1908. Irvinestown court, Old Age Pensions, Donegal V Fermanagh in hurling and a fatal drowning.

12th Sept 1908. IRVINESTOWN PETTY SESSIONS. TWO NEW MAGISTRATES. DRUNKS ON THE DECREASE. Small and simple were the cases of drunkenness at these petty sessions on Tuesday last, but long and tedious were the number of summonses against parents by the School Attendance Committee for neglecting to send their children to school. Many were the excuses offered, but the magistrates considered the cases in their proper light, and in nearly all cases imposed a fine. Mr. John Gray, R.M., presided, and there were also present:—Messrs. P. Riley, B. Bleakley, and Wm. Ginn, the two former being sworn in as Justices of the Peace at the beginning of the Court.

Constable Glynn summoned Jas. Doherty, Irvinestown, for being drunk and disorderly. This was an adjourned case from 8th June last. As defendant had conducted himself well in the meantime he was let off with a fine of 1 shilling.

Sergeant Dooley v. James Keys of Legnameltone for being drunk and disorderly. Complainant said the defendant was behaving in a very rowdy manner at Lisnarick Sports. He refused to give his name and when asked where he lived he said at home. Fined 6s. Same V. John Cassidy, for being drunk on the night of the 2nd inst. Defendant’s wife appeared and said he had taken the pledge.

Mr. Gray: Why did lie not appear himself? — He is away at a fair, sir.

Mr. Gray: That is no excuse; he should have appeared if he had any regard for the offence. Fined 7s 6d and costs.

TOO LAZY TO WORK. Sergeant Dooley summoned a youth named Jack Irvine for vagrancy. The sergeant stated that he found the defendant asleep in a shed. He was lately discharged from the workhouse, and was a very bad boy. He was hired with different farmers, but he would only remain, a day or so with any of them.

Mr. Gray: In my opinion he will be a criminal all the days of his life; at least he is on the right road for one. Their worships sent the defendant to gaol for 14 days with hard labour.

SCHOOL ATTENDANCE CASES. The following were fined by the School Attendance Committee, through their officer, Mr. John Dolan, for not sending their children to school:—James Somerville, 2s 6d; Wm. Garrity, 2s 6d; Thomas Hetherington, Is; Ellen Graham, Is; Elizabeth O’Kane, 2s; James Keys, Is; James Balfour, 2s; Patrick McHugh, 2s; Cassie McDonagh, Is. In the cases of John McPike, P. McCaffery, and James Manley the magistrates made school attendance orders against them.

12th Sept 1908. OUR READERS’ VIEWS. OLD AGE PENSION.

Dear Mr. Editor,—As there seems to be some difference of opinion as to how a farmer’s income should be calculated will you kindly allow me space for a few observations about how, in my opinion, this should be done. Of course I don’t pretend to say that the figures I give are exactly accurate to the shilling, but they will point out the lines on which to proceed.

The farmer, being a producer, the only way you can arrive at his income is to leave a value on all he produces and then deduct whatever expenses are incidental in the cost of such production.

Let me take the case of a farmer with whom I am well acquainted. He and his wife are over 70 years of age, and unable to work or attend to themselves. He has one son, and keeps a servant man and a servant girl. The son of course works on the farm, and surely no government or right-thinking person would deny wages to all the sons or daughters of age, that work on the farm. They are neither slaves nor bondsmen.

The total produce of this farm on a good season is as follows (On a bad year it would be about half the value).

10 stacks of oats at £4 each ..£40

3 peaks of hay at £4 each .. £12

1 acre potatoes, value  £15

1 acre flax, value £21

A quantity of turnips, value £10.

Butter and milk of 4 cows, value £36.

4 pigs fattened  £20.

3 calves sold £9.

Value of grazing land              £8.

Total value of all production £171

Expenses incurred in producing the above: — Wages and board to servant man …………£36;

Wages and board to servant girl £30

Wages and board, allowed–to son £40.

Rent, and taxes £8

Cost of feeding 4 Cows and 3 calves, summer and winter £24.

Manures and seed of various kinds £7.

Extra-hands for corn, flax, turf,- &c.  £3.

Price of scutching flax £3.

Price and cost of feeding and fattening 4 pigs. £10.

Cast of feeding and upkeep of horse £26.

Wear and tear of carts, harness, ploughs, harrows, grubbers, rollers, spades, shovels, graips, barrows tubs, pots, pans, &c. &c. £10

Repairs and upkeep of farm, house, and offices £5.

Losses on stock and crop £5

Doctor’s fees, clergymen, beggars of various kinds  £3.

Total                             £210

Please note that I did not allow anything for board and clothing of the old people. Besides there are other expense that I don’t like to occupy your space in mentioning. Fowls of various kinds I have left out, because I firmly believe that the cost is at least , equal to the profit. The income of a farmer is always uncertain,. but the expenses are constant and sure. You will see from the above, and I have quoted from the most favourable season, that the farmer’s income is mostly a negative one. Very sincerely yours. VIGILANT. (Card enclosed.)

19th Sept 1908. GAELIC FIELDS. ULSTER CHAMPIONSHIP.

FERMANAGH V DONEGAL.

On Sunday last at Bundoran, Fermanagh and Donegal crossed camans in their fixture in the provincial championship in hurling. The honour of representing the Maguire County fell to the lot of the Maguires (county champions), and the O’Neill’s. Donegal’s team, was composed principally of the Bundoran teams, Sinn Fein and St. Patrick’s.

The match was fixed originally by the Provincial Council for Sunday, 20th September, but owing to the excursions ceasing on Sunday the 13th, an arrangement was come to by which it was agreed to play the match on that date.

Mr. E. Kerrins N.T., set the ball agoing at 3.30 in the presence of a fairly large crowd of spectators. Donegal were the first to get under way and bore down on the Fermanagh goal, but Wilson and Slevin were not found wanting, and the leather again travelled np field. Again Donegal returned to the attack, and again they were repulsed; Fermanagh backs playing a

splendid game. For some time now the play was in mid-field, but Fermanagh at last got a run up the left wing, and Carleton drove hard and fast for the Donegal citadel, but Gallagher made a fine save, which, however, resulted in a fifty for Fermanagh. Slevin took the fifty, but it proved abortive. Donegal now got possession and from a rush in front of the Fermanagh goal scored their first point—the only point during the first half.

On resuming, the play for the first ten minutes was altogether in favour of Fermanagh—their passing and combination being splendid. Donegal’s backs were sorely pressed, and their custodian Gallagher, was called upon to save on several occasions, which he did coolly and in fine style. Fermanagh, however, returned again and again to the attack, and as last broke down all opposition, and up went the red flag, amidst the cheers of their supporters. The play was now of rather an even nature nevertheless the ball travelled rapidly from wing to wing. Donegal again got possession, and Naughton drove up well in front of Fermanagh’s goal, where a scuffle took place which resulted in a minor for Donegal. After the puck-out some splendid play took place both goals being visited in turn but without result. At last Donegal got the leather and succeeded in scoring the equalising point. There was yet seven minutes to full time—time enough to lose or win a hurling match—and both teams settled down to work with a will, each striving hard for victory, but the gods had decreed otherwise, and a brilliant match ended in a draw of 3 points each.

The game had much in it to commend itself to the spectators to give encouragement to the workers in the cause, and to popularise the game itself. It was played throughout in a spirit worthy of the Gael. It should be set down as a headline to some of our county clubs, who are so prone to bring discredit on the fair name of the Gael. We trust they will copy the headline carefully, and we would then suggest committing it to memory.

19th Sept 1908. SAD FATALITY ON LOUGH ERNE. BOAT OVERTURNED. FOUR YOUNG MEN DROWNED. A drowning accident, of an unusually sad character occurred on. Upper Lough Erne on Tuesday evening. It appears that five young men were coming from Belturbet after seeing a friend away who was leaving for America. On the return journey it is said an altercation took place, with the result that the boat was overturned and four out of the five were drowned. A young man named Fitzpatrick alone escaped. The bodies have not yet been recovered. The names of the young men drowned are Fitzpatrick, Martin, Corey, and Fitzpatrick.

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1908.

October 17th 1908. AEROPLANE TRIUMPH. 50 MILES IN 69 MINUTES. Mr Wilbur Wright on Saturday afternoon made a fifty mile flight with a passenger remaining over sixty nine minutes in the  air. He thus beat all the world records and triumphantly completed the tests required by the Lazarc-Weiler Syndicate before purchasing the French rights of the American aeroplane for £20,000. At 4.45 Mr. Wright and Mr. Paul Painleave, a member of the French Institute, took their seats in the aeroplane before the largest number of aeronautical experts who have ever been present at the demonstrations of Mr. Wright. The aeroplane rose to a height of 25ft and Mr. Wright commenced to describe a series of eclipses and triangles. For some time the aviator maneuvered at various heights. At times he reached a height of nearly 100 ft., and during the greater part of the flight the aeroplane travelled at a great speed. The performance was accepted as entirely satisfactory by the members of the Syndicate and may therefore be regarded as the conclusion of Mr. Wright’s work at Le Mans. (France).

October 17th 1908. INVASION BY AIRSHIP.  GERMAN PLAN TO CONQUER ENGLAND. Herr Rudolph Martin, Government Councillor and author of The Coming War in the Air who is president of the recently formed German League for Motor Airship Navigation, fired the imagination of his hearers at a meeting in Berlin with a plan for the conquest of England by airships. He averted that the principal duty of aerial navigators was to induce the combined Continental Powers to construct a fleet of 10,000 Zeppelins, each to carry twenty soldiers, to fly these across the English Channel and the North Sea, preferably by night, and to land and capture the sleeping Britons before they could realise what was taking place. Herr Martin disposed of the British Fleet by predicting that they would turn tail and leave the coasts defences as soon as the aerial armada hove in view in order to avoid being blown up by the shells which would otherwise be dropped on to them from the clouds. The aerial armada would assemble at leisure at points opposite the English coast, and begin their death-dealing voyage as soon as the weather was favourable. Herr Martin thought that artillery and cavalry could be landed in England quite as easily as 200,000 infantry.

28-11-1908. VICE-REGAL PARTY IN BELLEEK. ADDRESS OF WELCOME FROM THE INHABITANTS. SPEECH OF THE LORD LIEUTENANT. His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant and the Counters of Aberdeen, who travelled from Dublin on Monday, arrived in the pretty little village of Belleek by the 7.55 train last night, and were enthusiastically received by the townspeople. The windows of a number of the houses were illuminated for the occasion, and a pretty floral arch WITH THE WORD “WELCOME, in white letters on a crimson background, spanned the main thoroughfare.

An address from the people of the town and district was presented to their Excellencies at the entrance to the hotel. There was an immense crowd outside the building. The Very Rev Dr McMeel, P. P. chairman of the Reception Committee, presided, and in the course of his speech said it was necessary for the Government, in justifying the insertion of the Compulsory Notification Clause in the Tuberculosis Bill at present before Parliament to establish sanatoria in convenient centres through, the length and breadth of Ireland, out of the millions of pounds that this country had been obliged to pay in over-taxation to the British Treasury for the past sixty or seventy years (cheers). As their Excellencies had always cordially sympathised with the ideals and aspirations of the Irish people, he trusted that they would continue their valuable services until they should have everywhere established the flourishing tranquillity of a happy and contented Ireland (cheers).

Mr Edward Knox, hon. secretary of the Reception Committee, then read the address. The Lord Lieutenant, who was loudly cheered, in replying, said he need scarcely tell them that he had always endeavoured to support Lady Aberdeen in every possible manner in her efforts to help the Home Industries, and secondly, in regard to her fight with the scourge of tuberculosis (cheers). He thought it was a happy augury, and omen that they had already, by coming forward in this way and alluding to the matter as they had done in the address, indicated their hearty’ support and concurrence with the efforts now being made to stamp out this disease (cheers). Afterwards a number of the members of the Reception Committee were introduced to Lord and Lady Aberdeen. Three ringing cheers having been given for their Excellencies the crowd dispersed. On Tuesday the Vice-regal party motored to Donegal to open the Tuberculosis Exhibition. During their stay in Belleek they will visit the famous pottery and. other places of interest in this picturesque district.

28-11-1908. OLD-AGE PENSIONS IN FERMANAGH. The County Fermanagh Local Pension Committee held a prolonged sitting on Friday for the consideration of claims, during the course of which they allowed 5 shillings per week in 360 cases, 4 shillings in one case, 3 shillings in one case and 1 shilling in one case and postponed 35 cases for further evidence and investigation. One application was withdrawn. The total number of cases dealt with was 399, which constitutes a record for Ireland.

28-11-1908. OLD-AGE PENSIONS IN FERMANAGH. The County Fermanagh Local Pension Committee held a prolonged sitting on Friday for the consideration of claims, during the course of which they allowed 5 shillings per week in 360 cases, 4 shillings in one case, 3 shillings in one case and 1 shilling in one case and postponed 35 cases for further evidence and investigation. One application was withdrawn. The total number of cases dealt with was 399, which constitutes a record for Ireland.

28-11-1908. CALUMNY REFUTED. THE PROTESTANT BIGOTS OF THE SOUTH. ALLEGED SCENES AT FUNERAL. Under the heading of “Roman Catholic Intolerance in County Limerick,” “Barbarous conduct at a Funeral,” the Fermanagh Times of last week published letter from Rev. J. S. Wylie, Castleconnell in which the rev gentleman paints a further lurid picture of the scenes alleged to have taken place at the funeral of Mr John Enright. He points out in his letter that he was a frequent caller at Mr Enright’s during his illness, and that he ministered to him three times during this period. In the Irish Independent of Thursday last the mother of the deceased, Mrs K Enright, gives the lie to this statement of the pious rector of Castleconnell. Mrs Enright, who is naturally .horrified at the disgusting dispute which has arisen over her dead son, now considers it her duty to place the true facts before the public, and to put an end once and for all to the bigots’ roar all over Ireland. She denies point blank that Mr Wylie ministered to her son during his last illness. “Since the day my son fell sick she writes, “Mr Wylie never saw him, nor, as far as I know, ever asked to see him until the 25th October, when he was unconscious. He died in less than an hour after Mr Wylie leaving him.” What has the representative of Protestant truth and Protestant tolerance in Castleconnell to say to this point blank denial of his statements? “My son,” writes Mrs Enright “had been attended to by the priest on three occasions, at his own special request, uninfluenced by anybody while he was in his perfect senses; the priest received him into the Catholic Church, administered to him the last rites of the Catholic Church and he died a Catholic. Rev Wylie had been told this.” The fact then remains that the Rev. Wylie after being informed by the relatives of the deceased of the latter’s conversion to Catholicity, and his consequent desire to be buried according to the rites of the Catholic Church, showed an inhuman disrespect, both for the wishes of the living and dead, by stopping a funeral procession at the gate of his church, and calling upon the mourners, to bear the body of the deceased inside. This is how the Christian Minister describes the scene outside the church When the coffin reached the church gate a crowd of people surrounded it. Sticks were raised in a threatening manner; some of the bearers, including Dr George Enright, were roughly handled. The coffin was then seized by the crowd, who forcibly prevented it being brought into the church, and, with shouts and cries of “‘Don’t let him be buried a Protestant,” which were heard more than a quarter of a mile away, the body was rushed past the church and placed in the grave. It is enough to say that Dr George Enright absolutely denies getting any rough handling, as well as the statement that sticks were used in a threatening manner. Our readers will take the other statements of the rev gentleman for what they are worth.

SABBATH DESECRATORS. To the Editor of the “Fermanagh Herald.” The following letter has been addressed to the editor of the “Impartial Reporter’ in. reply to one appearing in the last issue of that paper.

10-10-1908. To the Editor “Impartial Reporter. – Dear Sir, Your correspondent “Ballinamallard Unionist” and a Lover of Truth must be a very simple man. He proceeds in the course of a lengthy letter to give the truth of the Ballinamallard incident where, the God-fearing loyalists are alleged to have gathered into that mecca of Orangeism in order to prevent by physical force some peaceable people passing through the village on the Sabbath. “Lover of Truth’ denies the allegation, and if his contention be accurate it is the manifest duty of the traders and inhabitants of Ballinamallard to take action to clear their village of the serious allegations which the police have made against it. Will they act or will they not? If they do not, then we shall believe that the police were correct when they advised the competitors at the Feis to go round by another road lest a riot might ensue. But that apart, “Lover of Truth” makes himself appear quite silly when he applies the, term ‘Sabbath Desecrators” to the competitors. Does he read the papers? If so, is he aware that two Sundays ago the Brewers of England —the great driving force behind loyalty and Unionism organised an extraordinary political demonstration in Hyde Park, London, to which over a hundred thousand people came from the English provinces? Huge crowds bearing banners with political party cries filled the streets the whole day and speeches were delivered from fifty platforms. Has “Lover of the Truth” written to the papers to protest against this colossal desecration of the Lord’s Day, engineered by drink in support of Unionism, Beer, beer, glorious beer! beer and the Union, beer and loyalty?

And the dozen or so boys from Enniskillen, who are passing to a musical festival, are Sabbath desecrators! Do you have any music on the Sabbath, “Lover of Truth? Either the police were correct or it is the plain duty of the Ballinamallard people to set themselves right with the public. If they allow the matter to lie, people must not be blamed for assuming that the Christianity which prompts a man to break his neighbour’s head for the love of God is not the Christianity of the gentle Christ, who loved all men, even His enemies. ‘Yours truly, etc.

21-11-1908. CLONES LACE AT FRANCO- BRITISH EXHIBITION. One of the most prominent and attractive stalls in the section devoted to arts and crafts and home industries at the Franco-British Exhibition in London was that of Mrs Philip Maguire lace dealer Fermanagh Street, Clones, who displayed an extensive assortment of lace and crochet, arranged in a most artistic and effective manned. The stall, which was a corner one and in a central position, attracted much attention, and being lined on the inside in emerald green, made a most appropriate setting for the beautiful fabrics on view, the work of deft and patient fingers of the industrious lace-makers of Clones district. The Clones lace industry, which is the means of keeping so many families from poverty or emigration, will, no doubt, benefit immensely from the display referred to, and it is satisfactory to know that Mrs. Maguire’s enterprise in securing a stall and placing the exhibit on view has been amply rewarded by the results, notwithstanding, the heavy expenses involved. During the fortnight which she spent at the exhibition she sold an enormous quantity of lace fabrics of all kinds, besides booking orders amounting to hundreds of pounds and. which it will probably take many months to supply. Mrs Maguire was specially complimented by a leading London daily on the success of her stall, and the effective manner in which she had arranged her display at the exhibition.