bay.  I don’t think anybody who were as there is ever likely to forget that day and a good many following.  Our first greeting was the plumping of shells around the transports.  One ship next to us was struck, but little damage apparently was done. The landing had to be done in lighters under heavy shell and shrapnel fire.  Some poor fellows did not reach the shore alive.  We had to wade ashore well above our knees in water with all our equipment on, including rifles and carrying two hundredweight drums of cable tied on poles –two men to each drum.  The greatest danger landing apart from shrapnel, was the landed mines.  They were all around the shore and for some distance inland.  The first sight we met on shore was the dead bodies of three Fusiliers.  One poor chap with his head blown off.  It was terrible to see these landmines going up.  You would see the chaps charging along, one mine go up and some emerging from the smoke and dust unscratched, run on another few yards, trip up another mine, and come toppling over.  I watched five go up like that within a few yards of each other.  We lost an officer and some men of our own company that day.  Well, we took up our quarters on a ridge and that afternoon and the rain came down as I never saw it rain before.  We got soaked through in a few minutes and had neither overcoats nor blankets, only just the clothes we stood in –no change of under clothing nor did we get any for three or four weeks later.  That night we just lay down as we were with our wet clothes on of the bare ground.  You can guess how hardy we were when not a man was knocked up over it.

Next morning I was laying a line and came across any amount of dead British and Turks; some of the sights would be inclined to make you sick under normal conditions, but we seemed to be braced up for anything.  Next night I was wakened up at about midnight and sent up to the firing line with a strange officer.  I was taking the place of a fellow who had been sent earlier in the day and hadn’t turned up.  After about two hours wandering in the dark we reached our destination; I was then ready to sleep on a clothesline.  The bullets were pinging around the whole night.  The next morning the other chap turned up with daylight and I returned alone to our own camp.  Twice I was sniped at, but soon learn to keep under cover of the brushwood.  I was very lucky all through.  One of the narrowest escapes I had was when having breakfast one morning; the shells were flying about as usual.  I was sitting with a chap named Meldrum when a shrapnel shell burst almost overhead.  One of the bullets hit Meldrum wounding him on the head and another buried itself in the ground by my side as I dropped flat on the ground.  If it hadn’t been that he was wearing his helmet at the time he would undoubtedly have been killed, as it penetrated first the purgaree, then the helmet, before it reached his head; the scalp was cut to the skull, but the bone was uninjured. On three other occasions high explosive shells burst so close to where we were working that we were covered with dust and stones.  I have been doing all classes of work – telegraphs, laying lines, digging trenches, of repairing broken lines and all classes of fatigue work.  When we first went there we were often 16 hours per day cramped up in a narrow trench with a telegraph instrument.  The flies and other vermin were terrible; there was a fearful lot of dysentery; we lost some men with it.  I had a touch myself for about 10 days, but hadn’t to go of duty.  We left there rather unexpectedly, destination, as usual, unknown; we got back to Lemnos where I met Fred Brennan again and after a week we set sail for Salonika.  This is a beautiful place approaching from the sea, but it is an ill-kept and dirty town, populated principally by Greeks, Turks and Jews.  I was able to get beer here – the first for three months for 5d for a large bottle and only 5d for a bottle of wine; other things were awfully dear.  Since I started this page Lewis Herbert called to see me. I met him in Salonika also and he is looking fit although he hasn’t had a wash or a shave for some days. Hope you will all have a good time at Christmas. Can’t say what mine will be like, but will make the best of it.  Your old pal.

 

Fermanagh Times December 30th 1915.  Hell at Suvla.  When Sir E. Carson described the condition at Suvla Bay as “a kind of hell” and indignantly asked why the troops had been allowed to stay there so long, he was understating rather than overstating the facts.  The sufferings of the men were awful.  Towards the end of the campaign owing to the breaking up of the season, they became almost unendurable.  A great storm of rain burst over the peninsula and lasted for 18 hours.  The trenches were flooded out, the men drenched to the skin, and many of them were exposed to the alternative of death by flood or by gunfire.  When the storm passed the land was frozen by a great frost, and the snow drifts became a source of danger – a veritable death traps at times.  Men’s wet uniforms froze stiff upon their backs.  To make matters worse, it was impossible for relief to be sent for as no one could find his way through blinding snow storms.  The fact that the Turks suffered as heavily as the British offers little consolation.  The most lurid description can give but little idea of all that our magnificent soldiers suffered for the last days of the occupation of Suvla Bay.