15 March 1917.

15 March 1917.

STATEMENT BY RETURNED AMERICAN.  NEW YORK-MONDAY.

According to Havana messages, the members of Gerrard’s party declare that the people of Germany are not only starving but have reached that stage of stoicism in face of the inevitable that they care little whether victory or defeat awaits them if they can only get food. They say that the last straw that will break the camel’s back must come for the German people before another year is past and that once they come to learn that the harvest has failed and that the supply of men is short the people will realize the failure which has hitherto been so carefully hidden from them.

15 March 1917.

DEATH OF COUNT ZEPPELIN.  The special correspondent of the National Tidente at Berlin telegraphs—Count Zeppelin who died at noon on Thursday in his 79th year in a sanatorium at Charlottenburg, Berlin, had been staying until a few days ago at the Hotel Kaiserhof, Berlin, When he became ill with inflamation of the lungs he was taken to the sanatorium.

It was in 1892 that the Count first conceived the idea of a dirigible. The German Government treated his representation for a subsidy without sympathy and though the inventor succeeded in flying over take Constance in 1900 his second Zeppelin was shattered on its first landing. The King of Wurtenberg and afterwards the German War Office were ultimately induced to take an interest in the invention which turned out to be of use for scouting purposes at sea but a failure for raiding purposes. The Count’s aerial ships are a national mania with the Huns, despite the disaster that has so often overtaken them. A warrior as well as a scientist, Count Zeppelin took part in the American War of Secession, and saw service in the Franco-German War of 1870.

15 March 1917.

POLICE SERGEANT CHARGED WITH MURDER. CHILDREN’S TRAGIC DISCOVERY.

Sergeant Joseph H. Crawford, of the Royal Irish Constabulary, appeared in the dock at the Belfast Police Court on Friday charged with the alleged murder of his wife, Ellen Jane Crawford, at their residence, 107 Fortwilliam Parade, on 17th January last. The accused was formerly dock sergeant in the same court and, as he was assisted into the dock, where, for two and a half years, he had discharged his public duties, the presiding magistrate and the officer s of the court were visibly affected. Throughout the proceedings he sat with a handkerchief to his eyes, as if he could not trust himself to look upon the familiar faces of the officers and professional gentlemen in court. On the 17th January, when the three young children of Mr. and Mrs. Crawford returned home from a pantomime they found their father and mother lying on the floor of the kitchen with their throats cut and a bloodstained razor between the bodies. Mrs, Crawford was dead and the sergeant has since been, under treatment in hospital. District-Inspector Gerty was the only witness examined on Friday. He arrested the accused that morning and after giving him the usual caution he said, “I never done it. Is she dead? I was sitting in the kitchen when she put her arm round my neck and gave me a jag. ’ ’ The accused also spoke some other words, which he the (the District-Inspector) could not catch, as he broke down and was sobbing. The accused was remanded for a week, Mr. Graham, who defended, stating that owing to the condition of the accused he was unable yet to get instructions.“ “It is one of the saddest cases I have ever known,” he added.

15 March 1917.

THE NEWTOWNHAMILTON MURDER. ACCUSED GETS FIFTEEN YEARS. George Berry, a young man of humble rank, who was placed on trial for his life at Armagh Assizes, before Mr. Justice Ross and a common jury, charged with the murder of Charles Warnock, a pedlar, in Newtownhamilton, on 24th January last was found guilty of manslaughter, and sentenced to fifteen years imprisonment.

15 March 1917.

LORD CROMER’S COMMISSION; The Part Played by Mr Asquith, Mr, Churchill & Lord Kitchener. The eagerly-awaited report of Cromer’s Commission of Inquiry into the Dardanelles Expedition was published on Thursday. A voluminous document of nearly 60 closely-printed pages, it covers the origin and inception of the campaign and the events up to March 23 of 1915 to, when, the naval effort having failed, it was decided to postpone further operations until adequate forces could be assembled. It is clear that the men mainly responsible for the campaign were Mr. Asquith, Lord Kitchener, Mr. Churchill, and Lord Fisher.

Mr, Churchill, in the first place, and Kitchener, subsequently, urged the need and practicability of the forcing of the Dardanelles, while Lord Fisher and the other naval experts, when they were consulted first dissented, and afterwards gave half-hearted approval. The report confirms the impression that by mismanagement, misunderstanding, and delay, an opportunity of reaching Constantinople by sea was thrown away, and rendered inevitable the ultimate failure of the Gallipoli operations which followed the naval failure.

The main points brought out by the report are: — Attack on Dardanelles first mooted November, 1914, but no intention then of making a purely naval attack.

On January 2, 1915, the Russians, hard pressed in the Caucasus, appealed to London to make a demonstration against the Turks elsewhere.

On January 13, the Admiralty were instructed to “prepare” for a naval attack on the Dardanelles, but there was some doubt as to whether the War Council had on that date committed themselves to the expedition.

On January 28 the decision to do so was confirmed. Lord Fisher decided to resign, but yielded to persuasion by Lord Kitchener.

There was still no intention of using troops; except in minor operations, but on February 16 it was decided to mass a large army ready to assist once the Fleet had forced the passage. Three days later the first bombardment took place, with “fairly satisfactory results.’ On the following day, February 20, the decision to send troops from England was suspended principally owing to the anxiety of Lord Kitchener regarding the position in other theatres. Mr. Churchill strongly dissented from this decision, and “disclaimed all responsibility if disaster occurred in Turkey as a result of the insufficiency of troops.”

On March 10 Lord Kitchener sanctioned the departure of the troops held back on February 20. Eight days later the second bombardment took place. Heavy losses were sustained, but Admiral de Robeck, commanding, and officials at the Admiralty wished to persist.

As a result, however, of representations made by Admiral de Robeck and Sir Ian Hamilton, who had been sent out to command the troops, it was decided, on March 23, to await the arrival of adequate troops before renewing the attack. By the time the troops were ready the Turks were prepared to meet the attempt.

15 March 1917.

CAMPAIGN OF MURDER. THE CALIFORNIA SUNK. 43 PASSENGERS AND CREW MISSING. THE SECOND OFFICER’S STORY. The Anchor Line steamer California from New York, with passengers and mails, has been torpedoed and sunk. Survivors state that 90 of the crew and 13 passengers are missing, and it is feared they are drowned. Four persons were killed by the explosion, and about 20 were injured. The big vessel, it is stated, was attacked by two submarines.

When the rescuing vessels arrived sympathetic crowds gathered near the deep-water quay and Custom House and cheered the survivors as they descended or were carried down the gangway. Motor cars, ambulances, and other vehicles were in readiness to convey the victims of the latest German sea outrage to the hospitals and the hotels and a strong feeling of indignation was evinced when the wounded were being carried on stretchers to the Red Cross ambulances hard by.

Second-Officer McCallum, of the ill-fated liner, who was one of the survivors, was in his shirt sleeves and wearing water-soaked clothes, he having been in the water for some time before being rescued. Mr. McCallum stated that the California left New York on last Monday week for Glasgow with about 205 passengers and crew. The voyage was a comparatively fair one for a winter passage. The weather was clear, with a heavy swell but calm sea. At 9-10 am. on Wednesday the steamer was quite suddenly struck by a torpedo close by No. 4 hatch. The shock was absolutely terrific, and the vessel shook from end to end. He was standing on the poop at the tune, and was knocked down, and a huge column of water was blown upon the dock, deluging those in the immediate vicinity. The captain, who was on the bridge, ordered the crew to the boat stations, and then promptly directed the boats to be lowered away.

There was no panic, and the passengers behaved splendidly. The women were first got into the boats, and he added that the number of boats ready was in excess of the requirements. He did not see either the submarine or the torpedo which sent their ship to her doom. But some of the crew assert that there were two submarines, one on each side of the liner, and that escape for them was impossible.

One boat got swamped unfortunately, but he could not say what happened to those who were in it. The captain, with splendid coolness and deliberation, gave his orders from the bridge, and did not leave his post until the California foundered under him. A number of the officers stood by the sinking vessel, even after the boats had filled, and then they had to plunge overboard to save themselves being carried down by the suction of the huge hull. She went down stern foremost. He {Mr. McCallum) got in the boat which had been swamped, and was subsequently taken into a boat, which also picked up the captain.

No warning of any kind was given by the Germans, who must have known there were helpless women passengers on board. The California only remained afloat about seven minutes after being struck. He was confident it was not ten. They were in the boats scarcely an hour when assistance came in response to the wireless messages sent out. The crew and passengers lost everything they had. “And,” added Mr. McCallum, “as you must have observed when they landed, some of the crew had only pants and shirts on, and were without boots or hats.” He believed that of the 32 passengers on board 19 were saved, and about 13 are missing.

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November 1918.

November 7th 1918. V.C. FOR FERMANAGH HEROISM OF COL. WEST IN FACE OF CERTAIN DEATH.

The King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Victoria Cross to the under- mentioned officer:—Captain (A. Lieutenant-Col.) Richard Annesley West, D.S.O., M.C., late North Irish Horse (Cav. S.R.) and Tank Corps, For most conspicuous bravery, leadership and self-sacrifice.

During an attack, the infantry having lost their bearings in the dense fog, this officer at once collected and re-organised any men he could find and led them to their objective in face of heavy machine-gun fire. Throughout the whole action he displayed the most utter disregard of danger, and the capture of the objective was in a great part due to his initiative and gallantry.

On a subsequent occasion, it was intended that a battalion of light tanks under the command of this officer should exploit the initial infantry and heavy tank attack. He therefore went forward in order to keep in touch with the progress of the battle, and arrived at the front line when the enemy were in process of delivering a local counter-attack. The infantry battalion had suffered heavy officer casualties, and its flanks were exposed. Realising that there was a danger of the battalion giving way he at once rode out in front of them under extremely heavy machine-gun and rifle fire and rallied the men. In spite of the fact that enemy were close upon him he took charge of the situation and detailed non-commissioned officers to replace officer casualties. He then rode up and down in front of them in face of certain death encouraging the men and calling to them ’Stick it men; show them fight; and for God’s sake put up a good fight. He fell riddled by machine-gun bullets.

The magnificent bravery of this very gallant officer at the critical moment inspired the infantry to redoubled efforts, and the hostile attack was defeated.  The deceased officer was a native of Fermanagh, being the fourth and younger son of the late Mr. A. G. West, of Whitepark. He was born in 1878, and fought in the Boer War .with Kitchener’s Scouts, afterwards taking a commission in the North Irish Horse. The West family has long been connected with Fermanagh and Tyrone, but Mr. E. E. West,  its present head, now lives, in Dublin.

Lieut-Colonel Herbert N. Young, D.S.O., Royal Inniskillings (temporarily commanding a battalion of the Sherwood Foresters), killed in action on 25th October was one of the best-known officers of the Inniskillings, with whom he had soldiered for 15 years.

THE MILK SCARCITY.

If the members of the Enniskillen Urban Council who raised the question of the scarcity of the milk supply were genuine in their anxiety for the poor, they have done nothing in the matter till it now is too late to do anything. A year ago an attempt was made to get milk from Fermanagh for Dublin’s poor, and this attempt the Impartial Reporter frustrated, pointing out at the time that any spare milk was badly needed by our own poor in Enniskillen. We then advocated the founding of a municipal milk depot, as had been done in other places, but the Urban Council took no action. The Council was asked to make preparations for the founding of a communal food kitchen to cook food for the very poor. This suggestion was also scouted by the very men who are now crying out about the coal shortage. It is the usual grumble without action. Everyone knew that coal would not get more plentiful, and it was common knowledge that milk would be much scarcer. To talk of obtaining a milk supply now is beating the air. The Chairman of the Urban Council should surely know that creameries have no milk to spare for sale in a stock-rearing county like Fermanagh, except perhaps from the Belleek district. The farmers require all the skim-milk they can get; the creameries dare not cut them short, and thus lose some of their best customers. Milk is scarce to all, rich and poor, alike, and if the poor are in a bad way for milk this winter they know who had it in their power to save them, from such a catastrophe but did nothing till too late, and then, as usual, only talked.

A MEMORIAL SERVICE. Enniskillen Presbyterian Church. It was a moving service — but just one of those things which Rev. Mr. Jenkins knows how to do well, at the proper time, and in the fitting way. Three soldiers of the Enniskillen Presbyterian Congregation have passed away quite recently—Lieut. John Darling, M.C., 9th Royal Irish Fusiliers, from wounds received in action ; Company Sergt. Major Wilson, of the 1st Royal Inniskillings, died in action; and Private Herbert Caldwell, from ill-health and starvation, when wounded as a prisoner-of-war in Germany. The congregation at Enniskillen, which has given most of its manhood to the army, per cent., has also had the greatest number of casualties.

November 21st 1918.

Lance-Corporal Seaman, of the Inniskilling Fusiliers has been awarded the Victoria Cross. The official record states that he is awarded the coveted distinction. For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty. When the right flank of his company was held np by a nest of enemy machine guns he, with great courage and initiative, rushed forward under heavy fire with his Lewis gun and engaged the position single-handed, capturing two machine guns and 12 prisoners and killing one officer and two men. Later in the day he again rushed another enemy machine-gun position, capturing the gun under heavy fire. He was killed immediately after. His courage and dash were beyond all praise, and it was entirely due to the very gallant conduct of Lance-Corporal Seaman that his company was enabled to push forward to its objective, and capture many prisoners.

BAR TO M.C.

The Commander-In-Chief of the B.E.F. has made an award of a Bar to the Military Cross to Second Lieutenant T. J. Adams, M.C., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, for conspicuous gallantry in action last month. Second Lieutenant Adams is a son of Mr. Thomas Adams, Tullywinney, Ballygawley.

DERRYGONNELLY MAN WINS D.C.M.

The Distinguished Conduct Medal has been awarded to Sergeant J. Foy, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (Derrygonnelly, County Fermanagh)

For conspicuous gallantry in command of his platoon during an attack. When an enemy machine gun attempted to check his advance he came round its flank and with another man charged it and captured the gun and four prisoners. He set a splendid example of courage and determination to his men.

The Cork Eagle records the death in hospital of Cadet Frank Semple of the Royal Air Force, son of Mr. John Semple, Bandon, and formerly of the General Manager’s office, Great Northern Railway, Enniskillen. The “funeral at Cavereham Cemetery was a military one, and the coffin was covered with wreaths. Mr. Semple’s eldest son, Herbert, a brilliant scholar, also gave up a career of bright promise to serve his country and fell in her cause.

PRIVATE JAMES MCTEGGART. Mrs. Quinn, Henry-street, Enniskillen, has been informed that her brother, James McTeggart was killed in action on the 7th November. He had seen much active service with the Inniskillings at the Dardanelles in the retreat from Servia, and in Palestine, before coming to France. His captain in a letter of sympathy says—‘His pals and I miss him very much as he had done good service for the battalion. He was struck by a bullet in the head and death was instantaneous. He is nearly the last of the good old boys who came out with the battalion.’

Private Wm. Manly, 9th Inniskillings, from Tullyavey, died in action on the 29th September, leaving a wife and seven children. His brother, who also had worked at Riversdale, had also served In the army, having served in the 27th Inniskillings in the Boer war. Trory parish yielded 37 of the Protestant men to the army at the call.

Private Bernard Drum, of the Royal Inniskillings has been at home on leave, after having been six months in hospital from wounds received in France, and has gone to Oswestry to join the reserve battalion of the regiment.

Clones and the Epidemic. SHORTAGE OF MEDICAL MEN.

Clones has been terribly in the grip of the Spanish influenza, and suffered all the more because that Dr. Henry, who has a wide circle of patients and the Union hospitals under his charge, became a patient himself.

The town found itself with only one doctor available to minister to the whole district, Dr. Tierney, and lamentable cases on every side. But Clones rose to the occasion. Its chief men met, as they generally do, as neighbours and friends, not as politicians, and subscribed money to meet the emergency; the ladies of the town provided meals for the poor; and by good luck one young doctor was found to take up medical duty in the district, and Mr. Knight obtained the friendly advice of Dr. Kidd of Enniskillen as to procedure; and Dr. Kidd advised among other things, that the assistance of men of the Army Medical Corps at  Enniskillen headquarters be requested, to enable nursing and care to be attended to.

Since then, the so-called influenza has got a bad grip of the Clones district, it has also brought its people together to meet the danger and combat it; and we trust their praiseworthy effort will meet with the success which it deserves.

The Recent boxing tournament in Enniskillen for the benefit of Inniskilling prisoners of war resulted in a net profit of £57, which has been sent to the Secretary of the fund at Omagh.

Sale of Fruit to Householders.—Instances having been brought to the knowledge of the Food Control Committee for Ireland, that apples are being sold to householders and others at prices in excess of those set out in the Apples and Perry Pears (Sales) Order, the attention of consumers is directed to the advertisement which appears in this issue.

The Cattle Feeding Staffs supply to Ireland is to be increased.

The German Army committed continual robberies in its retreat, including herds of cattle, carts, chickens, clothing, and vehicles.

The rumour is Revived that the ex-Czar is alive, and that he may be replaced on the Russian throne.

The Galway Board of Guardians have felt hurt that out of 156 circulars sent out, asking that medical practitioners who have been interned for political offences should be released to relieve the scarcity of medical practitioners, only five applies should have been returned, and of these one (Belfast) was against the resolution. Dungannon burned it.

A BIG FIRE AT THE GRAAN MONASTERY. HUNDREDS OF POUNDS DAMAGE.

A destructive fire, entailing the loss of several hundred pounds worth of property, broke out at the Gabriel Retreat, The Graan, about two miles from, Enniskillen, in the early hours of Sunday morning. Residing at the Retreat are four or five priests and about twelve students or novitiates of the Passionists Order of the Roman Catholic Church.

Shortly before one o’clock on Sunday morning one of the resident brothers observed a light in the office-houses near the main dwelling, and upon investigating the matter found the building was on fire. He immediately raised an alarm, but by this time the whole building where the cattle were stalled was a mass of flames. There being no efficient fire extinguishing apparatus about the place, efforts were made to quell the outbreak by means buckets of water drawn from water barrels near by, but these were quite ineffectual.

Word of the fire having been sent to Mr. Christopher Bracken, whose residence is close at hand, both that gentleman and his eldest son were soon on the scene, and worked very hard in assisting the inmates in their fight against the flames. Despite all exertions, however, eight valuable cows, worth from £40 to £50 each and also two calves were burned to death, while the byres, calf-house, and piggeries were razed to the ground. Fortunately the fire did not spread to the large barns attached, in which much corn, hay, and other inflammable material were stored, else the loss would have been considerably heavier. As it was, a valuable staircase, a huge quantity of glass, and other articles intended for use in the new building at present in course of construction, and which were stored temporarily in one of the office-houses, were all burned.

1916

Fermanagh Herald February 5th 1916.  THRESHING IN COUNTY LEITRIM.  During the week Messrs. W. E. Pye and William Johnston, Kinlough, attended at Messrs.  T. J. Rooney’s, Foxfield, E Thompson, Cherrybrook, with a steam thresher, for the purpose of giving demonstrations on the threshing of oats etc..  The thresher is one of powerful capabilities, having thrashed, cleaned and gathered 120 stone of oats per hour.  The ease and comfort with which work can now be done by the use of up-to-date machinery should be a great encouragement to the farmers of the county to increase the cultivation of crops during the coming season.

Fermanagh Herald February 5th 1916.  WOULD NOT LEAVE THE WORKHOUSE.  An interesting discussion arose over an inmate from Killybuggy.  It would appear that this woman was in the habit of living with her married daughter and was in receipt of the old age pension.  She went away from her daughter’s house and sought refuge in the Manorhamilton Union.  Her daughter appeared before their Guardians asking that our mother be requested to leave the workhouse and go back to live with her as heretofore.  The Guardians could not persuade the woman to leave the house so they allowed her to stay for the present.

February 10th 1916.  THE FAITHFUL HORSE.  A remarkable story of a horse’s faithfulness is related in the monthly magazine of the Claremont Mission Pentonville N.,  by one of the Coldstream Guards Regiment.  After the fierce fighting at Loos he writes it was noticed that there was a horse standing between the firing lines.  For two days he remained there.  Then some of our men crawled out and found that he was standing by the dead body of his rider and would not leave the spot.  Later on some of our men bravely arranged to get out to the horse again, blindfolded him and brought them back to our lines.  By no other means could the faithful beast be persuaded to leave its dead master.  F.T.

February 10th 1916.  NOTES.  Certain areas in the United Kingdom have now been forbidden to aliens.  In Ireland these included the counties of Dublin, Cork and Kerry.

The Compulsory Service Order of England comes into force today.  Unmarried men from 19 years to 30 are being called up, the last of them to report by March 3.

An old Crimean veteran named Matthew Johnston, has died as a pay patient in Enniskillen Workhouse hospital on Tuesday.  He had served under the late Col. Johnston of Snowhill and told how he used to carry biscuits from Balaclava to Sebastopol sometimes in his bare feet in the snow.  He received a special service pension about 15 years ago.  He will be buried today. I.R.

February 10th 1916.  SERGEANT J.  FYFFE 18TH ROYAL IRISH, rushed home from his regiment in France to see his father in Eden Street, Enniskillen, but before he could reach home his father had passed away.  Sergeant Fyffe is a smart young soldier and instructor of athletics in his battalion.  He met James and Willie Quinn of the Diamond, Enniskillen of the 5th Royal Irish Rifles near his own battalion in France and says that the Ulster division with the local battalion lay not far off from where his own battalion was located.  The Ulster division and other Divisions are on the best of terms.  All are comrades out there, no matter from the south or north and all are much superior in physique and in condition to the German soldiers.  The German soldiers would desert in numbers but that their own officers tell them that they would be shot at once if taken by the British.  One of the prisoners taken by the 18th on Christmas night was so frightened and he begged his captors to leave him his German head: he was led to believe that his head would be cut off.  The well-known action at the Brickfields reduced the 18th from 1,100 to about 43 men, they were so decimated.  The Germans, Sergeant Fyffe says, no longer advance in solid masses as they used to do, but in open formation.  They had suffered so much by the former that they were taught a lesson. I.R.

February 10th 1916.  THE 12TH INNISKILLINGS.  A draft of the 12th Inniskillings stationed at Enniskillen, has gone to the front and received a hearty send off, the whole of the battalion lining up and heartily cheering their departing comrades.  The officers of the battalion bade the men farewell at the Railway Station.  With the drafts leaving were the following officers – Second Lieutenants Allen, McKinley, Baker, Shannon and Reid.  The fine corps of drums played the men off to the tunes of “The girl I left behind me”, and to “Keep the home fires burning”, while at intervals “Auld Lang Syne” was played.  Among the men of the draft are some old soldiers who saw service in South Africa.  The order for departure was received only one hour before train time and so the townspeople had not an opportunity of knowing of the departure of the men, and of giving them a fitting send off. I.R.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  OBITER DICTA.  THE CONVENT BELL.  There is apparently no limit to the appalling pomposity of a certain set of Protestants, who are unfortunately in Enniskillen.  But happily their influence is nil.  Nevertheless that little bird  known as rumour has just hopped on my table and told me a surprising story concerning the Convent bell.  The hint is quite sufficient for this sect.  I write the above just to let them know that I am fully conversant with all of the leading facts, and I’m seriously thinking of pulling back the veil in a short time and exposing the bigoted scheme.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  DROMORE BISHOPRIC.  APPOINTMENT OF THE VERY REV. EDWARD CANON MULHERN, D. D., P.  P., INISHMACSAINT.  A Reuter’s cable from Rome of Monday’s date intimates that, on the recommendation of the Consistorial Congregation, his Holiness the Pope has appointed the very Rev. Edward Canon Mulhern of Inishmacsaint to be Lord Bishop of Dromore in succession to the late most Rev. Dr. O’Neill.  The new Bishop-elect is a native of Ederney, County Fermanagh and received his early education at St. Macartan’s seminary Monaghan where he ranked among the most successful students of his time.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  IT WILL BE LEARNED WITH REGRET that Private S.  H.  Young, of the 8th Highland Light Infantry, and brother of Mr. D.  Young, Omagh, was killed by shrapnel in France on the 21st of January.  Private Young was a native of Belleek, County Fermanagh and was employed for some time in Messrs.  White Bros.’ hardware establishment in Omagh.  After the outbreak of the war he joined the colours and went on active service about October last.  The news of his death was conveyed in a letter from the chaplain of the regiment, who states that he was buried with his Scottish comrades.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  CAPTAIN D’ARCY IRVINE KILLED.  Captain Charles William D’Arcy Irvine 6th Service Battalion, Leinster Regiment, who is reported in Monday’s casualty list to have been killed in action at the Dardanelles, was reported wounded and missing, believed killed, in September last.  He was the eldest son of Major Charles Cockburn D’Arcy Irvine, J.P. of Castle Irvine, Irvinestown, and of Fannie Kathleen, daughter of the late Lt. Colonel Jesse Lloyd, of Ballyleck, County Monaghan.  He was a grandson of the late Captain W. D’Arcy Irvine, D. L. of the 67th Regiment now the 2nd Battalion Hampshire Regiment, and his great grandfather, the late Mr. W. D’Arcy Irvine of Castle Irvine served at Waterloo with the 1st Dragoon Guards.  Captain C. W. D’Arcy Irvine who was 31 years of age, served for a time in the 3rd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles.  He afterwards transferred to the Leinster Regiment, and accompanied the 6th Battalion to the Dardanelles last year, taking part in the Suvla Bay operations.  His services were mentioned in dispatches by General Sir Ian Hamilton.

Fermanagh Herald February 12th 1916.  AGAINST FEMALE LABOUR AT PIT HEAD.  The Executive, Committee of the Northumberland Miners have resolved to oppose the introduction of female labour at the pit head, and recommended instead a rearrangement of male labour.  Their contention is there are many strong men at the bank who might be better employed underground, and many discarded old men who could be re-employed.  There are no pit head woman workers in Northumberland.

More 1916 Gazing Into Eternity.

MunitionsFermanagh Herald January 1st 1916. The wages earned on munitions by many women and girls without any previous knowledge or experience are surprisingly large, says the Daily News.  It would be very interesting to know what is the biggest average weekly earnings of a female “hand” who can be legitimately classed as an amateur.  The managing director of a munitions factory told the writer recently that he had several girls who, without any training before they came to him, were each receiving nearly £4 a week after a month at his works.  “They beat heaps of men hollow,” he added “naturally there are men who don’t like it.  But that’s their lookout.  The labourer is worthy of his or her higher in war time or in peace.”

January 6th 1916.  HOW OUR MEN SAVED THE DAY.  THE RETREAT FROM SERBIA.  THE ROYAL INNISKILLINGS.  In a vivid and thrilling story of the heroism of the Irish troops in the retreat from Serbia, ‘F’ in the Weekly dispatch says:-  Nothing finer can be imagined than the heroic stand of the depleted 10th division who rallied under the attacks of overwhelming forces to the cry of – ‘Stick it, jolly boys; give ‘em hell, Connaughts.’  A few thousand Irishman and a few hundred Englishmen turned what might have been a disaster into a successful retreat just as surely as the artillery of the Second Corps at daybreak on August 26, 1914, ‘the most critical date of all,’ turned what might have been an annihilating attack into a successful retirement.  In the first trenches were the Connaughts, the Munsters, the Dublin Fusiliers, the Hampshires and the Inniskillings, the latter – to a large extent Ulsterman – holding the extreme right wing.  Dawn had scarcely broken when the enemy made his expected attack.  The conditions wholly favoured him for a fairly dense fog prevailed and under its cover the Bulgars were able to get within 300 yards of parts of our line without being observed. I.R.

The Inniskillings were the first to be attacked; about 5.00 a.m. their outposts were driven in, and then a great mass of the enemy swooped down on the trenches, but were driven back by the fire of our Maxim guns and by the steady magazine fire which came from the trenches.  Scarcely had the attack on the extreme right of the line had time to develop the main body of Bulgarians were seen running down a defile leading to the centre of our front.  As they reached the end of the defile and the spread out as from a bottleneck and with wild cheers flung themselves on our line.  But before they had got so far our guns smashed and battered the procession of men leaping out of the narrow gorge.  It was impossible to miss them.  British artillery have never had such a target since the first battle of Ypres, when the guns literally mowed down the half trained German soldiers who attacked on the Yser.

The brave Irish regiments were pouring led into them as fast as they could load their rifles.  The poured into the oncoming masses as much as 175 rounds at point blank range.  This will give an idea of the slaughter that went on this December morning as the dawn slowly beat the mist away.  Mingling with the roar of the artillery and the clatter-clatter of the machine guns and the sharp snap of the rifles were the hoarse cries of the half-maddened volunteers whose officers ever drove them on to the death that came quick and hot from the British trenches.  Men of splendid physique they were who faced the hail of lead, cheering in a sort of wild enthusiasm of battle with bugles and trumpets blowing defiant challenges, as in their knightly days of the tourney.  They did not know many of them whether they were attacking French, British or Turks, but unquestioning, unthinking he came on with the fearlessness of life deserving of a better cause, leaping into a trenches and falling dead with a bullet in their throat of bayonet wound in their breast, or with head blown off by one of our shells.

But it was, for all our grim resistance, a hopeless kind of struggle.  Sooner or later that unceasing stream of men issuing out of the narrow defile must sweep us back.  Always the enemy returned to the charge, undeterred by heavy losses, undismayed by our deadly gun and magazine fire.  The line held and to their cheers we gave back answer and to their cries we gave answer with our own cries and if sometimes the line faltered the shouts of officers and men: “Stick it, jolly boys, give them hell, Connaughts brought new life and new strength.  They outnumbered the 10th division in the proportion of at least 8 to 1 and they were obstinately bent on its destruction at whatever cost to themselves.  Their artillery far exceeded ours in weight of metal but in effectiveness there was not a comparison.  Almost all of our shells told when many of theirs did no more than splinter rocks yards away.  The division never lost its cohesion and it gave ground only at the rate of 2 miles a day, which is a proof, if any were needed, of the splendid rearguard action that this so much outnumbered force fought.

In the two days battle the 10th Division inflicted on the enemy at least four times their own number of casualties and what is possibly equally important they taught him the temper and moral of British infantry.  The 10th division saved the situation by a display of courage and dogged heroism that cannot be too highly praised. It is hard to explain how the 10th division encompassed as it was, won through, and perhaps the most satisfactory thing to do is to fall back on the explanation of the Connaught Ranger whose only grumble is that he was kept 12 hours fighting without food; “They beat us with numbers.  We couldn’t hope to hold up against the crowd they sent against us, a daft, clumsy gang of men.  We gave them hell but their numbers beat us.”

January 6th 1916.  THE DARDANELLES.  THE WITHDRAWAL.  THE TURKS OUTWITTED IN A BRILLIANT OPERATION.  The withdrawal in the Dardanelles was the most difficult and dangerous work that has yet been undertaken in this campaign.  It was completed in the small hours of the 28th Inst…  The entire reserve of ammunition and nearly all the stores were removed from the beaches under the eyes and guns of a powerful Turkish army which had never realized that the operation had begun until some hours after the last officers of the naval beach parties had shipped us to their packet boats and steamed away.  Lord Kitchener in November brought the fact home to most of us that the whole position here was under review by the highest authorities.  That the withdrawal could be done without a loss at all entered into no one’s calculation.

The problem was to withdraw divisions and  their gear occupying a front of roughly 20,000 yards in length, which was hardly anywhere more than 500 yards, and at some places not more than 50 yards from the enemies trenches, and embark them from beaches which were nowhere beyond field gun range of the enemy positions, and in places actually not more than 50 yards from the enemies trenches and embark them from beaches which were nowhere beyond field gun range of the enemy positions and in places actually within rifle range of them..  The Turks occupied higher ground and nearly all of the Suvla Bay area was visible to them.  The suffering of the men from cold, wet and exposure had been so severe that thousands had to be sent away to recover and frostbite became for a while as bad as it had been last year in Flanders.  The sufferings of the Turks were at least as bad. I.R.

Fermanagh Herald January 15th 1916.  THE TURKISH VERSION.  A Constantinople telegram of today states that during the night, as the result of a violent battle the British completely evacuated Sedd-El-Bahr, with great losses.  Not a single soldier remained behind.  The Gallipoli Peninsula is now clear of the enemy.  All Constantinople is bedecked with flags to celebrate this victory.  Everywhere demonstrations of joy are evident.  In the mosques and churches thanksgiving services are being held.  During the evening the city was illuminated.

Fermanagh Herald January 15th 1916.  THE OPERATIONS.  The Dardanelles operations began on February 19, 1915 when a general attack by the Allied squadrons was delivered.  The combined land and sea operation as did not begin until April, 25th, following the failure of the naval operations to force their Dardanelles.  The memorable landing of troops took place in the early morning when the Irish regiments suffered such terrible losses on what was known as “V” beach.

January 20th 1916.  ON A DEAD MAN’S LAP. AIRMAN’S EXPLOIT AT A HEIGHT OF 10,000 FEET.  This story is related in the Daily News in a letter just received from a young officer attached to the Royal Flying Corps now a prisoner in Germany.  Poor B! I was so sorry he was killed, he writes.  He was such a nice boy and only 19.  I had a fight with two German aeroplanes and then a shell burst very close to us and I heard a large piece whizzing past my head.  Then the aeroplane started to come down headfirst spinning all the time.  We must have dropped to about 5,000 feet in about 20 seconds.  I looked around at once and saw  poor B with a terrible wound in his head quite dead.  I then realized that the only chance of saving my life was to step over into his seat and sit on his lap where I could reach the controls.  I managed to get the machine out of that terrible death plunge, switched off the engine and made a good landing on terra firma.  We were 10,000 feet up when B was killed and luckily it was this tremendous height that gave me time to think and act.  I met one of the pilots of the German machines which attacked me.  He could speak English quite well and we shook hands after a most thrilling fight.  I brought down his aeroplane with my machine gun and he had to land close to where I landed.  There was a bullet through his radiator and petrol tank but neither he nor his observer was touched. Fermanagh Times.

January 27th 1916.  INNISKILLING PRISONERS INTERNED IN GERMANY RENDER THANKS FOR THE GIFTS.  Our donations towards the prisoners of war have been greatly increased by the generous donations of Irvinestown per Mrs. D’Arcy Irvine of Castle Irvine and we are sending it out to those for whom it is intended.  It is 48 lbs of sugar, 10 lbs of tea, 10 tins of Oxo, 12 packets of cocoa, 2 lbs of candles and 16 tins of sardines.  I understand that some tins of condensed milk are on their way also, for all of which we are deeply indebted to our loyal friends in Irvinestown. Impartial Reporter.

January 27th 1916.   OUTLOOK FOR FARMERS – ARE THEY MAKING BIG PROFITS?  Never since the war began has the industrial community in Ireland reached a graver crisis.  Foodstuffs are rising rapidly, Meal is almost at a prohibitive price, and unless the farmers bestir themselves ruin may affect many of them before the war be out.  We do not wish to be alarmist, but facts must be faced as they are found.  About last October the present crisis really began.  There was a serious shortage of shipping to Ireland, and the consequence was that freight rose, with the result that the condition of affairs has steadily being getting worse, and if it continue much longer business will be paralysed and the price of all articles of food be at famine rates.

Farmers, no doubt, have made large sums of money through the war.  Cattle have been sold at enhanced prices; milk and butter produced at almost the same cost as before the war, have maintained a steady advance of about 50 per cent; and pork reached the record figure of 82s per cwt in Enniskillen market on Tuesday and on yesterday at Irvinestown 83s per cwt.  Against all this, feeding stuffs, through the present shortage of shipping and not through traders inflated profits, as some allege have advanced enormously.  Meal, the staple fattening food for pigs and fowl, which a short time ago could have been purchased for 13s a cwt, is now at 28s.  This price has frightened small farmers, and many have disposed of their pigs and ceased keeping them as they feared a loss.  Prices are alarming, but more a

Fermanagh Times December 2nd 1915.  PEACE.  ENNISKILLEN PRESBYTERIAN DIFFERENCES SETTLED.  HAPPY ENDING TO THEIR QUARREL.  We are extremely pleased to be able to announce that the differences which arose in the Enniskillen Presbyterian Church over the appointment of a successor to the late Rev. S. C. Mitchell have been amicably settled and the congregation will consequently now revert to its former strength, which was seriously depleted by the abstention from attendance of the dissenting members, who numbered one third of the whole.

Throughout the entire controversy, which has now existed for some months, the Fermanagh Times was the only newspaper in the County which give a true or correct report of the state of things actually existing and was the only newspaper to urge on every possible occasion a reconciliation between the opposing factions.  Happily this has now come about, and the final proceedings at which this happy ending of the trouble was reached justified in every detail the attitude adopted by us from the beginning.  The matter came before a meeting of the Clogher Presbytery in Maguiresbridge last week as result of a memorial received from the minority, and certain members of the Presbytery were then appointed to meet representatives of the minority in Enniskillen on Monday last, and discuss the whole situation.  This meeting duly took place and after a lengthy sitting, lasting nearly three hours, a document was drawn up and signed by the representatives of both parties expressing regret for any heat which had been displayed in the past, and a mutual wish for the future welfare and progress of the congregation.  The minority made it quite clear that it had not been to Rev. A. J. Jenkins, personally, they had objected, but to what they termed the questionable and objectionable methods adopted by one or two of his more prominent supporters during the progress of the election.

 

Fermanagh Times December 2nd 1915.  RECRUITING AND THE POPULATION. FACTS ABOUT FERMANAGH.  In a letter from Pro Patria dated from County Fermanagh in the Irish Times it states: –  In the first place, I may state that the farmers sons show no willingness to join the Army.  Their father say that they are needed at home, but I fear that this is due not only to the natural affection they have for them, but also – and, perhaps, principally – to the money the farmers have been making since the war began, very little of which has found its way into the War Loan.  With their sons help, they hope further to fatten on the needs of others.  The utter selfishness of this class of the community constitutes one of the chief obstacles to recruiting from this source, and has a reflex action upon other sources – namely the labouring class.  The labourers say:  “While should we go when men like the farmers who have their farms to fight for, won’t go?”  Though they say this yet probably as a class they have done better for the King and country than any others – with the possible exception of the county families.

In the next place –and here politics and religion, which, like the poor, are ever with us, come in – the Unionist young men say that they are quite willing to enlist if the Nationalist also enlist; for it is a notorious fact that very few of the latter have done so from here since the present crisis arose.  The proportion of recruits from a population almost equally divided religiously and politically is heavily in favour of the Unionist side – in the ratio of 30 to 1 or even higher.

 

Impartial Reporter.  December 2nd 1915.  A FERMANAGH SENSATION AS THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNTY COUNCIL IS SUSPENDED FROM THE MAGISTRACY.  The announcement of the suspension from the Magistry of Mr. John McHugh, Pettigo will cause a profound sensation in County Fermanagh.  Mr. McHugh is the Chairman of the Fermanagh County Council.  He has been for a number of year’s Justice of the Peace for County Fermanagh and sat on the bench for the Lack and Kesh districts.  As chairman of the County Council Mr. McHugh has influence on other county committees of which he was ex-officio a member.  He is also the Chairman of the County Fermanagh Old Age Pensions Committee.  On the bench Mr. McHugh was a good Magistrate –very much better than, and indeed an example to, a large number of the present magistrates in the county.  His removal from the Bench was nothing to do with his conduct as a magistrate, but as a public man holding public office on behalf of the ratepayers.

THE CAUSE OF HIS SUSPENSION.  Mr. McHugh is an auctioneer in business and so keen was the competition in his part of the county that he wrote letters to farmers canvassing for the sale of their farms.  It was in this that he proved most improper.  In one letter that he wrote –and it is alleged that several were written in a similar strain –Mr. McHugh promised a farmer, in return for giving him the sale to procure for him the old age pension as he had great influence with the Old Age Pension Committee.  The letter was handed over to the Crown authorities.  The incriminating document in due course was brought before the Lord Chancellor, Right Hon.  Ignatius O’Brien, who wrote to Mr. McHugh for any explanation he had to make.  That explanation evidently was not satisfactory and accordingly a writ of supersedeas was issued on the 23rd.  As to the public positions Mr. McHugh holds the Local Government Board control them and it remains to be seen if that Board will take any action.

 

Impartial Reporter.  December 2nd 1915.  VARIOUS.  500 recruits per day is the very loyal response of South Africa to the appealed for more men.  Australia is sending 50,000 more soldiers.

A parade of a rebel Sinn Feiners was held in Cork on Sunday when Anti –British speeches were made and congratulations offered to the R. C.  Bishop of Limerick on his extraordinary letter.

The Orange and Protestant Friendly Society Pettigo branch will hold a general meeting in Dernasesk Orange Hall on Saturday evening December 4 at 7.00 to elect officers and Committee for 1916.  J.  Johnston, Sec.

 

Fermanagh Times December 9th 1915.  The announcement made by Mr. Asquith that the British casualties have passed the half a million mark comes home to us all.  In the wars of the past there is nothing to compare with this, for hitherto we had always been accustomed to fight battles with small forces of professionals, and, since the idea of a nation in arms became a reality, our insular position has saved us from being entangled in European conflicts.  At any other period in English history no Government would have admitted such losses without the risk of an upheaval that would have endanger the whole fabric of the state.

Fermanagh Times December 9th 1915.  There is one other way in which the Irish Nationalists might do an immense service to recruiting in Ireland – by appealing to the Roman Catholic Church to alter its attitude.  It is the universal testimony of all recruiting officers that one of the greatest obstacles is for them conviction that the Church is against it.  Every Irishman knows the power of the Church over her people, how they are in absolute subjection to her commands, how they cannot for the most part even form an opinion, or still act, without the  Church’s knowledge and consent.  When, therefore, the members of the Church form, as he certainly has done, a firm opinion that the Church does not look favourably upon enlisting, what a poor chance and there must be for the recruiting sergeant.

 

Fermanagh Times December 9th 1915.  THE 11TH BATTALION.  MUD 3 FEET DEEP.  PROSPEROUS ORANGE LODGE IN THE REGIMENT.  HUNDREDS OF PLUM PUDDINGS DISPATCHED.  Rain and cold and mud everywhere, is the story told by practically all the boys in the 11th Battalion, who have written during the past week.  One correspondent, as will be seen below, speaks of mud in the trenches 3 feet deep, and what this means to the unfortunate young lads compelled to remain there for days at a time we, at home, cannot however adequately realise.  The boys, however, continue in excellent spirits and enjoy good health, and that is after all the main thing.

 

Fermanagh Times December 9th 1915.  MARRIAGE OF CAPTAIN PORTER, BELLEISLE.  The marriage of Captain John Grey Porter, D. S. O., (Queen’s Royal) Lancers, eldest son of Mr. John Porter–Porter, D. L., Belleisle, County Fermanagh, who is home from the front on leave, and Miss Enid Mary Duff–Assheton–Smith, only daughter of the late Mr. George William Duff–Assheton-Smith, of Vaynol, Carnarvon, and Mrs. Holdsworth, wife of Colonel George Holdsworth, 7th Hussars, took place on Monday at Saint George’s, Hanover Square, very quietly owing to the war.  The function which was distinctly a war wedding, came as a surprise to all but intimate friends, for news of the short engagement had been imparted only to the family circle.

 

Fermanagh Times December 9th 1915.  LOCAL MILITARY NEWS.  OLD FERMANAGH FAMILY BEREAVED.  CAPTAIN.  V. L. Y. DANE KILLED .  The death has been officially reported of Captain             Victor Dane 22nd Punjabia, Indian Army.  Captain Dane was one of a considerable number of Anglo-Indian officers who fell in the fighting near Baghdad prior to the British retirement on Kulel-Mara.  He was the second son of the late Colonel Arthur Henry Cole Dane, M. D. Indian Medical Service, grandson of the late Richard Dane M. D., C. B., Inspector–General of Hospitals, who died in 1901, and great grandson of the late Mr. Richard Martin Dane, D. L., Killyhevlin, Fermanagh, the former High Sheriff of that county.  Captain Dane was educated at Sandhurst and joined the Scottish Rifles in 1905, transferring to the Indian Army in 1906, and received his captaincy last year.  His father spent most of his life in India, where two of his brothers have served the State in High offices, one, Sir Louis W.  Dane, K. C. I. E., C. S. I., having been Lieutenant Governor of the Punjab from 1908 to 1913 and the other, Sir Richard Maurice Dane, K. C. I.E., having been Inspector–General of Excise and Salt in India 1907 to 1909 in addition having held other important offices in the Indian Civil Service. The late County Court Judge Dane, who was M.P. for North Fermanagh 1892 to 1898, was a nephew of Richard Martin Dane, M. D., C. B., already referred to and the present head of the family is Mr. James Whiteside Dane, Bonniebrooke, Co., Fermanagh, and Castle Warden, Co., Kildare, of which county he is Clerk of the Crown and Peace.  The Danes have been connected with Fermanagh since 1667, when John Dane settled at Enniskillen.  His eldest son, Paul Dane, of Killyhevlin was Provost of Enniskillen 1687 to 1689, and was present at the battle of the Boyne.  The only brother of the deceased is in the navy.  Every member of the Dane family is either in the Army or the Navy, except one engaged in munition work.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 11 1915.  The Post Office issues the following: – No postage stamps issued during Queen Victorious reign are now valid.  All the adhesive and impressed stamps of those issues which had up to that time remained valid were, in accordance with the announcement made in May last, invalidated after the end of June.  The public are reminded that no application to exchange any of the invalidated stamps for current stamps of equivalent value can be entertained unless made on or before the 31st of this month, at the Inland Revenue Offices, in London, Dublin, for Edinburgh.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 11 1915.  THE FIRST WIRELESS MESSAGE.  Maestro Rudolfe Ferrari, who in his picturesque fashion is now conducting the Chicago Opera orchestra and in his time has directed performances at Milan, Rome, Vienna, Madrid, Berlin, New York and Buenos Aires and singers such as Caruso, Tamagno, Calve, Chaliapin, and Titta Ruffo, likes to remember that Marconi when 11 years old was a pupil of his.

Marconi never took kindly to the piano.  He was a boy in Bologna, and one day he arrived for his lessons with grimy hands and a couple of boxes about a foot square.  “I was ordered,” says Ferrari, “to take one of them to a high hill while the lad went to the roof of my house with the other.  He gave me a pistol and told me if I heard a suspicious clicking to fire it.  I had half an idea that the box was an infernal machine, but I out his instructions – the boy’s enthusiasm was so beautiful –and toiled up that hill.  I sat down and opened the box.

“By and by I heard a click, and then a series of clicks.  I let off the pistol, and presently up ran Marconi, hatless and coatless, wildly excited.  ‘You heard?  You heard?’  I responded that I had.  It was the first wireless event ever sent.  What was the message?  I asked him, and he answered with a smile, “There is music in the air!  Ferrari’s efforts on Marconi’s musical education were not altogether wasted.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 11 1915.  OPENING OF SAINT MARY’S NEW SCHOOL DERRYHALLOW MULEEK.  On last Wednesday, the 1st of December Saint Mary’s National School, Derryhallow, in the Mulleek District of Pettigo parish, was opened for the admission of almost 50 pupils.  On the previous day the Feast of Saint Andrew, this beautiful school that has cost over £500 was blessed by the manager Very Rev. George Canon McMeel D.D., P.P., Pettigo, who at the same time installed Mr. John Kane as its principal teacher.  Owing to landlord intolerance in the past no suitable site could be procured for love or money for the building of a school for the Catholics on this estate, with the result that the present teacher as well as his late respected father were obliged to hold forth the lamp of learning to these downtrodden and persecuted people for upwards of half a century in a thatched cabin that was little better than a hovel.

As the mill of the Lord grinds slowly but surely, these tyrannical laws were at last swept away by the fierce agitation that has been carried on for the past 35 years by Messrs. Parnell and Redmond with the other members of the Irish Parliamentary Party, backed up by the ever loyal priests and the warm-hearted catholic people of Ireland.

When at the present energetic parish priest Dr. McMeel came to Pettigo parish he made up his mind to make the unfortunate tenants on this estate the owners of the land they tilled, and at once took steps through the Estates Commissioners to buy out their farms.  In this he succeeded admirably, so that at present their annuities are not  40 per cent of their former rack-rents.  Moreover, he succeeded in getting about 400 acres of the richest lands in demesne that surrounds the Bloomfield castle split up into reasonably sized plots, which were mostly allocated to the holders of uneconomic farms in the district; and by means of which these poor people are able to raise sufficient hay to feed their cattle during the winter.  It is unnecessary to give all the details of this purchase, including the troublesome question of turbary, which always gives great annoyance in the sale of any estate.  On this estate, however, the turbary question was settled satisfactorily by the tenants, who are assured of a plentiful supply of turf for centuries to come.

The landlord’s prohibitive power being now cleared away, the question of acquiring a suitable site was rendered comparatively easily.  When Mr. William N. Monaghan, Derryhallow, was approached, for a site, he, at once consented to give for the, on reasonably fair terms, a site which is most centrally situated for the children of this wide locality.  The obtaining of the usual grant from the Board of Works was a matter of great difficulty, which after years of persevering was at length overcome.  The plans and specifications having been drawn up, and a competent contractor having been selected, the work went ahead until the long wished for end was accomplished, and the splendid school with all its modern and up-to-date improvements has been thrown open amidst the joy and jubilation of the people.  To make the opening of the school a red letter day, the ladies of the neighbourhood provided a plentiful supply of tea, cakes, and apples for the youngsters, which they heartily enjoyed.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 11 1915.  THE SAD DEATH OF A YOUNG FERMANAGH MAN IN MANCHESTER.  With feelings of deep sorrow the relatives and friends of the late Mr. Lawrence Keon learned of his untimely demise at a hospital in Manchester, as a result of an accident. Deceased, who was a son of Mr. John Keon, D.C., Cornahilta, Belleek, was employed at the Oldham Road, Manchester, goods station, and on October 30th, after returning from his tea, when passing between two wagons was accidentally knocked down by one of them, the wheels of the wagon crushing his leg in such a manner as to necessitate his removal to hospital, where despite everything that medical science could do to prolong his life, septic poisoning developed, and he passed peacefully away fortified by the rites of the Catholic Church, of which he was an exemplary member.

 

Fermanagh Times December16th 1915.  GALLANT STAND OF THE INNISKILLINGS FACING OVERWHELMING ODDS AND HARDLY A MAN ESCAPES.  ANXIETY IN FERMANAGH.  No details have yet to come to hand of the casualties suffered by two companies of the Inniskilling Fusiliers, who in the face of overwhelming odds held a ridge in Macedonia the other day for several hours, thus checking the Bulgarians advance and giving the remainder of the British and French troops a valuable opportunity to withdraw and complete their defensive positions further in the rear.  All we do know is that according to the reports sent by the Press Association “hardly a man escaped.”  We have been informed that already at least two Enniskillen families have received notices from the War Office of the death of members of the household in this particular engagement, but this statement we have, so far, been unable to verify.  Why the superb courage of the men of our Territorial regiments were not mentioned in the official dispatches is one of those mysteries of the war, which only the General responsible, or the Censor, can elucidate.  One thing is certain, however, that such omissions or eliminations do not tend to encourage recruiting in the districts concerned.

Fermanagh Times December16th 1915.  ENNISKILLEN SOLICITOR BEREAVED.  Very much sympathy will be felt throughout Fermanagh with Mr. George Atkinson, solicitor, on account of the death of his son Mr. Andrew George Atkinson, who succumbed on the 27th of November in hospital in Alexandria, to wounds received at the Dardanelles on the 29th of October.  Mr. Andrew Atkinson who would have been 24 years of age on the fourth of the present month went to Australia four years ago.  In November, 1914, he joined the Australian Contingent with which he was drafted to the Dardanelles in early summer last.  He was at the landing at Suvla Bay, and took part in practically all the subsequent operations in that part of the peninsula.  On the 29th of October he was very badly wounded, his skull being fractured.  From the first there was but little hope of his recovery, but a owing to his wonderful vitality and the remarkably skilful treatment he received in hospital his life was prolonged for a month all but a few days.  The surgeon, who treated him said he had never operated on a more healthy man.  Deceased was 6 feet high, was built in proportion and was one of the picked Australians.  He was most popular with all who knew him in Enniskillen and district, and his death will be felt with very much sorrow.  He was educated at Lisgoole Abbey and at Conway College, England. Two other sons of Mr. Atkinson’s are with the colours.  His eldest son, Captain John Atkinson, of the West Riding Yorkshire Regiment, and who has been several years in the Army, has been in the trenches in France for some time.  The other son, now in the army, is William Claude Hamilton Atkinson who came over with the Canadian Contingent and is undergoing training prior to being sent to the front.

 

Fermanagh Times December16th 1915.  ENNISKILLEN SOLDIER’S SUICIDE.  INVALIDED HOME FROM THE FRONT AND CUTS HIS THROAT WITH THE RAZOR.  A GHASTLY AFFAIR AT OMAGH.  Word reached Enniskillen yesterday of a shocking case of suicide which occurred at Omagh that morning, the victim being Private Henry Gallagher belonging to the Inniskilling Fusiliers.  Gallacher is a native of Enniskillen where, we are informed, he the tenant of a house, and was here for some time recently after returning from the front.  He was afterwards sent to the Depot at Omagh, where he was found in the military barracks yesterday morning quite dead with his throat cut and a razor in his hand.  At an inquest held later in the day the jury brought in a verdict of suicide while temporarily insane and expressed the opinion that this was probably the result of depression caused by his experiences in the war.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 18th 1915.  A FARMER’S TRAGIC MISTAKE.  HE DRANK POISON FOR RUM.  A SAD OCCURRENCE NEAR IRVINESTOWN.  An inquest was held at Dullaghan, near Dromore, on Tuesday evening touching the death of a farmer named John McCarron.  Patrick McCarron, Dullaghan, deceased’s cousin, gave evidence that on the 8th of December deceased called at his house on his way home from Irvinestown fair, and he told witness that he drank portion of the contents of a bottle, now produced.  He said he had drunk it in mistake for rum, a naggin of which he had in his pocket and he afterwards drunk a quantity of water from a bog hole, and did his best to vomit off the fluid which he had drunk in mistake for the rum.  While he was in witness’s house, witness gave him a little soft water and mustard and he vomited.  He was put to bed, and he remained there until Friday, vomiting at intervals during that period.  He complained his throat and breast were burning.  Deceased was about 42 years of age and unmarried he had drunk a portion of the contents of a bottle which was labelled “Poison” and marked “Ringworm Wash.”

 

Fermanagh Herald December 18th 1915.  MR. CARSON AND EGGS.  There is something in the spirit of Christmastide which stimulates the descendants of the great Mr. Bumble to acts of pompous, uncharitable valour which arouse nothing but intense loathing in all generous hearted mortals.  This year some of the Enniskillen Bumbles have a new weapon ready to their hands.  We are at war and economy has become a national virtue, nay, an urgent necessity, therefore let us insist, to some extent, upon those who are looking after the ratepayers interests being economical.  Mr. Bumble was ever valorous in the public welfare at the cost of someone else’s happiness, and such folk as the anti-egg majority on the Enniskillen Board of Guardians wear his mantle with distinction.  Mr. Crumley, M.P. it was, I believe, who first secured the officials an egg each every day, and at the last meeting of the Guardians the valorous Mr. Carson made a desperate attempt to do away with the officials eggs in the interest of economy.  Good gracious!  On that great day of reckoning when Mr. Carson’s grandchildren shall ask him what he did for his country in the Great War?  He will say proudly, “I initiated the fight against luxury, by endeavouring to stop the officials’ eggs!  I do not think the children of the future will be edified by the announcement.  Petty tyrannies are repugnant to children and all healthy youngsters despise meanness.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 18th 1915.  JOTTINGS. Under the Allies Restriction Order, Mrs Gallagher, lodging-house keeper, Head St., Enniskillen, was at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday fined 2s 6d for failing to register a Pole named Slakeman who resided in her house for one night.

That the present three shillings and sixpence in the pound on unearned incomes will be raised to five shillings in the pound and the lower rates of income tax in proportion is the general opinion of the next Budget in April, according to the London correspondent of the Yorkshire Post.

The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Dick, principles of Roscor and Cornahilta National Schools, Belleek, will be pleased to hear that they have been awarded by the Commissioners of National Education triennial increments of good service salary of £10 each, dating from the first of April last.  This recognition speaks volumes for the efficiency of the schools in their charge.

Captain R. B. Burgess, Royal Engineers who has died in France of wounds received on the 9th inst., was the only son of Mr. H. G. Burgess, manager in Ireland for the London and North Western Railway Company.  He was educated at Portora Royal School, Enniskillen and Dublin University and last year left a growing practice at the Irish Bar to join the Army Service Corps, from which he was transferred on promotion to the Royal Engineers.  He was a man of splendid physique and a noted Rugby football forward.

Private E.  G.E. Stewart, Irish Guards, brother of Dr. Stuart, J.  P., Belturbet, has died of his wounds in London.

Mr. George Atkinson, solicitor, and coroner for North Fermanagh, Skea Hall, Enniskillen, has received word that his third son, Mr. Andrew George Atkinson, aged 22, had died of wounds in Alexandria Hospital.  The deceased emigrated to Australia four years ago and came over to the Dardanelles with the Australian contingent.  He was at the landing at Suvla Bay and was afterwards very severely wounded at the back of the head.  Mr. Atkinson has two other sons in the Army, Captain John Atkinson, the West Riding Yorkshire Regiment at present in the trenches in France, and Mr. William Claude Hamilton.?

 

Fermanagh Herald December 18th 1915.  BRITISH AIR RAID.  The following telegraphic dispatch has been received from General Headquarters.  On the eighth six Dean of her aeroplanes bombed a store death four at Marymount and an aerodrome at heavily.  This attack was carried out in a highly westerly when it’s made a flying difficult.  All the machines returned safely, and considerable damage is believed to have been done to both objectives.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 18th 1915.  INNISKILLINGS AND GALLANT STAND.  HARDLY A MAN ESCAPED.  The magnificent work of the Irish in saving the French and British forces from being cut off retreat to Greece from Serbia is the subject of enthusiastic commendation not only in Ireland but throughout to the British dominions.  In the British communique published on Monday the Connaughts, the Munsters and the Dublins were especially marked out for praise and now the Inniskillings are mentioned as having behaved with magnificent bravery, hardly one of them now remaining.  The London newspaper suggests that the Irish regiments who took part in the action should be thanked by a special vote of thanks passed simultaneously in both Houses of Parliament.  The Bulgar’s attempt to break through the British line was rendered fruitless by the bravery of the Irish and although the engagement resulted in retirement, the enemy was made to appreciate the qualities of the foe to which he is now opposed.  Not only were they outnumbered by about 10 to 1 by the enemy who was abundantly provided with field and mountain artillery and machine guns.  The Bulgarian attack began at 3.00 on Monday morning and a tremendous hail of lead poured upon our trenches which also suffered from whistling fragments of stone, the Bulgarian high explosive shells splintering the rocks and sending fragments in all directions, was greatly intensifying the effect of their fire.

Two companies of the Inniskillings held on to the ridge known as Kevis Crest, and kept back the Bulgarians practically the whole morning, although they were backed only by rifle fire.  Hardly a man escaped, but their stand impressed and delayed the Bulgars, thus giving much needed time to complete our defensive dispositions on our third line, where the Bulgarians were finally held up.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915. THE GALLANT INNISKILLINGS.  STORY OF A GREAT SACRIFICE.  CRAWLING THROUGH A SEA OF MUD SHOULDER TO SHOULDER WITH THE DEAD.  The Daily News says: – The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who sacrificed two whole companies in the rear-guard action in Macedonia, are never spoken of by their full title in the army, but they are invariably described by themselves as well as by their comrades as “The Skins.”  We have been allowed to learn how, by sacrificing one half of its personnel, one battalion of the Inniskillings secured the retreat of the British forces in Macedonia; but no official story has been published of the great feat achieved by the 2nd battalion of this gallant regiment at Festubert.  Yet it was only the enterprise and daring of the 2nd “Skins” that made possible the success of the – – Division.

One attack against the German trenches had been made and had failed, and the ground between the opposing lines was strewn with the dead of both sides.  A second attack was ordered.  The 2nd Inniskillings were to lead the van in the principal sector, and the attack was to be made under cover of darkness.  The space between the trenches was about 200 yards and in spite of the pitch blackness of the night it was certain that the German machine guns and rifles would take a heavy toll before the trenches were reached.  But the Inniskillings mix brains with their bravery.  So soon after night fell, about eight p.m., they crept over the parapet, one by one they squirmed on their stomachs towards the German trenches.  Slowly and painfully they crawled through a sea of mud, from dead man to dead man, lying quite still whenever a star shell lighted up No Man’s Land.  By this method platoon after platoon had spread itself over the corpse strewn field, until the leaders were within a few yards of the German parapet.  Then came the hardest task of all to lie shoulder to shoulder with the dead until at midnight a flare give the signal to charge.  But the “Skins” held on through all the alarms of the night.  Occasionally bullets whistled across the waste, and some who had imitated death needed to pretend no longer.  But the toll was not heavy; it was infinitesimal by comparison with the cost of a charge from their own trenches.  When at last the flash lifted the suspense the leading platoons were in the German trenches before the occupants had time to lift their rifles.  They caught them in many cases actually asleep and because of their cuteness the Inniskillings paid less for the capture of the first and second lines of trenches than they might have done for the first alone.  The same cuteness made it possible for the whole division to sweep on and to score a victory where another division had previously found defeat.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915.  DANCE IN BELLEISLE.  On Friday night a very enjoyable dance was given by Captain Porter to the tenants and employee’s at Belle Isle.  Some 50 couples were present and dancing started at 9.00.  Captain Porter and his bride were given a most rousing reception as they entered the room, which was beautifully decorated.  Mrs. Porter was introduced to everyone present and she and her husband took part in the first couple of dances.  Mr. O’Keeffe was M. C., and the refreshments were looked after by Mrs. McDowell and Messrs. Shanks and Porter.  At supper the health of Captain and Mrs. Porter was duly proposed and heartily responded to.  Dancing was kept up till early morning and after a hearty vote of thanks had been returned to the gallant Captain the proceedings terminated by the singing of Auld Lang Syne followed by God Save the King.  The music was supplied by Mr. W. Scott, Enniskillen, assisted at intervals by Mr. Cathcart, Killygowan.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915.  CHRISTMAS 1915.  It is with a diffidence easily understood that we wish our readers the compliments of the season.  Old prescriptive usage scarcely justifies it in this year of grace of 1915.  “Peace on Earth; Goodwill towards Men” –how fall of emptiness, worse even how full of irony sounds the phrase when the most fertile and populous parts of the earth are covered with woe and desolation.  The crash of armed men, the rush of battle, the roar of mighty guns, the cry of strong men in their agony are a terrible, a sinister, forbidding echo to the wish, “A Merry Xmas and a Happy New Year.”

Never in the whole Christian era has there been a period of tragedy comparable to the present.  Ruin and devastation widespread, the loss of millions of human lives, the mutilation and crippling of other millions are features of the passing time that even the most thoughtless and careless cannot contemplate without almost the blackness of despair.  The record of  events throughout the whole theatre of war are absolutely appalling.

When will it end?  We know not.  To what good does it tend?  Writers treatise dissertations on the purifying influences and ennobling results of war.  The dreaming of visionaries!  The whole world cannot be turned into a hell and only virtue and its attributes to emerge from the fierce cauldron of brutality, massacre and tribulation.  The prospect is deplorable.  In the surrounding gloom we see not a ray of hope for the near future.  If German autocrats are responsible for the outbreak of the war plague, if to them primarily is due the awful affliction, the indescribable sorrow, the ravages and miseries that it has brought about, to British politicians, to their narrowness of view, their lack of vigour and intellectual and selfish infirmities must be attributed much of its prolongation and not a little of the waste and horrors of bloodshed and death by which it has been accompanied.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915.  BRITISH LEAVE THE DARDANELLES!  TROOPS, GUNS AND STORES REMOVED.

From http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/evacuation_dec15.htmBattles – The Evacuation of Anzac Cove, Suvla Bay and Helles, 1915-16. Preparing for the Allied evacuation of Suvla Bay, Gallipoli In the wake of the failure of the Allied attacks at Scimitar Hill and Hill 60 beginning 21 August 1915, intended to link the two Allied sectors of Anzac Cove and Suvla Bay, Mediterranean Commander-in-Chief Sir Ian Hamilton telegraphed London in a state of increasing despondency. In his telegram Hamilton requested a further 95,000 reinforcements from British war minister Lord Kitchener.  He was offered barely a quarter, 25,000.  Confidence in the Gallipoli operation in London and Paris was dwindling.  While former First Lord of the Admiralty and architect of the operation Winston Churchill pressed both governments to provide continued support, French General Maurice Sarrail suggested a combined offensive against the Asian coast, a proposal rapidly over-turned by his Commander-in-Chief Joseph Joffre, who insisted upon retaining French focus on the Western Front.

Affairs outside of Gallipoli began to intrude upon strategy in the region.  The invasion of Serbia and plans for an extensive landing at Salonika exhausted resources from both French and British governments, with the latter offering to provide up to 125,000 troops (much against Kitchener’s inclination). Such were the demands for men intended for Salonika that forces were diverted away from Hamilton in Gallipoli, to the latter’s great dismay.  As it was Hamilton was facing increasing criticism from London as grim news of the expedition reached home, along with complaints of his mismanagement of the campaign (from the Australian journalist Keith Murdoch among others).

Thus with the possibility of further reinforcements to the region seemingly ruled out, Hamilton received word on 11 October 1915 of a proposal to evacuate the peninsula.  He responded in anger by estimating that casualties of such an evacuation would run at up to 50%: a startlingly high figure. The tide was clearly moving against Hamilton.  His belief in what was widely viewed as an unacceptable casualty rate in the event of evacuation resulted in his removal as Commander-in-Chief and recall to London at a meeting of the Dardanelles Committee on 14 October. Hamilton was replaced by Sir Charles Monro.  Monro lost no time in touring Helles, Suvla Bay and Anzac Cove upon his arrival on the peninsula on 28 October.  His recommendation was prompt: evacuation.  This did not however meet with Kitchener’s approval.  He travelled to the region to see the state of affairs for himself. Upon his arrival however he quickly reversed his thinking upon seeing the conditions facing the Allied force and recommended evacuation on 15 November 1915, overriding arguments by senior naval figures Sir Roger Keyes and Rosslyn Wemyss to attempt a naval seizure once again. The British government, having prevaricated for several weeks, finally sanctioned an evacuation on 7 December.  Unfortunately by this stage a heavy blizzard had set in making such an operation hazardous.  Nevertheless the evacuation of 105,000 men and 300 guns from Anzac Cove and Suvla Bay was successfully conducted from 10-20 December 1915.  The evacuation of Helles was conducted – comprising 35,000 men – from late December until 9 January 1916. The evacuation operation was easily the most successful element of the entire campaign, with casualty figures significantly lower than Hamilton had predicted (official figures quote just three casualties). Painstaking efforts had been made to deceive the 100,000 watching Turkish troops into believing that the movement of Allied forces did not constitute a withdrawal. Winston Churchill however viewed Monro’s achievement with a somewhat jaundiced eye: “he came, he saw, he capitulated” he wrote of Monro, and the sneer has remained through the years to blight Monro’s correct decision and remarkable follow-through.

480,000 Allied troops had participated in the Gallipoli campaign which comprised the Turkish Army’s most significant success of the war.  Of this figure 252,000 suffered casualties (of these 48,000 were fatalities).  One-third of the 33,600 Anzac casualties comprised fatalities. Turkish casualties have been estimated at 250,000, of which at least 65,000 are believed to be fatalities.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915.  MR. REDMOND AS USUAL POLITICAL CLEVERNESS MUST HAVE DESERTED HIM SADLY when he allowed to be published Mr. Asquith’s letter regarding the 16th Division.  We now have it on the very highest authority that only two of the three brigades in this much advertised Irish Division are up to strength, and that there seems so little prospect of the remaining brigade filling up at a reasonably early date that the division will have to go on active service without it.  What a remarkable comment this is upon the thousands of Irish Nationalists who are alleged to have joined the army!

The excuse given for the failure only makes matters worse.  We are told that 1,200 men had to be drafted from the 16th Division to fill up the Tenth, or else it too could not have gone on service when it did, so that this division also did not fill even though although a whole English regiment, the Hampshires, was brought in, as well as hundreds of other English recruits to complete the Leinsters and the, Connaughts.  It is also worth mentioning that men were taken from the Ulster regiments in the 16th Division and sent to the Munsters and, Connaughts in the 10th division.  Thus once more Ulster supplied the men for which other parts of Ireland claimed the credit.

As a matter of fact in the entire 10th division when it went to Gallipoli only about 20 per cent of the men where Irish Roman Catholics, though the Nationalists claim 100 per cent of the credit, and the numbers have not increased since.  And yet the Irish Nationalists, who from the whole of Ireland have not been able to raise a single division of their own, were never tired of sneering at the Ulster Division, the only genuine “all Irish” division from its commanding officer downwards, for it had not to be completed for service by drafts from any other division or from England, and whose success has only emphasized the failure of the other so-called Irish divisions.

 

Fermanagh Times December 23rd 1915.  FORD’S FOLLY.  A CHRISTMAS BURLESQUE.  NO RECEPTION IN EUROPE.  Surprized and considerably disconcerted at the lack of even the semblance of an official welcome to Norway, Mr. Henry Ford and his quarrelsome crew of Peace Pilgrims arrived at Christiania, on Sunday morning in the liner Oscar 11 from New York.  There was not a single Scandinavian pacifist at the docks to greet the remarkable conglomeration of –the-war cranks, whose members have for two weeks been fighting among themselves on the Atlantic.  Christiania seems coldly indifferent to the visit of these deluded pro-German propagandists.  Mr. Ford’s menagerie of misguided Peace soldiers arrived on European soil in as aimless a condition as that in which they left the United States.  Internal dissensions are as widespread and bitter as they were the day following the mutiny on the high seas, which was precipitated when an attempt was made to coerce befuddled delegates into signing a declaration censuring President Wilson for his “preparedness” program.  There is no disguising the fact that the majority of the Pilgrims now realise that they’re out on a fool’s errand.  As an insurgent expressed it in mixed Yankee metaphor “We have jumped the switch and are busted.  We have as much chance of getting away with one stunt as a snowball has of freezing in the hell.”  There is an overwhelming feeling of depression in the party.  At least a dozen delegates intend to desert before they make themselves more ridiculous.

 

Fermanagh Herald December 25th 1915.  JOTTINGS.  The flax markets remain as strong as ever.  Prices of Russian flax are steadily rising and there is still an absence of advice of new arrivals.  However the Belfast spinners are fairly well off for some time to come.

Dr. T.  Knox reported to the Lisnaskea Guardians on Saturday last that a further outbreak of smallpox had occurred involving three persons, who came from the same house, as the two cases previously reported.

The report that Anton Lang, who took the part of “Christus” a number of times at Oberammergau over the years has been killed in the war, which was first published in America, has been contradicted in America.  It is now announced by the German papers that the report was correct.

The farmers in Newcastle, Co., Down, are deriving phenomenal profits on flax during the present season.  The produce on an Irish acre of land in Legananny near Castlewellan, scutched during the week at Mr. McAnulty’s mill in Leitrim, yielded 104 ½ stone, which were sold at 22s 6d per stone, and realized £117 11s 3d.

Mrs. Alicia Adelaide Needham, the famous Irish composer, of Clapham Park, London S.W. is collecting and buying all kinds of comforts including woollens, tobacco, etc., for the Irish troops at the front.  She will gratefully acknowledge contributions received and for any money donated forwarded to her for this purpose she will send one of her autographed songs.

When a verdict of “Accidental death” was returned at an inquest on the charred remains of Fleming Wilson which were found in his barn, which was burned, at Ranelly, near Omagh, his widow stated that on the day of the tragedy he returned from Omagh with a large quantity of whisky and porter and toys for children.  He then left to go to his brother’s house and the short time afterwards the barn and was found to be in flames.

Mrs. Joseph Carson, egg and poultry merchant, Killeshandra, purchased a turkey cock, one of this season’s birds, from a farmer named Keith, which weighed 30lbs.  Mr. Keith was paid 1s per pound, which amounted to £1 10s for his bird.

 

Fermanagh Times December 30th 1915.  SANTA CLAUS IN ENNISKILLEN.  It will be remembered that a new departure was inaugurated last year by Rev A. J.  Jenkins in presenting gifts “from Santa Clause” to the poor children of our back streets.  This was repeated this Christmas with even more gratifying success.  As before an appeal was made to the families of all denominations to send in older toys to be renewed and made acceptable by the little-often-forgotten-ones.  The response was splendid from all sources with the result that some 400 toys, together with a large number of books, were brought to the homes of our poor, and each child in every household was made by the happy recipient of a little train that actually moved, or a pretty doll which actually closed its eyes, or a nice book with lovely pictures.  For some time before the distribution a number of ladies from the various Churches met together, renovated any of the toys which required the application of their deft fingers to make them as good as ever and packed them neatly.  The gifts brought a real and genuine joy to the little boys and girls and all thanked from the bottom of their warm throbbing little hearts the great kindness of “dear old Santa Claus.”

 

Fermanagh Times December 30th 1915.  MILITARY NOTES.  Private J. E. Johnston, 19th Battalion, Royal Canadian Grenadiers (Queen’s Own), has arrived home at Ballinamallard on sick leave from a military hospital in Sheffield.  Private Johnston was only out a few weeks at the Western front, when he was wounded, sustaining a fractured ankle.  He was formerly in the employ of Messrs. John Lemon and Sons, Enniskillen.

 

Fermanagh Times December 30th 1915.  ENNISKILLEN BOYS IN THE BALKANS.  SOME NARROW ESCAPES AT THE DARDANELLES.  An Enniskillen man writing from “Somewhere in Servia” to a friend at home gives the following graphic description of his experiences since he left of the ancient borough.  After a stay of a week at Lemnos we shipped for the scene of action where we arrived on the morning of the 7th of August the task before us being the forcing of a new landing at Suvla Bay.  I don’t think anybody who were as there is ever likely to forget that day and a good many following.  Our first greeting was the plumping of shells around the transports.  One ship next to us was struck, but little damage apparently was done. The landing had to be done in lighters under heavy shell and shrapnel fire.  Some poor fellows did not reach the shore alive.  We had to wade ashore well above our knees in water with all our equipment on, including rifles and carrying two hundredweight drums of cable tied on poles –two men to each drum.  The greatest danger landing apart from shrapnel, was the landed mines.  They were all around the shore and for some distance inland.  The first sight we met on shore was the dead bodies of three Fusiliers.  One poor chap with his head blown off.  It was terrible to see these landmines going up.  You would see the chaps charging along, one mine go up and some emerging from the smoke and dust unscratched, run on another few yards, trip up another mine, and come toppling over.  I watched five go up like that within a few yards of each other.  We lost an officer and some men of our own company that day.  Well, we took up our quarters on a ridge and that afternoon and the rain came down as I never saw it rain before.  We got soaked through in a few minutes and had neither overcoats nor blankets, only just the clothes we stood in –no change of under clothing nor did we get any for three or four weeks later.  That night we just lay down as we were with our wet clothes on of the bare ground.  You can guess how hardy we were when not a man was knocked up over it.

Next morning I was laying a line and came across any amount of dead British and Turks; some of the sights would be inclined to make you sick under normal conditions, but we seemed to be braced up for anything.  Next night I was wakened up at about midnight and sent up to the firing line with a strange officer.  I was taking the place of a fellow who had been sent earlier in the day and hadn’t turned up.  After about two hours wandering in the dark we reached our destination; I was then ready to sleep on a clothesline.  The bullets were pinging around the whole night.  The next morning the other chap turned up with daylight and I returned alone to our own camp.  Twice I was sniped at, but soon learn to keep under cover of the brushwood.  I was very lucky all through.  One of the narrowest escapes I had was when having breakfast one morning; the shells were flying about as usual.  I was sitting with a chap named Meldrum when a shrapnel shell burst almost overhead.  One of the bullets hit Meldrum wounding him on the head and another buried itself in the ground by my side as I dropped flat on the ground.  If it hadn’t been that he was wearing his helmet at the time he would undoubtedly have been killed, as it penetrated first the purgaree, then the helmet, before it reached his head; the scalp was cut to the skull, but the bone was uninjured. On three other occasions high explosive shells burst so close to where we were working that we were covered with dust and stones.  I have been doing all classes of work – telegraphs, laying lines, digging trenches, of repairing broken lines and all classes of fatigue work.  When we first went there we were often 16 hours per day cramped up in a narrow trench with a telegraph instrument.  The flies and other vermin were terrible; there was a fearful lot of dysentery; we lost some men with it.  I had a touch myself for about 10 days, but hadn’t to go of duty.  We left there rather unexpectedly, destination, as usual, unknown; we got back to Lemnos where I met Fred Brennan again and after a week we set sail for Salonika.  This is a beautiful place approaching from the sea, but it is an ill-kept and dirty town, populated principally by Greeks, Turks and Jews.  I was able to get beer here – the first for three months for 5d for a large bottle and only 5d for a bottle of wine; other things were awfully dear.  Since I started this page Lewis Herbert called to see me. I met him in Salonika also and he is looking fit although he hasn’t had a wash or a shave for some days. Hope you will all have a good time at Christmas. Can’t say what mine will be like, but will make the best of it.  Your old pal.

 

Fermanagh Times December 30th 1915.  Hell at Suvla.  When Sir E. Carson described the condition at Suvla Bay as “a kind of hell” and indignantly asked why the troops had been allowed to stay there so long, he was understating rather than overstating the facts.  The sufferings of the men were awful.  Towards the end of the campaign owing to the breaking up of the season, they became almost unendurable.  A great storm of rain burst over the peninsula and lasted for 18 hours.  The trenches were flooded out, the men drenched to the skin, and many of them were exposed to the alternative of death by flood or by gunfire.  When the storm passed the land was frozen by a great frost, and the snow drifts became a source of danger – a veritable death traps at times.  Men’s wet uniforms froze stiff upon their backs.  To make matters worse, it was impossible for relief to be sent for as no one could find his way through blinding snow storms.  The fact that the Turks suffered as heavily as the British offers little consolation.  The most lurid description can give but little idea of all that our magnificent soldiers suffered for the last days of the occupation of Suvla Bay.

October 1915.

Fermanagh Times October 7th 1915.  CLONES.  CAPTAIN J. C. PARKE HOME AGAIN.  Captain Parke the famous lawn tennis champion and international Rugby player, who was wounded at the Dardanelles on the 10th of August last and spent some time in hospital in Malta, afterwards undergoing treatment in England, has returned to his home in Clones.  Although looking very well he has not yet completely recovered from a wound in the wrist.  Soon after the outbreak of war, Captain Parke, then a practicing solicitor in Clones with his brother, Mr. W. A. Parke, solicitor, obtained a commission in the 6th Leinster Regiment and in a very short time was promoted.  He was in the famous landing with the Australians, at the spot since known as Anzac Cove and took part in the fighting in that neighbourhood for three days – one of the most desperate struggles in the history of the operations on the Gallipoli Peninsula.  On the third day while defending a shallow trench, which was undergoing a heavy bombardment from the Turkish guns, a shrapnel shell burst close to him, and he was struck by several of the bullets and splinters, but fortunately in no vital part.  He lost a great quantity of blood, but owing to the prompt treatment he received and his splendid physique, his recovery was rapid, and in less than a month he was able to sail for England.  Although a bullet went through his wrist from side to side it appears that no bone was broken or sinew torn and it is hoped that he may regain complete use of it.  As soon as he is sufficiently recovered he will rejoin his regiment.

Fermanagh Times October 7th 1915.  CYCLING ACCIDENT.  Mr. Patrick Clarke, Magheraveely, Clones, rural postmen in that district, was throw off his bicycle in Fermanagh Street, Clones on Saturday night and sustained a broken leg.

Fermanagh Times October 7th 1915.  LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GARTSIDE TIPPING, R.N.  The death of Lieutenant Commander Gartside Tipping, R.N. reported from the front is another of those grave incidents that bring home more intimately to us here in Fermanagh the tragedy of the war.  The deceased gentleman was a son of the late Captain Gartside Tipping of Rossferry, near Derrylin, one of Lough Erne’s most picturesque residences, afterwards occupied by the Hon. Cyril Ward on his marriage with a daughter of the Earl of Erne.  He was a brother of Mrs. Richardson, of Rossfad, with whom profound sympathy will be felt in her bereavement.  The family are relatives of the Earl of Erne.  The Lieutenant-Commander, although one of the oldest officers actively engaged in the British navy, being 67 years of age, gallantly offered his services on the outbreak of the war.  When the present King, then Prince George, was undergoing an early course of naval instruction he was lieutenant on of the Royal yacht.  For many years he was inspector of lifeboats in the Irish and West Lancashire districts, and he was well known at the various lifeboat stations on the Antrim and Down coasts.

Fermanagh Herald October 9th. 1915.  LISNASKEA GUARDIANS AND THE ATTENDANCE OF MEMBERS.  It was some time after 12 o’clock before the meeting could be commenced owing to the absence of a quorum, and the minutes were disposed of.  The Chairman drew attention to the fact that laterally there had been a very poor attendance of members, and suggested that it would be advisable for the Board to pass a resolution to the effect that any member who absented himself anyway frequently from the meetings should be penalised.  A lot of them, he said, only put in an appearance when there was a job on, and those men, he was of the opinion, should be disqualified altogether.  The Clerk suggested that the Porter be sent down the town to see if any members were there.  The Chairman objected to this and said if the members did not think it worth their while to attend those who did should not send after them.  This concluded the discussion.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915. THE GREAT ARTILLERY which so easily demolished the forts of Liege and Namur consisted of a gun weighing 87 tons, with a foundation of 37 tons for the carriage.  Two hundred men were engaged in the manipulation of it, and 25 or 26 hours were needed to erect the gun.  The shell weighed 8 cwts, and was 5 feet 4 inches long.  Twelve railway carriages were required to transport the gun. It was fired by electricity from a distance of ¼ mile, and the cost of each shot was £500.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  DERRYLIN PETTY SESSIONS.  At the above petty sessions Richards Meyers of Gortgorgan was fined £2 10 shillings with the recommendation that it be reduced to 10 shillings for carrying a gun without a licence.  A large number of persons were fined for using vehicles without lights and several were also fined for being drunk while in charge of horses and carts on the public road.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  LOCAL MILITARY NOTES.  Lieutenant John Irvine, of the 4th Royal Enniskillen Fusiliers who had been serving at the Dardanelles some time past with the Munster Fusiliers and whom we referred to in these columns last week arrived home yesterday at Killadeas.  He was gassed in action. We are glad to learn he is recovering well.  His elder brother, Lieutenant Gerard, is officer in charge of the Machine-gun Section with the 11th Battalion Inniskillings on the continent.  It is interesting to note the Major J. G. C.  Irvine, D. L. father of the gallant young officers, although incapacitated from taking an active part in the present great struggle was all through the South Africa Campaign and it was while fighting there that he received the injuries which now a preclude him from active service with the forces.  Although not able to go himself he has sent his only two sons, who are worthily maintaining the fighting traditions of the Irvine family in the British Army.

Jack Graham, son of the late Dr. Graham, Irvinestown, has just arrived home from South Africa looking fit and well after 11 months hard fighting under General Botha.  He, like Mr. Thomas Young of Fivemiletown has the unique experience of fighting against Botha in the Boer War and now under him against the Germans.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  MEMBERS PREVIOUSLY WARNED BY THE COUNTY SURVEYOR.  A SALUTARY LESSON FOR THE FUTURE.  In our columns “Things people want to know on the 9th of July in 1914 we queried: – How the ratepayers throughout Fermanagh like the announcement that the newly elected County Council shows decided signs of being the most reckless in expenditure of public money that has ever held office in this county?  This body made a reckless start on Thursday by passing over £2,300 worth of works on roads, many of which were condemned by the County Surveyor as being both illegal and unnecessary and which were strongly opposed by the Unionist members present.  In addition to all this expenditure, provisional proposals for a further £2,461 15shillings worth of roads and other works have already been handed in for consideration at the next meeting.  We asked what action will be taken by the Local Government Board through its auditor and replies to these queries have now been given in the most emphatic and practical manner possible.  Twelve members of the County Council, namely Messrs.  J.  McMahon, O. Hannah, F. Leonard, O. McBarron, Jas. Tierney, J.P.; James McCorry, F. Meehan, J.  Maguire, Jas.  O’Donnell, J.P., John McHugh, J.P. Gillen, and John Crosier, J.P. have been surcharged in the additional sum of £180 in respect of four roads which they voted at the meeting in question.

Fermanagh Times October 14th 1915.  PROGRESS OF THE I. A.S.O.  The I. A.S.O started from nothing.  It began to preach its gospel of organisation and self-help to the community to which these ideas were utterly new and strange.  Today it embraces more than 1,000 co-operative societies, with a membership of 106,000 farmers.  The turnover of the movement was £3,333,189 in 1913; last year it was £3,732,818.  Despite results which have attracted the attention and imitation of half the world, the cooperative movement has not yet come into its own in Ireland.  Our readers know the whole wretched story of official jealousy and hostility.

Impartial Reporter.  October 14th 1915.  A FOOTBALL CHARGE.  THE DRAMATIC INCIDENT.  Regarding the advance in France the Rev. C.  L.  Perry says that one officer had a football with the names of his platoon written on it.  Getting on the top of a parapet he kicked off crying ‘follow-up lads,’ and was almost immediately shot down.  The lads followed up, nevertheless.  ‘The fire from the machine guns,’ he adds, ‘was terrible and our men went down like corn before the scythe.’ For 48 hours all who could render first aid had their hands full.  What stories of heroism that will never be written.  An officer with three wounds knelt to bind the wounds of a man next to him, and was shot dead in the act.  Two wounded men stayed out 50 hours by the side of their sergeant, because they would not let him die alone.

Impartial Reporter.  October 14th 1915.  PETTIGO.  At a recent service in Pettigo Church, the Bishop of Clogher preached to a large congregation.  He took the opportunity of presenting to Matilda Taggart the silver medal (Bishop’s) for the highest place in the Diocesan examination in religious knowledge.

Impartial Reporter.  October 14th 1915.  FERMANAGH COUNTY COUNCILLORS SURCHARGES IN THE SUM OF £180.  The auditor, Major Eccles met the Nationalist members of the Fermanagh County Council to hear any explanation they might make as to four roads which he had refused to pass in the audit.  The members of the council affected by surcharges are – the chairman Mr. McHugh, J. P., Messrs J.  Tierney, J.  McGuire, J. Crozier, Felix Leonard, J.  P., J. P. Gillen, F. Meehan, J. McMahon, O. Hanna, J. Coulson.  Unionist members are not affected.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  THE MOTHER AND FOUR CHILDREN ARE BURNED TO DEATH IN A COUNTY DOWN TRAGEDY AS A LAMP EXPLODES IN THE BEDROOM.  The shocking tragedy occurred at Barnmeen about 7 miles from Newry on Sunday evening when the wife of a large farmer named Samuel J.  McKee and four children were burned to death and the extensive farmhouse in which they lived entirely gutted.  On Sunday evening Mr. McKee left to attend an evening service at the Brethren Hall, at Ballygorrian at 5.30 o’clock.  His wife Agnes, 36 and his sons William Murray McKee, four years, George McKee, 2 ½ years, and Louisa and Eliza Jane, twin children, age 16 months died.  The remains of the wife, unrecognisable from the effects of the fire, and two of the children were got out about 10.00 and later the other two.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  Seconded- Lieutenant John Irvine (gassed) is the son of Major J. G. C. Irvine, D. L., Killadeas, County Fermanagh.  He obtained his commission in the 4th Inniskillings on August 15, 1914, and has been temporarily attached at the front to the 2nd Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers.  He is now in hospital at Oxford, where he is progressing satisfactorily.

Lieutenant-Commander Gartside Tipping, Royal Navy, whose death in action was recently reported, was a son of the late Captain Gartside Tipping, of Rossferry, near Derrylin.  He was a brother of Mrs. Richardson, of Rossfad.  When the present King, then Prince George, was undergoing an early course of naval instruction, deceased was lieutenant on the Royal yacht.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  THE DEATH HAS OCCURRED OF MR. JOHN MALLON, J.P., MEIGH, NEAR NEWRY EX-ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER OF THE DUBLIN METROPOLITAN POLICE who expired suddenly on Saturday after attending 8.00 Mass.  Mr. Mallon was for 50 years connected with the Dublin Metropolitan Police and was greatly involved at the time of the Phoenix Park assassinations.  His share in the investigation which led to the arrest and conviction of the men concerned is well known.  Mr. Mallon had the doubtful honour of arresting several Irish patriots, including James Stephens, Charles J Kickham, O’Donovan Rossa, John O’Leary, Parnell, and Davitt.  Some years ago in collaboration with a well-known London journalist, Mr. Mallon essayed to publish a story of his career as a policeman.  Some instalments of the story, which were decidedly unpromising and largely incorrect, were published in the columns of a Sunday newspaper.  The project was dropped, and some futile actions at law between the collaborators were the only outcome of the scheme.

Fermanagh Herald October 16th. 1915.  AT TYRONE OFFICER IS KILLED, CAPTAIN A.M. READ.  Captain Anketell Moutray Read, Northamptonshire regiment, 1st Battalion, killed in action, was well known as an army athlete.  He won the heavyweight championship in India 8 times, and the middleweight twice, winning both in the same meeting.  Three times he won the army and navy heavyweight championship at Aldershot and Portsmouth making an unequal record in service boxing.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  NARROW ESCAPE OF LISBELLAW  MAN.  Mister P. Mulligan, Dromore, County Tyrone, has received an interesting souvenir from the front.  His brother, Private John Mulligan, first Canadian Contingent, 7th Battalion, has sent him a German bullet, which lodged in his cartridge case without inflicting a wound.  In a letter received a few days ago he mentioned that out of his platoon of 150 men only two came unscathed from Bill 60, but they have been reinforced since then.  He was also in the fierce fighting at Hill 90 and around Ypres, but never got a wound.  He has been offered a commission, but refused it as he considers it is sufficient honour to have a chance of fighting for his country.  He is a native of Lisbellaw, where his father resides.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  A ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPLAINS STORY.  BOTH IRISH MEN.  In a letter to his brother, at Navan, the Rev.  E.  J.  Cullen, Roman Catholic Chaplin with the 45th Field Artillery in Flanders writes under the date of September 30th: – “Of course, it was a great victory, but a very bloody one.  The Germans were simply massacred, and whole companies gave themselves up.  What between the gas, bombs, bayonets, rifle fire, machine-guns, and highly explosive shells – poor human nature had no chance, and fragments unrecognisable as belonging to human beings were the result.  The battle commenced with four days of bombardment, and a day and a night of intensive bombardment.  During this – a gun about 20 or 30 yards long, firing at  points 4 to 6 miles away – I went along the artillery, hearing the men’s confessions and giving Holy Communion.  I rode up at midnight to our battery, with a Captain Kenny, London but his parents Irish.  When I got up the colonel had just been killed by a shell – Butcher, related to Bishop Butcher, formerly at Ardbracken, Navan.  The major, two captains, and 16 men were Catholics, so I heard their confessions in a little hole, and it was most touching to see the major (the son of Lord Bellham), his two captains and all the catholic gunners kneeling on the ground behind their guns and receiving Holy Communion, and then making their thanksgiving aloud with me, at twelve o’clock at night. Of course, these expeditions were most perilous; but, what is the priest for save for such things as this?  When I tell you that shells were flying about you know why I always ask for prayers.

Next morning I went to another battery, and the major therein – Hannah, a relative of Hannah, K. C. an Irishman Protestant – told me that we priests were always after men.  When I had finished the Catholics there, he brought me to his big gun and said, as we are both Irishmen we may as well celebrates our meeting by having a crack at the Huns.  So he fired two rounds in my honour.  You see I have had some rare experiences.”

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  GERMAN BARBARITY.  ENGLISH LADY EXECUTED IN BRUSSELS.  SHOT FOR SHELTERING  ALLIES SOLDIERS.  The foreign office is informed by the United States Ambassador that Miss Edith Cavell, lately head of a large training school for nurses in Brussels, who was arrested on the fifth of August last by the German authorities at that place, was executed on the 13th Inst. after sentence of death had been passed on her.  It is understood that the charge against the Miss Cavell was that she had harboured fugitive British and French soldiers and Belgians of military age, and had assisted them to escape from Belgium in order to join the colours.  So far as the Foreign Office are aware no charge of espionage was brought against her.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915.  FRENCH FIRE. Describing the unprecedented  strength of the French artillery fire during the three days fire in the recent great offensive, the Tägliche Rundschau now says: – “On one position of the front in Champagne the fire was so intense that one shot fell every second on every 20 metres ( 21½ yards), this portion of the front receiving during the three days of consistent firing over 50,000,000 shots.

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915. BRITISH GAS. The public have noted with satisfaction Sir John French is intimation that at last our troops at the front her making reprisals on the enemy in the matter of the employment of paralysing gas.  It was never intended, however, to resort to the diabolical he torturing and poisonous vapours used by the Germans, and it is interesting to note that the enemy reports describes are a gas merely as intoxicating

Fermanagh Times October 21st 1915. RUSSIA’S “ONLY SONS” CALLED OUT.  Just before I left Russia (Mr. Stephen Graham) writes in The Times the “only sons” were called out, and with them militiamen up to 57 years of age.  Enormous numbers of young men who never expected to serve in the Army, whose parents had trusted in that immunity, are now being trained, and will shortly be advancing to the fighting line.  The act of calling them out synchronised with the Tsar’s taking the command, and it was in a way a further example of Russia’s wholeheartedness and her determination to cast everything on the altar of the nation.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  RELIGIOUS SERVICE BEHIND THEIR GUNS.  Rev E.  J.  Cullen, Catholic Chaplin serving with the 45th  F.  A., British Expeditionary Force, France writes about Hill 70: – The battle of Hill 70 will never be forgotten by me as long as I live.  The sights of horror are simply beyond description.  Imagine a short road so strewn with dead and dying those able to do so were kept very busy lifting the dead into a ditch to allow our guns, ambulance, etc. to pass and this among agonising groans all around and you have some notion of many such scenes.  The evening before the battle I went round hearing confessions and giving Holy Communion on the field or in the remains of houses along the line, and it was very sad to see these poor fellows laid out so soon but sadder still to see practically all young officers, and some of the Commanding Officers whom I knew so well –but for whom I could do nothing spiritually (all Presbyterians) brought in either dead or horribly mutilated.  I expected horrors and had already seen cases of shocking mutilations but I never dreamt of anything like this.  I had the consolation of attending about 19 Germans, and felt so pleased to be able to hear their confessions in their language, has they did not speak a word of French or English.  This murdering business went on in awful weather – rain and black mud and every other inconvenience that can be thought of.  Of course, it was a great victory, but a very bloody one.  The Germans were simply massacred and whole companies gave themselves up.  What between gas, bombs, bayonets, rifle fire, machine guns, and high explosive shells poor human nature had no chance and fragments unrecognisable as belonging to human beings were the result.

The battle commenced with a four day bombardment, and a day and a night of intensive bombardment.  During this a gun about 20 or 30 yards along was firing at points 4 to 6 miles away when I went along the artillery hearing the men’s confessions and giving Holy Communion.  I rode up at midnight to a battery with a Captain Kenny – London, was parents Irish.  When I got up the colonel had just been killed by a shell –Butcher, related to Bishop Butcher, formerly at Ardbracken, Navan.  The major, two captains and 16 men where Catholics so I heard all their confessions in a little hole there and it was most touching to see the major, the son of Lord Belham, his two captains and all the Catholic gunners kneeling on the ground behind their guns and receiving Holy Communion and then making their thanksgiving aloud with me at twelve o’clock at night.

Of course, these expeditions were most perilous; but what is a priest for save such as this?  When I tell you that shells were flying about you know why I always ask your prayers.  Next morning I went to another battery and the Major therein –Hannah, a relative of Hannah, K.  C., and Irishmen Protestant –told me that we priests were always after men.  When I had finished the Catholics there, he brought me to his big guns and said, ‘as we are both Irishmen we may as well celebrates our meeting by having a crack at the Huns.’  So he fired two rounds in my honour.  You see, I have had some rare experiences.

All are very hopeful of events now, as the ammunition seems to be quite sufficient, and a wonderful spirit pervade all ranks. The French are doing marvels.  Their prisoners amount up to 21,000.  We took about 3,000.  It was a wonderful spectacle!  Procession after procession of Germans marched by free.  Their officers seem to feel it, but the men were delighted they were taken, and gave themselves up in hundreds.  I am in the greatest form and most gratified for your prayers.  Get all the prayers around you for me and my work.  It is owing to someone’s prayer is that I escaped a shell in the trenches.  I slept on the floor last night in a wee store room small and smelly.  But this is nothing.  If you saw what the poor soldiers suffer – and officers, even colonels endure you would be shamed into enduring anything. Rev E.  J.  Cullen, Catholic Chaplin serving with the 45th F.  A., British Expeditionary Force.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  LONDON IN WAR TIME.  In my Palace Hotel, it is women who assist the Chief Waiters; it is women who serve in restaurants; it is girls in uniform who act is pages or attend to the lifts; you see women in police uniform; and when you alight from your train your ticket is checked by women.  Woman only attend you in the  Post Offices, and other public offices; women even drive motor wagons, though this work is too great a strain upon the feminine constitution; and women are everywhere, because of the drain of the men caused by the war.  Even at the Harvest Thanksgiving Service in Enniskillen last week the great preponderance of women over men was noticeable.  Every male who was a man, every youth of pluck and not a shirker has joined the navy and army; and only the elderly and married, with responsibility (not the married with no family) are supposed to be at home, along with the weaklings and wastrels and unpatriotic shirkers and loafers. W.C.T.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  London at night is the strangest a thing of all, for it is in London in darkness.  Long since precautions have been taken against wrong lights in the streets, but within a the last few weeks new regulations have been put in force under which with reduced and shrouded lights darkness has become largely invisible.  Gas lights, electric light, street lamps, tram lights are all surrounded either by Or dark paint so that light is thrown downwards and not defused. W.C.T.

Impartial Reporter.  October 21st 1915.  VARIOUS.  A League of Marriage is suggested, so that wounded soldiers from the front may marry respectable girls at home, and maintain the population.

Women from Hell is the term used by the Germans had to describe Highlanders when charging them.  We want more of those ‘women from hell.’

Great Britain declared war against Bulgaria from 10.00 PM on October 15, as Bulgaria had announced that she was at war with Servia.

Fermanagh Herald October 23rd. 1915.  A PRIEST’S GALLANT ACTION AT THE FRONT.  A gallant action by a Catholic chaplain is recorded by a correspondent of the Central News now at the British front.  It is the story of a bombing party of eight that went out in the night and never returned.  When morning came the regiment pictured their comrades lying wounded and dying in the mud and the slush and the decaying corn.  If they could only know for certain what had happened it would be relief of a sort.  But how to know?  It was broad daylight, the German snipers where in position; even to put one’s head over the parapet meant certain death.  While they were still discussing what appeared to be a hopeless situation a Catholic chaplain attach to the regiment came up to the firing line and asked to be allowed to go out in front and try to find the bodies.

After some hesitation his request was granted.  Wearing his surplus and with a crucifix in his hand the priest advanced down one of the saps and climbed out into the open.  With their eyes fixed to the periscope the British watched him anxiously as he proceeded slowly to the German lines.  Not a shot was fired by the enemy.  After a while the chaplain was seen to stop and bend down at the German wire entanglements.  He knelt in prayer.  Then with the same calm step, he returned to his own lines.  He had four identity discs in his hand, and reported that the Germans had held up four khaki caps on their rifles, indicating that the other four were prisoners in their hands.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  CHEQUE FOR BELTURBET’S V.C.  At Cloughjordan on Tuesday Sergeant Somers, V. C., was presented by Major–General Friend with a cheque for £240 which had been subscribed by the people of the district in recognition of the sergeant’s gallant conduct.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  RUDYARD KIPLING’S SON KILLED.  We have the heavy burden of announcing says the Morning Post, that Mr. John Kipling, of the Irish Guards, is reported “missing believed killed.”  John Kipling was the child for whom his father wrote the Just So Stories.  Mr. John Kipling was barely 18, a boy of delicate health, but indomitable zeal and resolution.  He had been nominated for the Irish Guards by Lord Roberts, and was determined to take his share in the war.  The sympathy of the whole Empire will go out to Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard Kipling in their sorrow.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  A HUGE SUM OF MONEY FOR A HAUL OF FISH.  The Don Company’s trawler Beaconmoor, of Aberdeen which had been operating in Iceland waters, landed a 40 ton catch at Aberdeen fish market on Monday morning.  Prices were high and the catch realised £1,220.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  The murder of Miss Edith Cavell is unparalleled.  And even worse than the crime is the cold blooded way in which it has been defended by the German Press.  It has staggered civilised humanity more possibly than any incident of the war, except perhaps the Lusitania; and in many respects it was more cold blooded and barbarous.  Its heartlessness and soullessness have roused the most bitter indignation.  But it has also aroused the recruiting spirit of the nation, and added to the stimulus which the movement was receiving.

Baron Von Bissing, who, it was reported, had followed up the ”ineffective volley” of the shooting party by blowing out Miss Cavell’s brains with a revolver bullet, now denies the assertion.  We are inclined to credit the denial for the act would have been so fiendish in its personal callousness that for the sake of humanity we hope it is untrue.  The King and Queen once more manifested their kindly and thoughtful nature by forwarding a sympathetic letter to the mother of the unfortunate victim expressing horror at the appalling deed.  By the way Miss Cavell visited Enniskillen a few years ago staying with Mrs. McDonnell, wife of the headmaster of Portora.

(Ed. Edith Louisa Cavell; 4 December 1865 – 12 October 1915) was a British nurse. She is celebrated for saving the lives of soldiers from both sides without distinction and in helping some 200 Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium during World War I, for which she was arrested. She was subsequently court-martialled, found guilty of treason and sentenced to death. Despite international pressure for mercy, she was shot by a German firing squad. Her execution received worldwide condemnation and extensive press coverage. She is well known for her statement that “patriotism is not enough”. Her strong Anglican beliefs propelled her to help all those who needed it, both German and Allied soldiers. She was quoted as saying, “I can’t stop while there are lives to be saved.” 12 October is appointed for her commemoration in the Anglican church, although this is not a “saint’s feast day” in the traditional sense. Edith Cavell, who was 49 at the time of her execution, was already notable as a pioneer of modern nursing in Belgium.)

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  THE TRAGIC DEATH OF LADY EDITH CORRY.  A SAD ACCIDENT AT CASTLE COOLE.  DROWNED IN THE DEMESNE.  We voice today a unanimous expression of very deep and sincere sympathy with the Earl of Belmore, the Countess of Belmore, and family, in the loss they have sustained by the death of Lady Edith Corry, who was accidentally drowned on Monday last in Lough Yoan, a sheet of water in the beautiful demesne of Castle Coole.  The deceased lady, who was the sixth sister of the Earl of Belmore and was born in 1878, was out and about the grounds in her usual excellent health and spirits on Monday morning. When she did not arrive at the Castle for lunch her two sisters, Lady Winifred and Lady Violet, went out to look for her.  They searched in vain the immediate vicinity, and then naturally turned towards Lough Yoan for Lady Edith and her sisters made almost daily visits to that picturesque spot where the boathouse is situated.

Lady Violet was the first by a few minutes to arrive there and after a casual look around was shocked to find the body of her sister lying in but two feet of water in a channel at the lake.  She called to the Lady Winifred and at once removed the body to the bank where it was when Lady Winifred came up.  It was then only too apparent that Lady Edith was dead.  She was bleeding from the nose, which was swollen and discoloured showing that her face and had come forcibly in contact with some hard substance, evidently a large stone of which there are many in the channel.  The one and only solution of the painful tragedy is that the deceased lady stumbled on the bank, which is broken and unstable and covered with long grass, fell headlong into the water and was stunned, and thus unable to help herself.  Dr. Kidd was immediately summoned, but could only pronounced life extinct.  The greatest sympathy is everywhere expressed with the noble family in their sad bereavement.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  YOUNG IRISH EMIGRANTS ARE FLYING THE COUNTRY.  The Liverpool correspondent of the Weekly Dispatch telegraphs on Saturday: – Large numbers of men of military age are embarking at Liverpool for the United States for the obvious purpose of evading military duty to their country.  These “runaways” as they have been dubbed, are, it is only fair to others to state, mainly Irishmen.  They have been coming over to Liverpool in large batches and booking their passage here to the United States.  One agent has established a substantial revenue from these bookings.  The emigrants are Irish labourers, illiterate, but fine manly fellows, who would be the envy of any recruiting sergeant.  “It is a scandal that these men should be allowed to leave the country”, remarked an official whose business is to is to meet outward bound boats.  “They are leaving to escape being soldiers.  I have questioned them as to why they are leaving, and all they say is that they are going to meet some uncle or aunt in the the States.  It is a poor excuse, for it is plain that they don’t want to fight.  I suggest that the British government make a law to prevent every single man of military age from leaving the country.”  The Irish emigrants to the United States usually leave in the American liners in the steerage, with little luggage and they seem glad to go.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  THE DEATH OF A GREAT CRICKETER.  Although we are steeled in these days to sad news, there was a special pang in many elderly hearts when the announcement came that Dr. W. G. Grace had been stricken down.  No man, perhaps, ever give more innocent pleasure to a larger number of people, and over a longer period of time.  It was in 1864, when he was only 16 years of age, that he jumped into notice by making scorers of 170 and 56 not out for the South Wales Club against the Gentlemen of Sussex.  In the following year he made his first appearance for the Gentleman verses the Players and from that time onward he was the leading figure in the cricket world for close on 40 years.  As “W. G.”, he was famous all over the English speaking world, and we can quite believe the story that his name and fame were familiar to many people in remote parts of England who had never heard of Mr. Gladstone or even of Queen Victoria.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915. LADY POSTMEN. The letters in Derrygonnelly district are being delivered by young ladies.  There are four of them, and they’re working, says our correspondent, “to perfection.”

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  THE DARDANELLES UNDERTAKING OUR LOSS OF LIFE AND THE RESPONSIBILITY.  We now know from Mr. Asquith’s lips that the unhappy Dardanelles expedition, which has cost 100,000 casualties and 78,000 invalids, was decided upon by the Cabinet against the opinion of the Government’s expert naval adviser, Lord Fisher.  Mr. Asquith accepts full responsibility for this and exculpates Mr. Churchill, who has generally been blamed for the ill-considered enterprise.  For some 20 lawyers and civilians says the Daily Mail to engage in a military operation of the utmost magnitude against the advice of the expert is nothing short of criminal.

Fermanagh Times October 28th 1915.  Miss Rice, Darling Street, Enniskillen, has received the following interesting letter from Captain and Dr. A. Geden Wilkinson, Gallipoli peninsula.

Dear Miss Rice, You’re very kind gift of “Woodbines” for the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers arrived today.  As you marked them “For the Wounded” they were given to me, the Medical Officer, to distribute.  I want to thank you very much indeed, especially as “Tommy” loves the Woodbine above all others, and also because when I have had cigarettes to give to men brought down to my dressing station, wounded, it seems to help them to bear the pain wonderfully.  We bind them up, put a “cig” in between their lips and they go away smiling in spite of all their nasty knocks.  I have been regimental medical officer since the Battalion came home from India to Rugby in England, and I may say you’ll be proud to know that our boys by the finest in the British Army.  Irish friends have been very good to us, and among them I would thank you on behalf of those who shortly may not be able to do so themselves.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  NURSE CAVELL EXECUTED.  GERMAN DECEIT AND TREACHERY.  Nurse Edith Cavell was condemned and shot by the Germans in Brussels for aiding English and Belgians to escape from Prussian cruelty.  She had lived in Brussels for nine years.  A trained English nurse she went there and found a nurse’s training home.  She and her pupils were known in Germany.  She was esteemed as an angel of mercy.  She admitted helping her fellow countrymen to cross the frontier and was arrested and calmly told what she had done.  But for her own words there was no evidence to convict her.  She was kept in the cell and had no opportunity of defence.  She said she was happy to die for her country a few hours before her death.  Throughout an ordeal that has no parallel during centuries of civilisation an insuperable spirit had sustained her until the rifles were levelled.  Then she swooned and fell and as she lay a German officers stepped near her and shot her with his pistol.  Only a German officer could do it.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  TRAGIC FATALITY AS LADY EDITH CORRY IS DROWNED AT CASTLE COOLE IN TWO FEET OF WATER.  This distressing fatality occurred on Monday afternoon last Lady Edith being sister of the Earl of Belmore, D.  L., and sixth daughter of the late Earl and the Countess of Belmore.  The deceased was aged 37 years and widespread sympathy goes out to the Countess of Belmore and her family in their bereavement.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  THE KING VISITS HIS ARMY IN THE FIELD.  The King is in France where he is gone to visit his army.  Accompanied by destroyers and aircraft on a gorgeous October midday he landed and was met by Sir John French.  With that sense of imperial affairs of which he is a student, the King elected to visit an English, a Canadian, an Australian and an Indian Hospital in the neighbourhood of the base after he had first investigated the more directly military departments.

Impartial Reporter.  October 28th 1915.  A STITCHED HEART.  One of the most remarkable operations in the annals of surgery has recently been performed on Pipe–Major G.  D.  Taylor of the King’s Own Scottish Borderers.  At Loos he was shot through the heart, but, marvellous to relate was not killed.  He was taken to the base hospital, where an incision was made in the chest and the laceration of the heart was stitched.  Pipe-Major Taylor is not only still alive, but the surgeons express every hope that he will pull through.

Herald October 30th. 1915.  THE EXECUTION OF NURSE CAVELL.  The official story of the execution of Miss Edith Cavell, an English nurse in Brussels, who was shot by the German authorities for assisting British and Belgian soldiers across the frontier, is contained in the correspondence forwarded by the American Legation in Brussels, and issued by the Press Bureau.

The letters reveal that the American Legation made a great but ineffectual fight to save her life.  The German authorities in spite of a promise to give the information, secretly and cunningly endeavour to hide from the Legation officials that sentence of death had been passed on Mr. Cavell.  Miss Cavell was shot at 2.00 a.m.  Sir Edward Grey says: – the news of the execution of this noble Englishwoman will be received with horror and disgust, not only in the Allied States, but throughout the civilised world.  Miss Cavell was not even charged with espionage, and the fact that she had nursed numbers of wounded German soldiers might have been regarded as a complete reason in itself for treating her with leniency.

A New York Telegram dated Saturday says: – the newspapers published long editorial articles upon Miss Cavell’s death roundly castigating Germany for cold blooded inhumanity towards a defenceless woman.  Germany has brought herself into a position where the world turns from her in horror and dread.  The “Press” says the iron hand of soulless Germany has struck another blow that kindles anew the bitter indignation of humanity. Nothing among all her cruel and inhuman acts except the sinking of the Lusitania, has so blackened her and so shocked the world as the hard, soulless, murder of this defenceless sweet-souled woman.

Fermanagh Herald October 30th. 1915.  CLONES INFANTICIDE CHARGE.  For the fourth time Martha Jane Johnston, a girl under 16 years; Mrs. Isabella Johnston her mother; and Isabella Johnston, junior., were brought up in custody on remand at Newtownbutler before Captain Gosselin, RM., charged with the murder of an infant female child of the first named accused about the end of July or beginning of August last.  The police have been scouring the district for over two months for the body of this child which they allege has been the victim of foul play, but up to the present without success.

Fermanagh Herald October 30th. 1915.  CLONES GUARDIANS AND MARGARINE.  The question of substituting margarine for butter was discussed.  Approval has been given by the local Government Board to the use of margarine in such institutions provided that affective steps are taken to ensure that uniformly good quality was supplied.  It was agreed that tenders for margarine be invited, in view of the high price of butter, the officers to be asked to accept the substitute also.  With reference to the application of Dr. D’Arcy, medical officer of Roslea dispensary district, for a year’s leave of absence for the purpose of joining the R.A.M.C. and the Local Government Board’s letter requesting the Guardians to reconsider their decision refusing this unless the doctor provided a qualified substitute who would reside in the dispensary district.  Mr. McCaldin handed in notice of motion that the matter be considered at the next meeting.

August 1915.

Fermanagh Times August 5th, 1915.  WAR NEWS.  Nearly half a million sterling is said to represent the loss of wages in Wales on account of the strike, and the other losses would also amount to a considerable sum, to say nothing of the loss of the output of a million tons of coal.  It would take a long period of increased wages to compensate the men for their immediate loss.  But they never seem to think of that.

It is wonderful how this old country manages to boggle and blunder through.  Its authorities seldom prepare for any eventuality or exhibit much foresight, so that we begin wars and other things under great disadvantages.  It transpired at a meeting of the Marconi Company that in 1910 the company proposed to the Government a chain of wireless stations throughout the British possessions, but it was rejected.  The Germans took up the idea and carried it out, with the result that some days before the war they were able to warn their ships to make for neutral ports.

As for the stoppage of cotton imports into Germany, the facts are now notorious.  After 12 months of war and a change of Government our Ministers have not yet proclaimed the chief ingredient of the German and Austrian powers contraband (or subject to seizure by the Allies cruisers).  They have proclaimed wool, oil, machine tools and large scale maps contraband, but not this stuff with which Germany kills our men and their comrades among the Allies.  Nothing in the whole history of this war is so inexplicable.

Fermanagh Times August 5th, 1915.  THE MAN WHO SANK THE LUSITANIA.  CONFESSION BY THE U21’S COMMANDER. “The order to sink the Lusitania arrived on May 2 at Heligoland and, and aroused the indignation of all the officers.  More than one was beside himself.  The order was nevertheless carried out by the U21, which left under the command of Lieutenant von Hersing.  The writer of the letter was on board his ship when Von Hersing returned from his expedition and was able to take note of the contempt which all the officers manifested towards him.  Without daring to lift his head he muttered: – “It went against me to act as I did, but I could not do otherwise. “ He was weeping.  He then told how none of his men knew the object of his voyage, and has several times he was on the point of letting them into the secret in the hope of seeing the crew mutiny.  On its arrival at the spot where it was to surprise the Lusitania, the submarine had a long wait.  At one moment the idea of making off enter the commander’s head, but he found that another submarine had stopped a short distance away.  The Lusitania meanwhile was approaching.  She could not escape her doom.  “I saw people gathered on deck” continued Von Hersing, “the ship was crammed with human beings.  I caused the submarine to plunge and the torpedo was discharged.  I do not know whether it was this torpedo or the one discharged by the other submarine that struck the liner, but the latter’s hull was ripped open.  I had tried to avoid witnessing the ghastly scene which followed, and made away from the torpedoed liner at full speed.  Then I came to the surface.  The sea was crowded with struggling wretches, and even at that distance I could hear the shouts of the drowning.  I had become a man of stone, incapable of moving or giving an order.”

Fermanagh Times August 5th, 1915.  BALLYSHANNON VICTIM IN THE LUSITANIA.  A PROBATE APPLICATION.  In the matter of the goods of Michael Ward, deceased an application was made in the Probate Court, Dublin on behalf of Mrs. Margaret Ward, Greenhall, Ballyshannon, mother of the deceased, for liberty to state death on belief and to obtain letters of administration.  It appeared that Michael Ward had emigrated to America many years ago, and up to April last had resided in Pittsburgh.  Having amassed a small fortune there, he decided to return to Ireland.  He had purchased a farm near Ballyshannon last year.  He sailed from New York in the Lusitania, and when the vessel was torpedoed he was seen helping women and children into the boats, and he undoubtedly sacrificed his life in saving others.  Mr. Justice Madden said it was clear beyond doubt that the deceased was another victim of the outrage.  It was, indeed, a sad case.  He would grant the application.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  A WOUNDED INNISKILLING BACK FROM THE FRONT.  Private Maguire of the 2nd Inniskillings who was wounded on the retreat from Mons has reached the military hospital at Enniskillen for care.  His brother Francis, also in the 2nd Inniskillings was killed in the war and the wounded soldier at the old Redoubt had a narrow escape as a shrapnel bullet tore one shoulder while another bullet tore the other shoulder, as he lay with his comrades in a turnip field on the defence.  He tells how he became unconscious and was found by the stretcher parties and conveyed for first aid before he was sent to the base.  The bullets were probed for and extracted; the parts were burned to guard against blood poisoning and gradually consciousness returned to the parts affected.  Maguire was for some time at Rouen in the hospital in which Miss Stuart of Enniskillen was the sister in the operating theatre; he was subsequently transferred to Brighton where local ladies took convalescent soldiers out in their cars for an airing and he liked the place well.  He has nothing but praise for the care he received at the Redoubt.  He says he is not in want of anything.

Maguire is confined to bed with pains perhaps from rheumatism contracted during some nights of exposure; but he is near Lisnaskea, and hopes to have friends from home as visitors on the fair and other days.  He had a year’s boy service in the old militia in which he served for six years and then entered the line battalions and served abroad for 11 years in both the 1st and 2nd battalion.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  COMFORTS FOR INNISKILLINGS.  I had several gross of fly papers dispatched to the 1st, 5th and 6th battalions of the Inniskillings last week to the Dardanelles where the fly nuisance is described as unbearable.  Severe as the strain is for myriad of flies to light on one’s food and ones face, so that even much desired sleep became a time for torture, it is worse for the wounded.  Many years ago when I was at Montreal I had a very mild experience of what our men have to endure at the Dardanelles in this respect so that I had to leave my food almost untasted.  The flies were in droves on the dinner plate, on the knife and fork, on my face, and the only way to obtain relief was to flee.  But our men cannot fly; they must endure.  (W. C. Trimble)

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  YOUTHS OF 19 CALLED UP.  ABOUT 1,200,000 MORE RUSSIANS FOR THE COLOURS.  An imperial ukase has been issued calling to the colours all men born in 1896 i.e. youths of 19 of whom there are about 1,200,000.  The lowest age at which Russians have been called up hitherto is 20.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  NEXT SUNDAY A DAY OF INTERSESSION.  The Archbishops and Bishops of the Church of Ireland have appointed Sunday, August 8 to be observed throughout our church as a day of prayer and supplication for our church and country.  The cruel war forced on the world by German perfidy and greed will have lasted for 12 months during which time blood and treasure have been freely poured forth that the nation may live.  Our own Church is the poorer for the loss of hundreds of our most gallant sons and is the richer for their noble faithfulness and for the example of their unselfish sacrifice.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  AN INNISKILLING RECOMMENDED FOR THE VICTORIA CROSS.  We are unofficially informed that Sergeant Somers of the 1st Inniskillings, at the Dardanelles has been recommended for the Victoria Cross.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  THE DEATH OF LIEUTENANT COLONEL JONES AT GALLIPOLI.  He was severely wounded by a shrapnel shell while sitting writing out orders.  It struck him in the thigh and part of the abdomen.  An immediate operation was found necessary and he survived the ordeal.  He was sent to Alexandria but while on the journey complications arose which necessitated a second operation from which he never regained consciousness and he passed away before the boat arrived at Alexandria.  His body was buried at sea.

Impartial Reporter.  August 5th 1915.  ARIGNA MINING. PAST AND FUTURE.  A question and reply was recently given in the House of Commons relative to the Arigna Mining Company.  The district abounds in coal of good quality and is rich in ore, fireclay and other valuable minerals.  Some 80 years ago a large Company was formed to work the coal and iron and extensive smelting works where the most excellent iron ware including rails grates, mantle registers, pots etc. were manufactured.  After working with a fair measure of success for some years in those days in which rail communication was entirely absent, the company, owing to intrigue and fraud in which one gentleman lost £80,000 and culminated in the shooting of the manager, the iron works closed down, and  today the great and extensive ironworks are a heap of ruins.  From time to time small companies were established to work to coal which was so much needed in the locality but each company failed after a short existence.

Fermanagh Herald August 7th 1915.  JOTTINGS.  The 8th Inniskillings 10th Irish Division arrived in Enniskillen on Monday night by special train.

Mrs. Bussell, of Tooliss, Lisnaskea he, has been notified by the Canadian Record Office that her son, Private Frank Bussell (27778), F.  Company 15th Battalion, 48th Highlanders, 1st Canadian Contingent, has been missing since the battle of Ypres.

Fermanagh Herald August 7th 1915.  A LIQUID FIRE FIGHT IS DESCRIBED BY MR. PHILIP GIBBS, the special correspondent of the Daily Chronicle in a telegram dated July 31.  For the first time, he says the British troops have had to face the ordeal of liquid fire squirted upon them by an enemy which has adopted every diabolical means to gain a temporary success.

They have gained something, it is true – 500 yards of trenches which we had previously held at Hooge –but they lose still more by a further slur upon their name as fighting men.  It will be remembered that we destroyed a German redoubt of considerable size and strength to the North of the Menin road by a successful mine explosion.  Infuriated by this, the enemy has been furiously shelling our trenches, and using every form of bomb and shell.  He began with a heavy cannonade against our trenches, and hurled large numbers of bombs from trench mortars, damaging part of our trenches, but not dislodging the men.  During a lull however, says Mr. Gibbs, the new horror made its appearance.  A flame – either of gas or liquid fire – was projected upon our advanced trenches.

Our men were taken by surprise at this new means of destruction; but in spite of the shock many leapt to their feet firing repeatedly at the flames.  Finally the trenches reached by the burning jets became untenable and the men were compelled to fall back.

Fermanagh Times August 12th, 1915.  BOOTS FOR WINTER WARFARE.  The Army Clothing Department is said to be engaged in the production of a new boot designed to meet the special necessities of winter wear.  The terrible ordeal of our men in the trenches last winter has set the experts thinking out designs of boots which will afford an altogether better protection to the leg than puttees gave under war conditions.  It must be remembered that the puttee was intended more especially for wear in tropical countries, where it was, indeed, found to give excellent protection against the bites of snakes and insects, but in the trenches puttees held the damp and contributed to frostbite.  Hence our soldiers demand for leggings to replace the puttees, the comfort and support of which they had appreciated so much before going into the flooded trenches.

But what became of that eager young chemist, Fritz Haber, whose table-top experiment first solved the world’s nitrogen crisis? A fervent German nationalist, he not only helped, as we have seen, supply Germany with explosives during World War One- he went on to develop chemical weapons. This was too much for his wife, Clara, herself a chemist. Just after his new poison gases were first put to work in the trenches, she took his service revolver and shot herself. Fritz left the very next morning to oversee the gas’s use on the Eastern Front. The Nobel Prize judges weren’t as critical of his wartime work as his wife. In 1918 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his work on nitrogen. And after the war, he used his know-how to develop pesticides – including that notorious group of nitrogen-based toxins, the cyanides. His work then came to an abrupt end in 1933. Although he had converted to Lutheranism, Fritz Haber had been born Jewish, and as far as the Nazis were concerned he had no place in the new Reich. He fled to England, only to be rejected by his fellow chemists because of his wartime record. A year later he headed for Israel, but died of a heart attack en route. And perhaps it was for the best. Had he lived, Fritz Haber would have seen most of his extended family in Germany wiped out by Zyklon B, a poison gas whose development he had overseen, and whose manufacture depended on the process of nitrogen fixation that he had pioneered.

Fermanagh Times August 12th, 1915.  A RECRUITING MEETING IN LISNASKEA.  A recruiting party composed of a number of officers and men accompanied by the band of the eighth Inniskilling Fusiliers now stationed in Enniskillen visited Lisnaskea on Saturday, the fair day when an open air meeting was held in the centre of the town and was attended by a fairly large crowd.  Rev. R. C. Lapham presided and delivered a brief but incisive address in an appeal for men to join the colours.  Rev. Father Benedict, who is on a visit to the district, and who described himself as a London Irish Catholic priest, also made a strong appeal “so that Fermanagh should take its rightful place in the Irish Brigade”.  Major Johnston also spoke and mentioned that they had obtained 40 recruits in Enniskillen last week.

Impartial Reporter.  August 12th 1915.  ANOTHER PERSON KEPT THE FLEET TOGETHER.  The well-known naval expert Mr. F. T. Jane, disputes the claim that has been put forward on behalf of Mr. Winston Churchill that before the outbreak of war he did a great service to the nation by keeping the Fleet together ready for action instead of allowing its demobilisation after the manoeuvres and that he achieved this bold stroke of policy on his own responsibility.  Mr. Jane says no one expected war, and Mr. Churchill was he believes week ending with his wife at Cromer on the East Coast – Cromer which years ago give birth to “The Garden of Sleep”.  It was all “The garden of sleep.”  No one, adds Mr. Jane’, worried except one man and that man was the First Sea Lord of those days – Admiral Prince Louis of Battenberg.  He is the one who kept the fleet together and saved them from the horrors of Belgium.  Prince Louis of Battenberg it may be recalled was driven into retirement from the post of First Sea Lord in response to clamour from the sensational press on the ostensible grounds of his family association with Germany.  Mr. Jane asserts that Prince Louis is half Russian and the other half just exactly as much French as he is German.  In well informed circles however it may be added that it has been asserted that the reasons why Prince Louis continuance at the Admiralty was objectionable to certain influential wire-pullers behind the scenes was concerned with acute political developments shortly before the war.

(From Norfolkcoast.co.uk) THE GARDEN OF SLEEP. The drama critic of the Daily Telegraph and the Morning Post Clement Scott arrived in Norfolk in August 1883. Unable to find himself accommodation he was put up in the Miller’s House in Sidestrand. He was so taken with the area that he wrote a number of articles in the newspapers expounding the virtues of Norfolk, which eventually resulted in Cromer and the surrounding area becoming a fashionable place for holidays for the rich and famous. He named his articles and, subsequent book Poppy-land. The book was dedicated to the Miller’s daughter.

The term Poppy-Land was due to the vast quantities of poppies which grew in, and around, the area which he so loved. One of his favourite places and for which he wrote a poem entitled ‘The Garden of Sleep’, was the church tower of St. Michael and All Angels at Sidestrand.

The church and churchyard stood right on the cliffs and as the land around it was gradually eroded the locals decided to re-locate their community church further inland. They dismantled the church stone by stone and rebuilt it on its current site. However, they left the church tower on the cliffs and also the old graveyard. Every New Year’s Eve for 15 years Scott walked along Tower Lane to the old church tower and churchyard and spent the last few moments of the old year on the cliffs in the place he called his Garden of Sleep.

As the sea continued to claim the land, the locals had the disconcerting sight of seeing the coffins and the remains of those who had been buried in the church since the 15th Century, tumbling one by one, piece by piece into the crashing waves below. Clement Scott died in 1904 and some say that in later life he regretted that he had made Norfolk famous and that he commented that it was no longer the lovely rural landscape he had first visited in 1883.

The Church tower eventually fell over the cliffs in 1915/16, though its image continued to be used on postcards right up to the 1930’s.The new church St. Michael and All Angels at Sidestrand used the headstones from the old churchyard to line the wall by the road.

The Garden of Sleep by Clement Scott

On the grass of the cliff, at the edge of the steep,

God planted a garden – a garden of sleep!

‘Neath the blue of the sky, in the green of the corn,

It is there that the regal red poppies are born!

Brief days of desire, and long dreams of delight,

They are mine when my Poppy-Land cometh in sight.

In music of distance, with eyes that are wet,

it is there I remember, and there I forget!

0! heart of my heart! Where the poppies are born,

I am waiting for thee, in the hush of the corn.

Sleep! Sleep!

From the Cliff to the Deep!

Sleep, my Poppy-Land,

Sleep!

In my garden of sleep, where red poppies are spread,

I wait for the living, along with the dead!

For a tower in ruins stands guard o’er the deep,

At whose feet are green graves of dear women asleep!

Did they love as I love, when they lived by the sea?

Did they wait, as I wait, for the days that may be?

Was it hope or fulfilling that entered each breast,

Ere death gave release, and the poppies gave rest?

0! Life of my life! On the cliffs by the sea,

By the graves in the grass, I am waiting for thee! Sleep! Sleep!

In the dews by the deep!

Sleep, my Poppy-Land,

Sleep!

Fermanagh Herald August 14th 1915.  NEWS HAS JUST BEEN RECEIVED from the War Office by ex-Sergeant Wilkinson, R.I.C., that his younger son, Bernard Joseph has been killed in action in France on the 22nd of July when serving with his regiment the 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  Deceased was only 20 years of age, and had only been at the front a few months.  He was one of three sons serving with the colours.  One of them fought under General Botha in German South West Africa.  We deeply sympathise with his parents in their sad bereavement.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  SMITH EXECUTED.  MURDERER PROTESTS HIS INNOCENCE TO THE LAST.  George Joseph Smith, the murderer in the Brides in the Baths case, paid the penalty of his crime with his life on Friday morning.  Up to the very last he protested his innocence.  He wrote several letters from Pentonville and Maidstone Prisons, and, robbed of their very extensive verbiage, his cry off “I am an innocent man his repeated through every epistle.” His last letter was written to Miss Pegler, “the woman to whom he always returned.”  He left his property to her.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  ESCAPED GERMAN PRISONERS CAUGHT STAYING IN A HOTEL IN CAVAN.  Two German officers who made their escape from the Oldcastle Internment Camp on Wednesday night were arrested at Cavan on Friday.  They engaged rooms in the Farnham Hotel, where they stopped for the night.  One of the officers, Carol Morlang, who was disguises a clergyman, was arrested by Constable Goldrick in the hotel, the other, Alfans Griem, being detained on the Railway Road while on his way, presumably to the station.  Immediately after their escape being discovered their description was circulated all over the countryside, and the police and military authorities were on the lookout for anyone answering their description. It is stated that they affected their escape about 12.00 on Wednesday night through the wire around the camp, and having previously obtained the clothing which they wore as a disguise, threw their own attire away on escaping.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  OBSTRUCTING RECRUITING.  A CASE AT MANORHAMILTON.  At a special court of petty sessions James Kerrigan of Drummonds was brought up in custody charged that he obstructed, molested and hindered Captain John O’Donnell, D. L., His Majesties recruiting officer, in the discharge of his duty.  Constable John Rogers deposed that the accused was present at a recruiting meeting, and endeavoured to interrupt Captain O’Donnell.  Accused said – “We have nothing to thank England for, remember O’Donovan Rossa, you are an idiot, a blithering idiot.”  Accused on cross examination said that he did not use the words charged against him.  Captain O’Donnell deposed that when he was speaking there were shouts of “shut up you idiot.”  Witness denied he was an idiot, and said if he was, God help the rest of them.  He found the crowd very hostile.  As a matter of fact he did not get a single recruit until 8.30 that evening.  The court imposed a fine of one guinea and two shillings and six pence costs or in default of payment five weeks in prison with hard labour.  The accused intimated his intention of appealing, but subsequently paid the fine.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  BELLEEK DISTRICT COUNCIL.  A meeting of the above council held on Saturday, at which the chairman, Mr. P. Scott, J. P. presided.  The Council decided, after some discussion, the rent of the labourers’ cottages under the new scheme in the Belleek rural district, at the sum of six shillings a month.  Applications for cottages being considered, which was the principal business, the meeting concluded.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  SMITH’S WIDOW WEDS.  ECHO OF BRIDES IN BATH CASE.  The marriage took place on Saturday afternoon of Caroline Beatrice Love, nee Thornhill, a native of Leicester and of Thomas John Davies, of New Westminster, British Columbia, who came from Canada to enlist in the Army, and is a sapper in the Royal Engineers.  The bride was the widow of George Smith who is executed on Friday and the special licence for the marriage was actually taken out on that day.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  THE ROYAL EDWARD.  According to information at present available the transport sunk by an enemy submarine in the Aegean Sea last Saturday morning had on board 32 military officers and 1350 troops in addition to the ship’s crew of 220 officers and men.  The troops consisted mainly of reinforcements for the 29th Division and details of the Royal Army Medical Corps.  It is known that about 600 have been saved.  The 29th Division contains at least three Irish regiments – 1st Royal Dublin Fusiliers, 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers, and 1st Munster Fusiliers.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  THE LOSS OF THE ROYAL EDWARD.  It is with very special sorrow we learn of the sinking of the British transport in the Aegean Sea, and the loss of presumably of 1,000 lives.  It is the first disaster in the magnificent transport service of which we have all been so proud since the start of the war.  The loss of so many fine fellows is most deplorable.  In the finest health, after a long spell of training and discipline, and eager to try themselves against the enemy and strike a blow for their country it is distressingly painful to think of them sinking hopelessly and helplessly in the deep waters just as their anticipation of landing and usefulness were on the point of culmination.  Very many of them were loyal Irishmen.  We do not get know yet what homes near to us here may be plunged into sorrow and mourning, but too many families, no matter where located must suffer irreparable grief from the grim tragedy.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  THE WONDERS OF THE TELEGRAPH SYSTEM.  No doubt it is a war at time of war.  Many of our public arrangements are out of gear.  The needs of the country must have priority over private ones.  But why should these affect us locally so that a telegram requires three hours to travel a distance of four miles from Ballyshannon Post Office to Rossnowlagh.  The fault lies in the thorough backwardness and crass stupidity of the telegraphic authorities.  The message in question, will it be credited, instead of being dispatched directly over the four mile wire that connects Ballyshannon and Rossnowlagh had to be sent away to Derry where it was reconveyed back to Donegal, we understand, and thence to Rossnowlagh.  Any private firm adopting a similar way of carrying on its business would find itself very shortly in the bankruptcy court, if not in a lunatic asylum.  Every divergence from medieval methods, every alteration towards up-to-date ness must have its origin in pressure from outside.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  MILITARY NOTES.  The recreation room opened in the Minor Hall of the Townhall on Wednesday week has proved a very popular resort for the men of the Battalion.  Evening after evening men have taken advantage of the facilities offered to them there for writing, reading, games and social intercourse.  The fact that tea and refreshments may be obtained at almost a nominal price no doubt has added immensely to the attractiveness of the rendezvous.  A large number of local ladies have very willingly given their services each evening and the place is conducted on the most economical lines possible.  A good supply of magazines and papers has been given to the room by people in both town and country.  There is a piano, too, and on this instrument many of the soldiers have shown themselves to be capable musicians and songs and choruses help to pass the time very pleasantly.

A telegram has been received from the War Office intimating that Captain John Cecil Parke, of Clones, 6th Leicester Regiment, the well-known international footballer, was wounded at the Dardanelles on the 10th Inst.  Captain Parke is the well-known Irish rugby football and lawn tennis International.  He represented Ireland in the three-quarter line in all her internationals for many seasons, frequently captaining the fifteen.  As a tennis player he was perhaps the most brilliant player in the three Kingdoms.  He was a member of the British team that won the few who of the Davies Cup in Australia, and subsequently captained the British team, that went to America.  He is a brother of Mr. W. A. Parke, solicitor, Clones.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  WHY WE GAINED AT HOOGE.  FOR THE FIRST TIME THE GERMANS MET THEIR MATCH IN ARTILLERY.  The Daily Mail special correspondent with the British Army in the field, Mr. G.  A Valentine Williams states that our men were successful east of Ypres last week because “for the first time the Germans met their match in artillery.  Our guns had the ammunition required.” “Our artillery was magnificent.  As our men saw our shells crashing in a never ending roar into the German positions and wreathing all the German lines in the mist and smoke they were related to think that at length the Germans were getting what our fellows have so often had to endure.  We all realized that this time at any rate, our guns had the ammunition required to deal with the immense battery which is what the German army really is.  Our advance resulted in the capture of 1,200 yards of trenches and 164 prisoners, including three officers, two machine guns, and a trench mortar as well as a large stock of German ammunition, notably bombs.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  DONEGAL LABOURERS’ FLEEING SCOTLAND.  There was a falling off in the number of Nationalist labourers’ arriving at Londonderry from Scotland on Saturday to escape registration.  Between200 and 300 came.  On Saturday there were almost 600 arrivals by boat and 200 by a train.  Practically all are Donegal men.  They were objects of derision, and soldiers could be seen ironically saluting them.  Half a dozen of Sunday’s arrivals were breakfasting in a lodging house, when the proprietor presented an alien registration form, and the party took fright and left the house without finishing the breakfast.

In Mayo two trains with very nearly 200 able bodied men arrived in the island of Achill from England and Scotland and were fine strong men all heading out to the west from England.  They admit they have left good jobs with good pay and that there is no work for them at home.  The hay is saved and the potatoes would not be fit to dig for a long time yet.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  AMERICANS AEROPLANES FOR FRANCE.  A PROPOSED GIFT OF 1000 MACHINES.  One thousand American aeroplanes, purchased with American money and officered by American aviators, are to be offered by an American organisation to France for the use of the French Army in the present war, according to a cable dispatch from the Paris correspondent of the New York World.  Circulars are to be issued to the graduates of Yale, Harvard, and Princeton, inviting them on patriotic grounds to aid in the defence of their country.  They will be asked to join the French Aviation Corps for the duration of the war, after which their military experience we’ll qualify them to become reserve aviators in the United States.  They will be formed into a special corps in France, under their own officers, and will receive an additional £10 a month over and above the regular French flying man’s pay.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915. THE GERMAN’S NEW AIRCRAFT.  The Germans super warplane or battle aeroplane has been designed to carry out the same tactics which the cruisers of the notorious Emden type were built to pursue on the ocean.  These aerial craft are essentially raiders, and they be launched against towns, villages, cities, strategic military centres, artillery fortresses or other defences.  Their outstanding features are an extensive carrying capacity of both men and ammunition in the form of bombs, while they are also powerfully armed with machine guns. The Germans have solved one or two perplexing problems in connection with the arming of aeroplanes in their new aerial machine gun. A new system allows the gun to be moved through the requisite firing arches and the gun can be swung from side to side and brought into the firing position with a minimum of effort and so the fire may be directed from either broadside as desired.  The new warplane is able to carry a larger crew in order to protect the aeroplane.  This is achieved by means of what has already become known as the aerial sniper.  Like his colleagues working in the trenches he is a crack quick shot and adept with the automatic arm.  His specific duty is to pick off the marksmen in any enemy machines.  These aerial snipers are selected men who have passed through a special course of aeronautical training.  When not engaged in sniping duties the rifleman is free to pursue bomb throwing activities.  Owing to the comparatively slow speed at which these large battle aeroplanes can travel the task of bomb throwing is appreciably facilitated, and great accuracy of aim is assured.  The steady platform which the aeroplane offers enables the machine gun fire to be concentrated far more effectively than is the case with the average aeroplane.  Steadiness and low velocity in flight are a decided assistance to the sniper because he is an able to take his aim with greater deliberation.

Fermanagh Times August 19th, 1915.  BELLEEK.  A man named James William Elliott, belonging to the town land of Killymore, was admitted on Wednesday to the workhouse infirmary, Ballyshannon, suffering from concussion of the brain and other injuries, the result of accidentally falling off a horse near Belleek.

When two men were working in a bog in the townland of Corry, near Belleek, they discovered a firkin of butter, weighing about 56 lbs, buried to a depth of 8 feet, and in a good state of preservation.  It is supposed to have been deposited in the bog for a considerable time.

Impartial Reporter.  August 19th 1915.  DISPUTE ABOUT A PRIEST’S BURIAL.  The remains of the Rev. J.  O’Toole, P.  P., which were interned in the church grounds of Kilmeena, West Mayo, were taken up and reinterred during the night, it is presumed by some parishioners in a grave dug within the church itself.  The ecclesiastical authorities having given direction as to the place of burial within a few feet of the church, which is a small one, a deputation to the Most Rev. Dr. Higgins auxiliary Bishop of Tuam, requested that the dead priests should be buried in a spot which the deceased had indicated within the sacred edifice. Dr. Higgins said he could not depart from the directions of the Archbishop. Accordingly after Office and High Mass the internment took place outside the church. Although there were murmurs of dissatisfaction the people separated quietly. It is said about 35 men took part in the retransfer but none of the relatives of the deceased participated in it.

Impartial Reporter.  August 19th 1915.  A SERIOUS FRACAS IN ENNISKILLEN BARRACKS AND TWO MEN IN HOSPITAL.  On Tuesday night last a serious affray took place in the main barracks Enniskillen. A detachment numbering about 50 men arrived from the Dublin fusiliers and this party since they arrived do not seem to have been particularly happy in their new surroundings. It is a well-known fact that the north cannot get on very well with the south and vice versa and the Dublin men since their arrival in the north have shown their antipathy to the transfer. It seems that the party of Dublin men had some trouble among themselves and eventually a section barricaded a room against all comers.  The men on duty battered at the door and eventually succeeded in breaking an open.  So fierce was the opposition that the fire hose had to be turned upon the recalcitrant who seeing the position was hopeless surrendered.  Some 20 panes of glass were broken and two men had to be removed to hospital suffering from bayonet wounds and two others had minor wounds, principally cuts.  Seven men were arrested and put in the guardroom to await a court martial.  After their arrest the Dublin men cursed the Inniskillings and acted in rowdy manner while  being conveyed to the cells.

Impartial Reporter.  August 19th 1915.  CAN ENNISKILLEN HELP?  While Enniskillen has already nobly responded to the call for recruits and has given over 600 of its inhabitants to the fighting forces might it not also be the site for a proposed munitions factory.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  MORE GERMAN MURDERS.  The White Star liner Arabic outward bound for New York from Liverpool was torpedoed and sunk off the Cork Coast on Thursday morning.  The pirates gave no warning of the outrage and the vessel disappeared in 11 minutes, her side being torn out.  There were about to 426 persons aboard and of these 50 are missing, including six passengers and 44 of the crew.  This latest submarine outrage took place close to the scene of that which resulted in the sinking of the Lusitania with its awful death toll.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  PERSONAL.  The death of Captain James C.  Johnston, adjutant of the 6th Royal Irish Fusiliers was announced on Saturday and received with all the more regret as the last male in the direct line of the Johnston family of Magheramena Castle.  Captain Johnston was High Sheriff for the county in 1910 and during the last three years of the Aberdeen regime in the Irish Viceroyalty was Private Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant.  He was a fine soldier, and had served through the Boer campaign with the 14th Hussars.  The late Captain Johnston who was educated at Charterhouse and Sandhurst was a Resident Magistrate for County Meath. The deceased was a cousin to Major Johnston, Recruiting Officer, Enniskillen.

Rev. W. H. Massy recently Methodist Minister in Enniskillen, while riding a motor cycle was severely injured in a collision with a large motor car driven by a Belfast lad, and has been conveyed to the Cottage Hospital, Coleraine.

Second lieutenant Reg.  S.  Trimble, 6th Royal Irish Fusiliers, wounded and suffering from shock at the Dardanelles has been removed to the Military Hospital, the Citadel, Cairo.  Second lieutenant L.  Falls is in the same hospital suffering from wounds in the leg.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  SINN FEINERS IN TYRONE.  PRIEST ON THE PLATFORM.  On Sunday afternoon a mobilisation of several companies of the Irish Volunteers (the Sinn Fein section) took place at Carrickmore, County Tyrone when some 200 members, about 1/3 of who carried rifles, paraded under the command of Mr. McCrory, Clogher, the county instructor. A crowd of about 700-800 also assembled.  A police note taker was present, and a considerable force of constabulary drawn from a number of stations in the county was in attendance under the command of District Inspector Barrington, Dungannon and Head Constable Fallon.  At a public meeting, Rev. C Shortt, CC, Carrickmore presided.  The chairman said Mr. Redmond had slippery English politicians to deal with who would try to make them swallow the exclusion of Ulster but if he had control of the Volunteers he could say, I can’t oblige you for I have obstinate fellows behind me who are driving me on.  (Cheers.)

Fermanagh Herald August 21st 1915.  A telegram has been received from the War Office intimating that captain John Cecil Parke, of Clones, 6th Leinster Regiment, the well-known International footballer, was wounded at the Dardanelles on the 10th Inst..  Captain Parke is the well-known Irish rugby football and lawn tennis International.  He represented Ireland in the three-quarter line in all her Internationals for many seasons, frequently captaining the 15.  As a tennis player, he was perhaps the most brilliant player in the Three Kingdoms.  He was a member of the British team that won the Davis Cup in Australia, and subsequently captained the British team that went to America.

The relatives of Private Alex Armstrong, of Maguiresbridge, have learned from the War Office that he died of wounds in France.  He belonged to the 2nd Inniskillings.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  IN MEMORY OF GALLANT INNISKILLING S.  DROWNED AT PORT ELIZABETH 60 YEARS AGO.  We are indebted to Mr. Arthur Rice, brother of our townsman, Mr. Edward Rice, for the following very interesting account of the unveiling of a memorial tablet recalling a pathetically tragic event in the career of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers so far back as three score years ago.  On the 11th of July in St. Mary’s Church, Port Elizabeth, the tablet erected by the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in memory of the members of the regiment who were lost in the wreck of the troopship, Charlotte, in 1854, was unveiled.  The prayer of dedication was recited by the Venerable Archdeacon Wirgman, after which the tablet was uncovered by Mrs. Dowsett, as the oldest parishioner of Saint Mary’s who remembers the wreck.  The tablet is erected close to the door and its inscription is as follows: In memory of 62 rank and file, 11 women and 26 children of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers who perished in the wreck of the Troopship Charlotte on the rocks at the end of Jesse Street, on September 20th, 1854.  This Tablet was placed here by the regiment, A.D. 1914.  R. I. P.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  CATTLE DRIVING IN IRELAND.  Violent outbreaks of cattle driving have taken place in various northern parts of King’s County the occasion being the annual grass lettings.  The drivers wanted the lands let to them, which the owners refused.  200 extra police have been drafted into the affected districts.  58 of the drivers were yesterday returned for trial to the county assizes.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  THE VALUE OF HORSES.  Owing to the stoppage of buying horses for the army, prices have fallen of greatly during the past month.  In many fairs recently, though the show of animals of all kinds on offer was considerable, very few business transactions took place.  Owners holding out for the high rates of three months ago when army purchasers were active failed to realise that the demand has slackened off.  Buyers in the trade are as anxious as ever to take horses at the normal prices.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  THE EVIL OF SEPARATION ALLOWANCE.  Alice Harren, Head street, had three summonses, one for disorderly conduct and two for simple drunkenness, Acting–Sergeant McGowan and Constable Cryan were complainants.  Defendant said two of her sons had been killed and another son had come home wounded last week.  The R.M.  Are you in receipt of separation allowance?  Defendant – Yes18 shillings and four pence a week.  My two sons have been killed.  The R.M. – Is that the manner in which you pay respect to their memory by getting drunk.  A months imprisonment in the first case was ordered, and a fine of 40 shillings and costs in each of the other cases, the  Chairman remarking that defendant had been repeatedly warned.  Mary Love, Enniskillen was fined 20 shillings for drunkenness.  She was also in receipt of separation allowance and she was warned that if she came back there a recommendation would be made by the Bench to have the separation allowance stopped.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  ANOTHER ATLANTIC LINER TORPEDOED.  THE WHITE STAR “ARABIC” SUNK WITH NO WARNING GIVEN.  The White Star Liner Arabic fell a victim to a German submarine on Thursday morning of the Fastnet.  She was torpedoed without warning, and foundered in 10 minutes.  The liner was on her way from Liverpool to New York, with a crew of 243 and 180 passengers.  Eleven of the ship’s boats were launched, and the occupants were picked up by another vessel.  Three hundred and ninety one persons are known to have been saved, leaving only 32 to be accounted for.  The Arabic is the first White Star Liner to have been sunk by a submarine.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  ROLL OF HONOUR.  A FERMANAGH OFFICER KILLED.  CAPTAIN J. C. JOHNSTON, MAGHERAMENA.  A telegram has been received from the War Office to say that Captain J. C. Johnston, adjutant of the6th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, has been killed in action in the he Dardanelles.  Captain Johnston served through their Boer War with the 14thHussars, and was Private Secretary to the Earl of Aberdeen during the last three years of his Viceroyalty.  He was educated at Charterhouse and Sandhurst, and was recently appointed Resident Magistrates for the County of Meath.  His family residence was Magheramena Castle, County Fermanagh, of which county he was High Sheriff in the year 1910.

Second–Lieutenant R. S. Trimble, 6th Irish Fusiliers, wounded at the Dardanelles, is a son of Mr. W. C. Trimble, Enniskillen.  He was engaged with Messrs. Guinness, and was a member of the Wanderers Football Club.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  THE HIDDEN DEATH.  HOW I SANK THE MAJESTIC AND TRIUMPH.  The New York Globe publishes the following description of the sinking of the British warships Triumph and Majestic off the Dardanelles given to its correspondent by Captain Otto Herzing, the commander of the German submarine, whom the correspondent describes as “a maker of world history.”

“In the early morning light we saw the Triumph and Majestic lying off the coast constantly encircled by destroyers.  Through the periscope I saw a destroyer coming directly for us.  We dived and the destroyer passed immediately over us with a sound like that of a motor car.  We came up immediately.  I took aim through the periscope at the Triumph, pressed the button automatically firing the torpedo, and the projectiles slipped noiselessly into the water.  We dived again.  The explosion which followed was as terrific as though it had been in the forepart of the submarine itself.

Then we lay hidden for two days and a half after which we came up again in the midst of the British ships.  Just before noon looking through the periscope, I saw the Majestic surrounded by 10 ships steaming around her in a constant circle for her protection.  I could see the Majestic Sailors on the deck taking their noonday nap.  Shall I disturb them?  I thought.  Then seeing a welcome space between the circling ships I pressed the electric button and the torpedo was going.  It caught the Majestic a little to the rear of amidships.  We dived again in silence.  It is remarkably quiet in a submarine when underwater, and we hear sounds, being able to distinguish various propellers by the different rumblings.  We noticed that the bombardment from the ships had ceased, for they had been shelling the Turkish land positions.  We remain submerged for several hours and then came to the surface to find that the British had disappeared, and all search for them was in vain.  We came to Constantinople, arriving yesterday morning having spent 42 days in the submarine without rest or let up. Captain Herzing’s record, declares the Globe correspondent is unique.  Aside from firing the first torpedo sinking a ship and sinking two more warships in the Dardanelles, he sank five English and French freighter ships which were in Havre last November.  The torpedo tube from which was fired the torpedo which sank the Pathfinder has been engraved with that name. Now the name Triumph has been added, while the name Majestic is engraved on the second tube.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.

THE HARVEST MEN OF DONEGAL.

The war has brought its humours; it has brought its horrors too,

Its horrors which have held the world in thrall;

But there is nothing more distressing to the Irishman who’s true,

Than the Harvestmen’s return to Donegal.

They were only asked to Register upon a certain date,

Their age and occupation – that was all;

Perhaps they might consent to earn good wages from the State,

These sturdy Harvestmen of Donegal.

Sure, the form wasn’t binding; it was well within their choice –

They were told – to still ignore the trumpets call;

But they were perverse to reason, they listened to no voice –

But the impulse to return to Donegal.

From Scotland’s fertile Lothians, from Ayrshire’s grainlands bright,

From Lancashire to Southern Cornwall;

They cleared off like silent Arabs, some in the dead of night,

Back to their little homes in Donegal.

Reviled and jeered and scorned by all who saw their flight,

At Greenock little kiddies tried to maul

These gallant Irish “Exiles” rushing on with all their might

To catch the boat en route for Donegal.

Their homes they reached in safely, though they gained ignoble fame;

Meanwhile they are free from any prying Paul,

For liberty’s a jewel oft known by another name

From the Police point of view – in Donegal.

The Huns may strangled Belgium, they made devastate fair France,

Our great empire may either stand or fall;

Such wrongs inspire no Harvestmen to take up gun or lance,

He’ll squat behind the hills of Donegal.

At Demonstrations he’ll be out arrayed in war paint green,

For freedoms glorious cause he’ll loudly bawl;

But Britain in the future should ignore his petty spleen,

For serfdom’s good enough for Donegal.

Fermanagh Times August 26th, 1915.  LISNASKEA CHILD’S DEATH.  The inquest was resumed by Mr. James Mulligan, J.P., coroner, on Monday night touching the death of the nine days old male child of Martha Burnes, a domestic servant.  The child, it seems, was left by the mother with a Mrs. Donaghy, at Derryadd, and on Mrs. Donaghy, junior, putting it into the cradle she found it was dead.  Medical evidence of the post-mortem examination showed that the body was emaciated and 2lb lighter than the average baby.  There was an extravasation of blood on the outside of the skull and a corresponding effusion on the brain, probably the result of a fall or a blow.  The viscera and other organs were forwarded to Mr. Patten, public analyst, Belfast, and he reported that he found no poisonous substance.  The Coroner commented on the action of the Lisnaskea Workhouse officials in refusing admission to the mother and child five days before its death.  The foreman Mr. McMahon said that if the mother and child had been admitted to the workhouse the child might have been alive yet.  The jury found that the deceased died from the effect of a blow or a fall on the skull, but how or by whom this was inflicted they had no evidence.  Private P.  McCormick, who at the outbreak of the war was porter in Lisnaskea Workhouse, has been wounded in the foot at the Dardanelles and now lies in hospital in Cairo.

Impartial Reporter.  August 26th 1915.  DARDANELLES.  THE LANDING AT SUVLA BAY.  The landing at Suvla Bay was a complete and staggering surprise for the Turks who had been expecting a new attack on the Asiatic side.  Never in military operations have any enemy been so hoodwinked.  On the appointed night warships, transports, destroyers and trawlers arrived at Suvla Bay and disembarked the troops when the Turks were all waiting feverishly for an attack on the Asiatic side of the Dardanelles.  Every soldier carried three days’ rations as well as trenching tools.  As the men landed they advanced 6 miles inland.  Daylight came and still the work was proceeding with the greatest possible speed.  Artillery and supplies and vast quantities were put on shore and still no opposition was experienced.  The warships were silent and for 24 hours the operation was carried out without a single shot from big gun or rifle being fired. The Turks rushed forces to the spot and on the second night both sides dug themselves in, fought for position in groups with bayonets and even with entrenching tools.  It is estimated that 700,000 were brought up by the enemy.  In the morning light a terrific battle began.  Strong bodies of troops thrown against several points of the British lines were hurled back.  All day long the lines of the fighting men turned and twisted turned and twisted again but never broke.

(From Wikipedia) The landing at Suvla Bay was an amphibious landing made at Suvla on the Aegean coast of Gallipoli peninsula in the Ottoman Empire as part of the August Offensive, the final British attempt to break the deadlock of the Battle of Gallipoli. The landing, which commenced on the night of 6 August 1915, was intended to support a breakout from the Anzac sector, five miles (8 km) to the south. Despite facing light opposition, the landing at Suvla was mismanaged from the outset and quickly reached the same stalemate conditions that prevailed on the Anzac and Helles fronts. On 15 August, after a week of indecision and inactivity, the British commander at Suvla, Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Stopford was dismissed. His performance in command was one of the most incompetent feats of generalship of the First World War.

The Suvla landing was to be made by the newly formed British IX Corps, initially comprising two brigades of the 10th (Irish) Division and the entire 11th (Northern) Division. Command of IX Corps was given to Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Stopford. British military historian J.F.C. Fuller said of Stopford that he had “no conception of what generalship meant” and indeed he was appointed not on his experience (he had seen little combat and had never commanded men in battle) or his energy and enthusiasm (he was aged 61 and had retired in 1909) but because of his position on the list of seniority. Hamilton had requested either Lieutenant-General Julian Byng or Lieutenant-General Henry Rawlinson, both experienced Western Front corps commanders, but both were junior to Lieutenant-General Sir Bryan Mahon, commander of the 10th Division and so, by a process of elimination, Stopford was selected.