1942. They were ‘Peeps’ before they became Jeeps.

4-7-1942. U.S. SERGEANT KILLED. Sergeant Robert D. Gibson, of the U.S. Army, a native of Knoxville, Iowa, was killed on Sunday afternoon when a “peep’ in which he was travelling was in collision with a U.S. Army truck. Deceased, who aged thirty eight years, was married. (Ed. Originally, many soldiers did not call it a jeep at all. Jack Keenan, a World War II Third Armoured Division veteran, wrote that early Willys-Overlands were not called Jeeps. “We called ’em ‘Peeps.’” His contemporary sketches of the vehicles in Louisiana and desert manoeuvres were clearly labelled “Peeps.” )

At the inquest, Private Robert D. Goey gave evidence that he had been walking with some companions, and the ‘‘peep” in which deceased was riding, passed them about 20 yards before the accident. The deceased was sitting on the right-hand side in the front seatt. Immediately the “peep’ passed him witness saw a large truck approaching. He saw the two vehicles hit and at that time the “peep’’ was well on its’ own side and the truck was over on its wrong side by about four feet. After the ‘‘peep” was hit it swerved to its left and then back to the middle of the road, where the deceased was thrown out as the “peep” swerved back again to the left.

When the “peep” ‘ was meeting the truck the deceased had his head out to the right over the side of the “peep’’ speaking to witness and his companions, and witness saw the head thrown back and he believed, hit by the radiator grill of the track. If the deceased had not his head out witness did not believe he would have been hit. On the same side that the “peep” was travelling there were some girls at a gate and he saw the driver of the truck looking at them immediately before the accident. In witness’s opinion both vehicles were travelling between 25 and 30 m.p.h.

Private Fred T. Ruggien, who was travelling with deceased in the “peep,” said he was sitting in the back seat on the right side and the deceased was sitting immediately in front of him.  They were travelling close to the grass verge on the left hand side and the truck was travelling about the centre of the road. The two vehicles hit about three or four feet from the left side of the road. Immediately after the collision witness saw blood spouting from a hole beneath deceased’s left temple and he lurched over towards the driver. The “peep” then swerved over again to the right, and as it swerved back to the left deceased was thrown back. The driver of the truck pulled in to his right and stopped about 50-60 yards from the point of impact.

Corporal Merl B. Averill said he was in charge of the truck which was being driven by Pte. John H. McLaughlin. About 100 yards ahead he saw a “peep’’ travelling in the same direction. Witness was sitting in the cab beside the driver and had his head, turned to the right, watching some children on the roadside.

So far as he could judge the truck was travelling on the left centre of the road. He did not see the “peep” coming towards them until he looked out after hearing the crash. The driver of the truck was perfectly sober.

Captain Garrold Hungester, a medical officer of the U.S. Army, said that deceased was dead when he arrived at the scene of the accident. In his opinion the cause of death was multiple compound fracture of the skull with cerebral haemorrhage. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence.

FIXTURES FOR SUNDAY, 5th JULY. Senior Football League.

Lisnaskea v. Newtownbutler — S. O’Grady, Ballyconnell.

Teemore v. Kinawley —  P. Maguire, Derrylin, 5 p.m. (E.S.T.).

O’Connells v. Harps — P. Maguire, Derrylin, 7 p.m. (E.S.T.).

Junior League.

Irvinestown v. Ederney—Father Kirke, C.C., Trillick.

Enniskillen v. Tempo—P. Corrigan, Belnaleck, 4 p.m. (E.S.T.).

Aghadrumsee v. Roslea—H. Fitzpatrick, Newtownbutler.

All matches on grounds of first-named clubs, and at 5 p.m. (extended summer time) except otherwise stated.

LEAGUE TABLES.

Senior Football League.

  1.       W.       L.         D.        Pts.

Lisnaskea … …            6          6          0          0          12

Newtownbutler. 4       4          0          0          8

Kinawley         6          2          4          0          4

Harps .   5        1          4          0          2

O’Connells …. 3          1          2 .        0          2

Teemore … .    6          1          5          0          2

JUNIOR         LEAGUE.

Northern Division.

  1. W.       L.         D.        Pts.

Derrygonnelly . 6        6          0          0          12

Mulleek … … … 6        5          1          0          10

Devenish … … , 4        1          3          0          2

Cashel … …     4          0          4          0          0

Drumavanty    . 4        0          4          0          0

 

Central Division.

  1. w.        L.         D.        Pts.

Enniskillen 5   4          1          0          8

Edemey ..        4          3          1          0          6

Tempo ..  4      1          3          0          2

Irvinestown  5 1          4          0          2

 

Southern Division.

  1. w.        L.         D.        Pts.

Roslea …          2         2          0          0          4

Aghadrumsee … 3 1 2 0 2

Killyvannon … 3 12 0 2

4-7-1942. FERMANAGH MOUNTAIN FIRE CLAIM AT QUARTER SESSIONS. A Fermanagh mountain fire which it was alleged raged over an area 395 acres in extent had a sequel at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Tuesday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., when an application for malicious damage was heard. The applicants were Elisabeth. M. J. Beacom, Tullyvocady; Jas. Stewart, Derrin; Cap., J. G. Barton, The Waterfoot; Geo. Lowry, Portnablaghey; Wm. Lowry, do., and Rebecca Mills, Tullyvocady, and they claimed £500 alleging that some person or persons maliciously set fire to 395 acres of meadow and grazing land, 5 acres of crop land and crops, together with game cover and eggs, fences, trees, shrubs and seeds. All the lands are situate in the Pettigo-Belleek area in the parishes of Muckross and Templecarne.

Mr. E. C. Ferguson, LL B., M.P., represented applicants, and Mr. James Cooper, D.L., solicitor was for the Fermanagh County Council, defendants. Richard Crozier, surveyor, gave evidence that a total of 316 acres were completely burnt in what he described as “a good burning.” A week after the fires were first reported’ he visited the area and had to walk through red hot ashes. Freshly cut turf were singed. The greater part of the land affected was arable mountain grazing.

In reply to Mr. Cooper, witness said that at the time of the fire the cover was in a most inflammable condition. James Stewart, farmer and gamekeeper for Mr. Barton, gave evidence of seeing the three fires at 1 o’clock, a.m., on 4th May, half a mile and a quarter of a mile apart. Attempts by relatives and himself to extinguish the flames were of no avail. All the ditches on his land were levelled and he had his cattle tied in since. He had lost £50 by the fire on his grazing land, which was full of grouse.

Cross-examined, witness said he lived a mile off the road and few people went up his mountain. All the applicants were very popular in the locality. George Beacom, husband of .one of the applicants, Mrs. Beacom, stated he saw the three separate fires about 4 p.m. One of the fires was about two hundred yards from his house and another a quarter of a mile away. The latter never joined with the two which converged towards his house. Twenty acres of his wife’s holding were burned including, fences, an acre of potatoes damaged, and four acres of arable land. He did his best to put the fires out.

Cross-examined, witness agreed nobody could have any possible interest in burning the mountain. Nobody had anything against the applicants.          .

Wm. Lowry said that after eleven o’clock on 4th May he saw a fire spread over a considerable area a mile or a mile and a half away. Ten acres of grazing land on his farm, worth £30, were burned, also four or five hundred acres of mountain grazing, of which he had a grazing right. A rood of early potatoes, value £5, were burnt, in addition to a ridge of cabbage plants worth £2.

Captain John Barton said he had exercised his shooting rights over the townland in question. For the defence, Sergeant Kerr, R.U.C. gave evidence of investigating the fire and said he could find no trace of malice. Similar fires occurred in other parts of the district. All the applicants were popular in the locality. His Honour refused the application and allowed McCrea 5s witness’s expenses.

NOTED. 11-7-1942. £14 Sought for Heifer.—Notice of intention to apply to the County Court for £14 compensation for the loss of a heifer, which he alleged was maliciously killed on Pushin Island, was received by Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday on behalf of Wm. Lunny.

R.M.’s Advice.—When John McClean, Rafinton, an ex-policeman, and Wesley Johnston, Ramult, appeared at Brookeboro’ Court in cases of threatening language, Major Dickie, on the advice of the solicitors on both sides, advised the parties to go home and leave each other alone in future.

Cycle Thief Gets Six Months—Described by Sergt. McQuaid as “a criminal and dangerous liar,” Edward Keenan, no fixed abode, was, at Virginia (County Cavan) sentenced to six months’ imprisonment for having stolen a bicycle. It was stated he made a statement involving an innocent man.

Rainfall at Heath Lodge, Belleek.—The rainfall for June amounts to only 1.09 inches, being the lowest for that month for the past eighteen years. Rain fell on twelve days, on ten of which it amounted to .04 inches or over. The drought which prevailed since early February caused an exceptionally low rainfall for the first half of this year, namely 18.78 inches, which is approximately one-third of the annual average rainfall for the past twenty years.

Tractor Offences. —Samuel Ernest Dane, of Mullaghmeen, Ballinamallard, was fined 5/- and costs at Enniskillen Petty Sessions for driving a motor tractor with trailer attached, without having an identification mark on the rear of the trailer. Philip Diver, Drumcullion, Ballinamallard, was fined 5/- and costs for not having an identification mark on the front of a tractor and rear of a trailer.

Pulled out without signalling.—When Ernest Elliott, of Drumconlin. East, Letterbreen, was charged at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday with having driven a motor car without due care and attention on 4th June last, Sergeant McNally gave evidence that defendant pulled out from the kerb in Darling St., Enniskillen, without giving a hand-signal, and a lorry coming behind had to brake violently in order to avoid a collision. A fine of 10/- and costs was imposed.

Increase for Town Surveyor—At Enniskillen U.D.C. on Monday, the Finance Committee recommended that in view of the part that Mr. J. Donnelly, Borough Surveyor, pays all his clerical and incidental office expenses out of his own pocket, he be granted a war bonus of £50 as from 1st inst. Further, subject to sanction, that he be granted an honorarium of £25 in respect of his extra services during the recent protracted illness of the Town Clerk. The recommendation was passed unanimously.

SUNDAY CINEMA CHARGES. Notice of a resolution, which will permit the Regal Cinema to increase the charge for the balcony seats on Sunday, from 8d to 9d to meet the increased tax, was given at Enniskillen U.C. on Monday by Mr. W. Monaghan. The Sunday cinema is confined to soldiers, and the proposed increased charge would not affect the ordinary soldier using the body of the

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SAMUEL B. HORNE, BELLEEK. MEDAL OF HONOUR WINNER.

SAMUEL B. HORNE, BELLEEK. MEDAL OF HONOR WINNER.

Samuel Belton Horne. Born March 3, 1843, Belleek, County Fermanagh, Ireland.  Died September 18, 1928, Connecticut. Buried at Winsted, Connecticut. United States Army.  Rank Captain

Unit.  Connecticut 11th Connecticut Infantry Regiment. Battles/wars. American Civil War. The 11th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 11th Connecticut Infantry was organized at Hartford, Connecticut, beginning October 24, 1861, and mustered in for a three-year enlistment on November 14, 1861. The regiment lost a total of 325 men during service; 8 officers and 140 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, 1 officer and 176 enlisted men died of disease.

Awards  Medal of Honour.

Samuel Belton Horne (March 3, 1843 – September 18, 1928) was an American soldier who fought in the American Civil War. Horne received his country’s highest award for bravery during combat, the Medal of Honour. Horne’s medal was won for heroism at Fort Harrison, Virginia, on September 29, 1864. He was honoured with the award on November 19, 1897.

Fort Harrison was an important component of the Confederate defences of Richmond during the American Civil War. Named after Lieutenant William Harrison, a Confederate engineer, it was the largest in the series of fortifications that extended from New Market Road to the James River that also included Forts Hoke, Johnson, Gregg, and Gilmer. These earthworks were designed to protect the strategically important Chaffin’s Bluff on the James River. On September 29, 1864, 2,500 Union soldiers from Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler’s Army of the James overran Major Richard Cornelius Taylor’s 200-man Confederate garrison and captured the fort in the Battle of Chaffin’s Farm. Brig. Gen. Hiram Burnham, a native of Maine and a brigade commander in XVIII Corps, was killed in the assault, and the Union-held fort was renamed Fort Burnham in his honor.

Horne was born in Belleek in County Fermanagh, Ireland, and entered service in Winsted, Connecticut, where he was later buried.

Medal of Honor citation. “The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honour to Captain (Infantry) Samuel Belton Horne, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 29 September 1864, while serving with Company H, 11th Connecticut Infantry, in action at Fort Harrison, Virginia. While acting as an Aide and carrying an important message, Captain Horne was severely wounded and his horse killed but he delivered the order and rejoined his general.”

The Medal of Honor is the United States of America’s highest military honor, awarded for personal acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty. The medal is awarded by the President of the United States in the name of the U.S. Congress to U.S. military personnel only. There are three versions of the medal, one for the Army, one for the Navy, and one for the Air Force. Personnel of the Marine Corps and Coast Guard receive the Navy version.

The Medal of Honor was created as a Navy version in 1861 named the “Medal of Valor”, and an Army version of the medal named the “Medal of Honor” was established in 1862 to give recognition to men who distinguished themselves “conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity” in combat with an enemy of the United States. (Versions of the Medal of Honor. Army version on the left.)

Because the medal is presented “in the name of Congress,” it is often referred to as the “Congressional Medal of Honor”. However, the official name is the “Medal of Honor,” which began with the U.S. Army’s version. Within United States Code the medal is referred to as the “Medal of Honor”, and less frequently as “Congressional Medal of Honor”.

The Medal of Honor is usually presented by the President in a formal ceremony at the White House, intended to represent the gratitude of the American people, with posthumous presentations made to the primary next of kin. According to the Medal of Honor Historical Society of the United States, there have been 3,514 Medals of Honor awarded to the nation’s soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen since the decoration’s creation, with just less than half of them awarded for actions during the four years of the American Civil War.

In 1990, Congress designated March 25 annually as “National Medal of Honor Day”. Due to its prestige and status, the Medal of Honor is afforded special protection under U.S. law against any unauthorized adornment, sale, or manufacture, which includes any associated ribbon or badge.

First noted by Gary McCauley, Belleek who informed me of its existence.

From  https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_B._Horne