1908.

October 17th 1908. AEROPLANE TRIUMPH. 50 MILES IN 69 MINUTES. Mr Wilbur Wright on Saturday afternoon made a fifty mile flight with a passenger remaining over sixty nine minutes in the  air. He thus beat all the world records and triumphantly completed the tests required by the Lazarc-Weiler Syndicate before purchasing the French rights of the American aeroplane for £20,000. At 4.45 Mr. Wright and Mr. Paul Painleave, a member of the French Institute, took their seats in the aeroplane before the largest number of aeronautical experts who have ever been present at the demonstrations of Mr. Wright. The aeroplane rose to a height of 25ft and Mr. Wright commenced to describe a series of eclipses and triangles. For some time the aviator maneuvered at various heights. At times he reached a height of nearly 100 ft., and during the greater part of the flight the aeroplane travelled at a great speed. The performance was accepted as entirely satisfactory by the members of the Syndicate and may therefore be regarded as the conclusion of Mr. Wright’s work at Le Mans. (France).

October 17th 1908. INVASION BY AIRSHIP.  GERMAN PLAN TO CONQUER ENGLAND. Herr Rudolph Martin, Government Councillor and author of The Coming War in the Air who is president of the recently formed German League for Motor Airship Navigation, fired the imagination of his hearers at a meeting in Berlin with a plan for the conquest of England by airships. He averted that the principal duty of aerial navigators was to induce the combined Continental Powers to construct a fleet of 10,000 Zeppelins, each to carry twenty soldiers, to fly these across the English Channel and the North Sea, preferably by night, and to land and capture the sleeping Britons before they could realise what was taking place. Herr Martin disposed of the British Fleet by predicting that they would turn tail and leave the coasts defences as soon as the aerial armada hove in view in order to avoid being blown up by the shells which would otherwise be dropped on to them from the clouds. The aerial armada would assemble at leisure at points opposite the English coast, and begin their death-dealing voyage as soon as the weather was favourable. Herr Martin thought that artillery and cavalry could be landed in England quite as easily as 200,000 infantry.

28-11-1908. VICE-REGAL PARTY IN BELLEEK. ADDRESS OF WELCOME FROM THE INHABITANTS. SPEECH OF THE LORD LIEUTENANT. His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant and the Counters of Aberdeen, who travelled from Dublin on Monday, arrived in the pretty little village of Belleek by the 7.55 train last night, and were enthusiastically received by the townspeople. The windows of a number of the houses were illuminated for the occasion, and a pretty floral arch WITH THE WORD “WELCOME, in white letters on a crimson background, spanned the main thoroughfare.

An address from the people of the town and district was presented to their Excellencies at the entrance to the hotel. There was an immense crowd outside the building. The Very Rev Dr McMeel, P. P. chairman of the Reception Committee, presided, and in the course of his speech said it was necessary for the Government, in justifying the insertion of the Compulsory Notification Clause in the Tuberculosis Bill at present before Parliament to establish sanatoria in convenient centres through, the length and breadth of Ireland, out of the millions of pounds that this country had been obliged to pay in over-taxation to the British Treasury for the past sixty or seventy years (cheers). As their Excellencies had always cordially sympathised with the ideals and aspirations of the Irish people, he trusted that they would continue their valuable services until they should have everywhere established the flourishing tranquillity of a happy and contented Ireland (cheers).

Mr Edward Knox, hon. secretary of the Reception Committee, then read the address. The Lord Lieutenant, who was loudly cheered, in replying, said he need scarcely tell them that he had always endeavoured to support Lady Aberdeen in every possible manner in her efforts to help the Home Industries, and secondly, in regard to her fight with the scourge of tuberculosis (cheers). He thought it was a happy augury, and omen that they had already, by coming forward in this way and alluding to the matter as they had done in the address, indicated their hearty’ support and concurrence with the efforts now being made to stamp out this disease (cheers). Afterwards a number of the members of the Reception Committee were introduced to Lord and Lady Aberdeen. Three ringing cheers having been given for their Excellencies the crowd dispersed. On Tuesday the Vice-regal party motored to Donegal to open the Tuberculosis Exhibition. During their stay in Belleek they will visit the famous pottery and. other places of interest in this picturesque district.

28-11-1908. OLD-AGE PENSIONS IN FERMANAGH. The County Fermanagh Local Pension Committee held a prolonged sitting on Friday for the consideration of claims, during the course of which they allowed 5 shillings per week in 360 cases, 4 shillings in one case, 3 shillings in one case and 1 shilling in one case and postponed 35 cases for further evidence and investigation. One application was withdrawn. The total number of cases dealt with was 399, which constitutes a record for Ireland.

28-11-1908. OLD-AGE PENSIONS IN FERMANAGH. The County Fermanagh Local Pension Committee held a prolonged sitting on Friday for the consideration of claims, during the course of which they allowed 5 shillings per week in 360 cases, 4 shillings in one case, 3 shillings in one case and 1 shilling in one case and postponed 35 cases for further evidence and investigation. One application was withdrawn. The total number of cases dealt with was 399, which constitutes a record for Ireland.

28-11-1908. CALUMNY REFUTED. THE PROTESTANT BIGOTS OF THE SOUTH. ALLEGED SCENES AT FUNERAL. Under the heading of “Roman Catholic Intolerance in County Limerick,” “Barbarous conduct at a Funeral,” the Fermanagh Times of last week published letter from Rev. J. S. Wylie, Castleconnell in which the rev gentleman paints a further lurid picture of the scenes alleged to have taken place at the funeral of Mr John Enright. He points out in his letter that he was a frequent caller at Mr Enright’s during his illness, and that he ministered to him three times during this period. In the Irish Independent of Thursday last the mother of the deceased, Mrs K Enright, gives the lie to this statement of the pious rector of Castleconnell. Mrs Enright, who is naturally .horrified at the disgusting dispute which has arisen over her dead son, now considers it her duty to place the true facts before the public, and to put an end once and for all to the bigots’ roar all over Ireland. She denies point blank that Mr Wylie ministered to her son during his last illness. “Since the day my son fell sick she writes, “Mr Wylie never saw him, nor, as far as I know, ever asked to see him until the 25th October, when he was unconscious. He died in less than an hour after Mr Wylie leaving him.” What has the representative of Protestant truth and Protestant tolerance in Castleconnell to say to this point blank denial of his statements? “My son,” writes Mrs Enright “had been attended to by the priest on three occasions, at his own special request, uninfluenced by anybody while he was in his perfect senses; the priest received him into the Catholic Church, administered to him the last rites of the Catholic Church and he died a Catholic. Rev Wylie had been told this.” The fact then remains that the Rev. Wylie after being informed by the relatives of the deceased of the latter’s conversion to Catholicity, and his consequent desire to be buried according to the rites of the Catholic Church, showed an inhuman disrespect, both for the wishes of the living and dead, by stopping a funeral procession at the gate of his church, and calling upon the mourners, to bear the body of the deceased inside. This is how the Christian Minister describes the scene outside the church When the coffin reached the church gate a crowd of people surrounded it. Sticks were raised in a threatening manner; some of the bearers, including Dr George Enright, were roughly handled. The coffin was then seized by the crowd, who forcibly prevented it being brought into the church, and, with shouts and cries of “‘Don’t let him be buried a Protestant,” which were heard more than a quarter of a mile away, the body was rushed past the church and placed in the grave. It is enough to say that Dr George Enright absolutely denies getting any rough handling, as well as the statement that sticks were used in a threatening manner. Our readers will take the other statements of the rev gentleman for what they are worth.

SABBATH DESECRATORS. To the Editor of the “Fermanagh Herald.” The following letter has been addressed to the editor of the “Impartial Reporter’ in. reply to one appearing in the last issue of that paper.

10-10-1908. To the Editor “Impartial Reporter. – Dear Sir, Your correspondent “Ballinamallard Unionist” and a Lover of Truth must be a very simple man. He proceeds in the course of a lengthy letter to give the truth of the Ballinamallard incident where, the God-fearing loyalists are alleged to have gathered into that mecca of Orangeism in order to prevent by physical force some peaceable people passing through the village on the Sabbath. “Lover of Truth’ denies the allegation, and if his contention be accurate it is the manifest duty of the traders and inhabitants of Ballinamallard to take action to clear their village of the serious allegations which the police have made against it. Will they act or will they not? If they do not, then we shall believe that the police were correct when they advised the competitors at the Feis to go round by another road lest a riot might ensue. But that apart, “Lover of Truth” makes himself appear quite silly when he applies the, term ‘Sabbath Desecrators” to the competitors. Does he read the papers? If so, is he aware that two Sundays ago the Brewers of England —the great driving force behind loyalty and Unionism organised an extraordinary political demonstration in Hyde Park, London, to which over a hundred thousand people came from the English provinces? Huge crowds bearing banners with political party cries filled the streets the whole day and speeches were delivered from fifty platforms. Has “Lover of the Truth” written to the papers to protest against this colossal desecration of the Lord’s Day, engineered by drink in support of Unionism, Beer, beer, glorious beer! beer and the Union, beer and loyalty?

And the dozen or so boys from Enniskillen, who are passing to a musical festival, are Sabbath desecrators! Do you have any music on the Sabbath, “Lover of Truth? Either the police were correct or it is the plain duty of the Ballinamallard people to set themselves right with the public. If they allow the matter to lie, people must not be blamed for assuming that the Christianity which prompts a man to break his neighbour’s head for the love of God is not the Christianity of the gentle Christ, who loved all men, even His enemies. ‘Yours truly, etc.

21-11-1908. CLONES LACE AT FRANCO- BRITISH EXHIBITION. One of the most prominent and attractive stalls in the section devoted to arts and crafts and home industries at the Franco-British Exhibition in London was that of Mrs Philip Maguire lace dealer Fermanagh Street, Clones, who displayed an extensive assortment of lace and crochet, arranged in a most artistic and effective manned. The stall, which was a corner one and in a central position, attracted much attention, and being lined on the inside in emerald green, made a most appropriate setting for the beautiful fabrics on view, the work of deft and patient fingers of the industrious lace-makers of Clones district. The Clones lace industry, which is the means of keeping so many families from poverty or emigration, will, no doubt, benefit immensely from the display referred to, and it is satisfactory to know that Mrs. Maguire’s enterprise in securing a stall and placing the exhibit on view has been amply rewarded by the results, notwithstanding, the heavy expenses involved. During the fortnight which she spent at the exhibition she sold an enormous quantity of lace fabrics of all kinds, besides booking orders amounting to hundreds of pounds and. which it will probably take many months to supply. Mrs Maguire was specially complimented by a leading London daily on the success of her stall, and the effective manner in which she had arranged her display at the exhibition.

 

1908.

FERMANAGH HERALD AND MONAGHAN NEWS. October 3rd 1908.

DROWNED. YOUNG MAN’S SAD END AT BELLEEK. UNFOUNDED SUGGESTIONS OF FOUL PLAY. INQUEST AND VERDICT.

The sad and deplorable circumstances attending the death of a young man named James Keenaghan. Jun., Rathmore, Belleek, who was drowned in the River Erne on Friday night last, were disclosed at an inquest held in the Courthouse, Belleek, on Saturday evening. The coroner for the district, Mr. George Atkinson, solicitor, Enniskillen, was unavoidably absent and the inquest was held before Messrs. J. Timoney, J.P., and J. Duffy, J.P.

On Saturday morning rumours were freely circulated to the effect that there were suspicions of foul play, and in the evening during the proceedings at the inquest, the Courthouse was crowded. However, these unfounded suggestions were disposed of and the jury returned a verdict of accidental drowning. Deceased, who was about thirty years of age and unmarried, was very popular and highly respected in the district, and naturally his tragic end has caused widespread grief amongst all creeds and classes of the community. Sergeant Ballantine watched the proceedings on behalf of the authorities, and Dr. Lewis R. Lipsett, solicitor, Ballyshannon, represented the owners of the Fishery.

The following jury were sworn:—Messrs., Thomas Mortimer (foreman), William McCawley, Charles Duffy, Patrick Montgomery, Thomas McGovern George Thornhill, William Slevin, F. Dolan James Slevin, F. Dolan, J. Gallagher, H. Slevin, and P. McCawIey.

Sergeant Ballantine gave evidence of the recovery of the deceased’s body, which was found that morning at half-past six by Mr. F. D. Rogan and witness in the River Erne at Corlea, at which place the water was only two feet deep. There were a few marks on the head. The body was removed to the residence of the father of the deceased,

William Joseph Gallagher gave evidence to the effect that he was on the Weir fishing on Friday- night at nine o’clock. Deceased, Peter Donaghan, and a son of the owner of the weir were also there. They all proceeded together to the eel house, where they lighted a lamp and a fire. The fishing nets were lifted by them three times. As was usual there was some drink and each of them took a share of a half-pint of whiskey. Donaghan and the other young man left for Belleek shortly before ten. Deceased and witness’ remained behind in the eel house and lay down on the bed. Shortly afterwards deceased produced another half-pint and each of them took about half a glass each. Having partaken of the whiskey deceased went out in the direction of the back door for the purpose of hiding the bottle of whiskey, and as he did not return after some time witness shouted and searched for him, but was unable to find any trace of him.

Witness proceeded to Belleek and on the way he met Donaghan and the other young man, both of whom he apprised of what had occurred. They all returned to the place and made a further careful search, but still no trace of deceased could be found. The other two young men were scarcely ten minutes absent when the deceased disappeared. Asked if the deceased was drunk, witness replied that he was not. Gallagher’s story was corroborated by Donaghan and another witness.

Evidence of the cause of death was given by Dr. Kelly, who stated that there were a few  cuts and scratches on the head, which probably might have been caused by the body being knocked about the weir. Death was due to asphyxia, the result of drowning. Mr. J. Timoney, J.P., in addressing the jury, made pathetic references to the sad occurrence. The jury found a verdict of accidental drowning and added a rider conveying their sympathy to the relatives of the deceased. Dr. L. R. Lipsett, solicitor, on behalf of the owners of the Fishery, also extended his sympathy to the deceased’s relatives.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1908. THE ABOLITION OF THE WORKHOUSE.

A campaign for the abolition, of the workhouses is vital to the interests of the country. All classes in Ireland are united on this question. The present system of Poor-Laws in vogue stands condemned as the most wasteful and extravagant in the world. The 159 workhouses now standing cost the country £1,300,000. Pauperism is increasing at the rate of 1,000 per year, and the number of admissions to work-houses is going up every day. The Viceregal Commission on Irish Poor-Laws has condemned the system as a whole, and in all its parts. The case for a, radical reform has been convincingly established, but we appear to be no nearer the application of the obvious remedy than when the Commission issued the report. Under the present system the vagrant is the only member of the community that is catered for. In the Irish workhouse the tramp finds a hotel where he is comfortably housed and fed. The Several Boards of Guardians throughout the country have been put to their wits end to escape from the burden imposed on the rates by the visits of laureates to the workhouses. The suggestion which was made at Lisnaskea on Saturday last was that the tramps should be prosecuted under the Vagrancy Act has been tried and found wanting in other unions. Imprisonment has certainly a deterrent effect in making nomads steer clear of the workhouse, where such means are adopted to get rid of them, but the evil has now become a natural one, and as tramps cannot he got rid of by this method of procedure, some more effectual remedies will have to be pursued. The Viceregal Commission made some very important recommendations on the subject, which should prove effective in coping with the evil. In Turkey tramps are confined in labour colonies where they are made to labour for the good of the nation. If the same were done in Ireland thousands of pounds would be saved to the country, and the nomadic tribe would soon become an unknown quantity. Holland years ago solved this problem by getting all those who were both willing and unwilling to work to labour at reclaiming her sandy coasts. To-day the professional loafer is unknown in Holland, and all her people are comparatively prosperous. The old aged poor are looked after by the State, just as in Ireland, before the Norman Invasion, the Chieftain was responsible for the care of the infirm members of the clan. The present system of Irish Poor Laws, whereby, the good and the bad, the young and old, the idle and the vicious, are all herded together with distinction, cannot but be regarded as evil-destroying and de-moralising. If the recommendations of the Viceregal Commission are put into force such a pitiable state of things would be at once remedied, for the changes suggested are drastic and far reaching.

October 10th 1908. KILLED ON THE RAILWAY. LABOURER’S TRAGIC DEATH NEAR PETTIGO. William Fitch, aged about 38 years, a labourer in the employment of Captain Barton, was instantly killed on the railway line about a mile from Pettigo       Station on Tuesday. From reports it appears that the unfortunate man was on his way to dig potatoes, and proceeded along the railway  line for a “near-cut,” and turning a curve he failed to see that the mid-day train from Derry to Bundoran was approaching, and before he was aware of his perilous position, his body was almost severed in two. The body was first discovered by a railway porter named Joseph Marshall and it was subsequently removed to Pettigo. Deceased was very popular and highly respected in the district and his untimely end has caused a great shock He leaves a wife and eight children, the youngest being six months old, to mourn his loss. Great sympathy is felt for the poor grief stricken family.

26-9-1908. IRVINESTOWN. A SPEECH FROM THE DOCK. MAGISTRATES DEAF TO ELOQUENCE.

Quite a scene took place on Friday when a mother appeared before the bench and made such an “eloquent” appeal on behalf of her son that the magistrates, not seeing their way to appreciate her oratory and unable to stay her flow of words, forcible if not over polished, had her removed from Court prior to committing her son to jail. The case was one in which Sergeant Dooley summoned James Diver, of Irvinestown, for being drunk and disorderly, for the fourth time in a year, on the 7th inst. The magistrates on the bench were Messers John Maguire (presiding), M. McGinn and Major Irvine.

District-Inspector Lewis was also present. Defendant’s mother appeared before the Court and had a lot to say regarding the goodness of her son and his tendency to be led astray. She got so loud and excited in her speech, and so eloquent in sounding the praises of her boy, that she had to be removed out of Court. When she had gone her son, who was also charged with threatening and abusive language towards a woman named Cassie McDonagh, was sent to jail for 14 days, with hard labour.

The Sergeant immediately after James was disposed of brought a case against Cassie McDonagh herself, for drunkenness on the 7th September. Constable Lapsley had a charge of drunkenness against her on the 10th inst,, and she was also called upon to answer to an adjourned summons for a similar offence. Defendant who appeared and, following the example set in the previous case, addressed their Worships in a lengthy harangue on her own defence. She swore that if she got a chance she would never appear before their Worships again. “I am the mother of small children” continued defendant, “and if you send me to jail they will have to go to the workhouses. It will break my heart. Be as lenient as you can with me and I will leave the town and never come back. . On the adjoined case defendant was fined 2s 6d and costs or 48 hours in jail; in the second 6s, or a week’s imprisonment, and in the third case a fine of £3 was imposed, or in default a month’s imprisonment. On hearing the decision the defendant made use of some very ”complimentary” language towards the magistrates.

Sergeant P. Dooley summoned Harry McPike, Drumharvey, for being drunk and disorderly on the 8th September. The defendant, who got a bad character from the police, who said he wouldn’t work if he was paid 10 shillings a day for it, was fined 5s or in default a week’s imprisonment.

Constable P. Igoe summoned Andrew Porter for being drunk and disorderly on the 8th September. The constable stated defendant was fighting and creating a disturbance. Defendant, who did not appear, was fined 5s or a week in jail. Same complainant summoned William Humphreys, Slievebane, for a similar offence on the same date. Defendant who appeared, was fined 3s and costs.

Florencecourt Yew tree in 1842.

10-2-1842. TAXUS FLORENCECOURTIAIANA.

(This is a more exact account of the origins of the Florencecourt Yew tree – Fermanagh and Ireland’s unique contribution to the trees of the world – Taxus baccata ‘Fastigiata.)

Florence-Court Yew. This pretty fastigiated tree is now to be seen in almost every garden in Europe; in the Turkish cemetery, Alexandria, and America. The parent shrub is still in existence growing in the garden of a farmer in the neighbourhood of Florence Court. It was found growing on a neighbouring calcareous rock, in the time of the present occupier’s grand-father, about 160 years since by whom it is held as sacred as Naboth held his vineyard. (Ed. Believed to be an ancestor of Dr. Willis buried in Florencecourt churchyard who is famous for introducing western medicine to Japan.) It is indebted for its notoriety wholly on two layers planted in a shrubbery in Lord Enniskillen’s demesne, at Florence-Court, from which cuttings were given away to occasional visitors. (Ed. where a low branch has touched the ground, taken root and turned into a new shrub ready to be dug up.) The original plant has not grown any these many years although it is in good health and has formed a handsome tree with a fastigiated head from a stem about 4 feet high; one of the layers has attained the height of 21 feet and the other has been cut and broken for cuttings from time to time. The contiguous rocks and ravines have been repeatedly explored but no such plant has been found and the berries have been sown and plants reared at various periods but on examination they were always found to be the common kind with little variation, some with shorter leaves and some of a darker hue, but none of specific difference from the common  mountain yew which induces us to conclude that it is nothing else but has been produced by accident meeting with pressure in protruding through the hard substance and being acted upon by the atmosphere in a close situation has fixed its upright character in prop and propagating by extension, but not by seeds.

W. Y.

(The Enniskillen Chronicle and Erne Packet is now available from Thursday 23rd January 1840 from the British Newspaper Archive.)

1842 January & February.

  1. January.

CHRISTENING OF THE PRINCE OF WALES. Even the very restricted particulars of this great and joyous event which we give in our, first page will be read with an intensity of interest by those who have not had an opportunity of seeing more enlarged accounts. The ceremony must have been truly imposing and the feelings of joy to the nation on the occasion is the circumstance of Her Majesty’s selection of the King of Prussia as sponsor to the young Prince. It is delighting to find the worth and rank that surrounded her most gracious Majesty and Prince Albert in the altered style of her Majesty’s government, where the heart and  affections in the security of her Majesty’s person and throne, are so closely identified with the present prevailing principles.

Primitive WESLEYAN METHODIST Tea Party. Friday evening last there was a tea meeting of the members and friends of this society held in the Preaching-house, Main-street. The attendance on this occasion exceeded in number and respectability, we believe those of any former instance. About half past five o’clock the parties at the several tables in the body of the House commenced tea and so throng was every spot that a large number had to move up to the gallery and wait till those below could afford them room. Though there were upwards of 300 present the utmost, order prevailed throughout. A short Hymn was sung at the commencement and another at the conclusion of the tea. On the motion of Mr. Joseph McCormack, senior Preacher of the Enniskillen circuit, Mr. Beatty of the Maguiresbridge circuit was called to the Chair, when the assembly was severally addressed by Mr. J. Heatley of the Cavan circuit, Mr. A. Dawson of the Ballyshannon circuit and Mr. Fitzgerald, Merchant Clones, brother to Mr. Wm. Fitzgerald of this town.

20-1-1842. ARRIVAL OF SIR ARTHUR AND LADY BROOKE AT COLEBROOKE. Friday last the extensive district of country from Maguiresbridge to Colebrooke was a scene of great rejoicing on the arrival of the worthy baronet and his lovely Bride. For many days previous arrangements were in preparation on a scale suitable to pay a just respect to so benevolent and extensive a proprietor. Sir Arthur and Lady Brooke arrived at Virginia hotel on Thursday evening and on Friday an open carriage and four went from Colebrooke to meet them beyond Lisnaskea. Being expected to reach Maguiresbridge about one o’clock, a platform was erected on the commons there, on which the young but very good, band of that town were stationed to play on, while the open space was crowded with the people of the surrounding neighbourhood. About twelve a well mounted cavalcade of the Colebrooke tenantry moved forward from Brookeborough increasing at every step towards the busy scene and crowds of men, women, and children thronged the entire way although the day was rather impropitious from the constant thick fog. About two the bugles stationed on the hills between Maguiresbridge and Brookeborough announced the advance of the cavalcade; passing through the Bridge they were received with deafening shouts and cheers which were most gratefully acknowledged by Sir Arthur and Lady. From thence they proceeded, headed by considerable party of horsemen while several hundreds followed in an orderly line three deep in the rear the bugles continually playing. At Gola, the residence of Major Sterne a magnificent arch was erected.

20-1-1842. The people of Ballyshannon have great reason to thank Colonel Conolly for his kind attention in presenting the memorial of the merchants of this town to the Lords of the Treasury and impressing on their lordships the claims of this place to enjoy the privileges of warehousing of foreign grain, teas, sugars, wines, spirits, tobacco, and other goods paying a high duty.  By referring to the annexed reply to the Memorial our readers will find but these very important privileges have been granted.  We therefore hope soon to see the aforementioned goods freely imported into Ballyshannon by some of the enterprising merchants of this place and Enniskillen.

Constabulary of Donegal.  At a meeting of the magistracy of the county of Donegal held at Lifford on Saturday they decided against the reduction of the constabulary force of the county by a majority of four.  This and the neighbouring markets were plentifully supplied on Wednesday last with the largest and richest fresh herrings we have seen for several years caught at Portnew in Boylagh Bay.

A poor woman named Molly Ginn who has for some years, at intervals, been deranged was founded dead yesterday morning on the public road at Milltown Ballyshannon. It is supposed that in a fit of insanity she wandered from her lodgings and the night being dark and extremely severe, she was unable to make her way back and accordingly foundered.

The town was visited by a terrific storm on the nights of Tuesday and Wednesday last; yet we have not heard of any injury sustained by the inhabitants; on the whole it has been the severest winter for the last 7 years. We trust the spring will set in more favourably.

Miraculous Escape. As William Wilson, Esq., was travelling in his gig from Derry to Carndonagh on professional business, on descending a steep hill within four miles of Carn, he was met by a carman who, driving the wrong side of the road, was the cause of precipitating Mr. Wilson, horse and gig into a dangerous ravine at least 15 feet deep. Although the gig and harness were smashed to pieces Mr. Wilson escaped unhurt.

Last week as Mr. T. Whitford, son of Mr. Whitford, attorney, of St. Columb,(Cornwall) was amusing himself on a shooting excursion about a mile from that town, on getting over a hedge, the gun accidentally went off and he was killed on the spot, his brain having been blown to atoms.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE STATESMAN.  Attention has been directed by a friend to an extract from the Fermanagh Reporter inserted in your paper of the 31st of December last which was calculated to mislead the public mind and to make it appear that I read our burial service over a Roman Catholic who died within the pale of the church and that it was on that condition he was admitted into our burial ground.  Such is not the case.

The facts are simply these: on the 23rd of December last an inquest was held on the body of a poor man named Thomas Campbell found dead in the snow about 2 miles from Ballyjamesduff.  The verdict of the jury was that he died of extreme cold.  When brought to the chapel yard to be buried he was refused a grave until the dues of the priests should be paid by those who carried the body; this they were unable and unwilling to do.  Although very poor they had already contributed towards getting a coffin and had left their work to carry the unfortunate stranger to his grave and were therefore indignant that this demand should be so cruelly insisted on.  The body lay on the public road at the chapel gate until evening.  Application was then made to me to allow it to be buried in our church yard and under the circumstances I felt that I could not refuse but as he had (in common with all Roman Catholics) had excommunicated himself and I could not, consistent with our rubric read the burial service over him.  He was buried by torchlight in silence.  When the internment was over I availed myself of the opportunity to address a word in season to the Roman Catholics who were present.  They listened with great attention and afterwards expressed their gratitude for our compliance with their request and the greatest abhorrence of the inhuman treatment they had received from those of their own creed. Two days after this took place two Roman Catholics partly influenced by that occurrence conformed to our church making a total of 12 who have come out from Babylon in this parish during the last year.

Yours etc. etc.

Samuel H Lewis, Perpetual Curate of Ballyjamesduff.

MUNIFICENCE OF HER MAJESTY. We learn that the Queen has been pleased to the forces employed at the capture of the outworks of Canton out of the sum received under the convention, a donation equal to one year’s amount of the Indian allowance known by the name of “Batta.” (Ed. During the British Raj, Batta or Bhatta was a military term, meaning a special allowance made to officers, soldiers, or other public servants in the field.) The shares of Colonels will be £900 each; Lieutenant Colonels £720; of Majors £540; of Captains £216; of Lieutenants £ 144, etc. the officers of the navy sharing according to their relative rank with those of the army. Those who were not present at the operations against Canton, but who were engaged in other operations of the war, such as the taking of Chusan, are to receive six months Batta. (This was part of First Opium War, 1839–42), fought between the United Kingdom and the Qing Empire over diplomatic relations, trade, and the administration of justice for foreign nationals in China. In the 17th and 18th centuries, the demand for Chinese goods (particularly silk, porcelain, and tea) in the European market created a trade imbalance because the market for Western goods in China was virtually non-existent; China was largely self-sufficient and Europeans were not allowed access to China’s interior. European silver flowed into China when the Canton System, instituted in the mid-17th century, confined the sea trade to Canton and to the Chinese merchants of the Thirteen Factories. The British East India Company had a matching monopoly of British trade. The British East India Company began to auction opium grown on its plantations in India to independent foreign traders in exchange for silver. The opium was then transported to the Chinese coast and sold to local middlemen who retailed the drug inside China. This reverse flow of silver and the increasing numbers of opium addicts alarmed Chinese officials. In 1839, the Daoguang Emperor, rejecting proposals to legalise and tax opium, appointed viceroy Lin Zexu to solve the problem by abolishing the trade. Lin confiscated around 20,000 chests of opium (approximately 1210 tons or 2.66 million pounds) without offering compensation, blockaded trade, and confined foreign merchants to their quarters. The British government, although not officially denying China’s right to control imports of the drug, objected to this unexpected seizure and used its naval and gunnery power to inflict a quick and decisive defeat, a tactic later referred to as gunboat diplomacy.)

3-2-1842. ACCIDENT.—On Thursday last a young lad about eighteen, named Stinson, from Monea, was conveyed to the county Infirmary in an almost lifeless state, from an injury received on the head while sitting at his father’s fireside, by the falling of a brick from the top of the chimney. We hear the skull is much fractured.

ROBBERY. Friday night Mr. Dogherty, shoe maker, Darling-street, while attending the Methodist Tea meeting, had his house entered through a back window and £9 10s taken from his box. It was rather singular that his watch, which was going and likely to have been heard, was left though hanging almost immediately over the box.

FIRE. Same night one of those infamous cabins in one of our back streets (Abbey-street,) was burned to the ground, some say through the design of some wags.

The carpenter, named Irvine, mentioned in our last, who fell from an office at Rossfad, while in the act of finishing some roofing, died of the injuries received in the fall on Thursday last, in the county infirmary. Dr. Nixon made a post mortem examination on the head, which it appears was fractured in almost every bone. The poor man’s relations have gratefully expressed themselves towards Dr. Nixon for his unremitting attention, both day and night, during his sufferings.

POOR-LAW RETURNING OFFICER. Mr Paul Dane, Clerk of the Enniskillen Poor Law Union, has been appointed returning officer for the election of guardians which is to take place on the 26th of next month.

July 1843.

6-7-1843. ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST OF JULY;

Friday evening last being the eve of the First of July, the flags were as usual hoisted on the Church Tower and Town-hall at about eleven o’clock, and the Conservative Band of the town continued playing the accustomed loyal tunes till after twelve, the toils chiming out at intervals. A number of respectable persons promenaded the streets during the playing and, we are happy to add, there was the most marked decorum and quiet.

The Rev. Dr. Greham and Miss Greham returned, to Portora on Saturday from Dublin.

John Brien, Esq., arrived at Castletown last Thursday from Dublin.

43D. Depot.—Saturday last Lieutenant Herbert joined the depot from the service companies in Canada; Major Fraser and Lord Tullamore are expected very shortly to join the depot from the regiment.

Royal Engineers—Lieutenant McCausland re turned to this garrison on Saturday from sick leave, and, left this station yesterday for the head-quarter, Belfast, Captain Lloyd, from Derry, has relieved Lieutenant McCausland here.

The Hon. Major Spencer, 60th Rifles depot, Belturbet; visited his brother, the Hon. Captain Spencer, 43d depot, this week.

CHEVALIER SCHLICK – This celebrated artist left Castlecoole on Monday last for England. We are happy to find that he is now so far recovered from his serious accident, as to enable him to proceed to England, by the advice of his medical attendants, for the restoration of his health.

The Lord Bishop held his Annual Visitation on last Thursday in Monaghan. There was a very full attendance of the clergy of the Diocese. Rev. Mr. Tarleton preached the visitation sermon.

ENNISKILLEN ROYAL SCHOOL. The school resumed business on Monday the vacation having terminated on Saturday.

SERIOUS ACCIDENT. Saturday, as Dr. William Dane, Drumard, about two miles from this town, was alighting from his pony at his own gate, it moved at the instant and his foot catching in the stirrup he fell and broke his leg a little above the ankle.

THE WEATHER.—-Saturday evening last we had some heavy showers, and nearly the entire of Sunday was wet The Crops look much refreshed and promising. Yesterday evening it rained heavily again and continued all night. Hay-making was busily going forward.

NEW POTATOES. — New Potatoes are already beginning to pore into the market. Tuesday we saw a clieve of very fines ones, as large as any old ones and selling at 1¼ and 2d per lb.

CHEVALIER. SCHLICK. The stay of Chevalier Schlick with the Earl of Belmore, at Castlecoole has afforded us an opportune of noticing those powers of art which we find have gained for him the attention and reward of the principal Crowned Heads of Europe and all the leading families of distinction whose position has enabled them to appreciate his unrivalled talents. The Chevalier has devoted upwards of twenty years of uninterrupted and laborious application in studying the paintings and models of the ancients to be found of France, Milan, and Tuscany, Rome and the whole Roman States, Naples, and Paestum, the whole of Sicily with Herculaneum and Pompeii. Of the above he has, we learn, spent no less than twelve years exploring and studying the paintings of the celebrated ruins of Herculaneum and Pompeii cities destroyed by an eruption of Vesuvius in the year 79, since which early date they remained undiscovered till the former in 1711, and the latter in 1750. These paintings of the Grecian School, wonderful as to their design and execution, as well for the peculiarity and richness of their colouring, have been restored to perfect imitation by the pencil of Chevalier Schlick beyond all modern hands that have preceded him, as is satisfactorily proved by the attestation of the most learned men of the age. The following is the opinion of one the first Antiquarians of the day – “These painting have been executed by a process essentially different from any previously known, and which has produced a perfect representation of the original. In these paintings , as in ancient paintings, the contours are not defined by lines brought are brought out by the mere contrast of tints according to nature, as was well understood by the Greeks, and studiously followed up by them in their wonderful works. The colours have no body and are perfectly transparent, producing an effect very different from that of oil painting, pastel or body colour, in the latter of which, truth of expression may be attained.

Inkwell Gift. This wedding anniversary gift from Queen Victoria is a manifestation of the couple’s taste for the Antique, as well as Prince Albert’s fascination with the process of electrotyping. Being made of silver and partly gilded, it is one of the costlier versions of a popular design. Elkingtons had originally produced the model in 1844/5 and offered examples in solid silver or electroplate. Mintons later produced a version in porcelain. The inkwell was designed by the Danish-born architect Benjamin Schlick, who was made a Chevalier of the Légion d’Honneur in 1828 by the French King Charles X, in recognition of his architectural work in Paris. He seems to have attended the British court several times. He was listed in The Times among the guests at the Buckingham Palace Fancy Ball of 1842, and it was at his suggestion that the following year Prince Albert visited Elkington’s Birmingham premises, where his interest in the electrotyping process was born. Schlick’s relationship with George Elkington was vital to the company’s production at this period. His early life, spent in the courts of France, Italy and Denmark, meant that he had access to works of art which provided invaluable source material for electrotyping. Schlick and Elkington were also firm believers in the dissemination of classical source material for the development of good taste. In 1839 Schlick had visited Italy and become one of the leading figures in the preservation and restoration of the ancient remains being uncovered at Pompeii. He made close observations and sketches and developed a pantograph to create reductions of several of the objects uncovered. Although the inkwell was not directly based on an excavated lamp, it was inspired by the sketches Schlick made at that time. The Queen herself seems to have specified the addition of a lid to the inkwell, which was provided not by Elkingtons but by Garrard & Co., the royal goldsmiths, shortly before its presentation in 1850. Text from Victoria & Albert: Art & Love.

DREADFUL ACCIDENT.—On Saturday evening a most afflicting accident occurred on board the canal boat coming to Limerick from Dublin. When the boat was passing the lock near Clonlara, the Rev. Mr. Cousins, a dissenting clergyman from England who with his wife, were on their way to Killarney looked out at one of the side windows of the boat to observe their position when the boat received a sudden side move as it generally does by coming in contact with either side of the gateway and the head of the unfortunate gentleman was caught between the boat and the wall of the dock, and he received such dreadful injury that he died at the hotel in. Limerick a few hours after the occurrence. The accident, it may be supposed, threw a gloom over those present. Every attention that was possible was paid by the gentlemen present to his afflicted partner. The deceased was an aged man, between 60 and 70 years. Clare Journal.   \

USEFUL HINTS.—Never enter a sick room in a, state of perspiration as the moment you become cool your pores absorb. Do not approach contagious disease with an empty stomach, nor sit between the sick and the fire because the heat extracts the thin vapour.

HYDERABAD. The amount of treasure in gold, diamonds, &c., captured by Sir Charles Napier at Hyderabad, falls little short of three millions of money. The share of that gallant general is estimated at no less a sum than £200,000.

PRESENT FROM CHINA. The Chinese bed with the golden posts – the description of which reads so magnificently in the newspapers, is no such Splendid looking affair after all. The golden pillars are hollow, of course, and though covered with engravings of a very oriental character, yet the designs manifesto none of that elegance or fancy, which one would think might have been displayed by the artisans of a country whose pagodas and public buildings are generally so fanciful in their designs and picturesque in their effect. The hangings are of green silk, and worked in a shawl pattern in a manner to delight the hearts of some admirers of this sort of fabric, here and there, there is a little bullion fringe. There are several other cases of presents which have scarcely yet been unpacked, but which are said to contain some shawls of a most recherché character. — Cheltenham Looker-on.

BOY DROWNED. —On Sunday last a promising lad named Wilson, about 16 years of age, went with others to bathe at the West-quay, he swam up towards the Fall, and on returning, the stream, being rapid, was taking him out to sea. He accordingly attempted to swim across to the North quay but his strength failing him, he sank in death. His body has not yet been found although every exertion was immediately made, by his disconsolate parent and the inhabitants. He was the son of a very industrious and well-conducted man who came here from Enniskillen under the employment of Mr Creden, to superintend the building of the Poor-house. Ballyshannon Herald.

ANGLING — During the past week, the anglers had splendid opportunities of indulging in their gentle sport.’ The waters have considerably fallen and trout and salmon were killed in abundance. There are several gentlemen from various parts of Ireland and England at present staying in this town, enjoying the pleasure and amusement of angling. Cockburn’s hotel is nearly full. Ballyshannon Herald.

NEW POTATOES. A fine sample of early potatoes has been sent to our office by Mr. Likely McBride, of this town – they were grown in the open air on his farm; and he expects to be able to supply the market with new potatoes, in eight or ten days. We have also on our table excellent cherries, raspberries, strawberries, and cucumbers, grown in the gardens of several gentlemen in the vicinity of this town. — Ballyshannon Herald.

On Thursday a quantity of fire-arms were lodged in the ordnance store, Enniskillen. They bad been seized in the neighbourhood of Carrick-on-Shannon by the police. Ballyshannon Herald.

The barrack mastership of Boyle and Carrick-on-Shannon is vacant by the death of Lieutenant Allingham, a Waterloo officer who was interred by the 74th depot with military honours.

We feel much pleasure in being able to state that Henry Robert Crofton, Esq., of the Modeste, fifth son of Duke Crofton, Esq., J. P and D.L. of Lakefield, county of Leitrim, has, for his distinguished services in China, received his commission as lieutenant in the Royal Navy, dated the 23d of December, 1842. The following notice of his services is from the New Navy List. When Master of the Modeste his services were officially mentioned in the operations on the coast of China, including the capture of Amoy and Chinghae in 1841 likewise at the destruction of the Chinese fire-raft attack on their camp at Segahon, and the surveying of the river Yant se-Keing in anticipation of the advance on Pekin in 1842.

MARRIAGE OF THE PRINCESS AUGUSTA and the Hereditary Grand Duke Mecklenburg Strelitz.—The solemnization of the nuptials of the daughter of their Royal highness’s the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge with the Hereditary Grand Duke of Mecklenburg Strelitz, look place on Wednesday evening, at half past eight o’clock in the Royal Chapel at Buckingham Palace, The Bishop of London officiated. The King of Hanover gave the young Princess away in the presence of the Queen and Prince Albert, the King and Queen of the Belgians, the Queen Dowager, the Duchess of Kent, the Duchess of Gloucester, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince George, his, Serene Highness Prince Edward of Saxe Weimar, & Immediately after the ceremony the Hereditary, Grand Duke and his Royal bride departed for the Duke of Cambridge’s house at Kew, where they will pass the customary period in privacy, after which they will take their departure for Germany. Her Majesty the Queen gave a grand, banquet in the evening, and there was a very brilliant assemblage after the nuptial ceremony, for which invitations were issued to most of the Nobility.— The presents to the Princess Augusta on the auspicious event of her marriage, are said to be exceedingly numerous. The cadeau (present) from the Queen Dowager, a head-dress of diamonds and precious stones, is of great value. The Queen and the King of Hanover have likewise made valuable souvenirs. The leading Nobility have given several costly presents, a bijou from a fashionable Marchioness having cost 250 guineas. The Princess’s trousseau was most magnificent and in every respect corresponding to her exalted rank. A series of fetes are spoken of as on the tapis, at Cambridge House, in celebration of the happy event of the Princess’s marriage.

GREAT ANTI-REPEAL MEETING AT COLLON. — On Monday evening, a meeting of the Protestants of Derriaghy (Antrim) and the surrounding districts was held at Collon for the purpose of addressing her Most Gracious Majesty in reference to the present distracted state of the country, occasioned by the agitation of Repeal. Long before six o’clock, the hour appointed for the meeting, there were not less than 5,000 persons present. Every mountain path presented its hundreds flocking to the spot, and the roads leading from Belfast, Lisburn, and the adjoining towns and villages were thronged with individuals passing forward to meet their brethren in a common cause, and for a common end, so that at one period of the meeting there could not have been less than 8,000 or 9,000 present. The meeting having been addressed by several Gentlemen, and a number of appropriate resolutions agreed to, the assembly gave three cheers for the Queen, and three groans for O’Connell, and then separated in a peaceable and orderly manner, seemingly much gratified with the proceedings of the evening.— Belfast Chronicle.

DEATH FROM LIGHTNING.—-An inquest was held on the 19th instant, at Carranacross across, before Mr. O’Grady, on the body of James O’Donnell,; who was killed by the lightning in Sunday, the 18th. When he came by his death he was engaged in lighting fires, to burn land, in which, he intended to put potatoes. His body when found lying in the field was much burned by the lightning, and there was a stream of blood from a wound on the face. The jury found that deceased came to his death from injuries caused by lightning. If the unfortunate deceased had not been violating the commandment to keep the Sabbath holy, he might be alive today.—Mayo Constitution.