1942 Fermanagh Herald.

.JANUARY 14, 1942. LARCENY CHARGE AT CASTLEDERG. ‘BOUGHT CYCLE FROM FERMANAGH MAN” Before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., at Castlederg Court, two youths, James Hegarty and William John Hegarty, Cormacoll, Drumquin, brothers, pleaded not guilty to the larceny of a cycle, value £4. They were not professionally represented. Thomas Lynch gave evidence that on Sunday, 7th Sept. he left his bicycle outside Castlederg Chapel and when he came out it was gone. On 28th Sept. he observed a cycle outside a house in Scraghey and on examination. identified it as his although the handle grips and oil bath had been removed. James Hegarty claimed the cycle and said he had bought it from his brother William John. Witness reported the matter to the police. Sergt. Blackstock said James Hegarty came to the barracks and said he bought the cycle from his brother for £2.15s.  William John said he bought the bicycle from a Fermanagh man for £3. He described the Fermanagh man but the police could not trace him. Mr. Long at this stage dismissed the case against James. William John Hegarty gave evidence that he met the Fermanagh man on the road and he offered to sell the cycle, but witness had no money at the time, and they arranged to meet at Castlederg later on. He did so and paid 30s and got possession of the cycle; he met him later by appointment and paid a further £2, getting 7s 6d as a lucks penny on condition that witness would give back the oil bath and witness agreed. The Fermanagh man appeared to have plenty of money. Cross-examined by the District-Inspector, witness said the Fermanagh man would turn his back to people who were passing them when they were negotiating the sale. He had not seen the man since he bought the cycle. Mr. Long said there was a doubt in the case and he would dismiss it, but he made an order that the cycle be returned to Thomas Lynch.

JANUARY 14, 1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER FIRE. BUSINESS PREMISES SERIOUSLY DAMAGED. Serious damage was caused by a fire which broke out during the blackout hours in the grocery and drapery premises of Mr. John J. O’Donnell, Main Street, Newtownbutler. The outbreak occurred on Saturday morning. The alarm was given by the proprietor, Mr. O’Donnell, who was awakened by the crackling of burning timber. He ran to his sister’s bedroom and carried her through the flames to the Main Street. R.U.C. and military assisted civilians to fight the outbreak but by the time they arrived the fire had a strong hold and the flames were extending to the adjoining shop. Water was carried by civilians from the two town pumps in buckets, tubs and creamery cans. When it was seen that it was impossible to try and confine it. Mr. Joseph McNamee and his four sons climbed to the roof of an adjoining shop and broke down the roof, portion of which fell on Mr. McNamee, who was rescued by his son, Marcus. The Enniskillen fire brigade was  summoned but when it arrived on the scene the local residents had the fire under control. Mr. O’Donnell’s premises included a private house as well as a large store, all of which were burned to the ground.

JANUARY 14, 1942. G.N.R. OFFICIAL DEAD. NATIVE OF MAGUIRESBRIDGE. The death has taken place at a Belfast nursing home of Mr. W. A. F. Graham, aged 46, deputy traffic manager of the Great Northern Railway Co. He was a native of Maguiresbridge, Co. Fermanagh, and was educated at Enniskillen Model School, and entered the railway service 29 years ago. He is survived by his wife and. one child.

January 7th 1942. A FERMANAGH DONKEY. AMUSING COURT EVIDENCE. An unusual claim in respect of alleged breach of warranty in the sale of a donkey came before Deputy Judge Ellison, K. C at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions in Enniskillen. Plaintiff was John Cassidy, of Cullintagh, and he claimed £4 10s damages for the alleged breach from Morton. Greaves, of Knockdooris, Derrylin, who sold him the animal for £2 10s on the 16th September, 1941.Mr. Cooper, solicitor for plaintiff, said the case was an unusual one. The animal was warranted sound and able to pull a 15 cwts. load. The animal was big but not too well looking. On being brought home the animal’s condition became worse and it died. Plaintiff in evidence said defendant asked him to buy the ass in the fair of Ballyconnell, but he did not like to buy it as it was imported. However, the deal was made and the animal was left for him at Blake’s of Derrylin. Defendant said the animal could draw 15 cwts anywhere, and was the best ass in County Fermanagh. (Laughter). He also told plaintiff that when trotting along the road the feet of the ass made a noise like a pony (laughter), and that it had mowed with a pony. The beast was brought home by plaintiff  but it died on 15th October. On the way home it was dragging its feet. Mr. Cooper – It looked like a lady doing one of these new dances. (Laughter). Plaintiff added that the ass had lumps on its backbone, and was, “jinked.” It also walked sideways. (Laughter). Mr. Ferguson (for defendant) —What did you think you were buying, a horse or a donkey?—-A donkey. I am not that far gone yet that I would not know a donkey. (Laughter). Did you ever see a donkey ploughing? –No, but he told me this one ploughed. Don’t you deal in donkeys?—No, but when I get an order I buy one. Didn’t you inspect this donkey? —No, I did not. I was in a hurry for the bus. (Laughter) Didn’t you run it up and down the fair green in Ballyconnell?—No, I took his word for it. You would think it was a thousand-pound horse he was selling. I could not keep him from warranting it. (Laughter). He told me it was the best in the world and was worth £20. This was .a stallion donkey ?—Yes. Did you find it on its back in a drain? —No. Have you got a girl in your house?— She’s not a girl3 she’s a woman. (Laughter) I will not differ with you about the age, but you have a. girl?—I have a housekeeper, if you want to know my business. (Laughter). I don’t want to know your business any more than necessary, but did it take you, the girl and your nephew to pull it out of the drain? There is not a word about it. Fred Hart, M.R.C.V.S. said he examined the carcass of the animal on 15th October and found that it had suffered ailments of the liver, heart and spine. The animal was about 10 years of age and the ailment of the spine was of five or six months standing. To Mr., Ferguson witness said the spinal trouble would be apparent to any one buying the animal. Mr. Cooper–What did it die of?— Witness— it was dead when I saw it. Laughter.). Apparently it lay down as a result of this spinal trouble and ‘konked out.’ (Laughter). To the Judge witness said his opinion was that the animal could not have pulled a load of 15 cwts.

In the witness box, defendant said he had the donkey in his possession for nine months, and the bargain was made with plaintiff in Ballyconnell fair in September. Plaintiff ‘vetted’ the animal in the fair and defendant told him it could pull a good load. No warranty was given, and the bargain was made by a man called Fitch. The first complaint he got about the animal was in the form of a note given to him in Derrylin fair in October, the note demanding defendant to take it back. Cross-examined by Mr. Cooper, defendant said the animal brought a load of 14 or 15 cwts. For him at times. There was no talk of mowing. Mr. Cooper I notice this ass was smuggled twice as a matter of fact. (Laughter). Defendant. Yes. Mr. Cooper. Well we are not going to say anything about that. (Laughter). You bought another ass? Yes. What age was it? It was a wee foal. Mr. Cooper. To plaintiff – What age was it? Plaintiff. It was an oul ass. (Laughter). What did he pay for him? – 18 shillings. Mr. Cooper. What do you intend to sell him for? Defendant – I don’t intend to sell him. (To the Judge)—-I didn’t notice anything wrong in the way the ass walked to Ballyconnell fair. Foster Greaves, son of the defendant, said the ass in question was a strong one, and had always been kept in the house or tied when let out while in defendants possession.

Thomas Fitch gave evidence of the making of the bargain and said plaintiff had been inspecting the donkey all morning. Mr. McEntee of Clones, “the biggest horse-dealer in the world” (Laughter)—was giving £20 for him not so long ago. Witness did not see anything wrong with the donkey when it was running up and down. It was represented that it could draw a load of 15 cwt., but no warranty was given. Mr. Ferguson questioned witness as to whether the offer of £20 was of recent date or not. Witness—Not so long ago, it was wartime. Mr. Cooper — During this war? I think it was the last one. (Laughter). But we have been told it was ten years old? —bout ten or twelve years. How could it have lived in the last war? I suppose it was the last. (Laughter). .It must have been this war?—No. You said it was not so long ago?—Mr. McEntee could have been here if he had been summoned. If it was not so long ago  when was it. I could not tell; I have not a good memory. Was it a year ago? It was more than a year. Was it more than two years?—It may be four or five. The man who owned him said he did not want him any more for the children. Mr. McEntee wanted him as a sire. It was represented he could pull 15 cwts.?— He could run like mad. He could leap over me or Cassidy either. (Laughter). His Honour held there was a breach, of warranty and allowed a decree for £3 with 15/- costs and expenses.

BALLYGAWLEY—Country butter Is 3d to Is 6d per lb.; potatoes 8d – to l0d per stone; fowl; chickens; 5s to 6s, hens 3s to 3s 6d, ducks 3s 9d to 4s 3d—each; slip pigs 75s to-85s, suckers 50 to- 60s— .each.

February 14th 1942. PETTICO COURT CASES. At Pettigo District Court on Tuesday of last week, before Mr. Justice O’Hanrahan, Guard Gallivan summoned Gerald McMenamin, Minchifin for using an unlighted cycle. Fined 5s.

Supt. Noonan charged Michael McGee, Carntressy, with cutting and carrying away eighteen young trees from a cut away plantation at Carntressy on the lands of William Monaghan. Guard James Ryan proved tracing the trees to McGee’s residence. Mr. Monaghan, the owner, refused to prosecute and pleaded for leniency for defendant. A fine of 10s was imposed.

Guard, Gallivan summoned Adam Eves, Gortnessy, for using an unlighted cycle. Fined 6s.

Guard Treanor summoned J. Fitzpatrick, tractor driver, for driving without licence and no rear light. The Justice fined defendant 10s.

February 14th 1942. BROOKEBORO’ COURT CASES. At Brookeboro’ Petty Sessions, before Major Dickie, R.M., Thos. Clarke, Little Mount, was charged with slaughtering a pig without a licence on 2nd January. D.I. Smith prosecuted, and Mr. Stewart, the Ministry’s Inspector gave evidence of visiting Clark’s house, and Clarke admitted having slaughtered the pig, and at that time there were only l0 lbs. of pork left in the house. Clarke pleaded that he killed the animal in November last, as he had a large number of men working, and wanted the pork to feed them.

His Worship, remarking that it was the worst case he had known, fined defendant 40/-.

CYCLISTS’ DIFFICULTIES. His Worship, when dealing with, a number of cases where cyclists, charged with no rear lights, gave the excuse that they could not get batteries, and he would like to make it known that cyclists should have a clear patch of white paint as a background to a reflector when they could not get batteries.

 

February 14th 1942. FERMANAGH CLAIM FAILS. ACTION AGAINST BELCOO TEACHER. BOY WHO LOST EYE. A denial that he had dictated a story to the pupils as to what they should say when asked about an accident was made by the principal teacher, the defendant in an action for damages, the hearing of which was resumed in the Belfast King’s Bench Division on Wednesday of last week before the Lord Chief Justice. Mr. James Ferguson, P.E.T., of Belcoo, was alleged to have been negligent by not exercising proper supervision over the pupils on March, 25, 1959, when one of the boys, Patrick Anthony Leonard, aged 13 years, of Creenahoe, Belcoo, lost his right eve. The plaintiff’s case was that while playing on the road during the luncheon interval he was struck by a stone and he sought damages against the master for negligence. Mr: C. L. Sheil (instructed by Messrs. Cooper and Cooper) was for plaintiff, Mr. J. D. Chambers, K.C., and Mr. J. Agnew (instructed by Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented the defendant. The defendant said it was customary for the boys to play on the road on which they had played in his predecessor’s time. Answering his Lordship, the witness agreed that he had no personal knowledge of that. Mr. Ferguson added that he had instructed the boys not to play on the road on Blacklion or Belcoo fair days and the days, immediately following. He had warned the children not to go on the road on the day of the accident as the previous day was Blacklion fair day. He said he was quite unaware that there were pupils playing on the road. In order to get a clear story of what happened he had asked the boys to write a letter stating what had occurred, but there was nothing in the nature of dictation.

In reply to Mr. Sheil, the defendant agreed that the road was the best, playground they had, as there was an open sewer in the yard. There had been a dancing class in the school during the lunch hour. Mr; Sheil commented that a girl pupil who had not been on the road had written in her exercise, book— “No one knows whether it was a ball or a stone that hit him,”

“Did that child imagine that story,” asked Counsel, to which the defendant replied that the girl heard the inquiry going on, and could think for herself and form her own conclusions. It was a description of what the girl had heard from other children. That pupil was only writing an essay. The witness mentioned that he had never seen children in Belcoo School throwing stones.         He agreed with Mr. Sheil that the Ministry of Education were apprehensive about children playing on the road, and that in a circular he had produced it was shown that between January and December, 1939, some 569 accidents to children at school had happened in Northern Ireland, and of that number 575 were due to the presence of the children on roads. He reiterated that he had taken all the care possible. Mrs. Annie McCabe, the first assistant in the school, and a number of pupils also gave evidence. The lord Chief Justice held that the supervision exercised was not unreasonable, saying that the accident was caused by a fellow-pupil who was acting playfully. Having detailed his findings as to fact, his Lordship entered judgment for the defendant, with costs.

February 14th 1942. £15 FINE AFFIRMED. KESH FARMER’S FAILURE TO PLOUGH

John. Spence, Bannaghbeg, Clonelly, Kesh, appealed to Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Friday against a fine of £15 and costs imposed on him at Kesh Betty Sessions for having, as alleged, failed to obey a direction of the Ministry of Agriculture to plough five acres. Mr. Aiden Herbert, solicitor, represented the appellant and Mr. J. Cooper was for the Ministry.

Opening the case Mr. Cooper said it was a somewhat peculiar case. The farm in question was almost twenty-five acres in extent. Appellant was visited by a couple of inspectors from the Ministry to whom he spoke of the difficulty of getting tractors to do the ploughing. To another inspector he said the land was not fit for ploughing. That official took him over the lands and, using a spade, pointed out to him that the soil was suitable for cultivation. He should have ploughed five acres but only cultivated a plot for potatoes and at the Petty Sessions a fine of £15 was imposed. At that Court appellant denied ownership of the farm and told the R.M. it was the property of his sister who lived in Co. Donegal for whom he acted as manager. Under the regulations, an occupier meant a person rated or liable to be rated to the poor rate in respect of the holding or who would be so rated or liable to be rated for the provisions of the Local Government (Rating and Finance) Act (N.I.), 1929, that was the Derating Act and included in relation to any holding, the occupier of which was absent from Northern Ireland, any agent or other person entrusted with the management of the land on his behalf. On appellant’s own statement that he managed the farm for his sister and that he was the herd he was convicted. Since then he (Mr. Cooper] had made a search and found that appellant was the person actually rated for the land (certificate produced). Mr. Herbert intimated that the defence was that the land was not arable.

Samuel Jordan, Ministry’s Inspector, said fifteen acres of the farm were arable. When defendant said the land was not arable witness got a spade, and showed him in the field he said was most suitable that there were four or five inches of soil.

Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness agreed that generally Clonelly was not an ideal district for tillage. He did not test the area he said was arable as there was no question raised by appellant at the time. Furrows in the fields showed that cultivation had been carried out previously.

  1. S. Flack, area officer, swore he visited the farm on 7th March and 26th May. Appellant complained of the difficulty of getting tractors to do work. There were about fifteen acres arable. He agreed that in general Fermanagh farmers were not very fond of ploughing. Appellant had taken out a crop of flax in 1940. In the witness box appellant swore that he was reared on this farm, owned by his sister, and never at any time had there been more than six or seven acres cultivated. In 1940 he got Samuel Mills to work the tractor plough on his land but owing to the rocky nature of the field he was unable to do the work. The soil was only two to four inches deep whereas one needed seven inches of soil to do successful work with the tractor. Appellant also got a man with horses and plough but his ploughman was no more successful than Mills. Mr. Cooper—I suggest you are what is known as a lazy farmer?

Appellant—I have had to work hard all my life.

Samuel Mills gave evidence of his unsuccessful effort to work the tractor plough on appellant’s land. On an adjoining farm he broke eight socks in the ploughing of three acres.

To Mr. Cooper—I believe with a different type of tractor yon could plough this land.

James Allen said he started to plough with a chill plough and gave it up as there was a danger of getting killed. He refused to do any more work on the farm. His Honour affirmed the lower court conviction and fine.

FEBRUARY 14, 1942. £120 REWARD FOR DOMESTIC SERVANT. SEVERE BURNS SUSTAINED. A domestic servant who received severe burns while working at eggs in the kitchen of her employer’s house; her clothing catching fire. and causing severe burns to face, right arm, shoulder and body, appeared before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions last week in connection with the recording of an agreement whereby the applicant .had agreed to accept £50 compensation, together with the sum of £10 costs, and £3 11s 0d medical expenses.

The applicant was Margaret Muldoon, Drumcullion, Dernacrieve, Co. Cavan, and the respondent Patrick Rooney, Sessiagh East, Inishmore, Lisbellaw. The matter had been referred to his Honour to see if the compensation was adequate or not. Mr. J; P. Black (for applicant) told his Honour that applicant was employed by respondent as domestic servant, and on the 10th March, 1941, at her employer’s residence she received serious burns.

Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B. (for respondent)—Not arising out of her work, according, to my instructions.

Proceeding, Mr. Black said that applicant was detained in Fermanagh County Hospital for a period of about, 4 weeks, and subsequently the agreement was arrived at as set out in the opening paragraph. Applicant gave evidence in the witness box. She said that respondent was in comfortable circumstances. Applicant had been living with a married sister since the accident had occurred, and had no means in the world at all.

Mr. Herbert—I am afraid it is more than a question of means. The doctor, he added, said that the only limitation she had was limitation of her arm on account of skin grafting. Her beauty might be injured, but beauty was not the subject of the Workmen’s Compensation Act.

Mr. Horace T. Fleming, surgeon in Fermanagh County Hospital, described the extent of applicant’s burns when she was admitted to hospital. He had again examined her that day and she was totally incapacitated for work.

In reply to Mr. Herbert, witness said that he did not think applicant could do the ordinary work of a house servant.

Mr. Herbert made an offer of £75 in settlement.        . .

Mr. Black said that applicant had agreed to accept £100. He thought she was meeting respondent very fairly in accepting £100.

His Honour—I am not inclined to sanction a settlement of £75.

His Honour made an award of £120, with £10 costs and £3 3s 0d medical expenses.

 

February 14th 1942. EVIDENCE AT INQUEST. The tragic death of a Kinawley school boy was investigated by Mr. James Mulligan, coroner; and a jury, at an inquest on 6th inst., on William John Thompson (7), Derryvran, Thompson’s Bridge, Kinawley, who was killed instantaneously the previous day by a motor lorry.

Head-Constable Thornton represented the police authorities, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B. (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) the driver of the lorry. James Molloy, a conductor on the bus, said the boy was travelling from Stragowna School to his home and got off at Thompson’s Bridge Post Office. Witness was helping other children off the bus; he heard the lorry go past and after a few momenta looked up to see that the accident had occurred. Bernard McGovern, Gortgesh, said he was standing on the roadside and saw the boy go forward from the bus and cross the load end collide with the lorry. He had seen the lorry pass the bus and it swerved as it met the boy, who, however, hit against the left front off side and fell, the wheel going over him. Dr. S. McQuaid, Derrylin, said the boy suffered from multiple injuries to the head and neck. Sergt. Devine gave evidence of measurements.

The lorry driver, Patrick Corrigan, Clonatrig, said he was driving from Derrylin—in the same direction as the bus was headed and the boy was walking— and saw the bus by the roadside at the Post Office. He was driving slowly and passed the bus. He saw no traffic on the road. When he had the engine of the lorry past the front of the bus he suddenly saw the boy a few feet in front of him, crossing the road. He applied his brakes and tried to avoid the boy, but after he got the front of the lorry past him he heard a noise and knew the boy was hit. He stopped and got out and found the rear wheel had passed over the boy’s head. There was four or five tons of sand on the lorry. A verdict was returned that death was caused by injuries received when the boy was knocked down and crushed by the lorry, loaded with sand, and that the accident was unavoidable. The funeral to the Protestant Cemetery, Derrylin, on Saturday, was very large and representative of all creeds and classes.

February 14th 1942. EDERNEY FARMER’S APPEAL CATTLE SEIZURE ECHO.

The seizure of seven cattle belonging to a young Ederney farmer and dealer, and the subsequent forfeiture of five of the animals, had a sequel at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Thursday, when David Jones, Crimlin, Ederney, from whom the animals were seized, appealed against their forfeiture of the five animals. Mr. G. Murnaghan appeared for the appellant and Mr. J. Cooper for the respondent authorities. Head Constable Conlin, Kesh, said the cattle were seized on 1st Sept. last on suspicion of being smuggled. Jones’ statement was that two black polly heifers were bought from John Kane, Kilgarry, and three from William Lunny, same place, on 35th June, 1940. Subsequently, Lunny and Kane stated the cattle were sold a year previously. Mr. Murnaghan said the whole thing was the result of a slip in regard to the date of the sale on the part of Lunny, who said 1939 instead of 1940. Kane, when questioned, said he could not remember the date but it was the same date as Lunny’s sale.

Five, witnesses having given evidence for the appellants, and Head-Constable Conlin (recalled) and Mr. J. McMenamy, veterinary surgeon, of the Ministry of Agriculture, for the respondents, Deputy Judge Ellison, G.C., dismissed the appeal.

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1942 Fermanagh Herald.

January 17th 1942. PAIR OF TOUGHS AND BULLIES. £10 ON EACH OF TWO DEFENDANTS Ballinamallard Assault on Policemen. “ From your behaviour in Court I regard you as . toughs and bullies declared Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., when, at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, he addressed two men convicted of assaulting two policemen in Ballinamallard. One of the men, Arthur Smiley, of Coa, was summoned for assaulting “ B ” Special Graham, while in the execution of his duty, and the second man, Edward Wilson, also of Coa, was summoned for assaulting Const. James Glassey, R.U.C. D. I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr. Aidan Herbert, solicitor, defended.

Constable Glassey swore that when on duty in Ballinamallard on 13th December he saw and heard a number of strangers shouting and singing as they left a public-house. They appeared to be rowdy, and witness stopped them, and demanded their identity cards. As witness was taking out his notebook and pencil, one of the men, Wilson, struck him a violent blow in the face, knocking him down. Defendant jumped on top of him and, putting his two hands round witness’s head, tried to batter it off the kerbstone. Special Const. Graham came to his assistance and, while attempting to release him, Smiley caught him (Graham.) by the two legs and “threw him up the street.” D, I. — A rugby tackle. (Laughter). Witness — Yes, and he kicked him at the same time. A large crowd gathered and the two men cleared off.

Cross-examined, witness agreed the night was dark—it was about 9-20 p.m. He did not see another row on the street. “Isn’t Ballinamallard street only twenty or thirty yards long?” suggested Mr. Herbert. D.I.—It is more than that. R.M.—It is a quarter of a mile at least.  Continuing, witness said he saw Wilson later, struck in a hedge outside the town. ”When he was pulled out and asked what he was doing there,- defendant replied: “ I hit nobody. ”

Special Const, Graham gave corroborative evidence as to the alleged attack by Wilson on Const. Glassey. He .went to the latter’s assistance, and while trying to separate them Smiley tossed him on his back and kicked him as well. Witness identified the men with the aid of a torch. Witness did not see any other row on the street that night. Sergt. J. V. Lewis gave evidence that following a report of the incident he went out the road and found Smiley’s car. A person standing beside it was asked where the’ other gentlemen were, and he replied that he did not know. Witness then heard a “fissling” in the hedge, and on going over found Wilson pulling himself out of the thorns; his face was covered with blood, and his clothes were torn. The first words defendant said were: “I hit nobody, skipper.” (Laughter).

RECOGNISANCES ESTREATED AT ENNISKILLEN. At the second December Court in Enniskillen, four .men were fined for coming into the Six Counties without proper documents of identity. Only two of the men surrendered to their bail. The two who returned to their homes in the Twenty-Six Counties did not appear before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M. They were fined 40/- each, and. the two fines were paid by Francis Macken, publican, Belmore Street, who had bailed the men. At Enniskillen Petty. Sessions on Monday, Mr. Macken appeared on an application by the police to estreat the recognisances entered into. Head Constable Thornton made the application, and Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., said bailing a man was a most serious matter, and he granted the application, estreating the recognisances in the  sum of 20/- in each of the two cases.

RAILWAYS AND ARIGNA COAL. Arigna coal, mixed; with Welsh, steam coal, is being used by Great Southern Railways Co. on a large section of the Western circuit, with the measure of success anticipated, states an Irish Independent representative. An expert explained that Arigna coal did not really suit railway engines because it was too dirty. It left a big residue of ash, and also burned the fire bars quickly and the fire box as well and abnormal renewals would be called for. It produced a fire which was really too hot for engines, but in existing circumstances, the railways would be glad to get it. The company was prepared to take increasing quantities of the coal.

“MY WIFE IS A CATHOLIC” ENGLISHMAN WHO WAS REFUSED TOWN CLERKSHIP OF BELFAST. ALLEGATIONS IN AN INTERVIEW. “I WAS ASKED MY RELIGION” Mr. W. L. Allen, town Clerk, Barrow- on-Furness, was appointed by the “Big Six’ of the corporation as Town Clerk of Belfast. He was selected as the most, competent amongst a large batch of applicants. Mr. Dawson Bates, Minister for Home Affairs, refused to sanction the appointment. Now it is alleged that the Minister’s refusal was prompted by questions of religion. This was stated by Mr. Allen in an interview with pressmen on Saturday last. I would like to make it perfectly clear,” said Mr. Allen, “that it seems to me amazing that such an issue could be seriously raised either as a recommendation or an objection to the appointment to such an important position as town clerk of a city of the importance of Belfast.

Sir Dawson Bates, Minister of Home Affairs on Saturday informed the “Big Six” Committee of Belfast Corporation that, .as requested by the Corporation, he had interviewed Mr, Allen and that nothing had emerged from the interview to alter his decision not to endorse Mr. Alley’s appointment. The “Big Six,” it is stated, have decided not to press further for the appointment, and Mr. John F. McKinstry, Acting Town Clerk who is due to retire next May, will again be asked to continue in office for an indefinite period.

Mr. ALLEN’S INTERVIEW. Mr. Allen, in an interview, said “I came over here at the direct, request of the Minister of Home Affairs. I had an interview with him, lasting 40 minutes, and it would have been a simple matter for him to have told me his decision. The first time I was over here, the first intimation I had of the appointment being refused was through the Press. This time the same thing has occurred. ‘’Since arriving on the second visit I have reason to believe that the religious question has been raised, and raised as a very serious issue. “It is incredible to me that such an issue could be raised as either, an objection or recommendation to an appointment such as Town Clark of a city as important as Belfast. One wonders what are the views of the thousands of Irishmen who fight for freedom.

“The position is that I and my family and ancestors for 250 years have been Church of England Protestants. The girl, who became my wife two years ago, after I had been widowed six years, is an English girl of Irish descent and a Catholic.

January 17th 1942. GREAT DERRYGONNELLY CEILIDHE. FR. McCAFFREY’S POWERFUL APPEAL FOR GAELIC CAUSE.A stirring appeal for support of the native games, dances and language and all things Gaelic, was made by Rev. D. McCaffrey, C.C., when on Sunday night he presented the Junior Football League Cup to the victors in the 1941 competition, Derrygonnelly Harps G.F.C., at a ceilidhe mhor organised by the club in St, Patrick’s Hall, Derrygonnelly. There was an attendance of over 400 at the ceilidhe, which was the first organised in the district for many years. The extraordinary success of the event ensures that for the future ceilidhthe will be a prominent feature of Derrygonnelly social events. Enniskillen and Cavanacross between them, alone sent nearly a hundred patrons, while travelling accommodation prevented nearly fifty more from attending also.

It was a great Irish night. Mr. Jim Sheridan, popular M.C., from Cavanacross, had a comparatively easy task in dealing with a fine programme and an orderly and happy crowd. The St. Molaise Ceilidhe Band, Enniskillen, added further lustre to its name by providing splendid music under the direction of Rev. Bro. Bede, its conductor. An excellent supper was supplied by a hard-working ladies’ committee, and contributors to a most enjoyable selection of songs, dances, etc., were: Misses Maisie Lunny, P.E.T., Eileen Early, Kathleen and May Burns, Margaret McGlone and  — Duffy, Monea; Messrs. Sean O’Boyle, J. Sheridan and J. Quinn.

Although Irish dancing has not been done in the district for some years, the performance of the dances was excellent, the Enniskillen and Cavanacross Gaels leading their Derrygonnelly friends through the various movements. Happy faces were everywhere, and as the popular chairman of the club (Mr. J. J. Maguire) remarked aptly: “at no other event could there be seen so many happy Irish faces.” Those present in addition to others mentioned were Father Duffy, Derrygonnelly; Misses Vera Tummon, P.E.T.; May, McCaffrey, teaching staff, . Convent of Mercy, Messrs. Seamus O’Ceallaigh, Secretary, Co. Board; G. McGee, M.P. S.I.  Parties were present from Belleek and Irvinestown, as well as other places mentioned.

Mr. Maguire, presiding, expressed regret at the unavoidable absence of Very Rev. T. Maguire, P.P., who was to have presented the cup. Father Maguire was the best Gael in Fermanagh, and they were sorry not to have him with them, especially as he was a native of the parish. They had a good substitute in their own beloved curate, Father McCaffrey. (Applause). He thanked all the patrons, and said it was a revelation to them in Derrygonnelly to see the pulling power of a ceilidhe. It was a lesson they were not likely to forget for the future. (Applause). He hoped 1942 would be an even more successful year for their club than 1941, and that they would retain the cup they had and add further trophies to their collection He hoped, too, that ceilidhthe would form their social entertainments for the future. (Applause). The only game they had lost during the year was to Derrylin in the Junior Championship final. Victory in that would have meant that they had won the two junior cups, but they very heartily congratulated Derrylin on their victory and wished them all success in the future. He thanked, everyone connected with the success of the night: the ladies, for their catering and the excellent band from Enniskillen.

FERMANAGH TEACHER SUED. PUPIL LOST EYE AT PLAY. CLAIM FOR DAMAGES. HEARING IN HIGH COURT. A claim brought by a 13 year-old pupil against the principal teacher of a Border school came before the Lord Chief Justice in the Belfast King’s Bench Division last week. The plaintiff, Patrick Anthony Leonard, a minor by his father, John Patrick Leonard, of Creenagho, Belcoo, claimed damages far ,the loss of his right eye alleging negligence on the part of James Ferguson, a public elementary teacher, of Belcoo, in not exercising proper supervision. The boy when playing on the road during the midday break was struck by a stone.

Mr. C. L. Sheil (instructed by Mr. Jas. Cooper) was for the plaintiff; Mr. J. D. Chambers, K.C., and Mr, J. Agnew (instructed by Messrs. Maguire & Herbert) being for the defendant.

Mr. Sheil said the accident took place during the lunch hour on March 23, 1939. The school was the last building on the border dividing Fermanagh from Cavan. The school was staffed by the defendant and two women teachers. On the day in question there were about 70 pupils at the school. Those who lived in Belcoo village or nearby got home for their lunch and about 30 children brought their lunch with them.

Mont of the playground or field had been used for instruction in horticulture by the master, and as part of it not tilled was wet the children played on the public road to the knowledge of the principal teacher.

Counsel added that one of the complaints was that the children were so allowed to play on the public road without any person being in charge of them. The children were playing football, and it is alleged that one of them lifted a handful of road material and threw it at the plaintiff,; who was struck on the right eye. The boy was attended by Dr. Hamilton and sent to Hospital. He was later taken to Belfast where the eye was removed. He submitted that the defendant should have foreseen the danger of letting the boys play on the road because of the traffic and the presence of loose road material. Under the Education Act there was cast on the defendant the statutory duty of exercising care over the children and supervision during the luncheon hour. Defendant, counsel asserted, had interviewed some of the boys, dictated to the children, and they wrote down statements. One boy would say that he was sent for by the master, who asked him to say that he (the defendant) was in fact on the road at the time of the accident.  Plaintiff gave evidence, and in reply to Mr Chambers agreed that he sometimes played on the roads at his home but not with the sanction of his parents. Sometimes the master told them not to go on the roads. Answering his Lordship, the plaintiff , said the master had told them not to be out on the road on certain days.

James McGurl, aged 16 years, said the boys used to play on the road. They were forbidden to be on the road on fair days but not on other days. The following day the master spoke to him and …………….

“IMPARTIALITY ” SERIOUSLY QUERIED. To the Editor Fermanagh Herald. ”Sir, Some of your readers who are unacquainted with the Impartial Reporters peculiar principles of impartiality, may have been misled by one of its “impartial” statements, published last week; will you, therefore allow me a few words on the subject. An article in that journal commenting on Regional Education Committee matters, concluded thus “Strange, when Mr. Hanna was appointed Principal, Captain Wray voted against him, favouring a candidate in the same line but with qualifications inferior to those of Mr. Hanna. Under the sharp pangs of remorse for having failed to favour the “Impartial Reporter’s” “highly qualified. candidate, I can just barely recall, as feeble consolation that my iniquity  on that occasion was shared by several other Corrupt nit-wits of the Committee, a few citizens with rank and title to their names – spiritual and temporal. The “Impartial Reporters” ‘‘highly qualified” candidate was, of course, championed by our well- known stalwarts of public rectitude.

The poor mutt, with the ‘‘inferior qualifications” for whom I voted had only a lot of silly stuff as certificates, one of which was from a comic naval dockyard named Chatham and, incidentally, he was only the son of a common British Naval Officer —’how ridiculously absurd to associate our Technical School, or sully its academic air, with such unqualified and inferior persons and places. Needless to add, that fellow with the “inferior qualifications” was not a Presbyterian, he was only just a Protestant, the poor devil could hardly have been more unqualified, I suppose, according to the “Impartial Reporter” unless he were a b…….. Papist.

I am Sir etc. J. P. Wray 27-1-1942.

January 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

Pettigo News. Fermanagh Herald. 17th January 1942. The death has occurred after a short illness, at her residence, Tievemore, Pettigo, of Miss Elizabeth Reid. There was a large attendance at the funeral.

On Saturday R.U.C. from Tullyhommon, Pettigo, made a search of a number of farm houses in the Cloghore and Camplagh districts along the Lettercran border, and seized a quantity of flour and bread. They also seized a quantity of sugar in bags, which had been smuggled from Donegal.

Blacklion District news. 17th January 1942. The wedding took place at Killinagh Protestant Church of Sergeant Alfred Brady R. I. F. Dungannon, a native of Florencecourt, and Miss Elizabeth Sheridan, Gola, Blacklion. Mr. George Sheridan, cousin of the bride, was best man, Miss Annie Sheridan, sister of the bride, was bridesmaid. Rev. Mr. Coleman, B. A. performed the ceremony.

There was a 90% attendance at meetings of the L.D.F. at Blacklion, Glenfarne, Barran and Glangevlin Groups during the week. At a meeting of the Locality Security Force arrangements for extending night patrols were made.

During the week 160 men started to work under the minor relief scheme in the different parts of the area.

When returning from milking cows at Drumcow, Mrs Leonard, Belcoo, fell from a foot style and had her leg broken. She was removed to Enniskillen Hospital.

FINTONA. Butter jumps 1s 7d per lb.; pork 23 carcasses; young pigs 85s to 95s each, potatoes 6s to 7s 4d per cwt.

CASTLEDERG. Pork, 40 carcases; young pigs 65s to 80s each; chickens 4s 6d to 6s 6d, hens 3s 6d to 5s 6d, ducks 3s to3s 6d each; potatoes 7s to 8s per cwt retail.

24th January 1942. CAR ON CONCESSION ROADS. QUESTION OF LIGHTS NOT “ BLACKED-OUT ” A point affecting thousands of motorists who use the Clones-Gavan Concession Road, was raised at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions, before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., when Patrick McEntee, Clonfad, Newtownbutler, was summoned on three counts for not having the lights on his motor car properly blacked-out.

Mr. J. B. Murphy, solicitor, who appeared for defendant, said the case raised the point of black-out on the Concession- Road, on which defendant resided. The road was in and out of Monaghan and Fermanagh at points. Cars in Monaghan could use undimmed lights while the Six-County cars must be blacked-out. District Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, said defendant’s car was found in the Six Counties. Mr. Murphy — Any person using that road could be stopped in the Six Counties. Major Dickie—I am afraid they could. The real trouble is that Six-County “cars meeting headlights are helpless. Major Dickie said he thought it was a very proper case to be brought, to- see what would be done. Constable W. H. Walker—I brought it for that purpose. Mr. Murphy —‘What is Mr. McEntee to do in future? ‘ Major Dickie – That is the trouble with, all of us. I would suggest he should have a dipping headlight and drive with one headlamp dipped. I think if the defendant and all other Free State drivers used that form of light on the Concession Road there would be no objection by the police. Mr. Murphy asked to have the Probation of Offenders Act applied with costs, and said they in Monaghan would dip their lights. The Probation Act was applied.

24th January 1942. POPULAR ENNISKILLEN WEDDING. MAGUIRE — SMYTH. A pretty and popular wedding was solemnised in St. Michael’s, Church, Enniskillen, on Wednesday morning of last week, the contacting parties being Mr. Peter M. Maguire, the well-known Gael and secretary of Enniskillen Gaels G.A.A. club for the past 15 years and Miss Margaret (Gretta) Smyth, Wellington,, secretary of the Fermanagh County Camogie Board. The best man was Mr. James Donnelly, and the bride was attended by her sister, Miss Mary T. (‘Dot’) Smyth, P.E.T.

The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev. E. Rhatigan, C.C., Terenure, Dublin, cousin of the groom, assisted by Ven. Archdeacon Gannon, P.P., Enniskillen. The reception in the Railway Hotel, Enniskillen, was attended by a large number of relatives and friends of the happy couple. Father Rhatigan presided, and those present included Rev. Father Vincent, C. P., the Graan. The honeymoon is being spent in the South and West of Ireland.

24th January 1942. CALL FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION ON WIDER BASIS. Mr. J. J. Coalter, J.P., urged Fermanagh Regional Education Committee to appeal to the Government to place secondary education on the same basis as primary education so that all might be able to obtain the higher standard of education without extra cost. Mr. Coalter said the time had arisen when they should press upon the Government the absolute necessity of providing the same facilities for secondary as for primary education. Secondary education was not available to all pupils. It was lack of a proper secondary education that had caused the dearth of properly trained young men that were now wanted by the country in time of war. It was impossible for the ordinary man, after providing the necessities of life for children, such as food and clothing, to provide a proper secondary education.

24th January 1942. LEITRIM LADY’S DEATH IN WICKLOW. Mrs. Alice Clancy, proprietress, Grand Hotel, Wicklow, who died, was a native of Manorhamilton and was widow of Mr. Patrick Clancy, Kiltyclogher, Co. Leitrim. Formerly of the Bellevue Hotel, Dun Laoghaire, she took over the Grand Hotel, Wicklow, in 1918. She was sister of Sister Mary Therese, O.P., and Sister Mary Patrick, Holy Faith Order, both in South Africa, and mother of Mr. Joseph Clancy, who has been managing the Grand Hotel for some years; Rev. R. Clancy, C.C., Donabate, and of the late Rev. Berchmans Clancy, O Cist., Mount Melleray.

24th January 1942. DROVE WITHOUT LICENCE. John P. Brannigan, 6, Henry Street, Enniskillen, was fined 20s at Enniskillen Petty Sessions for driving a motor lorry without a licence.

January 10th 1942. RAILWAY LINE CLOSED. LAST RUN IN THE CLOGHER VALLEY. The close of the old year coincides with the passing of the Clogher Valley Railway, which has served the district for 65 years and was closed down on Wednesday of last week in accordance with an Order of the Ministry of Home Affairs. To mark the occasion members of the office and locomotive staffs with a number of local folk took a joy ride on the last train from Aughnacloy to Fivemiletown and back, the arrival home at Aughnacloy being signalled by the hooting of the engine whistle. Competition was keen as to who would have the honour of punching the last ticket issued and this distinction was credited to Dr. Gillespie of Tynan.

Some 70 employees are affected by the closing of the line, but most of them, will receive compensation on a varying scale. Although: no trains are now running the head office staff at Aughnacloy carry on as usual and will continue to do so for the present as a lot of clearing up work has to be attended to before the liquidator proceeds with the dispersal of the property.

The Ministry’s cattle grading centers at Aughnacloy, Clogher, and Fivemiletown will be carried on at the railway premises as usual, the Clogher Rural Council having made arrangements for the use of the railway weighbridges for the purpose.

It is interesting to note that the first ticket issued on the railway is retained by Mr. W. D. Graham, solicitor, Fivemiletown, having been purchased by his father, the late Mr. D. Graham, on the first run 56 years ago.

January 10th 1942. MANOR HAMILTON NEWS. Roses in Bloom. — Roses in bloom are to be seen in Mr. M. O’Donnell’s garden at Boleyhill.

L.D.F. District Command Dance. — The L.D.F. District Command Dance held on Sunday night was well patronised.

January 10th 1942. ROSLEA POTEEN CHARGE. BARREL OF WASH FOUND. JAIL SENTENCE. At Roslea Petty Sessions on Friday before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., Thomas Beagan, farmer, Tonnaghaboy, Roslea, was sentenced to two months’ imprisonment without hard labour when he pleaded guilty to having 20 gallons of wash in his possession, on Dec. 6th. A further charge of having a bottle in his possession containing a few drops of poteen was dismissed without prejudice. Defendant was not professionally represented. In reply to District-Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, Sergt. Ryder, R.U.C., Fivemiletown, stated that while accompanied by Sergt. C. E. Williams, Roslea, he assisted in searching the house of defendant. In the sitting-room he found two empty 141b. tins which had contained syrup. He then went to a hayshed and with the assistance of a graip he found a barrel in the hay which contained 20 gallons of ‘wash’. The wash had matured and was ready for running. Witness heard Beagan saying it was his wash. Defendant then informed the court he admitted having the wash.

Sergt. Williams deposed to finding a large bottle which smelled strongly of poteen. When questioned about the bottle defendant stated it had been left there by a girl called Lena Murphy. In fairness to defendant he would like to say he tested that statement and found there had been a bottle left there some days previously. When questioned about the wash defendant said it was his. When asked to account for the syrup defendant’s wife said it was used for making cakes. Later after the barrel was found defendant admitted the syrup was used for making the wash. Witness destroyed the wash and kept a sample. Defendant (told the court he admitted the wash but not the poteen. In reply to his Worship, the District Inspector said there were no previous convictions. In imposing the sentence stated Major Dickie said he would not impose hard Labour, although actually he believed it made no difference. Defendant was then removed in custody.

BLACKLION NEWS. In accordance with custom, groups of ‘Wren Boys’ travelled the district in the days prior to New Year’s Day.

The annual Xmas Tree was given in the Blacklion School by Mrs and the Rev. Mr Coleman on Wednesday night. A big number of children were entertained.

A dance in aid of funds for the new band was held in the MacNean Hall, Belcoo, on New Year’s Night. The spacious Hall was packed. The music was by the Sunny Melody Band.

A special meeting of the Group Staff of the Local Security Force was held in Blacklion on Friday night. Group Leader Wynn presided. Sergt Rock and D. S. O. Maguire, N. T. were in attendance. A letter from the Minister for Justice was read, thanking the group for their services for the past year. The question of the formation of a branch of the Red Cross was discussed and it was decided to assist in forming a branch as soon as possible. The appointment of Mr. John Jas. Grane as Section Leader was sanctioned. Mr Michael Foley was appointed Asst. Section Leader. An Intelligence Officer was also appointed.

PETTIGO NEWS. The poor in Pettigo village were provided with food, clothing and fuel by a number of charitable gentlemen and ladies in the vicinity during the Christmas season. The donors include: – Guard J. Treanor and Mrs Treanor, Mr. James Gallagher, Postmaster, Mr Michael Fullerton, Customs and Excise, Mr and Mrs Thos. Bradley, Sic-Co., Customs and Mrs Dora Wrenn, C.M.B.

On Tuesday night of last week Lettercran B. Group of the L. S. F. under Squad Leader T. Haughey assembled at the local hall and underwent instruction in squad drill.

On Thursday night of last week a very enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Parochial Hall, Agheyarron, (sic) the proceeds being in aid of Parochial Funds. The music was supplied by Messrs Eddie McHugh, Corgary, and Edward Lynch, Mullinabreen. Mr. James Neill McNally was M. C.

On Wednesday night of last week a dance was held in Letter Hall, Pettigo, the proceeds being in aid of charity. The music was provided by the Trio Dance Band. Mr. William H. Marshall, Skea, was M. C.

The Famine 1847. Ballyshannon Herald.

1847. The issue of January 1st records a classic tale that ought to be filmed for it has all the ingredients of high drama or perhaps more accurately melodrama. On Christmas Eve a schooner lay just inside the Bar at Ballyshannon. The Bar is a high sandy ridge four miles down river from Ballyshannon that constantly threatens to block the exit of the Erne to the sea and the schooner was sheltering here waiting on a favourable wind. The ship was bound for Liverpool later with bacon and lard and had been charted by Mr. Edward Chism of Ballyshannon (Food was constantly being exported from Ireland during the famine). After a time a boat owned by Mr. Wade pulled alongside the vessel and men who claimed that they were from the saltworks at Ballyshannon asked to come aboard to light their pipes. (The real salt workers would have had to row outside the bar (sandbar) of Ballyshannon estuary) to the open sea to get saltwater which was then evaporated at Portnason, Ballyshannon, to get the salt for preserving the fish and meat exports from the area). Several men came on board and then produced guns, overcame the captain and crew and took a large quantity of bacon and lard from the ship. This is the Irish famine equivalent of Bob Cratchet’s Christmas turkey, especially when (as it turned out later that) it was hogsheads of ham and bacon that were on board. Many a starving household must have had an unexpectedly happy Christmas as a result of this piece of local piracy. By Christmas day the police recovered some of the booty buried in the nearby sand dunes and the soldiers were out combing the area. Three were arrested. Scarce a night passes by without a robbery in town or the vicinity, the paper reports.

1847.January 8th. There is great distress in the area. One man died after just being admitted to the Ballyshannon Workhouse. People won’t come in for aid until the last moment. The dead from the famine are not being buried properly in the Abbey graveyard in Ballyshannon as the graveyard has not deep enough soil. A man on his way from Ballyshannon to Donegal heard the sound of lamentation from a house along the way. Going into the house he found a girl of about sixteen dying and her parents trying to keep her warm. He gave money for food, etc., in the tradition of the good Samaritan, but the girl died in a short time.

January 22nd reported that Colonel Conolly and his family were staying at Cliff for the winter in order to give aid to their tenantry and a terrible increase of poverty, sickness and death was recorded by the paper. Unfortunately and damningly for the paper the above words were all they reported. It says volumes for their social attitude and incomprehension of the situation that they could write: “The details are too horrid to be published.” From Fermanagh the paper reports the action of the Rev. Grey Porter, whose principal estate was at Lisbellaw and who had brought in 150 tons of Indian meal at Derry per the ship Peru. He had bought in the grain at £10-10s-6d per ton and was going to sell it to his tenants at cost price which he hoped would be less than £12 per ton. This compared with £24-10-0 for Indian meal or £30 for oaten meal at market prices. Robberies for money, cattle or arms are a nightly occurrence.

On February 19th the Ballyshannon Herald published a very long letter from John Hamilton of St. Ernan’s near Donegal Town. This man was estate agent for the Conolly Estate around Ballyshannon and possibly for the Leslie Estate of Pettigo and other estates as well. In his own way he seems a man sensitive to the situation and practical for the future, although badly lacking in short term solutions. He seeks to combat apathy and fatalism in the tenantry which is admirable, if the person has the energy to look some distance ahead, but useless if starvation is a matter of days away.

John Hamilton begins by asking everyone to work hard in order to hold on to their tenancies. “Stir yourself and be doing. Drain a rood of ground and dig it eighteen inches deep and you will be paid for it if it done right and get many years to repay this money” (not a generous bargain and in the same vein) “seed will be provided and can be paid for later. Sow corn and not potatoes in rows nine inches apart and the seed two inches apart. This requires two stone of seed and repays 200 stone if the !and is well dug or well ploughed and is dry”. Tenants will be allowed to burn as much as they like and he (John Hamilton) will say nothing for this season (burning the dried sods of the land gave a short term fertility but was ultimately ruinous and absolutely forbidden normally). Tenants were urged to burn as much as they liked on black land i.e., bog land and to cart it to other ground to grow turnips. Sow “pease” (sic) and barley and field and garden beans (and mangle wozzels. Come to him for help. Uncommon work is required and he will not help anyone who holds land but will not work it. He, Hamilton, works hard himself and expects others to do likewise.

In the same issue Colonel Conolly has imported 500 tons of rice and one ton has been sent to the Bundoran schools and two to the Ballyshannon Relief Committee. The columns were illuminated by a row between the Vicar of Drumholm Mr. M. G. Fenwick and a local land agent. Alexander Hamilton, on the question of who should be allowed to get a place on the Relief Works. Should a man who has paid his rent get on the Relief? — if he is able to pay his rent does he need relief work? (as long as you managed the rent you could do what you liked afterwards and if you hadn’t the rent you could work until you could pay the rent — either way the rent was sacrosanct and Catch 22 was born long before Joseph Heller).

From now until April the Famine cannot squeeze into the Ballyshannon Herald and on March 12th we are informed that Fermanagh is improving and that petty thefts and slaughter of cattle had completely ceased, according to the Erne Packet. The reporting of the Donegal Assizes on March 12th at Lifford hints at what the newspaper doesn’t report. Bartley Loughlin, a former bailiff to Mr. H. Coane of Waterloo Cottage, Higginstown, Ballyshannon was alleged to have sent a threatening letter to Mrs. H. Coane saying that their family would be blown up with gunpowder for their oppression of the tenantry. Laughlin had been bailiff for Coane for fifteen years and his handwriting was familiar to his former master. In his capacity as bailiff Laughlin had been ordered to serve notice to quit on thirty tenants and ordered to distrain those persons who had not paid — as far as the landlord was concerned it would not be hard to seize fodder in lieu of rent. For inability or unwillingness to carry this out Bartley Loughlin was sacked. Councillor Doherty defended the ex-­bailiff and demolished the case by asking if Laughlin’s handwriting was so well known to Coane then why would he be so stupid as to write the letter in his own hand? A not-guilty verdict was returned. In the next case a John Donald got seven years’ transportation for stealing sheep from Michael Ward, but a woman, Rebecca Brack, (Brock?) was found not guilty of exposing a child to die at Finner, near Ballyshannon.

1847.In an echo of the Christmas Eve piracy in the Erne Estuary, James Currie, was accused of receiving a ham knowing it to be stolen. The ship’s name is now given as The Confidence and its Master as Joseph Davidson. The ship had been boarded by two boat’s crews and nine bales of bacon and hogsheads of ham had been stolen. Sub-Constable Davis arrested Currie walking through Ballyshannon on Christmas day carrying a ham. Currie said that he had found it in a hole in the ground among the sand dunes. He was found guilty with a recommendation for mercy and got nine months hard labour.

At Fermanagh Assizes at this time Daniel Nealy was convicted of stealing valuable property, plate, etc., from J. C. Bloomfield at Castle Caldwell. He was sentenced to seven years’ transportation. For a similar crime in the same area, the breaking into the house of Launcelot Corcoran near Castle Caldwell on the previous December 27th the following were tried:- James Mulrean, Maurice Connor, Peter Gallagher, Francis Gallagher, Maurice Lannon, William Lannon, George W. O’Connor and Edward Muldoon. All were found guilty and sentenced to fourteen years’ transportation except the last four, who got seven years’ transportation.

The March 26th issue details a brutal occurrence in the Pettigo area which happened on March 23rd. George Allingham with one Patterson and “the notorious Melanefy, the bailiff” came to the house of John McCrea of Clonaweel. Their purpose seemed to be to execute on order upon the person of John McCrea who wasn’t present. Only his two sons were there and after some persuasion they managed to get the three intruders out of the house. They seemed rather inebriated and threatened the sons and finally Melanefy fired at young Edward McCrea “wounding him dreadfully” in the head. Melanefy has run off and the countryside is now in pursuit!

By 2nd April, 1847 things have got so bad in the area as to force its attention upon this blinkered newspaper. It reports that the poor house is crowded to excess and fever and dysentery are spreading alarmingly. “Deaths are frightfully numerous. A fever hospital is urgently needed and its building would give employment to the poor.”

  1. April 23rd:- Captain Fortescue has arrived to take charge of the Commissariat Department, i.e., to give out food for the starving. A vessel with breadstuffs for this town and Enniskillen is waiting for a fair wind to get into port. It is hoped that she will get in today as the people discharged from the workhouse are in great distress. There is plenty of food coming in from America, but it is still at famine prices. Captain Lang is to superintend the public charities. Arrangements are in hand to setup a public soup kitchen to the plan of Mr. Sayer (but the paper notes with unaccustomed concern). “We fear it will not answer the purpose.”

Between Garrison, Derrygonnelly and Holywell many hundreds of acres wilt be left without crops because of the utter poverty of the people. Farmers and graziers cattle are being stolen nightly.

April 30th: There is a great fever sweeping Fermanagh especially in the country districts and arising largely from those who have left (or been sent out) of the workhouse and had now gone home and infected their friends who had generously but fatally taken them in.

  1. May 7th: Reports the hanging of Samuel Crumrner at Lifford. He was hanged for the murder of his father. His wife had also been sentenced for the same crime, but the sentence was commuted to transportation for life. It was the first hanging in Donegal for fourteen or fifteen years and about a thousand people came to watch. On the scaffold Crummer said (the name was not printed) swore his life away for small money in these times. He was a big man of 6’-2” and he said goodbye to his wife and children from the scaffold, although they were not present, before he was launched into eternity.

The steamship Albert under Commander Geary arrived in Ballyshannon with breadstuffs. It also towed in two ships which had been waiting outside the Bar for a favourable wind. The Albert is 147ft long, 42 feet wide, can carry 600 tons and has a capacity of 200 horse power. Many people have been shown over this ship.

On May 14th it is reported that the deaths around Clones, Co. Monaghan, are “inconceivably great”. In Enniskillen the poor and starving rushed the Board of Guardians meeting and all had to be admitted. Colonel Conolly has given his tenants eight tons of rice this week free plus free turnip seed. John and William Tredennick (local landowners between Ballyshannon and Belleek) are reducing their rents by 40% to 50%.

1847.May 21st reports the melancholy death of Captain Drake of the 92nd Regiment and a young local man, Henry Lipsett of Ballyshannon, who were drowned when their sailing boat was upset in the estuary.

Hundreds of the poor are being provided for by the Johnstons of Magheramena Castle near Belleek and their rents are reduced also.

There is great fever in Fermanagh and the well known Dr. Collum has recently succumbed. “God knows who will be next sacrificed on the altar of pestilence and death”. This last item is reprinted taken from the pages of the Erne Packet.

  1. May 28th: reports great fever in the locality of Ballyshannon and all classes were affected. People are warned not to feed beggars at their own door, especially strange ones. Heaps of manure must be removed from thoroughfares, lanes and alleyways as otherwise the Committee of the Ballyshannon Board of Guardians will cause them to be removed and prosecute the offenders. This is signed by M. Davis J.P., chairman.

In the June 11th issue the fever has greatly moderated and not a single death has been reported last week. There is a huge plague of snails affecting crops and people are advised to gather them as they are very suitable for feeding pigs.

June 18th: issue contains a very indignant letter protesting about a pauper with fever lying on Ballyshannon Bridge since Sunday last. The Board of Health should have put him in a lodging house and had a doctor visit him. Only one death has been reported in the past three weeks and that was of Matthew Donohue, an inoffensive, industrious man who kept a public house in Main St., Ballyshannon. There are very good prospects for the harvest. Enniskillen jail is said to be the most crowded in the kingdom.

At the Donegal Petty sessions reported on June 25th a little boy pleaded guilty to stealing a few ship’s biscuits from Messrs Bradshaw of Donegal Town. He was given six months’ jail. He cried as he was led away. Mary Ward got two months jail for stealing two hens.

Sept. 17th: reports that no rot can be seen in the potatoes and that a great fever rages about Enniskillen. The news from Fermanagh continues in the Oct 1st newspaper as it reports on the dissolution of Lowtherstown (Irvinestown) Poor Law Union. The immediate cause was the raising of the salary of the R.C. Chaplain to the Workhouse. In the row that followed the Protestant Chaplain’s salary was raised. Further rows caused the dismissal of the master of the workhouse and finally the Board of Guardians themselves were dismissed! This is the newspaper version of the dissolution of Lowtherstown P.L.U., but in fact there were much more grievous reasons why this

Union was taken over by a Government appointed Commissioner. The Guardians failed to levy anywhere near sufficient funds to support the poor and starving of the locality, thus causing the effects of the Famine to be even worse than need have been and the Workhouse which they were in charge of was very badly run. An inspector who visited Lowtherstown Workhouse wrote that he found people half naked dying in their own vomit and excrement, lying on the floor. He said that Lowtherstown was the worst workhouse that he ever visited. (See Parliamentary Papers: Irish Famine).

October 15th: reported the dissolution of Ballyshannon P.L.U. Commissioners and the appointment of a new government inspector. November 19th sees a letter saying that the people of the country are living on turnips and nothing else. The Gentlemen of the country must unite to stave off famine as they did last year.

The final note of 1847 reports the death of Mr. William Hassard of Garden Hill near Belcoo in Fermanagh. He was shot in the leg and died later. Suspicion pointed to one Creagh, (probably a Mc Grath from the Irish rendering of the name Mc Creigh) but there was insufficient evidence. Creagh’s father had been jailed by Hassard for non-payment of arrears of rent and had died in jail. (This is the type of indirect evidence of the Famine and its effects which makes one wish that this paper had made any decent attempt to write about the momentous events it was living through).

FERMANAGH HERALD. SAT., NOV. 9, JOTTINGS

  1. FERMANAGH HERALD. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, JOTTINGS

THE FATHER O’FLANAGAN FUND. THE hosts of admirers of the Rev. Father Michael O’Flanagan, not only in North Roscommon but throughout the whole, of Ireland, are anxious to inaugurate a Fund to mark in some small degree the feelings they entertain for his fearless work in Ireland’s Cause. With this object in View they respectfully solicit subscriptions, which will be duly acknowledged in the columns of the Press from time to time. Subscriptions can be sent to the Treasurers of the Fund in Crossna, namely Mr. Edward Doyle, Chairman of Boyle No. 1 .Council, Crossna (Co. Roscommon) and Mr. Patrick Kerins, Knockvicar, Boyle.

SHAUN MCDERMOTT’S. F. C. STOP-WATCH COMPETITION, 2 minutes to 10. At Arney Gaelic Hall, Sunday Evening, 3rd THE WINNER: MISS BONNIE WARD, CO. MONAGHAN.

ENNISKILLEN TECHNICAL SCHOOL, (TOWN HALL). IRISH FOR NATIONAL TEACHERS. THIS Class will reopen on SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, at 1.15 p.m. JOHN W. MANSFIELD, Principal.

DEATH. KELLY- October 30, 1918, at St. Vincent’s Hospital, Dublin, Anna Teresa, third daughter of William and Susan Kelly, The Hotel, Belcoo. Age, 22 years. R. I. P. At a rehearsal of the Blacklion Dramatic Club a resolution was passed in silence on the motion of Miss M. Maguire, seconded by Miss A. Dolan tendering the sincere sympathy of the members to Mr. and Mrs Kelly, Belcoo on the loss sustained by them in the death of their beloved daughter Miss Anna Kelly, and as a mark of respect to the memory of the deceased all the rehearsals for the week were adjourned.

John Small, C. C. Belturbet, for cutting the tyres of bicycles belonging to P. Callaghan, Knockaraven, Co., Fermanagh, and Jas McDonald, Milltown on the night of the East Cavan election result was traduced for £3 and £8 in the respective cases at the Cavan Quarter Sessions. Defendant, who did not appear, was with the Sinn Fein crowd said the plaintiff Callaghan.

Manorhamilton Electric Light Co. has increased the charge for light from 6d to 9d per unit.

At the meeting of workers in Enniskillen on Saturday week a resolution was passed urging shop assistants to join the National Union.

The licensed vintners of Enniskillen are taking steps to have the hours of closing in the afternoon altered, especially on fair and market days.

Mr. W, J. Brown, J.P., presided at a meeting of the Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday. The business was purely routine.

At the meeting of Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday, Mr. W. J. Brown, J.P., said that vaccination was a humbug and fraud.

The medical officer of Lisnaskea Guardians reported that six cases of influenza, three of them exhibiting serious pulmonary complications, were admitted to hospital daring the last week. (The ‘Spanish Flu’ which killed about 50 million people around the world at this time including populations in the Pacific Islands including my grandmother at the age of 28.)

The Earl of Belmore, Mr, J. Crosier, J.P., and Mr. J. P. Gillin, Fermanagh County Council, have been surcharged in £50 expended in connection with Fox’s Ferry, Upper Lough Erne. An appeal has been lodged against the surcharge.

Several new members have joined the Derrygonnelly branch of the National Amalgamated Union of Labour, and it is stated that labour candidates will go forward at the next local government elections.

In the course of his quarterly Report to the Fermanagh County Council, Mr. J. P. Burkitt, county surveyor, paid a tribute to the work of Mr. Finnegan, assistant county surveyor, who, he said, carried out his duties in an admirable manner.

A special meeting of the Enniskillen Urban Council will be held on Friday night to co-opt a member and to consider an application from the National Amalgamated Union of Labour asking for an increase for the employees who were members of the Union.

The “flu” is fairly prevalent in Enniskillen and district, but there are signs that the epidemic is abating. Several schools have been closed including Portora Royal School, where a number of the students contracted the disease.

At Enniskillen Quarter, Sessions C.E.R.A. Irvine, solicitor, sued W. J. Browne, J.P., auctioneer, Kinawley, to recover £17 for-costs incurred on defendant’s behalf. Mr. Irvine appeared in person and Mr. Clarke (Messrs. Clarke and Gordon) for the defendant. The case was dismissed,

MR, ARCHDALE, M, P. AND LABOURERS’ UNION. At the quarterly meeting of the Fermanagh Co. Council on Thursday, Mr. John McHugh (Pettigo) presiding, a letter was read from Mr. M. Donnelly, Derry, National Amalgamated Union of Labour, applying for an increase of wages on behalf of the members of the Union who were in the Council’s employment as surfacemen, attendants to steamrollers and other works in connection with road maintenance.

Mr. Archdale, M.P. — I think the National Amalgamated Union of Labour is going to destroy the labourers of this country. It will upset them and put them out of work. It is of no help to the labourers. Lord Belmore — What are their present wages?

The Co, Surveyor said that the drivers were paid £2 or 35s: the attendants, 24s; surfacemen from £l to 25s. He believed that none of the men should be paid any less than 22s 6d per week. Mr. Archdale —  None of them are paid less than that fixed by the Wages Board?

Co. Surveyor — I don’t think so. We have very few men who are constantly employed. The application was referred to the Roads and Quarries Committee.

ENNISKILLEN MILLING SOCIETY. The Committee of the Enniskillen Milling Society had under consideration at their last meeting, the question of erecting a new patent kiln in their new mill. It appears that a Belfast firm have arranged to make kilns of the new pattern known as “air drying which dries the grain before milling at the rate of about one ton per hour without any labour whatsoever, thereby saving the very expensive operation of turning the dried grain as it had to be done on the old kiln heads. It was decided to have this new invention established in their new mill.

DECEMBER 21, 1918. ENNISKILLEN WORKHOUSE ‘BURIALS.

DIGGING THE GRAVES. Assistant Clerk’s Report.

At the meeting of the Enniskillen, Guardians on Tuesday, Mr. Edmund Corrigan, vice-chairman, presiding, Mr. Joseph Ross, assistant clerk reported:—“Owing to the illness of the Master and Matron and the inmates who usually assist at burials, being laid up with influenza, I asked Mr. James Harvey to allow a couple of his men to open the, graves for two inmates in the Workhouse Cemetery on Friday last, who died three days previously, but these men were stopped at the work by Felix Cleary (who is at present under suspension), who went up to them. Two others (who are in the employment of Mr. Rutherford) were, got to bury one of the bodies, and the remains of the other man were buried in the new cemetery by Mr. Millar, who kindly undertook to nave a grave ready after a few hours’ notice. In connection with the above I paid a sum of 10s for having the work carried out, which I would ask the Board to refund me under the circumstances.”

Mr. Carson said it was very kind, of Mr. Ross, and it was a most blackguardly and disgraceful act of Cleary. Mr. W. Elliott (Greentown) said the Board must be in a powerful fix if they would tolerate such work. Mr. Ben Maguire suggested that they should consult their solicitor with the object of having proceedings taken. Mr. Cathcart said he had never thought before that the country around Enniskillen had gone to such a pitch.

The Chairman said there was no member of the Board or no man outside the Board who believed more than he did in the principle of a man being paid a living wage, but when it came to this — to try and leave corpses unburied — it was going too far for him. Mr. B. Maguire proposed that their solicitor be consulted with the view of having proceedings taken against Cleary. Mr. Cathcart thought the matter should be reported to the police authorities. Mr. Ross said a police sergeant was sent round with the coffin to the burial ground lest the men would be interfered with. No further action was taken in the matter.