1942. They were ‘Peeps’ before they became Jeeps.

4-7-1942. U.S. SERGEANT KILLED. Sergeant Robert D. Gibson, of the U.S. Army, a native of Knoxville, Iowa, was killed on Sunday afternoon when a “peep’ in which he was travelling was in collision with a U.S. Army truck. Deceased, who aged thirty eight years, was married. (Ed. Originally, many soldiers did not call it a jeep at all. Jack Keenan, a World War II Third Armoured Division veteran, wrote that early Willys-Overlands were not called Jeeps. “We called ’em ‘Peeps.’” His contemporary sketches of the vehicles in Louisiana and desert manoeuvres were clearly labelled “Peeps.” )

At the inquest, Private Robert D. Goey gave evidence that he had been walking with some companions, and the ‘‘peep” in which deceased was riding, passed them about 20 yards before the accident. The deceased was sitting on the right-hand side in the front seatt. Immediately the “peep’ passed him witness saw a large truck approaching. He saw the two vehicles hit and at that time the “peep’’ was well on its’ own side and the truck was over on its wrong side by about four feet. After the ‘‘peep” was hit it swerved to its left and then back to the middle of the road, where the deceased was thrown out as the “peep” swerved back again to the left.

When the “peep” ‘ was meeting the truck the deceased had his head out to the right over the side of the “peep’’ speaking to witness and his companions, and witness saw the head thrown back and he believed, hit by the radiator grill of the track. If the deceased had not his head out witness did not believe he would have been hit. On the same side that the “peep” was travelling there were some girls at a gate and he saw the driver of the truck looking at them immediately before the accident. In witness’s opinion both vehicles were travelling between 25 and 30 m.p.h.

Private Fred T. Ruggien, who was travelling with deceased in the “peep,” said he was sitting in the back seat on the right side and the deceased was sitting immediately in front of him.  They were travelling close to the grass verge on the left hand side and the truck was travelling about the centre of the road. The two vehicles hit about three or four feet from the left side of the road. Immediately after the collision witness saw blood spouting from a hole beneath deceased’s left temple and he lurched over towards the driver. The “peep” then swerved over again to the right, and as it swerved back to the left deceased was thrown back. The driver of the truck pulled in to his right and stopped about 50-60 yards from the point of impact.

Corporal Merl B. Averill said he was in charge of the truck which was being driven by Pte. John H. McLaughlin. About 100 yards ahead he saw a “peep’’ travelling in the same direction. Witness was sitting in the cab beside the driver and had his head, turned to the right, watching some children on the roadside.

So far as he could judge the truck was travelling on the left centre of the road. He did not see the “peep” coming towards them until he looked out after hearing the crash. The driver of the truck was perfectly sober.

Captain Garrold Hungester, a medical officer of the U.S. Army, said that deceased was dead when he arrived at the scene of the accident. In his opinion the cause of death was multiple compound fracture of the skull with cerebral haemorrhage. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence.

FIXTURES FOR SUNDAY, 5th JULY. Senior Football League.

Lisnaskea v. Newtownbutler — S. O’Grady, Ballyconnell.

Teemore v. Kinawley —  P. Maguire, Derrylin, 5 p.m. (E.S.T.).

O’Connells v. Harps — P. Maguire, Derrylin, 7 p.m. (E.S.T.).

Junior League.

Irvinestown v. Ederney—Father Kirke, C.C., Trillick.

Enniskillen v. Tempo—P. Corrigan, Belnaleck, 4 p.m. (E.S.T.).

Aghadrumsee v. Roslea—H. Fitzpatrick, Newtownbutler.

All matches on grounds of first-named clubs, and at 5 p.m. (extended summer time) except otherwise stated.

LEAGUE TABLES.

Senior Football League.

  1.       W.       L.         D.        Pts.

Lisnaskea … …            6          6          0          0          12

Newtownbutler. 4       4          0          0          8

Kinawley         6          2          4          0          4

Harps .   5        1          4          0          2

O’Connells …. 3          1          2 .        0          2

Teemore … .    6          1          5          0          2

JUNIOR         LEAGUE.

Northern Division.

  1. W.       L.         D.        Pts.

Derrygonnelly . 6        6          0          0          12

Mulleek … … … 6        5          1          0          10

Devenish … … , 4        1          3          0          2

Cashel … …     4          0          4          0          0

Drumavanty    . 4        0          4          0          0

 

Central Division.

  1. w.        L.         D.        Pts.

Enniskillen 5   4          1          0          8

Edemey ..        4          3          1          0          6

Tempo ..  4      1          3          0          2

Irvinestown  5 1          4          0          2

 

Southern Division.

  1. w.        L.         D.        Pts.

Roslea …          2         2          0          0          4

Aghadrumsee … 3 1 2 0 2

Killyvannon … 3 12 0 2

4-7-1942. FERMANAGH MOUNTAIN FIRE CLAIM AT QUARTER SESSIONS. A Fermanagh mountain fire which it was alleged raged over an area 395 acres in extent had a sequel at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Tuesday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., when an application for malicious damage was heard. The applicants were Elisabeth. M. J. Beacom, Tullyvocady; Jas. Stewart, Derrin; Cap., J. G. Barton, The Waterfoot; Geo. Lowry, Portnablaghey; Wm. Lowry, do., and Rebecca Mills, Tullyvocady, and they claimed £500 alleging that some person or persons maliciously set fire to 395 acres of meadow and grazing land, 5 acres of crop land and crops, together with game cover and eggs, fences, trees, shrubs and seeds. All the lands are situate in the Pettigo-Belleek area in the parishes of Muckross and Templecarne.

Mr. E. C. Ferguson, LL B., M.P., represented applicants, and Mr. James Cooper, D.L., solicitor was for the Fermanagh County Council, defendants. Richard Crozier, surveyor, gave evidence that a total of 316 acres were completely burnt in what he described as “a good burning.” A week after the fires were first reported’ he visited the area and had to walk through red hot ashes. Freshly cut turf were singed. The greater part of the land affected was arable mountain grazing.

In reply to Mr. Cooper, witness said that at the time of the fire the cover was in a most inflammable condition. James Stewart, farmer and gamekeeper for Mr. Barton, gave evidence of seeing the three fires at 1 o’clock, a.m., on 4th May, half a mile and a quarter of a mile apart. Attempts by relatives and himself to extinguish the flames were of no avail. All the ditches on his land were levelled and he had his cattle tied in since. He had lost £50 by the fire on his grazing land, which was full of grouse.

Cross-examined, witness said he lived a mile off the road and few people went up his mountain. All the applicants were very popular in the locality. George Beacom, husband of .one of the applicants, Mrs. Beacom, stated he saw the three separate fires about 4 p.m. One of the fires was about two hundred yards from his house and another a quarter of a mile away. The latter never joined with the two which converged towards his house. Twenty acres of his wife’s holding were burned including, fences, an acre of potatoes damaged, and four acres of arable land. He did his best to put the fires out.

Cross-examined, witness agreed nobody could have any possible interest in burning the mountain. Nobody had anything against the applicants.          .

Wm. Lowry said that after eleven o’clock on 4th May he saw a fire spread over a considerable area a mile or a mile and a half away. Ten acres of grazing land on his farm, worth £30, were burned, also four or five hundred acres of mountain grazing, of which he had a grazing right. A rood of early potatoes, value £5, were burnt, in addition to a ridge of cabbage plants worth £2.

Captain John Barton said he had exercised his shooting rights over the townland in question. For the defence, Sergeant Kerr, R.U.C. gave evidence of investigating the fire and said he could find no trace of malice. Similar fires occurred in other parts of the district. All the applicants were popular in the locality. His Honour refused the application and allowed McCrea 5s witness’s expenses.

NOTED. 11-7-1942. £14 Sought for Heifer.—Notice of intention to apply to the County Court for £14 compensation for the loss of a heifer, which he alleged was maliciously killed on Pushin Island, was received by Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday on behalf of Wm. Lunny.

R.M.’s Advice.—When John McClean, Rafinton, an ex-policeman, and Wesley Johnston, Ramult, appeared at Brookeboro’ Court in cases of threatening language, Major Dickie, on the advice of the solicitors on both sides, advised the parties to go home and leave each other alone in future.

Cycle Thief Gets Six Months—Described by Sergt. McQuaid as “a criminal and dangerous liar,” Edward Keenan, no fixed abode, was, at Virginia (County Cavan) sentenced to six months’ imprisonment for having stolen a bicycle. It was stated he made a statement involving an innocent man.

Rainfall at Heath Lodge, Belleek.—The rainfall for June amounts to only 1.09 inches, being the lowest for that month for the past eighteen years. Rain fell on twelve days, on ten of which it amounted to .04 inches or over. The drought which prevailed since early February caused an exceptionally low rainfall for the first half of this year, namely 18.78 inches, which is approximately one-third of the annual average rainfall for the past twenty years.

Tractor Offences. —Samuel Ernest Dane, of Mullaghmeen, Ballinamallard, was fined 5/- and costs at Enniskillen Petty Sessions for driving a motor tractor with trailer attached, without having an identification mark on the rear of the trailer. Philip Diver, Drumcullion, Ballinamallard, was fined 5/- and costs for not having an identification mark on the front of a tractor and rear of a trailer.

Pulled out without signalling.—When Ernest Elliott, of Drumconlin. East, Letterbreen, was charged at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday with having driven a motor car without due care and attention on 4th June last, Sergeant McNally gave evidence that defendant pulled out from the kerb in Darling St., Enniskillen, without giving a hand-signal, and a lorry coming behind had to brake violently in order to avoid a collision. A fine of 10/- and costs was imposed.

Increase for Town Surveyor—At Enniskillen U.D.C. on Monday, the Finance Committee recommended that in view of the part that Mr. J. Donnelly, Borough Surveyor, pays all his clerical and incidental office expenses out of his own pocket, he be granted a war bonus of £50 as from 1st inst. Further, subject to sanction, that he be granted an honorarium of £25 in respect of his extra services during the recent protracted illness of the Town Clerk. The recommendation was passed unanimously.

SUNDAY CINEMA CHARGES. Notice of a resolution, which will permit the Regal Cinema to increase the charge for the balcony seats on Sunday, from 8d to 9d to meet the increased tax, was given at Enniskillen U.C. on Monday by Mr. W. Monaghan. The Sunday cinema is confined to soldiers, and the proposed increased charge would not affect the ordinary soldier using the body of the

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1942 Fermanagh Herald.

January 17th 1942. PAIR OF TOUGHS AND BULLIES. £10 ON EACH OF TWO DEFENDANTS Ballinamallard Assault on Policemen. “ From your behaviour in Court I regard you as . toughs and bullies declared Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., when, at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, he addressed two men convicted of assaulting two policemen in Ballinamallard. One of the men, Arthur Smiley, of Coa, was summoned for assaulting “ B ” Special Graham, while in the execution of his duty, and the second man, Edward Wilson, also of Coa, was summoned for assaulting Const. James Glassey, R.U.C. D. I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr. Aidan Herbert, solicitor, defended.

Constable Glassey swore that when on duty in Ballinamallard on 13th December he saw and heard a number of strangers shouting and singing as they left a public-house. They appeared to be rowdy, and witness stopped them, and demanded their identity cards. As witness was taking out his notebook and pencil, one of the men, Wilson, struck him a violent blow in the face, knocking him down. Defendant jumped on top of him and, putting his two hands round witness’s head, tried to batter it off the kerbstone. Special Const. Graham came to his assistance and, while attempting to release him, Smiley caught him (Graham.) by the two legs and “threw him up the street.” D, I. — A rugby tackle. (Laughter). Witness — Yes, and he kicked him at the same time. A large crowd gathered and the two men cleared off.

Cross-examined, witness agreed the night was dark—it was about 9-20 p.m. He did not see another row on the street. “Isn’t Ballinamallard street only twenty or thirty yards long?” suggested Mr. Herbert. D.I.—It is more than that. R.M.—It is a quarter of a mile at least.  Continuing, witness said he saw Wilson later, struck in a hedge outside the town. ”When he was pulled out and asked what he was doing there,- defendant replied: “ I hit nobody. ”

Special Const, Graham gave corroborative evidence as to the alleged attack by Wilson on Const. Glassey. He .went to the latter’s assistance, and while trying to separate them Smiley tossed him on his back and kicked him as well. Witness identified the men with the aid of a torch. Witness did not see any other row on the street that night. Sergt. J. V. Lewis gave evidence that following a report of the incident he went out the road and found Smiley’s car. A person standing beside it was asked where the’ other gentlemen were, and he replied that he did not know. Witness then heard a “fissling” in the hedge, and on going over found Wilson pulling himself out of the thorns; his face was covered with blood, and his clothes were torn. The first words defendant said were: “I hit nobody, skipper.” (Laughter).

RECOGNISANCES ESTREATED AT ENNISKILLEN. At the second December Court in Enniskillen, four .men were fined for coming into the Six Counties without proper documents of identity. Only two of the men surrendered to their bail. The two who returned to their homes in the Twenty-Six Counties did not appear before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M. They were fined 40/- each, and. the two fines were paid by Francis Macken, publican, Belmore Street, who had bailed the men. At Enniskillen Petty. Sessions on Monday, Mr. Macken appeared on an application by the police to estreat the recognisances entered into. Head Constable Thornton made the application, and Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., said bailing a man was a most serious matter, and he granted the application, estreating the recognisances in the  sum of 20/- in each of the two cases.

RAILWAYS AND ARIGNA COAL. Arigna coal, mixed; with Welsh, steam coal, is being used by Great Southern Railways Co. on a large section of the Western circuit, with the measure of success anticipated, states an Irish Independent representative. An expert explained that Arigna coal did not really suit railway engines because it was too dirty. It left a big residue of ash, and also burned the fire bars quickly and the fire box as well and abnormal renewals would be called for. It produced a fire which was really too hot for engines, but in existing circumstances, the railways would be glad to get it. The company was prepared to take increasing quantities of the coal.

“MY WIFE IS A CATHOLIC” ENGLISHMAN WHO WAS REFUSED TOWN CLERKSHIP OF BELFAST. ALLEGATIONS IN AN INTERVIEW. “I WAS ASKED MY RELIGION” Mr. W. L. Allen, town Clerk, Barrow- on-Furness, was appointed by the “Big Six’ of the corporation as Town Clerk of Belfast. He was selected as the most, competent amongst a large batch of applicants. Mr. Dawson Bates, Minister for Home Affairs, refused to sanction the appointment. Now it is alleged that the Minister’s refusal was prompted by questions of religion. This was stated by Mr. Allen in an interview with pressmen on Saturday last. I would like to make it perfectly clear,” said Mr. Allen, “that it seems to me amazing that such an issue could be seriously raised either as a recommendation or an objection to the appointment to such an important position as town clerk of a city of the importance of Belfast.

Sir Dawson Bates, Minister of Home Affairs on Saturday informed the “Big Six” Committee of Belfast Corporation that, .as requested by the Corporation, he had interviewed Mr, Allen and that nothing had emerged from the interview to alter his decision not to endorse Mr. Alley’s appointment. The “Big Six,” it is stated, have decided not to press further for the appointment, and Mr. John F. McKinstry, Acting Town Clerk who is due to retire next May, will again be asked to continue in office for an indefinite period.

Mr. ALLEN’S INTERVIEW. Mr. Allen, in an interview, said “I came over here at the direct, request of the Minister of Home Affairs. I had an interview with him, lasting 40 minutes, and it would have been a simple matter for him to have told me his decision. The first time I was over here, the first intimation I had of the appointment being refused was through the Press. This time the same thing has occurred. ‘’Since arriving on the second visit I have reason to believe that the religious question has been raised, and raised as a very serious issue. “It is incredible to me that such an issue could be raised as either, an objection or recommendation to an appointment such as Town Clark of a city as important as Belfast. One wonders what are the views of the thousands of Irishmen who fight for freedom.

“The position is that I and my family and ancestors for 250 years have been Church of England Protestants. The girl, who became my wife two years ago, after I had been widowed six years, is an English girl of Irish descent and a Catholic.

January 17th 1942. GREAT DERRYGONNELLY CEILIDHE. FR. McCAFFREY’S POWERFUL APPEAL FOR GAELIC CAUSE.A stirring appeal for support of the native games, dances and language and all things Gaelic, was made by Rev. D. McCaffrey, C.C., when on Sunday night he presented the Junior Football League Cup to the victors in the 1941 competition, Derrygonnelly Harps G.F.C., at a ceilidhe mhor organised by the club in St, Patrick’s Hall, Derrygonnelly. There was an attendance of over 400 at the ceilidhe, which was the first organised in the district for many years. The extraordinary success of the event ensures that for the future ceilidhthe will be a prominent feature of Derrygonnelly social events. Enniskillen and Cavanacross between them, alone sent nearly a hundred patrons, while travelling accommodation prevented nearly fifty more from attending also.

It was a great Irish night. Mr. Jim Sheridan, popular M.C., from Cavanacross, had a comparatively easy task in dealing with a fine programme and an orderly and happy crowd. The St. Molaise Ceilidhe Band, Enniskillen, added further lustre to its name by providing splendid music under the direction of Rev. Bro. Bede, its conductor. An excellent supper was supplied by a hard-working ladies’ committee, and contributors to a most enjoyable selection of songs, dances, etc., were: Misses Maisie Lunny, P.E.T., Eileen Early, Kathleen and May Burns, Margaret McGlone and  — Duffy, Monea; Messrs. Sean O’Boyle, J. Sheridan and J. Quinn.

Although Irish dancing has not been done in the district for some years, the performance of the dances was excellent, the Enniskillen and Cavanacross Gaels leading their Derrygonnelly friends through the various movements. Happy faces were everywhere, and as the popular chairman of the club (Mr. J. J. Maguire) remarked aptly: “at no other event could there be seen so many happy Irish faces.” Those present in addition to others mentioned were Father Duffy, Derrygonnelly; Misses Vera Tummon, P.E.T.; May, McCaffrey, teaching staff, . Convent of Mercy, Messrs. Seamus O’Ceallaigh, Secretary, Co. Board; G. McGee, M.P. S.I.  Parties were present from Belleek and Irvinestown, as well as other places mentioned.

Mr. Maguire, presiding, expressed regret at the unavoidable absence of Very Rev. T. Maguire, P.P., who was to have presented the cup. Father Maguire was the best Gael in Fermanagh, and they were sorry not to have him with them, especially as he was a native of the parish. They had a good substitute in their own beloved curate, Father McCaffrey. (Applause). He thanked all the patrons, and said it was a revelation to them in Derrygonnelly to see the pulling power of a ceilidhe. It was a lesson they were not likely to forget for the future. (Applause). He hoped 1942 would be an even more successful year for their club than 1941, and that they would retain the cup they had and add further trophies to their collection He hoped, too, that ceilidhthe would form their social entertainments for the future. (Applause). The only game they had lost during the year was to Derrylin in the Junior Championship final. Victory in that would have meant that they had won the two junior cups, but they very heartily congratulated Derrylin on their victory and wished them all success in the future. He thanked, everyone connected with the success of the night: the ladies, for their catering and the excellent band from Enniskillen.

FERMANAGH TEACHER SUED. PUPIL LOST EYE AT PLAY. CLAIM FOR DAMAGES. HEARING IN HIGH COURT. A claim brought by a 13 year-old pupil against the principal teacher of a Border school came before the Lord Chief Justice in the Belfast King’s Bench Division last week. The plaintiff, Patrick Anthony Leonard, a minor by his father, John Patrick Leonard, of Creenagho, Belcoo, claimed damages far ,the loss of his right eye alleging negligence on the part of James Ferguson, a public elementary teacher, of Belcoo, in not exercising proper supervision. The boy when playing on the road during the midday break was struck by a stone.

Mr. C. L. Sheil (instructed by Mr. Jas. Cooper) was for the plaintiff; Mr. J. D. Chambers, K.C., and Mr, J. Agnew (instructed by Messrs. Maguire & Herbert) being for the defendant.

Mr. Sheil said the accident took place during the lunch hour on March 23, 1939. The school was the last building on the border dividing Fermanagh from Cavan. The school was staffed by the defendant and two women teachers. On the day in question there were about 70 pupils at the school. Those who lived in Belcoo village or nearby got home for their lunch and about 30 children brought their lunch with them.

Mont of the playground or field had been used for instruction in horticulture by the master, and as part of it not tilled was wet the children played on the public road to the knowledge of the principal teacher.

Counsel added that one of the complaints was that the children were so allowed to play on the public road without any person being in charge of them. The children were playing football, and it is alleged that one of them lifted a handful of road material and threw it at the plaintiff,; who was struck on the right eye. The boy was attended by Dr. Hamilton and sent to Hospital. He was later taken to Belfast where the eye was removed. He submitted that the defendant should have foreseen the danger of letting the boys play on the road because of the traffic and the presence of loose road material. Under the Education Act there was cast on the defendant the statutory duty of exercising care over the children and supervision during the luncheon hour. Defendant, counsel asserted, had interviewed some of the boys, dictated to the children, and they wrote down statements. One boy would say that he was sent for by the master, who asked him to say that he (the defendant) was in fact on the road at the time of the accident.  Plaintiff gave evidence, and in reply to Mr Chambers agreed that he sometimes played on the roads at his home but not with the sanction of his parents. Sometimes the master told them not to go on the roads. Answering his Lordship, the plaintiff , said the master had told them not to be out on the road on certain days.

James McGurl, aged 16 years, said the boys used to play on the road. They were forbidden to be on the road on fair days but not on other days. The following day the master spoke to him and …………….

“IMPARTIALITY ” SERIOUSLY QUERIED. To the Editor Fermanagh Herald. ”Sir, Some of your readers who are unacquainted with the Impartial Reporters peculiar principles of impartiality, may have been misled by one of its “impartial” statements, published last week; will you, therefore allow me a few words on the subject. An article in that journal commenting on Regional Education Committee matters, concluded thus “Strange, when Mr. Hanna was appointed Principal, Captain Wray voted against him, favouring a candidate in the same line but with qualifications inferior to those of Mr. Hanna. Under the sharp pangs of remorse for having failed to favour the “Impartial Reporter’s” “highly qualified. candidate, I can just barely recall, as feeble consolation that my iniquity  on that occasion was shared by several other Corrupt nit-wits of the Committee, a few citizens with rank and title to their names – spiritual and temporal. The “Impartial Reporters” ‘‘highly qualified” candidate was, of course, championed by our well- known stalwarts of public rectitude.

The poor mutt, with the ‘‘inferior qualifications” for whom I voted had only a lot of silly stuff as certificates, one of which was from a comic naval dockyard named Chatham and, incidentally, he was only the son of a common British Naval Officer —’how ridiculously absurd to associate our Technical School, or sully its academic air, with such unqualified and inferior persons and places. Needless to add, that fellow with the “inferior qualifications” was not a Presbyterian, he was only just a Protestant, the poor devil could hardly have been more unqualified, I suppose, according to the “Impartial Reporter” unless he were a b…….. Papist.

I am Sir etc. J. P. Wray 27-1-1942.

1908.

October 17th 1908. AEROPLANE TRIUMPH. 50 MILES IN 69 MINUTES. Mr Wilbur Wright on Saturday afternoon made a fifty mile flight with a passenger remaining over sixty nine minutes in the  air. He thus beat all the world records and triumphantly completed the tests required by the Lazarc-Weiler Syndicate before purchasing the French rights of the American aeroplane for £20,000. At 4.45 Mr. Wright and Mr. Paul Painleave, a member of the French Institute, took their seats in the aeroplane before the largest number of aeronautical experts who have ever been present at the demonstrations of Mr. Wright. The aeroplane rose to a height of 25ft and Mr. Wright commenced to describe a series of eclipses and triangles. For some time the aviator maneuvered at various heights. At times he reached a height of nearly 100 ft., and during the greater part of the flight the aeroplane travelled at a great speed. The performance was accepted as entirely satisfactory by the members of the Syndicate and may therefore be regarded as the conclusion of Mr. Wright’s work at Le Mans. (France).

October 17th 1908. INVASION BY AIRSHIP.  GERMAN PLAN TO CONQUER ENGLAND. Herr Rudolph Martin, Government Councillor and author of The Coming War in the Air who is president of the recently formed German League for Motor Airship Navigation, fired the imagination of his hearers at a meeting in Berlin with a plan for the conquest of England by airships. He averted that the principal duty of aerial navigators was to induce the combined Continental Powers to construct a fleet of 10,000 Zeppelins, each to carry twenty soldiers, to fly these across the English Channel and the North Sea, preferably by night, and to land and capture the sleeping Britons before they could realise what was taking place. Herr Martin disposed of the British Fleet by predicting that they would turn tail and leave the coasts defences as soon as the aerial armada hove in view in order to avoid being blown up by the shells which would otherwise be dropped on to them from the clouds. The aerial armada would assemble at leisure at points opposite the English coast, and begin their death-dealing voyage as soon as the weather was favourable. Herr Martin thought that artillery and cavalry could be landed in England quite as easily as 200,000 infantry.

28-11-1908. VICE-REGAL PARTY IN BELLEEK. ADDRESS OF WELCOME FROM THE INHABITANTS. SPEECH OF THE LORD LIEUTENANT. His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant and the Counters of Aberdeen, who travelled from Dublin on Monday, arrived in the pretty little village of Belleek by the 7.55 train last night, and were enthusiastically received by the townspeople. The windows of a number of the houses were illuminated for the occasion, and a pretty floral arch WITH THE WORD “WELCOME, in white letters on a crimson background, spanned the main thoroughfare.

An address from the people of the town and district was presented to their Excellencies at the entrance to the hotel. There was an immense crowd outside the building. The Very Rev Dr McMeel, P. P. chairman of the Reception Committee, presided, and in the course of his speech said it was necessary for the Government, in justifying the insertion of the Compulsory Notification Clause in the Tuberculosis Bill at present before Parliament to establish sanatoria in convenient centres through, the length and breadth of Ireland, out of the millions of pounds that this country had been obliged to pay in over-taxation to the British Treasury for the past sixty or seventy years (cheers). As their Excellencies had always cordially sympathised with the ideals and aspirations of the Irish people, he trusted that they would continue their valuable services until they should have everywhere established the flourishing tranquillity of a happy and contented Ireland (cheers).

Mr Edward Knox, hon. secretary of the Reception Committee, then read the address. The Lord Lieutenant, who was loudly cheered, in replying, said he need scarcely tell them that he had always endeavoured to support Lady Aberdeen in every possible manner in her efforts to help the Home Industries, and secondly, in regard to her fight with the scourge of tuberculosis (cheers). He thought it was a happy augury, and omen that they had already, by coming forward in this way and alluding to the matter as they had done in the address, indicated their hearty’ support and concurrence with the efforts now being made to stamp out this disease (cheers). Afterwards a number of the members of the Reception Committee were introduced to Lord and Lady Aberdeen. Three ringing cheers having been given for their Excellencies the crowd dispersed. On Tuesday the Vice-regal party motored to Donegal to open the Tuberculosis Exhibition. During their stay in Belleek they will visit the famous pottery and. other places of interest in this picturesque district.

28-11-1908. OLD-AGE PENSIONS IN FERMANAGH. The County Fermanagh Local Pension Committee held a prolonged sitting on Friday for the consideration of claims, during the course of which they allowed 5 shillings per week in 360 cases, 4 shillings in one case, 3 shillings in one case and 1 shilling in one case and postponed 35 cases for further evidence and investigation. One application was withdrawn. The total number of cases dealt with was 399, which constitutes a record for Ireland.

28-11-1908. OLD-AGE PENSIONS IN FERMANAGH. The County Fermanagh Local Pension Committee held a prolonged sitting on Friday for the consideration of claims, during the course of which they allowed 5 shillings per week in 360 cases, 4 shillings in one case, 3 shillings in one case and 1 shilling in one case and postponed 35 cases for further evidence and investigation. One application was withdrawn. The total number of cases dealt with was 399, which constitutes a record for Ireland.

28-11-1908. CALUMNY REFUTED. THE PROTESTANT BIGOTS OF THE SOUTH. ALLEGED SCENES AT FUNERAL. Under the heading of “Roman Catholic Intolerance in County Limerick,” “Barbarous conduct at a Funeral,” the Fermanagh Times of last week published letter from Rev. J. S. Wylie, Castleconnell in which the rev gentleman paints a further lurid picture of the scenes alleged to have taken place at the funeral of Mr John Enright. He points out in his letter that he was a frequent caller at Mr Enright’s during his illness, and that he ministered to him three times during this period. In the Irish Independent of Thursday last the mother of the deceased, Mrs K Enright, gives the lie to this statement of the pious rector of Castleconnell. Mrs Enright, who is naturally .horrified at the disgusting dispute which has arisen over her dead son, now considers it her duty to place the true facts before the public, and to put an end once and for all to the bigots’ roar all over Ireland. She denies point blank that Mr Wylie ministered to her son during his last illness. “Since the day my son fell sick she writes, “Mr Wylie never saw him, nor, as far as I know, ever asked to see him until the 25th October, when he was unconscious. He died in less than an hour after Mr Wylie leaving him.” What has the representative of Protestant truth and Protestant tolerance in Castleconnell to say to this point blank denial of his statements? “My son,” writes Mrs Enright “had been attended to by the priest on three occasions, at his own special request, uninfluenced by anybody while he was in his perfect senses; the priest received him into the Catholic Church, administered to him the last rites of the Catholic Church and he died a Catholic. Rev Wylie had been told this.” The fact then remains that the Rev. Wylie after being informed by the relatives of the deceased of the latter’s conversion to Catholicity, and his consequent desire to be buried according to the rites of the Catholic Church, showed an inhuman disrespect, both for the wishes of the living and dead, by stopping a funeral procession at the gate of his church, and calling upon the mourners, to bear the body of the deceased inside. This is how the Christian Minister describes the scene outside the church When the coffin reached the church gate a crowd of people surrounded it. Sticks were raised in a threatening manner; some of the bearers, including Dr George Enright, were roughly handled. The coffin was then seized by the crowd, who forcibly prevented it being brought into the church, and, with shouts and cries of “‘Don’t let him be buried a Protestant,” which were heard more than a quarter of a mile away, the body was rushed past the church and placed in the grave. It is enough to say that Dr George Enright absolutely denies getting any rough handling, as well as the statement that sticks were used in a threatening manner. Our readers will take the other statements of the rev gentleman for what they are worth.

SABBATH DESECRATORS. To the Editor of the “Fermanagh Herald.” The following letter has been addressed to the editor of the “Impartial Reporter’ in. reply to one appearing in the last issue of that paper.

10-10-1908. To the Editor “Impartial Reporter. – Dear Sir, Your correspondent “Ballinamallard Unionist” and a Lover of Truth must be a very simple man. He proceeds in the course of a lengthy letter to give the truth of the Ballinamallard incident where, the God-fearing loyalists are alleged to have gathered into that mecca of Orangeism in order to prevent by physical force some peaceable people passing through the village on the Sabbath. “Lover of Truth’ denies the allegation, and if his contention be accurate it is the manifest duty of the traders and inhabitants of Ballinamallard to take action to clear their village of the serious allegations which the police have made against it. Will they act or will they not? If they do not, then we shall believe that the police were correct when they advised the competitors at the Feis to go round by another road lest a riot might ensue. But that apart, “Lover of Truth” makes himself appear quite silly when he applies the, term ‘Sabbath Desecrators” to the competitors. Does he read the papers? If so, is he aware that two Sundays ago the Brewers of England —the great driving force behind loyalty and Unionism organised an extraordinary political demonstration in Hyde Park, London, to which over a hundred thousand people came from the English provinces? Huge crowds bearing banners with political party cries filled the streets the whole day and speeches were delivered from fifty platforms. Has “Lover of the Truth” written to the papers to protest against this colossal desecration of the Lord’s Day, engineered by drink in support of Unionism, Beer, beer, glorious beer! beer and the Union, beer and loyalty?

And the dozen or so boys from Enniskillen, who are passing to a musical festival, are Sabbath desecrators! Do you have any music on the Sabbath, “Lover of Truth? Either the police were correct or it is the plain duty of the Ballinamallard people to set themselves right with the public. If they allow the matter to lie, people must not be blamed for assuming that the Christianity which prompts a man to break his neighbour’s head for the love of God is not the Christianity of the gentle Christ, who loved all men, even His enemies. ‘Yours truly, etc.

21-11-1908. CLONES LACE AT FRANCO- BRITISH EXHIBITION. One of the most prominent and attractive stalls in the section devoted to arts and crafts and home industries at the Franco-British Exhibition in London was that of Mrs Philip Maguire lace dealer Fermanagh Street, Clones, who displayed an extensive assortment of lace and crochet, arranged in a most artistic and effective manned. The stall, which was a corner one and in a central position, attracted much attention, and being lined on the inside in emerald green, made a most appropriate setting for the beautiful fabrics on view, the work of deft and patient fingers of the industrious lace-makers of Clones district. The Clones lace industry, which is the means of keeping so many families from poverty or emigration, will, no doubt, benefit immensely from the display referred to, and it is satisfactory to know that Mrs. Maguire’s enterprise in securing a stall and placing the exhibit on view has been amply rewarded by the results, notwithstanding, the heavy expenses involved. During the fortnight which she spent at the exhibition she sold an enormous quantity of lace fabrics of all kinds, besides booking orders amounting to hundreds of pounds and. which it will probably take many months to supply. Mrs Maguire was specially complimented by a leading London daily on the success of her stall, and the effective manner in which she had arranged her display at the exhibition.