First Garda in 1922.

I WONDER how many men are left in Donegal who joined the Garda in 1922, when the force was founded? And of the few there may be, how many did all their service in Donegal? I met one the other day who could answer affirmatively on both counts.

Patrick McInerney, now in retirement and living in Letterkenny, where he spent part of his service, belongs to O’Callaghan’s Bridge in Co. Clare. He joined the Garda at the formation of the force — he still recalls the day, 22nd May, 1922. His first station was Ballyshannon; a short sit, as it turned out. He moved in on 14th October and was on the transfer list by December 12th. Then it was a brief stint in Pettigo (where my picture was taken) and shortly it was on to Carrick, in 1923. He remained there until 1927 when he moved to Ballintra. Some years there, and the next posting was Letterkenny. Promotion came on transfer to Castlefin and Sergt. McInerney spent spells in Burnfoot and Quigley’s Point before going for his longest service, to Moville. Retiring in 1961, he continued to live on there for some years before coming back to Letterkenny, the home town of his wife, a member of the well-known McClay family of Oldtown, formerly a nurse in the then District Hospital.

Pat, a man with a vivid memory for places and people, could fill a book with reminiscences of his years as a policeman in Donegal, a county he came to love and where he was held in high regard wherever duty took him. He holds two medals of which he is very proud. First, his old I.R.A. medal then the plaque and medal presented at the jubilee celebrations in Dublin to mark the fiftieth year of the existence of the force. This was awarded only to those who had served from the first year. There are few others in Donegal who hold these two much cherished mementos. In retirement, time does not hang heavily on him; when the opportunity is right and the weather inviting he does his daily spot of gardening.

There are seven in the family; a son, Father Matthew McInerney, is parish priest of St. Mary’s Church in Brighton, in the south of England. A keen angler, he manages a run home twice a year. At present he is busy with an extension to the church and a new presbytery is being built, a £100,000 project which entails a succession of fund-raising schemes. Another son is an Assistant County Engineer with the Co. Council.

Having seen service in so many places in Donegal, Pat knows it even better than his native Banner county and still recalls his days in the different stations and the firm friendships formed. He had no ambition to spend his retirement anywhere else.

 

Advertisements

October 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

10-10-1942. SIX-COUNTY DAIRY INDUSTRY. FARMERS’ RESENT MINISTRY’S ACTION. CLOSING OF CREAMERIES. “CHANGES HAD CREATED INDIGNATION ”

The Ministry would get far better and more successful results by acknowledging the education which the farmer had gained by experience, and consult him and secure his co-operation in their new schemes before touching them, said Mr. J. Johnston, secretary of the U.A.O.S., at the annual meeting of Creamery shareholders. Mr. Thos. McCaughey referred to the changes the Ministry was making in the dairying industry, not only in closing such a large number of creameries, but in upsetting the existing transport arrangements for milk suppliers. Milk will now have to be transported by lorry whereas previously 70 to 80 per cent of all the milk in Northern, Ireland was delivered by horse and cart.

Several suppliers present said they had notice from the Ministry to leave their milk at collection points over two miles from their house and away from the creamery, although, their house was only three-quarters of a mile from the creamery. It was unanimously agreed to leave, their milk at the point where they had always left it. Mr. J. Johnston, secretary, U.A.O.S., said the changes that were now being introduced into the industry by the Ministry had created a wave of indignation from farmers throughout the country. Inexperienced officials with little local knowledge of the country had marked out on a map the collection points where suppliers were to leave their milk and they had just heard some of the results. The same thing had happened all over the country.

It had been stated that farmers approved of the scheme because there had not been any protest, but the farmer has learned that if he dared to protest his milk would not be paid for. In his opinion the new transport arrangements to be carried out under the Ministry’s control would require a very large increase in the amount of petrol used, and would ultimately cost a great deal more. The petrol increase was a matter for the Petroleum Board, but the increased cost would have to be paid by the farmer.

With regard to the closing down of 60 creameries in Northern Ireland at 1st October, Mr. Johnston said, it had always been the view of the practical dairyman that the earlier in the morning the milk could be collected at the farm, and the nearer to the depot or creamery at which the milk was to be treated, the better the quality of the milk to be delivered to the consumer. They were told the whole scheme was intended to process the milk at present going to the creameries to make it suitable for the liquid milk market. By closing two-thirds of the creameries the distance to the creameries retained for treatment was greatly extended. The larger quantity to be treated took much more time, and the new system meant that milk would be collected from some points up to 3 o’clock and later.

10-10-1942. NO LICENCE FOR DANCE HALL. “EXCUSE ME ” DANCES A MENACE. Objections were made to the renewal of the licence for dances at Jamestown Hall by Sergeant John McGrath, Drumana, at Carrick-on-Shannon; District Court when the adjourned application of

Mr. John Gaffney, one of the trustees, came before the fortnightly (District Court) for the renewal of the licence.  Last year they got 12 dances and the hours were from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m. and the rows did not start until 1-30 or 2 a.m., and accordingly this year they wished to curtail the hours to 1 o’clock. Continuing the applicant said that the committee, tried to settle the row and keep the opposing parties separated but the crowd was so big it was impossible to handle them. There were dances held in August and September and there were no rows at them. He asked for 12 dances 8 p.m. to l a.m.

Sergeant John McGrath, Drumana, said that unless the Guards were present the parties in attendance came to blows, the committee took no action to prevent disorderly scenes and law abiding citizens had to pay for admission while the disorderly crowd were sent out free tickets. Witness said that he saw the free tickets himself being sent out to the disorderly crowd. Sergeant Gallagher said arguments developed in the hall and caused people to crowd around the hall. He had warned the committee not to have “excuse me” dances, as they cause trouble, and there was not a dance, on the occasion of the row, but was an “excuse me.” Mr Keane said that on the evidence of the Sergeant he had no hesitation in refusing the application. Had the hall been governed by a proper committee he would grant the application.

17-10-1942. “BRAINWAVE” SCHEME RETURNS TO AID RED CROSS. It was reported at the meeting of County Fermanagh Committee of Agriculture on Saturday that the amount of money raised in the .Six Counties for the month of August on behalf of the Red Cross. Agricultural Fund in the scheme initiated by Fermanagh of 1d in the £ on cattle passing through the grading centre was £1,111 8s 11d and for the month of July the total raised from the milk deductions (also suggested by Fermanagh) was £188 18s 0d.

Mr. H. A. Porter said he had meant the scheme to include pigs. Major W. O. Nixon (chairman) said the scheme had been satisfactory so far, but if they took the percentage of people that really subscribed to the fund it was very disappointing. Mr. J. N. Carson—It is not brought to their notice. If it is brought to their notice they pay at once.The Chairman said it was printed on the cards. Fermanagh had the highest percentage of any county in the North. Although the fund was doing well, it could do better. Mr. J. E. Fawcett, J.P., thought if it were printed in red ink on the cards it would emphasise it better. Chairman—I think the scheme was a brain-wave of the people on this Committee who suggested it.

17-10-1942. BISHOP MAGEEAN BLESSES NEW CHURCH. The Catholics of the pariah of Aghagallon, three miles from Lurgan, went to Mass in their new £20,000 church for the: first time on Sunday. On Thursday last the Bishop of the Diocese, Most Rev. Dr. Mageean, had solemnly blessed .and dedicated the building, but on Sunday he formally opened the new edifice! It was a day of celebration in the parish, and everywhere there were manifestations of joy, practically every Catholic house in the district displaying Papal flags. The front of the new building was decorated with streamers of Papal colours. Right Rev. Mgr. Dean O’Hagan, P.P., V.G., celebrated High Mass, and Rev. A. Ryan, D.Ph., D.D., preached. Very Rev. J. Connelly, P.P., thanked the subscribers

17-10-1942. KINAWLEY ROAD NEEDS REPAIRS. At Enniskillen Rural Council meeting Mr. J. R. Crawford moved that the Council repair the old road in Drumbinnis and Corracrawford between Kinawley and Florencecourt. Ten or eleven ratepayers he said had their farms alongside this road which was in a very bad condition. Mr. W, Kelly said he had been informed that it was impossible to use this road. One man had two carts broken on it within two months. The county surveyor (Capt. Charlton) said the road was not in as bad a condition as stated. However, financial provision had been made for it in the estimates. After further discussion it was decided to leave the matter in the hands of the County Surveyor.

17-10-1942. “TYRANNY OPERATING AGAINST MINORITIES’’ BRITISH M.P.s AND STORMONT. Two M.P. in the British House of Commons on Tuesday said that tyranny was operating against minorities in the Six Counties and that there was ’disgraceful discrimination” against Catholics. Mr. McGovern (I.L.P.), when the Prorogation of Parliament Bill was considered in Committee, moved the rejection of a clause dealing with the duration of the Northern Ireland House of Commons, and, urging an election there, said there was overwhelming opposition to the Northern Government taking dictatorial powers over Belfast City Council. Unionists have told me that the Government should be purged of certain elements and undergo a drastic change. “Three or four hundred people are interned there—some without charge or trial for over five years—-and many believe that they are prisoners because of malicious and political intolerance. Tyranny is operating against minorities I there.’’

Mr. Stokes (Lab.) said: “There is disgraceful discrimination against Catholics in Northern Ireland. When six young men were charged with shooting a Belfast policeman, the Government refused to have a single Catholic on the jury. That Government is not fit to carry on.” The amendment was rejected by 220 votes to 6, and after ,a further amendment by Sir Richard Ackland (Ind.) to prolong Parliament for six months instead of 12 had been rejected, the Bill was read a third time.

17-10-1942. LADY SEARCHER AT BALLYSHANNON. Customs searches on the Belleek border have been intensified. Train and bus passengers are all searched—a practice hitherto unknown in that area. A lady searcher has been appointed in Ballyshannon and she was on duty for the first time last week at all the trains. On Saturday evening she carried out a search of all the lady passengers on the last bus leaving Ballyshannon. On both sides there is much greater Customs activity at all posts but the number of seizures from ordinary travellers are comparatively few.

17-10-1942. CLONES COUNCIL FINANCES.  At a special meeting of Clones Urban Council held on Friday night for the  purpose of considering the council’s finances it was unanimously decided to raise a loan of £2.000 by temporary borrowing by way of overdraft accommodation for the months of October-November to enable the payment of arrears of loans to the Commissioners of Public Works and to their treasurers.

17-10-1942.TO LET OR SELL. Farm OF 100 ACRES, good 2 story slated Dwelling-house (with hot and cold water) (Calor Gas}; splendid Office houses, all in good repair, about 1 mile from Irvinestown. The above place can be let for a number of years, with 70.acres if required.—F. SCALLON, Moynaghan, Irvinestown.

17-10-1942.70 PER CENT. OF OAT CROP HARVESTED. FERMANAGH FARMERS’ GOOD WORK. Despite severe harvesting conditions experienced this year, seventy per cent, of the 1942 oat crop has been cut and stacked in County Fermanagh, while ninety per cent. has already been cut stated Mr. W. T. McClintock, B. Agr., War Executive Officer, at a meeting of the County Fermanagh Agricultural Committee in Enniskillen on Saturday afternoon. He said the farmers had, in spite of adverse conditions, done a remarkable job and .their work had been heroic. One man had cut twelve acres of oats with hooks.

At the present time, he said, there were in operation in the county 150 tractors and ploughs, 72 disc harrows, 88 binders, 46 mobile threshing mills, and, in addition, hundreds of horses. Labour, which had been one of their chief problems in the past, would not now be such a problem owing to machinery which had been set up by the Government to direct men to the land and remain on it. Voluntary labour, which had been so successful in other counties, had not been a success in Fermanagh, and in this respect there would remain, a stain on the county which, it was hoped, would be wiped out by an improvement in the matter next year.

The new Tillage Order had been issued, and .farmers had been asked for an increased effort. Subsidy would be paid on four crops in the coming season, i.e., wheat, rye, potatoes and flax. Mr. John Graham complained of the price allowed for potatoes, contending that after the £10 per acre subsidy and the £3 15s 0d per ton fixed price were added together the return did not compare favourably with that received by the “Eire” farmers.

Mr. F. Doherty thought that the reason was to be found in that the price was the same as that fixed, for the English crop. Mr. Graham said farmers in Northern Ireland were not getting a fair deal in this respect. He added that in “Eire’’ the price given for potatoes was £8 per ton. They were not worth digging at the price now fixed in Northern Ireland. Mr. J. O. Rhynehart, of the Ministry of Agriculture, who was pressed for an explanation as to the discrepancy in prices stated he was not in a position to state what the prices were in another part of the country, but pointed out that in ‘Eire’ the scarcity of manures would possibly result in a poorer crop, so that in the end the return per acre in Northern Ireland might be higher. Mr. Graham – I think that is not an answer. Mr. Doherty said that in country places potatoes were not worth moving at £3 15a per ton.

Mr. A. Wilson—Better do away with the potato crop. Mr. McClintock objected to the question as to the price paid in “Eire” stating they were not concerned with it. Mr. J. N. Carson, J.P.—Indeed we are concerned with it. Mr Graham (to the Secretary) — Yes, so, I am not going to let you away with that. We are concerned if a better price is paid across the Border in the Free State. Mr. Graham then spoke of the number of fat cows, which were going across into “Eire,’’ where a better price was being paid than at home. Major W. G. Nixon, D.L., chairman, said he was sure Mr. Rhynehart would bring their views on these two questions before the price fixing authorities.

Mr. J. E. J. Fawcett, J.P., voiced the appreciation of the farming community at the efforts of Mr. McClintock and his staff in promoting the tillage drive in the county. It had been a difficult period but the farmers had come through fairly well on the whole, and the position was much more satisfactory than anyone could have imagined earlier in the season. Mr. J. R. Hamilton, J.P., stated Mr. McClintock did a wonderful job of work, and the farmers had scored a wonderful achievement. Supporting, Mr. Graham said he was still of the opinion, that the Ministry had given the farmers an unfair deal as regards the potato crop. He requested Mr. Rhynehart to convey to the Ministry the Committee’s expression of thanks to their officials. Mr. Rhynehart said he would be delighted to do so. In reply, Mr. McClintock said the farmers of Fermanagh had responded promptly to the appeal for more tillage, and it was only in a very odd instance that the officials encountered any difficulty.

17-10-1942. MINUTES AMENDMENTS. WAR BONUS FOR RELIEVING OFFICER. Mr. James Murphy objected to the signing of the minutes of Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday on the ground that they stated that an increase in war bonus be granted to Mr. P. MacManus, reliving officer, to bring the grant under this heading up to 5s a week. Mr. Murphy said his proposal on the last Board day was to increase Mr. MacManus’s war bonus by 5s a week which would bring the grant up to 6s 6d a week.  Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., chairman, stated he had the entry in his book which corresponded to what Mr, Murphy now said. Mr. J. Brown, cleric, said he understood Mr. MacManus was being treated in the same way as Mr. Fee, another relieving officer had been dealt with—i.e., an increase of 3s per week, half payable by the Board and half by the Rural Council.

Mr. Murphy said that what really happened was Mr. Beatty proposed 10s a week, and he seconded. Mr. Thornton proposed. 3s and that was why he (Mr. Murphy) had proposed 5s a week. Mr. J. Beatty, J.P.—I understood the 5s proposal was passed. Mr; James Burns said his recollection of what happened was that the bonus be made up to 5s a week as the Clerk had stated in the minutes. Mr. C- McKeown—Didn’t the Ministry sanction 10s a week for a nurse? Didn’t the ferryman get 10s? I do not see why the Ministry should object to it. Clerk—It is not a question of that at all—it is a case of the minutes being correct. That now makes the bonus a total of 6s 6d per week? Mr. Murphy—Yes. Mr. Beatty—I would like to know why he was only allowed 6s 6d. Clerk—That was the Board’s decision. Mr. Beatty — That was nothing to allow any man. Mr. McKeown—It would buy matches. The minutes were amended as Mr. Murphy suggested.

17-10-1942. GAVE CAR ON LOAN—LICENCE SUSPENDED FOR YEAR. Fines of 40s and costs with suspension of licence for twelve months were imposed on Patrick McGovern Grayport, Belcoo, user of the vehicle, and John McGale, Tattysallagh, Clanabogan, Omagh, owner, when at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday is was proved that McGovern was found using the car which was covered with owner driven insurance only. Constable McKimm was the police witness. McGale said McGovern asked him for the loan of the car and witness acceded to the request. Mr, R. A. Herbert, LL.B., for McGovern, said the latter had walked into a trap. Major Dickie, R.M. (to McGale)—What right have you to give your car and petrol to anyone to drive round the country? He told me he would put the petrol in to do the job. I was always allowed petrol to go to my work.

£10 FINE ON IRVINESTOWN MAN. FALSE REPRESENTATION CHARGE. At Irvinestown Petty Sessions, on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., James Keys, of Glenall, Irvinestown, was charged with having on 22nd December, 1941, for the purpose of obtaining a supplementary pension for himself under the Unemployment Assistance Act, made a false representation that, during the seven days up to and including the 18th Dec., 1941, he had not earned more than 5s, whereas during this period he was employed by Messrs. Courtney, Ltd., I, Shipquay Place, Derry, at an average daily wage of 6/11d. The case had been brought at the last Irvinestown, Court but was dismissed without prejudice. Alan McCullagh, an official of the Assistance Board, gave evidence that he received an application from defendant for a supplemental pension on 31st Dec., 1940. He stated that he was in receipt of 10s old age pension and had stock of about one dozen hens. Later defendant wrote to him asking him if he could do something about placing him in employment and witness referred him to the Ministry of Labour.

William Henry Howe, another official, said that on the 26th May he told defendant that information had come into the possession of the Board that he had been employed with Messrs. Courtney and witness gave defendant the dates. Defendant made the following statement: “I was never employed by Messrs. Courtney and have done no work since ceasing to be employed by Mr. Hermon of Necarne Castle, Irvinestown. I am not living on a holding and get no privileges from the owner of the house where I now live. My son Irvine does no work of any kind.’’ Witness identified defendant’s signature on a document produced. John Charles Burkey, of the firm of Messrs. Courtney, said defendant was employed as a labourer by his firm from the 2nd December 1941, till 20th December, 1942. For the week ending 18th Dec., 1941, defendant was paid £2 7s 6d. The week prior to that, he was paid £2 9s 7d and the week before that £1 7s 4d. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, M.P. (defending)’ —Did you pay the defendant?—I paid a “J. Keys.” When Desmond Mahon was called as a witness and did not appear, Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, who prosecuted, said he would ask for a warrant for his arrest if necessary.

Mr. Ferguson submitted that he was entitled to a direction on the grounds that the prosecution had not identified defendant as the man, but his Worship ruled against him on this point. Defendant swore that he got a supplementary pension first about the end of 1940 and drew it from then until the 31st October, 1941, when his book was taken away and kept till 18th December. During that time he had to go and look for some work. He worked for a week and left on the 11th December. Before he went into employment he actually wrote to the authorities and told them he was going to apply for a job. After he had worked for almost three weeks he had to give up. From December, 1941 he had been in receipt of a supplementary pension. He was not working for the week ending 18th December and did not earn more than 5s during that week. There were any amount of Keys in that country besides defendant. Mr. Cooper—You don’t mind telling a little falsehood now and again, do you? No, never to my knowing. Defendant added that he signed his name that he never worked with Messrs. Courtney while he was getting the pension. Mr. Ferguson said he did not see any particularly hidden fraud in the case. Defendant had written to the Labour Exchange and called three times. His Worship said that during the week for which defendant had been prosecuted he thought it had been proved beyond any reasonable doubt that he had actually earned the sum of £2 7s 6d. He imposed a fine of £10 and £2 2s costs, and allowed defendant-two months to pay.

17-10-1942.CARDINAL MacRORY AND THE WAR. PLEA FOR NEGOTIATED PEACE. ADDRESS AT MAYNOOTH. His Eminence Cardinal MacRory, speaking at the annual distribution of prizes in Maynooth College on Tuesday, pleaded for a negotiated peace. He said: – On various occasions I have expressed my hope for a negotiated peace, because I believed that only in this way is there any hope of peace with justice. I am convinced of that more than ever, seeing that cruel feelings are arising on both sides and prisoners are being put in chains. “If the war is fought to a finish,’’ said his Eminence, “there may possibly be a stalemate owing to utter exhaustion on both sides, but if either side win there will be a peace, not of justice, but of vengeance which will but sow the seeds sf future wars.” The Cardinal, continuing, said:—”I am not so foolish as to imagine that anything I can say will have any effect. However, I feel it a duty to say something.

17-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN BOARD AND QUESTION OF REPAIRS. When an account from a local garage proprietor for repairs to the ambulance came before Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday for payment, Mr. J. Brown, Clerk, said Mr. J. Cathcart, the ambulance driver, was not prepared to certify some of the items. Mr. Cathcart said some of the items were not in his book in which he kept a record of all repairs to the ambulance. The explanation was this: On 15th, January last Mr. Barton’s man was employed to bring a patient into the Hospital in this ambulance, he (Mr. Cathcart) being out at the time in the other ambulance. An accident happened to the ambulance in charge of Mr. Barton’s (the garage proprietor) driver. On one occasion since it would not start. He thought himself these repairs were made necessary by the accident. The ambulance never had been in order since. It would not charge until it was driven at 35 miles per hour—a speed too high for a vehicle of the kind, it should start charging at at least 20 m.p.h. The repairs were, therefore, in his opinion chargeable to the insurance company. He had some of the items of the account in his book.

Mr, Murphy—Do you keep an account as well as Mr. Barton? Mr. Cathcart—Everything I get is kept in my book. Mr. Murphy—Mr. Barton’s account does not correspond with yours? Mr. Cathcart — No sir. Mr. Murphy—Very well, I would not pay him. Mr. Beatty-Was it sent back to Mr. Barton? Mr. Cathcart—No; it is here for payment. Mr. Beatty—Can’t you send it back? Mr. Cathcart—No; it is a matter for the Board. Mr. Kelly—Mr. Brown will ask Mr. Barton, about it and get the thing squared up. Mr. Murphy—Did the insurance company pay for the accident? . Clerk—We have not got any bill for it anyway.

Mr. Murphy—The ambulance should be put right and the insurance company should be informed accordingly. Mr. Beatty—Mr. Barton’s attention should have been drawn to it. Mr. Murphy—That ambulance is giving far too much trouble here and there is something wrong somewhere. There has always been trouble with it since it came here. Mr. Beatty—When you found it not right, why didn’t you draw his attention to it? Mr. Cathcart—I am tired drawing his attention to it. The Chairman, (Hon. C. L. Corry) was proceeding to the next business when Mr. Murphy said: We are here as representatives of the ratepayers; the ratepayers’ money is being paid away and we are entitled to know what it is being paid for. I am not at all satisfied. Write to the insurance company and tell them the ambulance is not giving satisfaction. Mr. Beatty — Draw Mr. Barton’s attention to it. Chairman — The Clerk is going to do that. Mr. Murphy—The insurance company is the body.

17-10-1942.ILLEGAL USE OF COUPONS. STATEMENTS IN BELLEEK CASES. CHARGES AGAINST MERCHANTS. Eight summonses alleging the illegal use of coupons were heard by Major Dickie, R.M., at Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday. John Stephens, draper, Main Street, Belleek, and who also has a business in Ballyshannon, was summoned (1) for having, at Belleek between 7th and 16th March, 1942, without the authority of a licence granted by the Board of Trade and for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods, made use of rationed documents or coupons other than those issued to him or those surrendered to him; (2) had in, his possession, with intent to obtain goods, rationed documents or coupons issued to another person; and (3) using for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods, rationed documents, or coupons which did not bear the name, address and National Registration number of the person or persons to whom they were issued. Michael McGrath, Main, Street, Belleek, was charged with aiding and abetting in the commission of these offences. Thomas Daly, grocer, Main St., Belleek, was charged with transferring rationed documents or coupons, and Michael McGrath was summoned for aiding and abetting. Mr. R. A. Herbert, LLb., defended.

Mr. J. P. Getty, solicitor for the Board of Trade, who brought the prosecutions, said his instructions were that Daly had quite a number of customers who left their ration books with him. His Worship would remember that certain ration books which were issued in the first instance with regard to food had 26 margarine coupons in them. Those coupons were not valid and were not used. At the 1st June, 1941, when clothing was rationed for the first time, these: margarine coupons were then to be used for the purpose of acquiring clothing. Their case was that Daly, having got all these margarine coupons from his customers he transferred them to Stephens or McGrath (who managed Stephens’ shop in Belleek), or both. If he did so it was an offence.

He (Mr. Getty) was going to call a number of witnesses to prove that they left these margarine coupons with Daly and gave him no instructions or authority to transfer them to Stephens or anybody else and they did not use them themselves. A quantity of these coupons was sent to Stephens’ wholesaler in Belfast, Messrs. Moffitt and Co., whose agent would tell the Court that 500 coupons were delivered by Stephens to him in return for goods to be supplied. Having got those coupons, the practice was for Messrs. Moffitt to send them to the Post Office and they in turn sent them to the Board of Trade, When they got to the Board of Trade these margarine coupons were found in the bundle, and this started the inquiries. Miss Rosalie Aiken, chief assistant in the Food Office, Irvinestown, gave evidence that ration books containing margarine coupons were issued to a number of people, whom she named.

Sadie Agnes Keown said that Daly was her grocer, and she received .ration books for herself, and three daughters which she gave to her grocer. She did not use the margarine coupons, but her husband used some and bought clothes in Stephens’ using the margarine coupons for the purpose. William Dolan said he never purchased clothing with the margarine coupons and did not authorise his grocer to hand them on. Ernest W. Hall, area manager, of the Board of Trade, Belfast, said the coupons came to him from the Post Office and included margarine coupons. Statements made to Sergt. J. D. Cochrane by Stephens, McGrath and Daly having been read,

McGrath gave evidence and said he could not say when the coupons came into his establishment. He was not given the particulars of the coupons before the prosecution came on, and consequently he was unable to make any inquiries. Sadie Keown’s, husband left in margarine coupons in exchange for clothes, and whatever he handed in would be sent to Moffitt. Dolan’s father and also Daly bought clothes from him. He had some difficulty in getting any regulations and ultimately got part of the regulations from a traveller. He had written five times previously to the Board of Trade and never got an answer from them. So far as he could, he carried out all these relevant regulations. John James Dolan said he did the buying for all of his family, and used his son’s coupons too.

His Worship dismissed the charge against Daly and also the charge against McGrath for aiding and abetting him. Regarding the other case, he said he found it fully proved. He fined Stephens 20/- and 10/- costs on each of the charges of making use of rationed documents other than those issued to him and using  them for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods. McGrath was fined £10 and £3 3s 0d costs for aiding and abetting in the commission of the first offence, and 120/- and three guineas costs for aiding, and abetting in the second offence. The other summonses against Stephens and McGrath were dismissed without prejudice.

17-10-1942. £5 FINE AT BELLEEK. HAD FIVE STONES OF TWENTY SIX COUNTY SUGAR. £5 FINE AT BELLEEK. James Johnston, Aghamuldoney, County Fermanagh, was charged at Belleek Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., with having on 28th May knowingly harboured five stones of sugar imported from the 26-Counties into the Six Counties with intent to evade the payment of Customs duty thereon. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, told the court that in the defendant’s house the police found five stones of sugar, which was of 26-County origin. Mr. P. T. Flanagan, LL.B., who pleaded guilty, in mitigation of the sentence said that if it were possible for defendant to pay duty on the sugar he would very willingly have done so. In certain seasons of the year defendant had special work to do on his farm. He could not get any labour in the Six Counties, and had to get a man from the Free State, This man had no ration card and during the time his application was in for one, by arrangement between him and the defendant they brought over this sugar, for which they paid 5/3d a stone in the Free State, whereas it was obtainable in the .Six Counties for 3/6d per stone. It was really a matter of trying to get over a personal inconvenience. Saying that he did not think it was a bad case, his Worship imposed a fine of £5.

£15 FINE FOR SMUGGLING SPIRITS. John Farry, Monendogue, was charged of knowingly harbouring ten bottles of Irish whiskey, one bottle of Sherry, and one bottle of port wine imported from the 26 Counties into the Six-Counties! Mr. R. A. Herbert, L.L.B., (defending) said that defendant lived with his father and brother on a small farm on the mountain side. His father was an invalid, over 80 years of age; and they were constantly afraid of him dropping off when they would not have any stimulants to give him. Defendant said he hold the police it was for his brother in Belfast. That was not true. None of the local people would sell him (defendant) a bottle of whiskey. Some of the whiskey had been in the house since Christmas- He collected it from time to time and brought it over with him. Mr. Cooper-—-Were you going over the Border on different days and bringing it back—accumulating it?—-No. His Worship—There’s no proof he was dealing in it on a very large scale. I think £15 would meet it.

LORRY DRIVER FINED AT IRVINESTOWN. “The lorry came round Flack’s corner 40 at m.p.h. without slackening speed.” “My lorry is governed down to 25 m.p.h.” These two conflicting statements of evidence, the first one by a constable and the second by the driver of the lorry were given at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday when District Inspector P. Walshe summoned Charles McQuaid, of Drogan, for driving a motor lorry in Irvinestown on 7th Sept. without due care and attention and without reasonable consideration for other users of the highway. Constable McKimm proved the summons and was corroborated by Constable Bradley, neither of whom heard a horn sounded. Defendant said he sounded the horn and only accelerated when he got round the corner. His lorry was governed down to 25 m.p.h. Major Dickie, R.M., said the two constable were definite that defendant came round without due care and he imposed a fine of 10s and costs.

TWICE TORPEDOED MERCHANT NAVY MAN FINED £5. A wireless operator in the Merchant Navy, who, according to his solicitor, had been twice torpedoed and had also been in a tussle with the ‘Deutschland’ appeared at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., on a charge of being concerned in a fraudulent attempt at evasion of payment of Customs’ duty on two bottles of spirits, at Kesh, on 28th July, imported from “Eire” into Northern Ireland.

Defendant was Vincent Mahon, of Mill St., Irvinestown, and Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, said a Customs officer found defendant sitting reading a book in a third class carriage of the train. He asked defendant if he had any articles to declare and he did not reply. He then asked defendant, what he had in his pockets: and defendant produced. two camera films and said that was all he had got.

The Customs officer, proceeded Mr, Cooper, was very suspicious of defendant as this pockets seemed bulky and ordered him to stand up till he searched him, and found a bottle of whiskey in each of his trousers pockets. When asked why he did not declare the spirits defendant told the officer to “go to hell you and the spirits;” When asked to furnish proof he admitted he had not paid any duty and absolutely decline to recognise the Customs authorities in any way.  His Worship—In what way? Mr. Cooper-He said he did not recognise them. His Worship — A very unfortunate position, with two bottles of whiskey in his pockets.

Mr. E. C. Ferguson, LL.B., M.P., defending, said they admitted having the two bottles of whiskey. The circumstances were these Defendant was a wireless operator employed by the Marconi Company with the Merchant Navy. Since the outbreak of war he had been torpedoed twice and on one occasion had been in a tussle with the ‘Deutschland.’ As a result of these sea activities he had been invalided home at the end of July by the Company. He (Mr. Ferguson) was instructed by defendant that he had wanted these two bottles of whiskey to send to a friend of his. Defendant was a decent fellow who was now fit and ready to return to duty and was awaiting a call to his ship. Mr. Cooper said if defendant .had adopted a different attitude he would have been fined there and then. The duty on the spirits was £l 15s 5d. Mr. Ferguson said in the circumstances perhaps it was excusable. “I am asked,” he said, “to apologise for anything, that he did wrong. His Worship said defendant knew quite well he should not have done this. However, in view of his record he imposed a fine of £5.

SUNDAY CARTING DISAPPROVED. A meeting, under the auspices of the Six-Co. Farmers’ Union was held in the Townhall, Enniskillen on Saturday afternoon, when representatives from all over County Fermanagh attended. Addresses on the policy of the Union were given by Mr. H. Jamison, General Secretary ; Mr, J. H. Barbour, Organiser; Mr. Hughes. Farmers’ Union Insurance Company, and Rev. R. J. M‘Ilmoyle, Dervock. Resolutions were passed, viewing with apprehension the milk marketing scheme so far as payments were concerned and a unanimous expression of opinion was voiced against the carting of milk on Sundays. The main purpose of the meeting was the formation of new branches and progress in this direction was made.

FELLOW INTERNEE’S TRIBUTE TO CAHIR HEALY, M.P. By Frederick Bowman, Internee, Brixton Prison, London and 5, Bradley Place, Eastbank St., Southport; Lancashire, England.

TILL IRELAND UNITE IN PEACE

The years, untried, in prison passed,

Have made impressions sure to last,

Many are grim, but, I’ve a few

For which my gratitude are due.

One patriot I’m proud I’ve met

While tangled in the prison net,

Is CAHIR HEALY—always kind,

Whose noble heart and cultured mind

Inspires respect and strengthen all

Whose courage might incline to fall.

His fine example—smiles of cheer

Make prison walls less gloomy here

His shrewd remarks and sound advice:

Confer a boon beyond all price

On those whose prison .life he shades,

Smoothing their madness, easing cares.

His land and loved ones far away,

Are in his gentle thoughts all day.

But helping others makes him try

To keep suppressing any sigh.

A man of wit and worth and charm.

Sincere and steadfast, firm and calm;

To death for Ireland he would go—

This man whom I’m so proud to know.

Peace for the world is what I claim

And Healy’s object is the same.

His work for Ireland will not cease.

Till Ireland can unite in peace.

SIX-COUNTY VACANT SEATS. STORMONT REJECTS LABOUR MOTION. A motion by Mr. H. Midgley (Labour, Willowfield) at Stormont on Tuesday which asked that writs for vacant Parliamentary seats be issued not later than three months from date of vacancy was defeated by 24 votes to one. The  motion was described by the Minister of Agriculture as the most reactionary that had ever been brought.

 

1942 Fermanagh Herald. Belleek Attack.

8-8-1942. SMUGGLER ESCAPES BY RIVER SWIM. LARGE LOAVES SEIZURE BY NEWTOWNBUTLER POLICE. A seven a.m. chase of smugglers on the Monaghan-Fermanagh border last week led to the capture by Sergt. Blevins and Constable Freeman, Newtownbutler, of a large quantity of loaves. Sergt. Blevins, newly transferred to Newtownbutler from Belleek, where his customs work had gained him a wide reputation, surprised two men on the banks of the River Finn, which at this point is the border between the two States. The men were conveying loaves to a ‘’cot,” which is a large unwieldy float for carrying cattle across lakes and rivers in Fermanagh. On the arrival of the police, the cot, drawn up at the Six-County side of the river, already held a large consignment of loaves. As the police rushed to the “cot’’ one man made off across fields in the direction of the border. The other man, divesting himself of his clothes, put his pants around his neck and plunged into the icy-cold water and swam the thirty yards of river to Twenty- Six County territory. Both men made good their escape. The police seized all the loaves and the “cot’ which was later conveyed to Enniskillen. They also found and seized the jacket, waistcoat, boots and other clothing, excepting the trousers of the swimmer.

8-8-1942. TYRES SEIZED AT ENNISKILLEN. Seeing a man dragging two large bags along a railway line at Enniskillen, Sergt. McNally and Constable Walker investigated and found in the bags several doz. bicycle tyres which they seized.

8-8-1942. CUSTOM ACTIVITIES INTENSIFIED. Customs officers along the entire stretch of the Border (on both sides) from Pettigo to Clones are redoubling their efforts to prevent smuggling and the quantity of goods finding their way across from either side must have fallen to such an extent as to be a very small proportion of the former quantities. Trains and buses are gone through almost “with a fine comb” and many cross-border time schedules have been completely upset by the customs delay for months past, but more particularly of late. The intensified efforts, while naturally showing fair returns in seizures, are not producing nearly the same proportion of captures as in former times, the reason probably being that those with an inclination to smuggling are being ‘‘headed off” by the knowledge of what awaits them on arrival at the Customs post. This, of course, refers to ordinary travellers, and does not affect the professional smugglers who presumably have other means of getting across their consignments of prohibited goods. But even these find the more intensive police watch on both sides distinctly more discouraging.

5-9-1942. GLENFARNE NEIGHBOURS’ DISPUTE. AN ASSAULT CASE. “ Jealousy Over Land ” CASE AT KILTYCLOGHER COURT. At Kiltyclogher District Court on Tuesday, before Mr., Flattery, District Justice, Patrick McDermott, a minor, through his father, Peter McDermott, Lougnross, summoned Peter Clancy, of the same place, for alleged assault.

Mr. Alfred McMorrow, B.A., L.L.B., appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. P. O’Flynn, solicitor, Manorhamilton, appeared for defendant. Patrick McDermott, in evidence, stated that a few evenings before the alleged assault had taken place, Mrs. Clancy was milking a cow on the road and the cow had .its head across a gate leading into his (plaintiffs) father’s field. There had been some words between defendant’s wife and himself on that occasion about trespass, and a few days later, when he (plaintiff), was riding down the road on a donkey, Peter Clancy had come down the road meeting him and had knocked him off the donkey with a blow of a spade shaft and had got on top of him, pounding him with his knees. He had to take through another man’s land to escape as he could, not pass Clancy’s house.

Mr. O’Flynn—-Were you not prosecuted some time ago in this Court for stealing Clancy’s fowl?

Witness—It was my brother took the fowl; I only accompanied him.

Mr. O’Flynn—You were along with your brother, and for that reason you have spite in for Clancy. Do you know anything of a well between Clancy’s land and the land of a man named Flynn?—There is water in a shough; it is not a well.

Mr. O’Flynn — Why did you put bushes around that well from which the Clancy’s get water ?—I did it to stop trespass of cattle.

Mr. O’Flynn—On the evening of this terrible assault was Clancy thatching? — He was not.

Mr. O’Flynn—I put it to you that Clancy was thatching, and when you came down the road he came down the ladder and asked you what filthy language you had used to his wife. – He was not thatching.

Did you call Clancy a grabber?—-No.

You didn’t go home to tell your father about this terrible assault? A slap was all you got.

Peter McDermott, father of plaintiff, in evidence, stated that he suffered a lot with Clancy, all owing to jealousy over a bit of land he got. Clancy’s cattle were always on his land.

Mr. McMorrow-—You were going to town on the day of the assault? — I was going to the town, and I went to Clancy’s house and asked for a drink of water. Clancy came round the house with a knife in his hand, and said to me “When I get up to that son of yours it won’t be good for him.”

Mr, .O’Flynn — You went to the house of your greatest enemy and you asked for water. Did you get milk? — I did.

Mr. O’Flynn — You got more than you asked for. Was Clancy thatching?—I don’t know.

Mr. O’Flynn — You say he had a knife in his hand? Of course that knife was for cutting the scallops. Did he complain about the language your son used to his wife, and did you tell him to correct your son every time he heard him because he uses language like that at home?—I don’t remember.

5-9-1942. Clones Call for Reprieve—At the meeting of Clones Urban Council on the motion of Mr. McCabe, seconded by Mr. O’Connor, it was decided to send the following telegram to  the Duke of Abercorn:—“The newly elected Urban District Council of Clones composed of all shades of religion and politics, begs your Grace to use your prerogative of mercy for the reprieve of the six young men under sentence of death. By doing so you will ensure goodwill and friendship amongst the people on both sides of the border.”

 

5-9-1942. BELFAST YOUTH EXECUTED. WILLIAMS BORE UP WELL TO THE END. EARLY MORNING SCENES. POUCE PRECAUTIONS IN VICINITY OF PRISON. Thomas Joseph Williams, aged 19 was executed at Belfast Prison on Wednesday morning at 8 o’clock, all efforts to secure his reprieve having failed. At 8.15 a.m. a notice intimating that the death sentence had been carried out in their presence was posted on the prison gate and signed Robert Henderson, Sheriff for Belfast, George Stewart, Justice of the Peace, Thomas Moore Stuart, Governor of the prison, and Rev. T. McAllister, Chaplain.

Young Williams bore up well to the end. He had been visited by relatives a short time prior to the execution and his spiritual comforts were attended to by priests in attendance. Precautions against a demonstration were taken by the police and crowds who gathered at various points at the approaches to the jail and knelt in prayer.

No people were allowed into Crumlin Road for a distance of about 200 yards in front of the prison. A police car patrolled the area around the prison and a strong cordon of police was also drawn around the district.      .

As eight o’clock was striking there was an opposition demonstration in Old Park Road when about 100 women and girls gathered and sung ‘’God Save the King” and British songs and engaged in cheering. They were forced into side streets by the police.

Williams, with five others was convicted and sentenced at the Assize Commission in August on the charge of causing the death of Constable Murphy, R.U.C., by shooting in April. An appeal to the Court of Criminal Appeal over a week ago was dismissed. A Nationwide appeal for the reprieve of the youths was without result in the case of Williams. On Sunday last Lord Abercorn’s statement announcing the reprieve of five of the youths was issued but it stated that the law must take its course in the case of Williams.

LORD ABERCORN’S STATEMENT. The statement issued at Stormont Castle said that the Six-County Governor had considered the cases of Thomas J. Williams, William J. Perry, Henry Cordner, John T. Oliver, Joseph Cahill and Patrick Simpson, ‘’prisoners lying under sentence of death in His Majesty’s Prison Belfast,” and decided that in the case of Williams the law must take its course, that the sentences in the cases of Perry, Cordner, Oliver and Cahill be commuted to penal servitude for life, and that Simpson’s sentence, be commuted to15 years’ penal servitude. The Governor’s decision was conveyed to the parents of the five reprieved men by Mr. D. F. Marrinan, their solicitor.

 

5-9-1942. …. and that such consecration as may be desired by the Church of England or the Catholic Church should be carried out on the individual grave. It was found that this principle met the wishes of the fighting Services better than the use of denominational plots and that it corresponded to a very deep conviction that the graves of men of very different faiths, who died, however, in a single cause, should be side by side. “If the local conditions make it necessary for a Separate Catholic plot to be formed, will you please arrange this through our District Inspector.’’ The Chairman—I suppose the Council would have no objection to that. Mr. William-Kelly—It is all the same, I think. The Council decided to grant Archdeacon Gannon’s request.

5-9-1942. £100 FOR ENNISKILLEN GRAVEYARD CARETAKER. The caretaker of Enniskillen new Cemetery—Mr. Jas. H. Kerr—applied to Enniskillen Rural Council for an increase of salary. The application, made last May, was adjourned till Tuesday, when the members had received the report of the Committee relative to the acquisition by the Catholic people of their hitherto unused plot. Mr. Kerr, who has £50 a year with free house, coal and light, plus £7 10s 0d a year war bonus, said he was afraid of the extension throwing so much additional work on him that, with the scarcity of  labour, he would find it difficult to cope with it. On the proposal of Mr. J. J. Bowler, seconded by Mr. A. Wilson, the Council unanimously agreed to increase Mr. Kerr’s salary to £100 a-year and to make him wholly responsible for the carrying out of all work at the Cemetery. -The Clerk pointed out that on many occasions the Registrar was not given sufficiently early notice of burials.

Old Graveyards—Caretakers’ Replies. Recently complaints were made as to the state of the old graveyards in Enniskillen rural area under the care of the Rural Council, and the Clerk was directed to write to the caretakers drawing their attention, to the complaints. Here are three replies received by the Council from caretakers :— From the caretaker of the old graveyard in Kinawley—‘‘I have mowed it twice this summer—the last time less than a month ago—and am now going to mow it a third time. It is quite possible that the person or persons who complained to you about the appearance of the graveyard, made a mistake about .the identity of .the plot. You can enquire off  some local person around the village about the  appearance of the old graveyard.’’ Devenish graveyard caretaker stated  that he never had failed to mow the graveyard, while the caretaker of. Pubble cemetery, Tempo, said: ‘‘I mow it once every year, and at the same time I remove the weeds, and trim the hedge.”

5-9-1942. GARVARY PENSIONER’S ESCAPE. An old-age pensioner named Mary McQuillan, of Shankhill, Garvary, had a remarkable escape when she was knocked down by a military lorry. Found lying in a pool of blood, she was rushed to hospital where it was found that her injuries were superficial. When knocked down she was going for a jug of milk, and on reaching hospital she was still clutching the jug.

5-9-1942. CAVAN FARMER FOR TRIAL. At Cavan District Court, before District Justice Lavery, Patrick Greene (24) farmer, Enniskeen, Kingscourt, was charged with maliciously burning a quantity of hay, value £100 the property of Patrick Tinnelly, Enniskeen, and maliciously burning a cart and harness and other property, value £50. Accused was returned for trial.

5-9-1942. Rossinver Convent.—The Franciscan Sisters of the Atonement of the Mother Lurana Mary Francis House, Rossinver, County Leitrim, have pleasure in announcing that permission has been given by the Holy See to make the Mother Lurana Mary Francis House a Temporary Novitiate for the duration of the war. The time of receptions will be announced later.

5-9-1942. £2 5s for Graveyard Caretaker.—At Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Mr. J. Murphy enquired if the salary of the caretaker of Cleenish Old Graveyard had been increased recently. The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) said originally the salary was 30/-. Then about two years ago the salaries of all graveyard caretakers were increased by 50 per cent.

5-9-1942. Catholic Burials — Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., presiding, instructed its engineer, Mr. James Donnelly, to prepare a specification for carrying out certain works at the New Cemetery, where the local Catholic community are utilizing their plot in future owing to lack of space at the Catholic Cemetery.

5-9-1942. NOTICE TO OUR CUSTOMERS. THE DERBY CAFÉ,ENNISKILLEN, WILL BE CLOSED ALL DAY THURSDAY,10TH SEPT. RE-OPENING FRIDAY MORNING.

5-9-1942. BUNDORAN LADY DIES IN COUNTY FERMANAGH. The death occurred of Mrs. F. Maguire, late of’ Ocean View, Bundoran. Since the death of her husband she had resided with her son and daughter-in-law at Lattoon, Belcoo, Co. Fermanagh. At the funeral last week the chief mourners were—James Hackett, Clogher (brother); Mrs. P. Carty (daughter); John and Freddie Maguire (sons); Peter Carty (son-in-law); Mrs. J. Maguire and Mrs. F. Maguire (daughters-in-law); Miss M. Maguire (sister-in-law); Nano, Packie and John Maguire, Jose, Jack, Frankie, Paddy, Peter and Michael Carty (grandchildren).

5-9-1942. AMERICAN SOLDIER SENTENCED. SEQUEL TO FATAL STABBING. Found guilty by secret ballot of the manslaughter of a member of the British Pioneer Corps, an American soldier, Pte. William Davis (23), of Texas, was sentenced to eight years’ imprisonment by a United States Army courtmartial in the Six Counties on Tuesday.He was also ordered to be dishonourably discharged from the American Army. Davis, who was found not guilty on the original charge of murdering the Pioneer Private, Owen McLoughlin, of Motherwell, will be sent back to America to serve the sentence in a penitentiary. McLaughlin was fatally stabbed on August 1st during a row at a dance in Randalstown Orange Hall.

5-9-1942. THREE TYRONE SISTERS ENTER RELIGIOUS LIFE. Miss Agnes Murray (Sister Mary Laurence) was finally professed, and her sister Winnie (Sister Bernard Therese) made her first profession at La Sainty Union Convent, Bath, on 15th August. Another sister Miss May Murray, H. Dip., has entered the Loreto order in Llandudno, North Wales. She was educated at St. Louis Convent, Carrickmacross, and University College. Dublin. Miss Winnie Murray was educated at Loreto Convent, Omagh, and the Convent High School, Southampton. They are daughters of Mr. .and Mrs. Patrick Murray, Rathfragan, Fintona.

5-9-1942. TO FIGHT TUBERCULOSIS IN BRITAIN. A number of sets of miniature radiography apparatus-the new weapon to combat tuberculosis—has been ordered and may be ready about the end of the year, Mr. Ernest Brown, British Minister of Health, disclosed on Monday opening a sanatorium at Nottingham. We have many difficult problems to solve in finding how the best use can be made of this new weapon, he said. Ideally everyone ought to undergo a regular examination and look upon it as a normal health measure. The fight against tuberculosis—that scourge happiness and destroyer of manpower has a definite, and by no means unimportant, place in the nation’s war effort.

5-9-1942. TRANSACTIONS IN BRANDY. TWO MEN FINED AT BELFAST.

CASE AGAINST ENNISKILLEN MAN. Fines totalling £125 or in default three months imprisonment were imposed by Major Dickie, R.M., in Belfast Summons Court on Desmond McGratty, Ormond Road, Dublin, in Customs prosecutions arising out of transactions in brandy. Samuel Moore, Down St., Enniskillen, was fined in sums aggregating £101 and ordered 12 months’ imprisonment without hard labour. Immediate warrants were issued against both defendants. The summons against McGratty was for being concerned in dealing in 59 bottles of brandy and a bottle of wine, with dealing wholesale in .spirits without a licence, and for causing to be harboured 446 bottles of brandy. Moore was summoned for dealing in 59 bottles of brandy, delivering spirits without a permit, dealing wholesale in spirits without a licence, and causing spirits to be harboured.

Fines of £10 were imposed on R. M. McLane and John Watters, publicans, Belfast, for failing to make an entry in their stock books and other cases against them were dismissed. The former was summoned for being concerned in dealing with 59 bottles of brandy and a bottle of wine, with receiving spirits without a permit and failing to make the necessary stock book entries, and the latter for being concerned in harbouring 446 bottles of brandy, for receiving spirits without a licence, and for failing to make the necessary stock book entries.

Mr. T. J. Campbell, K.C., M.P. (instructed by Messrs. J. Donnelly & Co.) for the defence, said if there was any offence at all it was a Customs offence, and he submitted that his clients were innocent even of the Customs charge. Mr. R. F. Sheldon (Crown Solicitor), for the Commissioners of Customs and Excise, gave notice of appeal in the Excise Cases against these two defendants.

5-9-1942. POLICE RAIDS IN BELFAST. 200 PERSONS DETAINED. Belfast police raided various districts in the city early this week and as a result 200 men have been detained. The raids began at five o’clock on Tuesday morning and the district covered include Falls Road, Ardoyne, North Queen Street, the Dock area, the Markets area, and portions of Ballymacarret and Short Strand. A very large force of police was engaged and the swoop was made simultaneously in each district. The majority of the suspects were taken from their beds, and the men, having been allowed to dress, were removed in cage cars and taken under strong escort to the cells at Chichester Street. There was intense police activity in the Falls Road area of Belfast all during Tuesday night and into the early hours of Wednesday morning.

A number of houses were raided. One man is known to have been detained. In Lisburn district there were also extensive police raids and a number of persons taken to the local barracks were questioned and afterwards released. There were many raids on Thursday night and early on Friday morning. After a night of patrol activity by armoured cars, police in tenders and on foot carried out concentrated raids at dawn. It is understood that the people detained are mostly youths, but a number of girls are also under detention.    In one case a father and his five sons were taken, leaving the mother the only remaining member of the family. . Police waited outside factories and mills and questioned young men as they left at lunch hour. Some on arriving home were detained.

In one street in the Falls, police with drawn revolvers followed a number of youths and later another chase developed when a young man jumped out the back door of a house when the police entered, and ran across the Bog Meadows. The men detained comprised dockers, factory, mill and munition workers and some A.R.P. wardens and fire watchers were taken to the barracks.

12-9-1942. BELLEEK BARRACKS ATTACKED. BOMBS FAILED TO EXPLODE, SHOTS FIRED. ENNISKILLEN HOUSE SEARCHES. At 4 o’clock on Friday morning the R.U.C. Barracks at Belleek, a short distance from the .Border, was attacked. A homemade time bomb or bombs placed near the building failed to explode. Shots were fired at the barracks and to these the police replied. The telephone wires to Enniskillen were cut but the police got a message through to Kesh from which a police party under Head-Constable  Conlin rushed to the assistance of their Belleek colleagues. After less than half an hour, however, the firing ceased and the only damage caused was a few windows broken in the barracks. About fifty shots in all were fired. Considerable police activity followed, several men in the Belleek district being questioned. Police from County Head-quarters at Enniskillen, under County Inspector Gorman for several hours investigated and received reports on the occurrence.

ENNISKILLEN SEARCHES. In Enniskillen district during Friday six houses were visited by a party of armed police and detectives. Nothing was found it is believed. One mart, Mr. Bertie Love, of Mill St., Enniskillen, was painting on the roof of a hut several miles from the town when he was taken into custody. He was later released. In the interval, he was lengthily and closely questioned by several police officers. His house was one of those searched. Other houses raided included that of Mr. Sean Nethercott, Paget Square, well known Fermanagh Nationalist, and Mr. W. J. Monaghan, U.D.C., P.L.G. Several hours were spent in each search.

OFFICIAL STATEMENT. On Friday night R.U.C. headquarters issued this statement:—“At 4 a.m. to-day Belleek barracks, Co. Fermanagh was attacked by fire and bombs. About fifty shots were fired. Police returned the fire. After calling on the police to surrender, the assailants disappeared.

RANDALSTOWN AFFAIR. The explosion at Randalstown barracks, caused by a bomb placed on the sill, blew in one window and the surrounding brickwork, cut the heavy steel bars over the window, badly damaged adjacent houses and broke windows for a hundred yards on either side of the barracks. One of the injured policemen, Sergeant McCammond was flung across the day room and through a door opposite the window. He had been doing clerical work at the time. Constable Bunting, the other injured man, who was standing in the centre of the room was blown against another door and knocked semi-conscious. The sergeant was found to have a fracture of the left arm and severe abrasions to the left leg when he was removed to the Royal Victoria Hospital, where he was stated last night to be comfortable. The constable was not .seriously hurt. The day room is only 9ft. by 12ft. The floor was littered with bricks and other debris, while the walls were pitted with holes.

12-9-1942. ROSLEA COURT BORDER MERCHANT FINED. At Rosslea Petty Sessions before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., John Maguire, merchant, Lackey, Roslea (near Clones), was charged on three counts with being in possession of the following goods with intent to evade export prohibition— 8 cwts. rice, 5 cwts. barley, 2½ cwts. S/R flour, 3 cwts. currants, 2 stones sultanas, 96 tins salmon and 42 lbs. soap powder. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted, and Mr, Herbert, solicitor defended. Martin Shaw McMullen, of McKay and Leetham, Belfast, deposed to selling the goods to defendant on September 23rd, 1941. He had never seen defendant before. Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness said there were no restrictions on the goods at that time.

Sergeant Moffatt deposed to visiting defendant’s premises, which were about 20 yards from the border, on Oct. 29th. Defendant had a very small stock and the goods which were seized were found in defendant’s dwelling-house. At that time witness could find no trace of baking soda or lentils which defendant had purchased in Belfast. In a statement defendant said half the goods were for a Mr. Somerville who owned a shop about 1½ miles away. Defendant refused to sign the statement.

Defendant, in evidence, stated he was an ex-serviceman and had served in the British army in France and in the East during the last war. He had been in business for himself since 1934 and was on friendly terms with Mr. Somerville, Clones with whom he had previously been employed. His purchases from January, 1941 to August, 1942, were £910. Witness had never any intention of smuggling these goods across the border. Convicting, defendant of being in possession of the goods for export, the R.M, imposed a fine of £60, with time to pay. He dismissed the other two charges. He ordered the forfeiture of 2 cwts. of barley and 2 cwts. of currants.

12-9-1942. MISCONDUCT AT WEEKLY DANCES. AMERICAN OFFICERS’ COMPLAINT.  A letter was read from the officer in charge of U.S.A. military police, regarding dances held in the Minor Townhall—particularly those held on Saturday nights, under the auspices of the football club. It stated: “The door keepers have no limit in admission; the result being that the atmosphere is appalling. There is no room to dance and when evilly disposed. There is no room to dance and when evilly disposed persons start a “brawl’ the hall is so crowded it is impossible to pick out the participants. We suggest that the number of persons admitted be limited to 150 at the outside. We are agreeable to place joint police patrols at the door, who will be responsible for seeing that the service men do not gain admittance after the correct number had been reached, and also our patrols will enter the hall if there is any disorder among the service personnel at the request of the door keeper or a member of the dance committee. We take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation to all classes in Enniskillen for the hospitality and cooperation we have invariably received.” In a subsequent letter it was stated: “We can no longer provide police patrols for duty at the above mentioned dances as we are not getting the cooperation of the organisers.’’

The Chairman (Mr. Johnston) said the difficulty was 200 to 300 people go to this dance and the place gets choked up. One dance last week had to be stopped on account of the conduct. There was only one thing they could do and it would be a drastic remedy—close the hall altogether to these dances. The Council made an order that the number of persons to be admitted to a dance in the Minor Hall be limited to 150.

12-9-1942. LEITRIM COUNCIL SYMPATHY. THE BALLINAMORE TRAGEDY. Mr. Mooney proposed a vote of sympathy with the relatives of the victims of the Ballinamore drowning tragedy. He happened to be in Ballinamore the previous Tuesday, and he witnessed a scene of sorrow there which he hoped never to see again. It was a consolation to know that the children who lost their lives were daily attenders at Mass and communicants. Therefore they were well prepared to meet their Creator, and their parents had the whole-hearted sympathy of the Council in their bereavement. Mr, P. J. Reynolds, in seconding said it was his intention as a member of the Council for Ballinamore area to propose a vote of sympathy as he thought according to procedure the agenda had to be finished first before taking up consideration of such a resolution. The parents had the wholehearted sympathy of the Leitrim County Council in the great loss which they had sustained. The Chairman said the sad occurrence had cast a gloom not alone over the Ballinamore area but it caused a painful shock throughout “Eire.” They sympathised deeply with the relatives of those children.

12-9-1942. DEARER 26-CO. BREAD. The price of the 41b. batch loaf is to be raised in the 26 Counties from ls to ls 1d, delivered, as from September 21. The price will be Is when sold at bakers’ shops. The price of flour (including wheaten meal) will be increased South of the Border from 52s 6d a sack of 280 lbs. to 60s free on rail at port mills, as from September 14th. The flour price increase is attributed to the new guaranteed price of 50s a barrel for Irish wheat,

12-9-1942. GLANGEVLIN TRAGEDY. MAN FOUND HANGED. A distressing tragedy was discovered in Glengevlin on Friday afternoon when Peter McGovern, Bealballie, Glangevlin was found dead, suspended from a rope, in his home. A niece of deceased, who had acted as housekeeper for him, had left on the previous evening to visit her sister’s house, some miles away. On her return on Friday afternoon she found the door bolted and. was unable to gain admittance. Securing assistance the door was forced .and the grim discovery made. THE INQUEST. At an inquest held on Saturday a verdict of suicide while of unsound mind was returned. It was stated that deceased had not been in good health since a recent illness. Sympathy was extended to his relatives. The funeral, which took place to Glangevlin, was largely attended.

12-9-1942. BALLYSHANNON COURT. JAIL SENTENCES FOR ASSAULT. At Ballyshannon District Court, before Mr. J. O’Hanrahan, D.J., Patrick and John Rooney, Single Street, Bundoran, were each sentenced to two months’ imprisonment with hard labour for assaulting Charles Gorman, who said he was cut in several places, Lieut. James Mahony, National Army, said one of the Rooneys held Gorman as the other beat him. Witness interfered and took the man away. John Rooney said Gorman started the row.

12-9-1942. KESH MAN GETS DECREE. A decree for £25 was given in a civil bill brought by Francis Maguire, Derrynieve, Kesh, against Lena Gallagher, Tourist House, Bundoran, for that amount due for. cash lent and advanced by plaintiff to defendant on the 20tk October, 1938.

12-9-1942. 60 DOZEN EGGS SEIZED. Imposing a penalty of £100 with a recommendation that it be reduced to £5 in a case in which James McGonigle, Corlea, was convicted of attempting to smuggle 60 dozen eggs across the Border, the Justice said he hoped it would serve as a warning to people on this side of the Border not to be catspaws for those outside the jurisdiction of the State. Garda McGarvey said when questioned McGonigle, who was carrying three boxes of eggs, in a donkey cart in the direction of Corlea, said he was conveying them for a day’s pay from a shop in Cashelard to a man who lived in the Belleek district. The eggs were seized.

12-9-1942. DRUMKEERAN DISTRICT COURT LICENCE APPLICATIONS. Mr. M, J. C. Keane, District Justice, presided at this Court on Wednesday. DANCE LICENCE. Mr. H. Murray, solicitor (Mr. C. L. Flynn), Carrick-on-Shannon, applied on behalf of Mrs. Celia Crowne, Drumkeeran, for an annual dance licence in respect of Crowne’s Hall, Drumkeeran.

Superintendent McNamara, Carrick-on-Shannon, said there was no objection to the licence and the Justice granted the application as asked by Mr. Murray— twenty dances in the year from 8 p.m. to 12 midnight. Mr. Thomas Dowd, Gluckawn, was granted a licence to hold a dance at Gluckawn National School, the guards having no objection.

ANNUAL LICENCES. The publicans in Drumkeeran and district had their annual applications listed for the renewal of their licence and as there was no objection the applications were granted, as also exemptions for early opening on fair mornings.

Mr. Patrick Dolan, .Drumkeeran, applied for the renewal of his spirit grocery wholesale and retail licence, and the Justice inquired if there was any proof of valuation with regard to the wholesale licence. Mr. Early, court clerk, said the applicant was within the limitation and had been granted a licence on a previous occasion. The renewal of the licence was accordingly granted.

12-9-1942. D.J. SUGGESTS TRANSPORT FACILITIES TO COURT. MINERS’ ABSENCE HOLDS UP CASE. Fifteen miners, summoned to give evidence at Ballyfarnon in a series of cases under the Holidays (Employees) Act, 1939, against Michael Leydon, managing director Arigna Collieries, Ltd., failed to appear, and Mr. Keane, D.J., adjourned the summonses for a month for their attendance. It was alleged that Mr. Leydon had failed to give workers annual leave and public holidays, and had failed to pay, assessor pay when they quitted his employment.

Mr. M. Lavin, Inspector of Mines and Factories, said Mr. Leydon had told him that he thought the Act did not apply to his mines. Mr. Leydon, after the issue of the summonses, sent a letter to the Department enclosing receipts from the persons concerned stating that they had got payment in respect of assessor pay, annual leave and holidays. Mr. C. E. Callan, defending, said the inspector had prevented Mr. Leydon increasing the men’s wages. The men could not be present at court owing to transport difficulties. Mr. Keane thought that some effort to transport them to court might he made.

12-9-1942. SMALL FINES PROTEST. CROWN SOLICITOR AND R.M. When at Tynan Petty Sessions on Saturday, Mr. Austin, R.M., fined Patk. Carbery, Balteagh, Middletown, £15 for having been concerned in carrying 35 bottles whisky, uncustomed goods, Mr, J. P. Best (Crown Solicitor) said it was no use the Commissioners getting small penalties like that.He again protested when Fras. Hughes, Lislanley, was fined £3 in respect of two cycle tyres.

If these penalties were to continue he suggested to the Commissioners that they make the minimum fine £100. Mr. Austin — If you want to fill the prisons well and good. Mr. Best—Small penalties encourage smuggling. Mr. Austin—I don’t believe in imprisonment unless it is absolutely necessary. Mr. Best — You don’t seem to think there is a war on.

SUING FOR £1,000 FINE. When Patrick Hamill, John St., Portadown, was charged in respect of 2 lbs. tea. Mr. Best said that under a new Order the authorities were suing for a. £1,000 fine. The R.M.—Very well, I will fine him £1,000. Then he goes to jail. Defendant—I’ll go to prison rather than pay £1,000. Mr. Best, (to the R.M.)—If you want to make yourself ridiculous you can impose the fine. A fine of £3 was imposed.

12-9-1942. BLACK-OUT WARNING. “I would like people clearly to understand that penalties will be very heavy in the coming winter if they don’t blackout, said Major Dickie, R.M:, at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. Addressing District Inspector Peacocke, his  Worship said: “At the same time, Mr. Peacock, I might suggest, that it would be well to draw, the attention of the military authorities to the practice of military cars and lorries not only passing through Enniskillen, but parking in Enniskillen, with unscreened headlights full on. I counted six of them at midnight with blazing headlights. . The whole town of Enniskillen must have been blazing with lights visible from the air for miles away,” he said. D. I. Peacocke—That matter has been given attention already. Of course you understand we must approach the authorities. In, the black-out cases before the Court, his Worship imposed fines of 5/- and costs in the majority and in one a fine of 20/- and costs was ordered.

COCOA SALE: £31 FINE. Thomas Coogan, merchant, Ballybay, was fined £20 and his brother, Patrick Coogan, £5 when summoned at Ballybay for charging 3/9 for a lb. of cocoa. They were also fined £2 each for selling the  cocoa to a non-customer For refusing to give a. receipt a further fine of £2 was imposed on Patrick Coogan.

12-9-1942. ROSLEA DROWNING TRAGEDY. FATHER’S STORY AT INQUEST. How a horrified father watched his son drown in a lake a short distance from the shore was described at an inquest held in Rosslea on Wednesday of last week into the circumstances of the death of a boy named Frank Morton (18) son of Constable Francis Morton, R.U.C., Rosslea, who: was drowned in Drumacritten Lake on the previous evening. The inquest was held by Mr. James Mulligan, Coroner, sitting without a jury. District Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, conducted the proceedings for the Crown. The death of young Morton, who was a general favourite with everyone, caused a pall of gloom in the district. A lad of fine physique, measuring six feet in height, the deceased was about to be accepted in the police force, and his untimely death has evoked widespread sympathy. A native of Co. Armagh, his father was transferred from Derrylin about five months ago, Deceased was his second eldest child, fond, of all kind of sport and a remarkably strong swimmer.

At the inquest, Constable Horton, who was obviously overcome with grief, stated that on the evening of the tragedy witness left his home about 6.30 to have a shot with his gun. His sons, Frank (dead) and George, asked him where he was going, and witness told them so that they would know where to get him. Later witness shot two wild ducks rising off  Drumacritten Lake. Witness tried to get his setter dog to go out for the ducks, but the dog would not go, as it had not seen the ducks on the water. Witness gave up trying to get the ducks and was going away when his two sons arrived. Frank said he would go in for the ducks, and started to take off his clothes. Deceased was a strong swimmer. His son entered the water, and when he was about halfway turned to come back, shouting for help. Witness ran up to a .field to get assistance, but when, he returned he could only see bubbles where his son had disappeared. A verdict of accidental death was returned and sympathy expressed with the bereaved family and relatives.

12-9-1942. SYMPATHY WITH POLICEMAN. When Constable Frank Morton, R.U.C., was giving evidence in a black-out case, Major Dickie said he would like to mention how much they all sympathised with Constable Morton on the occasion of his recent sad bereavement. They were all extremely sorry. Mr. Cooper also, associated himself with the expression of sympathy and Constable Morton, returned thanks. Constable Morton’s 18-year-old son had been drowned in a lake hear Roslea a couple, of days previously. Fines were imposed in a number of cases against householders for not having their premises effectively blacked-out, and Major Dickie said the .penalties would be much heavier this winter if there were any complaints from the R.A.F.

Fermanagh Junior Football 1942.

FERMANAGH JUNIOR LEAGUE. MULLEEK’S WIN OVER CASHEL. Mulleek 6-2. Cashel 0-3. There was a good attendance at Cashel Gaelic Park on Sunday, when Cashel and Mulleek teams met in the Junior League competition. Mulleek started with a slight breeze in their favour. From the throw-in they broke away bombarding the Cashel goals, but Leonard  (the goalie) did some splendid saving. For the first ten minutes Cashel defence held good. A determined rush by Mulleek forwards resulted in a goal per H. McGauran. Despite some fine Cashel clearances, Mulleek had another major per H. McGauran. Inside of a few minutes Pat McGauran again raised the red flag for the visitors. At this stage play waxed very rough, and one of the Cashel, players had to retire owing to severe head injuries. Fisticuffs were indulged in and it was only by exercising great tact that the referee settled the fracas. In the last five minutes of this moiety Mulleek added two goals per H. McGauran and P. McCaffrey and 2 points per P. McCaffrey arid Sean McCaffrey. Half-time score Mulleek, 5 goals 2 pts.; Cashel, nil. No sooner had the game resumed than Cashel went to the attack but the Mulleek defence was impregnable. Play veered from one side to the other, and several Mulleek shots went wide. A determined Cashel rush resulted in 3 points scored in quick succession by Frank Gallagher, Alfie McGovern and P. McGee. Frayed tempers resulted in further incidents. Mulleek had the last score of the match— a goal per Sean McCaffery. Cashel had much, lighter team than Mulleek, who also showed superior training in catching and combination. Mr, J. Daly, Belleek, refereed.

DEVENISH V. DRUMAVANTY. Before a large attendance of spectators the above teams met at Drumavanty on, Sunday. The game which was one of the closest and best contests ever witnessed at Drumavanty was an exhibition of good football of high standard played in a sporting manner and spectators were kept at a pitch of excitement with not a dull, moment from the throw-in to the final whistle. The final scores were:—Drumavanty, 0 goals 6 points; Devenish, 1 goal 2 pts. Rev. Brother Gilleece, Ballyshannon, was a very efficient referee.

As a prelude to the junior game a minor match was played between Ballyshannon and Devenish, which proved very interesting. In this game Ballyshannon, who were faster and better trained than their rivals, emerged victorious by the score of 3 goals 2 points for Ballyshannon; 1 goal 3 points for Devenish. Rev. J. Burns, C.C., refereed.

The Erne Packet. Enniskillen, August 28 1817.

The Erne Packet. Enniskillen, August 28 1817.

Irish Manufacture.—On Tuesday last, three men and a woman were committed to Wexford goal, by A. H. Jacob, who were detected by that active Magistrate, in the neighbourhood of Enniscorthy, in the act of manufacturing leaves of alder, birch, &c. so as to resemble the various kinds of tea imported from China. About two hundred weight of this deleterious article, together with the sheets and blankets used in the process of drying, were lodged in the Custom-house stores.— Wexford Herald.

MOST IMPORTANT. It has long been a desirable object with the Public to have the Currency of the two Countries assimilated. We understand that the thing is effected by the most simple process. The Bank of England has agreed to receive the Notes of the Bank of Ireland the same as their own. To illustrate this subject it is only necessary to state, that a Merchant in Dublin, instead of paying 10 per Cent, for a Bill to meet his engagement in London, may transmit Irish Notes and they will be received as British Currency. It may be a “wonder of nine days,” but Ireland reaps the advantage,—it raises her property 10 per cent, in price, in the great market of the world, and if it be true, as we are confident it is, to owe to the present Minister, on this account alone, more than to all their predecessors since the Revolution. We do not choose at this time, to enter into any particular discussion of the matter. We merely announce the circumstance, and it admits a conclusion of the largest import, which we shall soon fully explain. —Dublin Journal.

HARVEST WEATHER, &.

LIMERICK, AUGUST 23. NEW WHEAT.—Unfavourable as the past rainy weather must have been towards the maturity of all Irish grain we felt pleasure in seeing, at this day’s market new red wheat, of prime quality. — It belonged to Mr. William Watson, near Nenagh, and is enough to shew agriculturists what may be expected from an Irish soil, when properly cultivated, and the seed thereof seasonably deposited. —Chronicle.

A barrel of new oats, reaped fifteen days since, the property of A. French St. George, Esq. appeared in Galway Market, on the 12th inst.

A Cup potatoe, weighing nearly one pound three quarters, was grown at Whitehall, North Liberty of Limerick, the seat of Joseph E. Vize, Esq. It is a very extraordinary natural production at this early period—the stalk was quite green, and would therefore be much larger if left in the ground.

BELFAST, AUGUST 23. Yesterday, an unusual quantity of Oatmeal was brought to market—probably about 150 bags, and little disposition evinced to purchase so that a great quantity remained unsold. The prices were from 23s. to 24s. 6d. per cwt. There was also so large supply of Potatoes, that the market was crowded to excess. They were generally of an excellent quality, and sold for 3½d. to 5d. per stone.

Yesterday Mr. Younghusband commenced reaping a large field of Potatoe Oats, at his house at Ballydrain, near this town. The Oats appear extremely fine, and unusually productive. Another field of Oats, near the old Race Course, between this town and Lisburn, is already partly cut down.

DROGHEDA. AUG. 21. Most of the Liverpool and Preston traders have arrived this week. The markets are in this town most plentifully supplied. Beef and Mutton from 5d. to 6d. per pound. Potatoes, best quality, 7d. per 211b.  Bread, from American flour, 41b. in the Shilling Loaf.—We are happy to state that trade in the above ports is reviving, and business assuming an animated appearance.

The heavy rains that fell last, and beginning of this week, lodged several fields of luxuriant corn, but very little if any injury, we hear has been sustained. The cold winds from the N. and W. that prevailed for some weeks, has shifted to the, S. E, and the temperature of the atmosphere is more genial. Though the sun is partially obscured, the wheats and oats are fast arriving at maturity, and a few weeks will bring in abundance of new corn. Potatoes are at 5d. 6d. and 7d. per stone. Very little grain appeared in the corn market for some weeks and the prices nearly nominal. Our linen market has been brisk for the last fortnight and extensive purchases made for England.

WINDOW LIGHT TAX. A Vestry was held in the Parish of St Michan, Dublin, on last Wednesday week, for the purpose of preparing represent a representation to Mr. Vansittart upon the subject of the Window Tax.

At one o’clock, the Churchwardens took the Chair, and Mr. Wm. Smith immediately rose, and after observing that the subject upon which the Household were assembled, had so recently engaged the attention, as well as that of all the Parishes in the City, and was so generally and well understood, that he felt it would not be necessary form to occupy the time of the meeting by dwelling upon it—proposed a resolution for the appointment of a Committee to wait upon Mr. Vansittart with an address upon the subject of the Window Tax. This mot was immediately carried and the Committee appointed.

Mr. Smith then produced the draft of an Address to Vansittart congratulating the Right Hon. Gentleman on his arrival in this country— complimenting him upon the motives of his journey—representing the distressed state of the Parish of Saint Michan, in which one half of the houses, (amounting in the whole to near 2,000 houses were either shut up, or inhabited by persons unable to pay rent or taxes—in which 12,000 individuals out of a population of 22,000, were reduced from competence, in many cases from affluence, to poverty—and declaring the utter inability of the Parishioners to pay the Window Tax any longer; and therefore praying a repeal of that oppressive impost. After some consultation, this address, being seconded by Mr. Dillon was agreed to, and the Churchwardens were directed to write to the Chancellor of the Exchequer requesting him to appoint a time for receiving the address.

(The window tax was a property tax based on the number of windows in a house. It was a significant social, cultural, and architectural force in England, France, Ireland and Scotland during the 18th and 19th centuries. To avoid the tax some houses from the period can be seen to have bricked-up window-spaces (ready to be glazed or re-glazed at a later date). In England and Wales it was introduced in 1696 and was repealed in 1851, 156 years after first being introduced. France (established 1798, repealed 1926) and Scotland both had window taxes for similar reasons. The tax was introduced in England and Wales under the An Act for granting to His Majesty several Rates or Duties upon Houses for making good the Deficiency of the clipped Money in 1696 under King William III and was designed to impose tax relative to the prosperity of the taxpayer, but without the controversy that then surrounded the idea of income tax. At that time, many people in Britain opposed income tax, on principle, because the disclosure of personal income represented an unacceptable governmental intrusion into private matters, and a potential threat to personal liberty. In fact the first permanent British income tax was not introduced until 1842, and the issue remained intensely controversial well into the 20th century.)

ASCENT AND DESCENT OF THE BALLOON. On the 20th, after repeated postponements, the Balloon ascended from Portobello Barracks with Miss Thompson and Mr. Livingston. The hour had been fixed for half-past one o’clock, but the necessary preliminaries of inflation, adjusting the car &c., were not concluded before half-past three, at which time it was loosed from its fastenings and went off in admirable style, and with great rapidity, taking a southerly direction. The great anxiety of the immense crowd which had assembled within the Barrack enclosure, seemed to be, to see Miss Thompson enter the car, and prepare for her aerial flight—to accomplish this, the pressure was inconceivably great upon those who superintended the arrangements preparatory to the ascent. This lady displayed a perfect composure and self-possession at the time of her departure from the platform, to which the Balloon had been carried, and the apparent intrepidity of her companion was likely to confirm her confidence in the security with which she committed herself to atmospheric space. The shouts and cheerings of the multitude, both within and without the barracks, served to encourage her resolution, and she waved her hand and bade adieu, with seeming gaiety, as she ascended. In four or five minutes after the Balloon departed, a Parachute, to which was attached a small land Tortoise, was separated from it, and in a short period reached the earth and in seventeen minutes from the period of ascent, the Balloon descended on the boundary of the demesne of Marley, the seat of J. D. Latouche, Esq.—the hospitable proprietor of which had watched their progress, and was prepared to assist and receive them and he provided for all the claims their situation presented, with his characteristic kindness and urbanity. The voyagers partook of a dinner at Marley, after which they returned to town, where they were warmly welcomed by their friends. This short trip was in consideration of the course which the Balloon had necessarily taken, and which would have brought it very expeditiously to the sea-coast, and Mr. Livingston, with a laudable gallantry, did not wish to expose his fair partner to the peril which might result from entering upon a marine region, and abridged his voyage in consequently. No accident of any kind occurred.

The attention of Colonel Pelly, and the Officers and men of the 16th Lancers, was friendly and unremitting while the Balloon was preparing for the ascent. Miss Thompson wore a striped sarsnet dress and Spanish hat and feathers. (The first ascent in Ireland was from Ranelagh Gardens in Dublin in 1785 by Richard Crosbie.)

DIED. In the town of Monaghan on the 18th inst. of a fever, Mr. Robert Jackson, Merchant, universally esteemed in life and lamented in death—He was an affectionate husband, an indulgent father, a generous master, a pleasing companion, and an honest man.

Last week, Mr. Con. O’Donnell of Ballyshannon, innkeeper.

On the 13th inst. in the 59th year of his age at his residence Annagheen, near Carrickmacross, greatly regretted by a numerous and respectable circle of friends and acquaintances James Kelly, Esq.

It is under impressions of extreme concern that we have to state the death of Mrs. Richardson, wife of Major Richardson of Rusfad (Rosfad) in this County, and sister to Lieutenant-General Archdall. She expired on the evening of Friday last, after a short but severe illness, in a malignant fever, which baffled all the powers of medicine, and the best efforts of professional skill. This excellent and lamented lady, it may be truly said, fell a victim to her charitable feelings, having caught the infectious and fatal disease, which took away her valuable life, from some of the numerous sick and indigent poor, who sought and found daily relief at Rusfad. Her remains were deposited in the family vault at Templemahery (Templemaghery) (Ardess) on Sunday.

On Thursday night last two cows, one of them belonging to the Rev. Mr. Kernan, were stolen out of a field contiguous to this town. In the fair of Lurganboy on the following day, the thieves were detected offering the cattle for sale, and have been since lodged in Gaol. One of them proves to be a man named John Rorke, who was tried for an offence of a similar nature so recently as the late Assizes here.

We lament to state that, for several nights past, very considerable damage has been done in the potatoe fields situated near this town, by some nocturnal prowlers who destroy the plant, to procure such portion of its produce as is worth removing. The institution of a nightly watch has been adopted in many places, as a protection against the depredations of these wretches, and is a prudent and necessary measure, which should be resorted to everywhere under such circumstances.

A white Swallow has been observed for some days past flying about Castlecoole demesne. Its plumage is pure snow-white, and the beak somewhat of a dark colour. The bird, which is altogether very beautiful, is rather larger than the common species of swallow, and seems to be an object of envy and persecution among its associates of homelier garb.

A malignant fever is at present raging in many parts of the kingdom. Its effects are comparatively unfelt in this neighbourhood, although many cases of a milder character of the disease appear among the lower classes, and a few respectable families have been visited by me calamity.

The weather, since our last, though variable, and rather more moist than could be wished, has, nevertheless, been on the whole pretty favourable to the maturation of the farm crops, which everywhere exhibit, a weighty ear, and a ripening appearance. Yesterday was uninterruptedly fair, and the fineness of this morning would seem to justify the most favourable presages.

Extract of a Letter from Lifford dated 21st instant. “I had a carpenter doing a little job, and I feel much in assuring you that he had, to-day, to go to Strabane to assist in making coffins for the dead and dying in that town and neighbourhood of the contagious Fever now prevalent there. There is also a fever in our Gaol, and there are also several cases in town. The Sick- Report yesterday stated 63 ill in the Fever Hospital.

 

ENNISKILLEN EXECUTION. Last Thursday, Thomas Broughton, pursuant to his sentence at the late Assizes held here, was executed from the drop in front of the New Gaol. The morning war unusually fine and the sun rose bright for every eye but the unfortunate criminal’s. Stimulated by a curiosity which, however it may be censured as cruel, we would not wish to see repressed, in consideration of the appalling lesson it may bring under the eyes of many of our fellow creatures, callous to ordinary admonition, the population of the surrounding country, for many miles, assembled to witness the awful ceremony. The space immediately in front of the Gaol was occupied by the military, consisting of a troop of Dragoons, with a Company of the Royal Scots and the immense concourse of spectators of both sexes extended a considerable distance to right and left,, and in front, as far as the Fort Hill, the sides and summit of which appeared one animated mass.

The Rev. Mr. Duffy, R.C., Chaplain of the Gaol, passed a great part of the preceding night in the cell of the criminal, fortifying his mind against the approaching trial with the sublime consolations of religion; and with such happy effect, that the penitent seemed already almost enfranchised from his mortal coil; in contemplating and desiring the eternity before him. His affections were, in fact wholly disengaged from the things of this world; and he was heard more than, once to regret the few hours delay prescribed by the formalities of the law under such circumstances. Previous to leaving the cell his wife and some of his children, were permitted to take their last fare well, and here, even amid this trying scene, so calculated to wring a father’s heart, he preserved the mastery over his feelings, and that unshaken firmness and composure, which astonished at once and edified the beholders. In every stage of the proceedings his fortitude, leaning upon a Redeemer’s love, and lifted up by a humble confidence in His mercy regained equally unmoved; and the deep, settled resignation of his mind, to a casual observer, might have appeared the effect indifference, or insensibility. Shortly after the departure of his family, he was conducted to the execution room, accompanied by the Rev. Messrs. Kernan and Duffy who there read the sublime affecting office suited to the occasion of a parting soul. There was something beyond what is merely of this earth—something spiritual and heavenly—in the moment. The terrors and ignominy of a public death—the crimes which incurred such punishment—faded from the picture, and the heart only contemplated the spectacle of the frail creature returning to the bosom of his Creator—of the sinner approaching the feet of his Saviour, through the path of repentance and under the mediation of religion.

After some time spent in further acts of devotion, the fatal hour was announced. The prisoner, with the most perfect collectedness, again joined with the Reverend Gentlemen, and some others, present, in fervent prayer. He freely, acknowledged the justice of the sentence, by which he was to suffer, forgave his prosecutors and all others, & expressed himself fully reconciled, and ready, to yield up his life as a small atonement for his crimes. He then cheerfully submitted to the operation of binding his arms by the executioner, who was in attendance, and advanced on the platform, in view of the people, with a firm step, and some appearance of alacrity. Having been fixed in a proper  posture and situation, he raised the cap off his face, as well as the position of his arms would allow, and looked round on the multitude for a moment, apparently with some intention of addressing them. He, however, continued silent—the executioner immediately replaced the cap—retired— and the next instant the unfortunate man was launched into eternity. He expired almost instantaneously, without the slightest struggle or indication of suffering and, after remaining suspended for the usual period, the body was lowered into the coffin underneath and delivered to the relatives, who bore it out of town.

It has been said, and we fear too truly, that, from his early youth up to the advanced age, at which his life terminated thus ignominiously, Broughton was an occasional, if not a habitual violator of the laws. A report prevailed, said to be founded on his own confession, that he was a former associate of Peebles of Lisnaskea, long known as a notorious marauder in this County; and also that he was a party at the robbery of Lisgoole Abbey, near this town, about forty years ago. We feel it but justice to state, that, while under sentence of death, he disclaimed, in the most solemn manner, any sort of connection with Peebles, farther than having afforded him shelter and guidance on one occasion, when flying from pursuit, he accidentally stopped at his house; and that he denied, in the same unequivocal terms, any participation whatever in the attack on Lisgoole alluded to. The solemn lesson taught by his history, and his end, cannot fail to sink deep into the minds of those, who may have unhappily fallen into similar habits of crime. The old and practiced transgressor may be warned, that vengeance, though often slow, and suspended for a time, no doubt for the gracious purpose of holding out an invitation to repentance, is sure to overtake the hardened criminal at last; while the young offender, yet unconfirmed in the ways of guilt, must tremble to perceive the certain fate he is preparing for himself, and learn to remember his Creator in the days of his youth.

All spellings as per original.

1911 Donegal Vindicator.

Donegal Vindicator. 10th March 1911. LOCAL NOTES – By way of the coals of fire idea we mention that the Catch-my-Pals and friends are having a good concert in the Church School, on Thursday. 16th March, and if reports are true it promises to be a really good one. Mr Sealy Jeffares comes “with his name and fame” from Dublin. Mrs Lewis Lipsett is expected to make her debut, and rumour credits her with a really good voice. Mr Sparrow will sing, and many others coming with him commas ‘talented amateurs.’ Isn’t this nice of me? Maybe next time they will give me the eighteen pence for printing the posters. I want it badly. Then I’ve to complain that the managers of these affairs do not send the courtesy cards usual where civilization holds sway. Yet now and then reports of the proceedings are sent for publication. All of which, including the eighteen penny item, goes to prove that the bon ten of Ballyshannon are really very, very provincial, that they don’t know enough to go in when it rains.

I’m on this subject now. If they thought at all it would occur to these people and to others that where they are earning their bread and butter—some of them even get jam—is where they should leave any small dribs and drabs of cash they are bound to expend (note the ex).

I do not refer to ‘that awful crowd’ the Lipsett’ as their friends affectionately dub them. They are past praying for, but I do refer to otherwise thoughtful people, who should try, whether in a large way or a small way, to benefit the town, and enable it to keep its head above water. But they don’t. The printing is run mostly by Papists hence they must get good Protestant ink. It is very rubbishy, because the Papists eat Protestant loaves with a clear conscience— even in Lent.

Nor are the heretics only to blame. Every week considerable sums of money go away to Belfast, Dublin and elsewhere, money that could be left in town, but either from want of thought, or with deliberation, it is sent away at prices, in many instances, double what the work could be done for at home.

This may go on, I am powerless to prevent it, but it is not going on underground any longer. The people who are milking the town dry, and not even leaving the buttermilk in it, will have their services acknowledged, even if it is a benefit to them.

The Half-Holiday movement has extended to Ballyshannon, and a couple of meetings have been held on the subject. Unless it is gone about in the right way it will prove a pretty expensive business to make it compulsory. But by getting all the businesses to sign at the same time, and having only one set of advertisements and legal expenses, it can be worked out for a moderate sum. Anything less than compulsion is useless. There will always be a number of mean persons who otherwise would comply with the letter but breakthrough the spirit. Look at the holidays in the licensed trade for instance. All sign and put up shutters, but, with the exception of about half a dozen, trade goes on as usual. Let there be no loophole. A half-holiday for all or for none.

While in Bundoran on the look-out for an invitation to spend the first Sunday in April at the sea-side I dropped into Mr James Carroll’s and had a look at his newly got-up Skating Rink, It is a bit of all right. A splendid maple floor for skating, a room sixty feet long, lit by electricity. What could you wish for more? Adjoining is a fine billiard room, with a good table, and next door a commodious game room, where one may indulge in simple games, but not games of chance,—-just simple, childish games, the highest single stake allowed being a 1 penny. So that for a threepenny bit one can have a whole evening’s amusement. I’ve often had it too.

Donegal Vindicator Ballyshannon Friday June 16th 1911. The progress of Irish Industrial Development has been steady if not rapid. Year after year we have preached the doctrine but our voice was of one crying in the wilderness. But every good movement is sure to win in time and there are signs that the Industries of Ireland will receive a proper measure of support at, home, instead of having to look abroad for it. The importation of blouse lengths is now done almost surreptitiously by those ladies who believe that only, in Leeds can ‘style’ be discovered. Much, however yet remains to be done and not altogether by the purchaser. There are still too many shopkeepers who are afraid and more who are ashamed to push Irish made goods. Why this should be so is a mystery and a phase of Irish character not easily understood. The Irish made article is usually much better in quality—and since manufacturers have learned a little common sense,—it is generally as cheap, cheaper if we consider quality. To be sure the Sunlight myth is still all powerful, but there are no want of signs that as in the tobacco trade Ireland has stood up against an intolerable monopoly, so will it in the soap business. There is no superiority in the English made article over the Irish and if we went further we might not be afraid of being able to prove our statement. Irish housewives are to blame. They have the word in their months, they never take time to think and so it comes first to them, but if not, the grocer is only too willing to oblige. Let us each resolve to give our own country a chance and practise until we get it upon our tongues ‘Irish made, please.’ A branch of the Irish Industrial Association, should be formed in every town and village in Ireland. There are a sufficient number of earnest workers now in Ireland to carry them on. Three men in a town can work wonders when they set about it in earnest and all the average householder requires is to have the matter kept before him and repeated with sufficient persistency.

On Sunday Mr Walter Mitchell’s Pierrot crowd begin operations in Bundoran, and from appearances I would say they mean to make things hum. He has got together a galaxy of talent such as cannot be found many similar shows in Ireland, or perhaps out of it. I am asked to say that anyone may come without fear of vulgar songs offending the ear. That is good news.

There are sixteen policemen, several sergeants, sub-sergeants, and a handsome District Inspector in Ballyshannon, all for the purpose of keeping the inhabitants in order. Said inhabitants do not require such a large force or any force to compel them to keep the peace, but for an entire week two or three tramps—one a foul mouthed virago—have kept the two Ports in a turmoil but the police were conspicuously absent.

June 16th 1911. CO., FERMANAGH TRAGEDY. OLD MAN’S AWFUL FATE – BEATEN TO DEATH- TERRIBLE SCENE IN HOUSE. Lisnaskea, Friday. An appalling case of murder and attempted suicide has taken place near Lisnaskea, in an outlying mountain district. The police at Lisnaskea learned of the occurrence about nine o’clock last night.

The facts ascertained up to the present show that a man named Felix Scollan was living with, an old age pensioner named Owen Nolan, at Carrickawick, a townland about seven miles from Lisnaskea, in the direction of the mountains.

On Thursday a man named John Duffy was working at the house and in the evening the three men sat down to tea. The three men were sitting quietly in the kitchen having tea, when Scollan it is alleged suddenly and without             warning lifted a heavy stick from under the table, and commenced to attack the old man Nolan, belabouring him on the head. After several blows had been delivered Duffy tried to wrest the stick from Scollan but was unable to do so.

Duffy is an old man, and consequently his power to struggle with Scollan was ineffectual Scollan then procured a razor and attempted to commit suicide by cutting his throat. He inflicted a slight wound. Duffy proceeded to Lisnaskea and reported the matter to the police, a large party of whom arrived at the house with the greatest promptitude. Accompanying the police were Dr. Knox, a priest, the clerk of petty session and a magistrate, but on arrival at the scene they found Nolan had been some tine dead. Scollan was immediately arrested and conveyed to Lisnaskea Barracks.

June 16th 1911. GAELIC SPORTS IN BALLYSHANNON. The paths of the organiser of Sports in Ballyshannon is not strewn with roses, rather do his neighbours cart boulders to throw in the way. Last year when the Gaelic Sports were initiated by that most energetic of Irish athletes, Mr Toal, I R., his presumption was resented so fiercely that the Ballyshannon Brass Band refused to turn out on the occasion, but until we grow up to be a city this will probably continue to be our attitude towards any man who is not content to go to sleep with the rest of us.

The Aodh Ruadh Football and Hurling Club has made for itself a position that few similar organisations in the North-West occupy. Success has attended it at every turn, due entirely to steady perseverance and the keeping up in its ranks of a true sporting spirit. The football and hurling teams are popular wherever they go, and it may be added are usually successful. It was therefore only right that they should have real Irish athletic sports, and we have to congratulate them on the success which has met their efforts, modified as it was. Still there are signs that the Irish revival is taking hold, and we venture to predict that within a few years the event will become a regular Irish Carnival for the entire North-West.

Judges—Messrs J. J. Woods, James Daly, Cormac McGowan and M. D. Quigley.

Starters—F. G. Townsend, T J Kelly and J Kane.

DETAILS.

100 Yards—; 1. J. Gallagher; 2, H. Gallagher.

220 Yards Flat Handicap (open)—1. J E Irvine; 2, James Naughton; 3, D Dolan.

440 Yards Flat Handicap (open) — 1, H Gallagher; 2, James Naughton.

High Jump (open)—1, J E Irvine, 4ft. 10½ in. 2, James Naughton, 4ft. l0 in.

Schoolboy’s Race under 16 Years—1, Wm. Crawford; 2, B Dorian; 3, J. Lawn.

Half-Mile Championship (open); — 1, J Gallagher; 2, M Cleary; 2, Hugh Gallagher. Tie for second place.

Throwing the Weight, 161bs—1, E. Carbery; 2. F Dolan.

Sack Race—1, H Gallagher; 2, F Crawford.

One Mile Flat Handicap (open) — 1, M Cleary; 2, Patrick Crawford ; 2, J E, Irvine Tie for second place.

Slinging 581bs between legs without follow— 1. D J Crowley, I5ft. 1 in. 2, Edward Carbery; 3 James Naughton.

Egg and Spoon Race—1, Patrick Crawford; 2, T. J. Kelly.

Pucking Hurley Ball—1, James Daly; 2, J. Sheerin.

Marathon Race—1, Patrick Crawford; 2, J E Irvine; 3, John Sheerin. Time—Thirty minutes.

June 16th 1911. KING’S BAD QUARTER OF AN HOUR. COMES WHEN HE KISSES ‘MERE MEN’. AN EMPHATIC ROYAL OBJECTION. King George has a bad quarter of an hour in store at the Coronation It is when he has to submit to being kissed— not by the charming ladies of the aristocracy, but by quite a number of elderly male dignitaries. The performance will be commenced by the Archbishop of Canterbury, who will kneel at the King’s feet; place his hands between those of the King, and recite the time honoured formula of allegiance. Thereafter the Archbishop ‘kisseth the King’s left cheek.’

November 3rd 1911. Mr Frank Miller, Cycle Agent, Main Street, has removed to Market Street, as per announcement in another column.

During the week a Retreat was given to the children of Inismacsaint Parish, and was conducted by Father Doyle, of the Jesuit Order.

Mr Thomas. J. Kelly, Agent for the Pearl Life Assurance Company, at Ballyshannon, has been appointed Assistant Superintendent. He remains in Ballyshannon for the present to develop South Donegal. Mr William Ward, Bridge – End, Ballyshannon, succeeds him as Agent for the District.

Before purchasing your Winter Boots call at Munday & Co.’s East Port, Ballyshannon, where you can procure Footwear that will resist the excessive damp of the Winter months at lowest cash prices. Don’t forget to see the ‘Lee Boot.’ Special value in Men’s Nailed Derby’s at 8s 6d, wear guaranteed. Immense stock to select from. One price only. Exceptional Value in Blankets, Flannels, Hosiery, Shirts, at Munday & Co-’s, East, Port, Ballyshannon.

HOME RULE MEETING IN GARRISON. A SKETCH OF THE PROCEEDINGS. BY SEAGHAN. A Home Rule Meeting in Garrison is not an everyday occurrence, and, though the day was anything but a pleasant one, in company with a few friends,—Home Rulers,—I put in an appearance. The picturesque village, which is situate on the banks of the far-famed Melvin was, notwithstanding the moisture, in gala attire. The day being a Holiday (1st November) all the country folk crowded in,—not that I wish it to be understood that it was due to the fact of it being a day of rest that the multitude was so large, No ; these men,—and women, too—are always ready to answer the call of duty, and would surmount all obstacles to: further on the cause.

Almost all the surrounding towns sent contingents with bands and banners, and amongst the number I noticed the Erne ’98 Flute Band under the baton of Mr John Kane, the Cashelard Flute Band, and Belleek Flute Band. Several Divisions of the Ancient Order of Hibernians (B.O.E.) were present, and paraded the village immediately before the meeting was held.

There were a lot of people wearing temperance badges—and some few without them. However, on the whole, I think there was more tea than whisky drank on Wednesday.

Very Rev. Fr. McCleary, P.P., Garrison, was moved to the chair, and, after a short criticism of the Home Rule question, and having read statistics as to the loss the country sustained by emigration, introduced Canon Keown, P. P., Enniskillen whom he said, being a parishoner of their own, he was sure would receive a hearty welcome.

Canon Keown, P.P., familiar to every Lough Derg pilgrim, came to the front aud received a great ovation. ; He spoke in a clear, ringing tone, and is, what he looks, a born fighter. He said times were changed sinoe the last Home Rule Meeting was held in Garrison twenty- nine years ago. That meeting was proclaimed, and the village was iuvadad by Lancers from Dundalk, and a large force of police, and the people had to wade the Garrison river to receive William O’Brien. I . expeotad to hear some¬thing more about William but was disappointed. He roferfeclto English misriilo in Ireland, and spoke of the resources of the distriot,

The next speaker was Mr Wray, Eniiiskillsn,. and any person could see; lie was a lawyer-maa by the rapidity with which he turned orer bis notes. He hammered awav at the Lords amidstCanon Keown, P.P., familiar to every Lough Derg pilgrim, came to the front and received a great ovation. He spoke in a clear, ringing tone, and is, what he looks, a born fighter. He said times were changed since the last Home Rule Meeting was held in Garrison twenty- nine years ago. That meeting was proclaimed, and the village was invaded by Lancers from Dundalk, and a large force of police, and the people had to wade the Garrison River to receive William O’Brien. I expected to hear something more about William but was disappointed. He referred to English misrule in Ireland, and spoke of the resources of the district.

The next speaker was Mr Wray, Enniskillen, and any person could see he was a lawyer-man by the rapidity with which he turned over his notes. He hammered away at the Lords amidst cries of ‘Down with them.’ He said they had wrecked Gladstone’s and other great men’s efforts. He referred to the visit of the Lord and Lady Lieutenant to Enniskillen, and had a shie at the landlords en passant. One of the arguments he said that was brought against Home Rule was that they wanted Separation. Before they could have Separation they would have to destroy the Navy, and they all knew what that meant.

The Chairman then introduced Mr John Fitzgibbon, M P of Castlerea, A good-humoured gentleman with a goatee, and. wearing a tile hat, which he doffed before he made his bow. He is like a man that could hustle. I wonder if he is a cattle-driver? He owes the English Government a ‘wee’ grudge, having suffered imprisonment for the cause. There is one thing certain; he must have kissed the blarney stone. That was a well-timed piece of flattery when he said he wondered if Sir William Carson knew, when he was making use of all that bunkum about Ulster going to fight, if there was such fine-looking men and women in the province as he (Mr Fitzgibbon) saw before him. But it was true all the same, and I hae my doots if Maguire’s men would come out second best in the tussle. He advised them —and he felt sure every Nationalist would agree with him — to be tolerant to everybody who differed with them,—whether in politics or religion, and never be the first to start a quarrel. He related a jocular incident that took place between himself and Captain Craig, and said the Captain and he parted the best of friends. He spoke at length on the Home Rule question. He travelled all the way from the West to be present, and I am sure he was well pleased with the reception he got.

Mr Fitzgibbon proposed a vote of thanks to the Chairman, Rev Father McCleary, and said he hoped that when they next came together on that hillside Ireland would have regained its rights. Canon Keown seconded, and spoke of what Father McCleary had done in the way of wiping out landlordism. Father McCleary suitably responded and the meeting terminated.

November 3rd 1911. FUNERAL OF MR WILLIAM McVITTY, CASHEL, BALLYSHANNON. The funeral took place on Saturday last, to the family burying ground, Mullinashea, Cemetery, of the above gentleman. Deceased was one of the most respected inhabitants of the neighbourhood, a fact which was strikingly testified by the large numbers who attended at the obsequies. The chief mourners were—Mr Wm. McVitty, (nephew) and Mr W H Stack. Canon Holmes officiated at the graveside.

November 10th 1911.MRS WINIFRED GAVIGAN. At an advanced age the death took place on Tuesday .last of Mrs Winifred Gavigan, at the residence of her son, James Gavigan, Clyhore, Belleek. For some short time deceased had been ailing, being greatly affected at the departure of her favourite granddaughter for America recently, also a grandson who had recently visited her. By a strange coincidence it was only on the day of her demise a letter was received from her granddaughter from America asking her to cheer up. The Gavigan family are highly respected in the district, and deceased was one of the old inhabitants of Drimholme, the Travers family, a well-known Irish sept in the neighbourhood. As might be expected, on Tuesday the funeral was large and representative, St Patrick’s, Kilbarron, being crowded at the Requiem Mass solemnised by Rev C. Cunningham, C. C. The remains, in a brass mounted oak coffin, were borne to the hearse by immediate relatives after the service in the Church. The chief mourners were her sons, James and Hugh Gavigan; her daughter, Mrs Flynn. Other relatives, John, May, Kate, and James Gavigan; James Flynn, son-in-law; Hugh, John, James, Michael and Charles Flynn, Joseph, James and James Gavigan, junr.; Owen Gavigan, Edward Gallagher, James Cleary, Corner House, Belleek; John and Edward Cleary, Bridget, Michael, and E. J. Cleary, cousins to deceased. Rev C. Cunningham also officiated at the grave, and at his request prayers were offered for the repose of the soul of deceased.—R.I.P. Mr Edward Stephens had charge of the funeral arrangements.

November 10th 1911. DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MR JOHN F. TIMONEY. On October 30th, in the quiet little church- yard of Toura were laid to rest the mortal remains of Mr. John F Timoney, a well-known Dublin business-man, Mr Timoney started his commercial career twenty-five years ago as an apprentice to the late Mr .Robert Sweeny, Ballyshannon. Of a refined nature, good address and gentlemanly bearing, his promotion was rapid, and he passed on to some of the highest positions in the leading Cork and Dublin warehouses enjoying all the time the unbounded confidence of his employers, and the love and esteem of the hands under him. Amid the temptations and trials of city life his example, advice and purse were always available to the unfortunate youths who went under. Some eight years ago he started business on his own account, but a chill caught in crossing the Channel was followed by an attack of pleurisy, the effects of which have brought to a close at the early age of 43 years a career of great promise. Six months ago he bade farewell to city life and returned to his ancestral home to lay down life’s burden in the spot where he was born, and where the happy days of his childhood were spent. During his long illness no murmur or complaint did he utter. Perfectly conscious to the last moment, and fortified by the Rites of Holy Church, he calmly awaited the dread summons with a resignation, confidence and serenity which were not of this world. Of him it may be truly said, ‘As he lived so he died’—in peace. Rev P. A. McCleary, P. P. officiated at the graveside, and delivered an eloquent panegyric on the many good qualities of the deceased, and commending the example of his beautiful life.

The chief mourners were Messrs J Timoney, J P, sad P. Timoney, brothers; P Slavin, brother-in-law, J Flanagan, B Flanagan, J O’Dare, F O’Dare, J Flanagan, M Flanagan, B Flanagan, B Keown, P Keown, T B Feely, cousins. Amongst those present or represented in the immense funeral cortege were:—Dr Timoney, J. P., Rev G. C. O’Keefe, Dr. Kelly, M Cassidy, J. P., E Kelly, J P, J Dully, JP; J. O Reilly, J. P, E Kerr, J P; B Devine, Strabane; J McGonigle, Ballyshannon; J Beacom, T. Beacom, E. Daly, J. Daly, E Knox, M Knox, W Gallagher, S Moohan, J. Cleary, B. Cleary, J Gallagher, R. Donaldson, S. W. Donaldson, J McBrien, J Busbey, P Montgomery, F Slavin, J Gallagher, T Gallagher, R. Freeborn, J. Keown, J. Johnston, R. Elliott. J. Keown, P. Keown, R. J. Dick, N T; Wm Ferguson, J (D) Keown. J. (P) Keown, J Campbell, E. Campbell, J. Earls, P. Keown, W. Treacy, F. McBrien, J Flanagan, J. Duffy, D. Duffy, J. Kelly, R. W. Dundas, J. Campbell, P. Elliott, D. McGuinness, ? McGuinness, P. Elliott, B. O’Brien, E. J. Johnston, O. Mills, P. J. McBrien, R Morrow, J. Earls, J. Owens, J. Gallagher, J. Greene.

It might be mentioned the funeral was the largest to Toura graveyard for many years in fact since its dedication. The greatest sympathy goes out in the district to the family, as all admired John F Timoney.—R.I.P.

November 10th 1911. CHARLES GALLAGHER, DERRYNASEER, BALLYSHANNON. On Thursday last, in the family enclosure, The Rock Graveyard, Ballyshannon, were laid to rest the mortal remains of the late Charles Gallagher, Derrynaseer, Ballyshannon. The respect paid to the memory of deceased and his family was manifested by the large numbers attending the obsequies, including representatives from Counties Donegal, Leitrim, Sligo, and Fermanagh. At his demise he was over eighty years of age and his Christian and patriotic life was portrayed in a neat panegyric delivered by Rev M. Kelly, C. C., Kinlough, who officiated at the grave, and described deceased as a man who never neglected his duties to God, and who ever kept the end of life in view, resigning himself to the Will of the Almighty. He ever kept before him that ‘If man remembers his last end he shall never sin,’ Father Kelly then asked for the prayers of those present for the repose of deceased. The funeral, as mentioned, was very large, and the chief mourners were his sons, Hugh Michael, Francis and Thady Gallagher (sons); Patrick (grandson); Thady, Edward, and P Gallagher (nephew of deceased). At the grave the usual prayers were said, and a large number waited to see the last sod laid on Charles Gallagher. R.I.P.

1911. Donegal Vindicator. Lough Derg, two doctors and Peter McGuinness.

Donegal Vindicator. 8th September 1911. LARGEST PILGRIMAGE FOR MANY YEARS. Not since the year of the Irish famine of 1846-47 has there been such a number of pilgrims to visit Lough Derg. For many years past there has been a steady increase of persons visiting this retreat, but this year the number has exceeded that of any previous year. Previous to the day of closing there were no fewer than one thousand persons on the island. The Very Rev Prior, Canon Keown, Enniskillen, speaking on the increase this year, which exceeded all others, said it afforded him much pleasure to see such large numbers visiting Lough Derg and performing its exemplary penance at a time when ‘materialism and infidelity’ were over-running so many other lands—a proof that the faith of St Patrick was still flourishing in Erin. All classes, he said, from the members of Parliament down to the humblest peasant, visited Lough Derg and underwent its austerities. It was, he said, particularly gratifying to notice the spirit of social equality that pervaded the ranks of the pilgrims—a spirit that existed nowhere else outside of Lough Derg, There was a general levelling up and down, and all met on the same footing, and at the same scanty hoard of plain bread and black tea once a day, and mingled together in the church, that was beautiful and edifying to see. He advised pilgrims to come out earlier in the season in future, to avoid the discomfort attendant on such large crowds as had been there for the past few days. He said he hoped next year to be able to improve on the voucher system for obtaining reduced railway fares.

Donegal Vindicator. 11th August 1911. Sir Arthur Chance and Dr Rutherford held a consultation yesterday morning regarding Dr O’Flynn, who was so seriously injured in a motor-bicycle accident on Monday. As a result, a further trephining operation was successfully performed, and a large clot of blood removed from the brain. The patient rallied slightly, but in the afternoon he relapsed into unconsciousness.

DEATH OF DR O’FLYNN. Dr Bernard Andrew O’Flynn, Manorhamilton, who was the victim of a motor bicycle accident on Monday, last, has succumbed to his injuries. The operation performed by Sir Arthur Chance on Tuesday gave considerable relief to the patient, who recovered partial consciousness, but he soon relapsed into a state of coma, in which he remained except for momentary rallies, until death subvened at 9 o’clock on Thursday evening. Dr Rutherford was in constant attendance until the last. The deepest sympathy is felt by all classes for his widow and young family.

Donegal Vindicator. 15th December 1911. EDUCATION IN BALLYSHANNON.

We understand that the petitions of the inhabitants of Ballyshannon in favour of the introduction of an order of Teaching Brothers has been so far successful that it is now practically certain that the Brothers De, la, Salle will be installed within the next few months, The Provincial of the Order, Brother Kiernan from Waterford, accompanied by Brother Joseph, Superior at Castlebar, visited Ballyshannon and inspected the town and district, the result being that they have decided to accept responsibility for the educational future of the town. We learn that for the present the existing buildings will suffice but in all probability it will be necessary to provide in the near future for an extension and the erection of an educational establishment on a very much extended scale.                                               ‘

Donegal Vindicator. 11th August  1911. BELLEEK FAIR. The August fair in Belleek is generally recognised by producers and purchasers as an index of the probably current prices for the real season of the cattle trade beginning in September This year owing to many circumstances, including Strikes, weather, etc., the fair was not no well attended by cross channel buyers, besides haymaking being in progress the supply was remarkably shorter than usual. The general report of the market is that demand unless for local exchanges, especially to County Leitrim, was slow. Quotations— ; Calves, £3 10s to £5 15s: year-olds, £5 to £7; two-year-olds, £10 to £12 springers, £12 to £17; sheep (wethers) 18s to 25s; bonbams, 25s each. Beef and mutton absent.

Donegal Vindicator. 11th August  1911. GALLANT RESCUE BY DR KELLY, BELLEEK. Dr Kelly, dispensary doctor, Belleek was the hero of a very plucky action the other day. It appears that a boy named Donagher, about five or six years old fell into the water above the lade near Belleek Creamery. An old man caught him but was unable to bring him ashore and ultimately he was compelled to lose his hold and the child was carried down through the salmon leap, and through the bridge into the rapid river below, where the water runs at a terrific speed. Dr. Kelly, who was in the vicinity hearing the cries, ran to the spot and plunging in, caught the boy and brought him ashore, where it was found that beyond the fright he had not suffered much. The speed of the torrent had kept him from sinking. One would require to see the place and the turmoil of the water before being able to realise the heroism of Dr Kelly in plunging in clothes and all.

Donegal Vindicator. 8th September 1911. THE INVASION OF BALLYSHANNON.

Air—‘Scot’s Wha’ Hae.’

In the month of July, 1597, Sir Conyers Clifford, Governor of Connaught, aided by O’Brien of Thomond, Burke of Clanrikarde, O’Brien, Baron of Inchiquin, O’Connor, Sligo, and others invaded Ballyshannon with an immense army of horse and foot also with a maritime force sent from Galway, and after crossing the Erne, and sailing up from the sea invested Ballyshannon, besieged the castle of the O’Donnell, and occupied the Abbey of Assaroe. After a siege of several, days they were defeated in a pitched battle, the invading force repulsed and pursued by the forces of the O’Donnell over the plain of the Moy and many slain. The following ode is supposed to be composed on the occasion and sung to the harp by Owen Row McWard, the bard of the O’Donnells.

Lord Clifford rose, O’Donnell’s foe,

Resolved to conquer Assaroe,

And march where Erne’s waters flow,

Tyrconnell to subdue.

As clouds roll onward with the wind,

With lightning flash and force combined,

He moved along, on death inclined,

To lay the hosts of Hugh.

 

From Thomond, where the Shannon.flows

O’Brien came with warrior foes,

The Burkes of Galway martial rose,

To aid Lord Clifford then.

O’Connor Sligo, rose in might.

Arranged his forces for the fight,

And helped to swell that dreadful sight

Of many warlike men.

 

Then shaking earth and piercing sky

With tramp and shout and battle cry,

They raised their martial standard high

And crossed the River Erne—

Resolved Tyrconnell to enslave,

They sent their ships across the wave

Containing many a warrior brave

And Galloglass and Kerne.

 

At shore and fosse and tower and gate

We met that martial foe elate,

And blow for blow and hate for hate

Imparted to the crew.

Until the invaders rued the day

With hostile force they came away

Resolved in ruin black to lay

The ancient town of Hugh.

 

But down they fell as falls the rain,

Upon Moy Ceitua’s ancient plain—

They’ll never come with boasts again

Tyrconnell to subdue

Lord Clifford and his chieftains fled

Ignobly with the hosts they led,

Their choicest warriors lying dead

Upon the land of Hugh.

 

Then raise the song and strike the lyre

With fingers bold and soul of fire,

And lift your voices high—yet higher

Unto the sky of blue,

With martial flame and loud acclaim

We’ll ever sing O’Donnell’s name.

A conqueror: to us he came

The valiant son of Hugh!

  1. McGENNIS.

(+) From an unpublished novel of the author’s, ’Red Hugh O’Donnell last Prince of Tyrconell.

(+) In crossing the river O’Brien, Baron of Inchiquin was drowned. Peter Magennis (1817 – 1910)

Peter Magennis was born in County Fermanagh and became a National School teacher. The Ribbon Informer, 1874, was among his most successful novels, and he also wrote poetry. He was known as the bard of Knockmore. Born:            1817 Died: 1910.

Seamas McAnaidh writes – Eoghan Rua Mac an Bhaird 1570-1630 was from Killbarron, married Maire Ni Chleirigh; was bard of O’Donnell and took part in the Flight of the Earls in 1607. Two of his sons were Franciscans, Aodh Bui was guardian of St. Anthony’s College, Louvain and Fearghal Og was hanged in Ireland in 1642. I suspect this ‘translation’ is an original work by Magennis.

3rd March 1911. A football match was played in the Erne Park on Sunday last, between a team representing Belleek and Ballyshannon Ernes, and resulted in a draw of two goals each. Mr J. Kane was referee.

There was a nice rumpus at Fermanagh County Council, over the new roads in Belleek district. In the end the decisions of the District Council and of last meeting of the County Council were rescinded. Notice of motion to once more rescind was handed in by Mr Leonard, so that we may expect lively times.

Kinlough is to have a system of sewerage and Mr O’Brian, who is at present architect for the scheme of Labourers’ Cottages, was, on Saturday, selected as engineer by the District. Council.

The coming Census is going to make things hum in Bundoran. If half we hear be true, then it will be a plaoe worth living in at the end of March. The decision to become a Rural District within the meaning of the Act, will, it is stated, be responsible for much hospitality.

An interesting Hurling match was played on Sunday last in the Rook Enclosure between Ballyshannon Aodh Ruadh (junr.) and Ballinacarrick Faugh-a-Ballagh’s, and resulted in a win for Aodh Ruadh.

Mr Augustine Roche was selected at the United Irish League Convention in Dundalk on Monday. It is anticipated that Mr T. M Healy will again contest the Division,

Sergeant John Gardiner, R.I.C., stationed in Ballyshannon, and Inspector of Weights and Measures, leaves tomorrow (Saturday) to take charge of Newtowncunningham Station in this County. During his stay here—-scarcely two years—he carried out his duties in a most impartial and straightforward manner, being held in much esteem by the people of Ballyshannon and district. He carries with him best wishes for his future prosperity.

The Innishowen salmon fishermen have won their case in the Court of Appeal, and it only now remains for the Irish Society to take them to the House of Lords, which may happen. The decision involves very great interests outside of the district directly concerned, in fact, the whole coast line of Ireland will be affected. Let us hope the Irish Society will be advised to allow the matter to drop. If they do not it will certainly look as if they were relying upon the poverty of the fishermen being unable to provide funds for an expensive Appeal before the House of Lords,

3rd March 1911. BALLYSHANNON .LACE CLASS. ANNUAL CONCERT. The Ballyshannon Lace Class Concert has now become an annual event, and one which is looked forward to with eagerness, not only by the members of the Class, but by the general public, as being an assured artistic and musical treat in every sense, This year’s Concert maintained, if indeed it did not surpass, the usual standard of excellence. Once more the services of Miss Gabrielle O’Doherty, Strabane, had been secured, and those who heard her on her first visit to Ballyshannon were most anxious to enjoy that pleasure once more, and those who did not hear her were present this time in large numbers, and, as a consequence, the Rock Hall was well filled on Monday evening when the programme commenced. The first item was a solo by Mr William McCusker, Enniskillen, who is the possessor of. a powerful baritone, which was well suited to the songs selected, ‘The Outlaw’ and ‘ The Diver.’ An enthusiastic encore was accorded him, and he responded with ‘In Happy Moments,’ and ‘Beautiful Isle of the Sea.’ Miss Dora McCafferty’s rendering of ‘The Last Milestone’ was well worth hearing, and in response to an undeniable recall she gave ‘ The …….

Donegal Vindicator. 10th February 1911. DEATH OF MR JOHN J. GAVIGAN, U.SA. TOUCHING REFERENCES AND RESOLUTIONS.

We learn with deep regret, of the death in Trenton, U.S.A., of Mr John J. Gavigan, brother of Mr James Gavigan, Belleek Pottery. The American newspapers contain lengthened references to his death, and the loss sustained by the various organisations with which he was connected. We tender our sympathy to his bereaved family and relatives.

The Daily State Gazette’ writes John J. Gavigan, one of the best known potters in the United States, died abont  2 ’clock yesterday morning after an illness extending for more than a year. He lived at 200 Reservoir Street. He was taken ill with insomnia, and serious nervous troubles followed. Then he contracted rheumatism, and one ailment aggravated the other until he became very bad. Mr Gavigan resigned his position as superintendent of the Hallmark pottery about a year ago, since that time he had been confined to his room.

Mr Gavigan was one of the oldest potters in the country. When a boy he started work in the famous potteries at Belleek, Ireland, and learned his trade there. He was a skilled mechanic, and soon learned to master every detail of the pottery business. He became one of the best informed men in the country on matters pertaining to the pottery industry. Many sought his advice when they became puzzled over questions of the trade. He came in contact with all the leading pottery, supply houses in this country.

When a young man Mr Gavigan came to this country, and twenty six years ago he secured a position in the old Delaware pottery, on Prospect Street. The pottery was built by the Olipliants, who afterwards got control of the Bellmark pottery, and Mr Gavigan was made superintendent of the plant. By hard work he raised the pottery trade to the highest standard.,

The deceased leaves two sons—John, Jun, who is assistant superintendent of the Bellmark pottery, and Joseph a bookkeeper at the Mechanics National Bank. Mr Gavigan was a prominent member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians. Besides holding several local offices, ha was state president of the organisation for some time. He was a deep thinker and reader, and was known as a man of great wit. No matter how busy he was, he always had time to tell a humorous story and joke, and was pleased to entertain his friends. Ha was known for his oratorical ability, and won many friends by his kind disposition. Treasurer Oliphant and General Manager Gilkyson of the Bellmark Pottery, said last night that Mr Gavigan’s death would be keenly felt in the pottery world and in other business circles.

Mr Gavigan was a member of Division No 1 A.O.H., St. Patrick’s Alliance, Branch No 1 District No 7; Trenton Council No 355, Knights of Columbus; Mercer County Board, AO.H., and the Holy Name Society of St. Mary’s Cathedral. The funeral will take place from his late home, 200 Reservoir Street, on Wednesday morning at 8 o’clock. Solemn requiem High Mass will be celebrated at the Cathedral at 9 o’clock. The interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

Donegal Vindicator. 9th June 1911. DEATH. McDermott – At the Workhouse Infirmary, Ballyshannon on Friday 9th June, Terence McDermott. R.I.P.

Donegal Vindicator. 9th June 1911. This hot weather in not a season for figures, but even at the risk of injuring some splendid intellects we direct attention to an excellent exposure of the Irish deficit bogey which has been so extensively worked by the English press. Every Irishman should make himself up in the figures for which we are indebted to our contemporary ‘ The Irish Homestead’—

Our readers will all remember, for a year has hardly elapsed since a Treasury paper was issued pointing out that the local expenditure in excess of revenue in Ireland was £2,357,000 for the financial year ended 31st March, 1910. What a roar went up ! We were assured on all sides that we were living on charity, which was very ungenerous, because our English friends had been assisted by our charity for a hundred years, and had many times received from us a yearly contribution to their expenses far greater in amount than this supposed first contribution of theirs to our national expenditure. For example, in 1819 our contribution to England to help it to govern itself was £3,691,684; in 1829 it was £4,150,575 ; in 1839 it was £3,626,322 ; in 1849 it was £2,613,773; in 1859 it was £5,396,000; in 1869 it was £4,488,210; in 1879 it was £3,226,307; and in 1889 it was £2,684,694. So from these figures, figures supplied by the Treasury itself, it can be learned what average aid we gave the sister island during a century, and we were hardly prepared for the roar of exultant superiority which came from the throats of English journalists when for one year it appeared as if we were living on English charity and the more usual alternative practice was discontinued. But those who shouted loudest about the depraved pauper condition of Ireland run at a loss of £2,357,000 overlooked the fact that England itself had a deficit in the same year of £26,248,110, and if our condition was bad theirs was much worse. This was ignored, and the attitude of those who so suddenly turned and patronised us reminded us of nothing so much as an incident which occurred to the present writer, who once clubbed with a friend. and one evening the friend, who had boiled two eggs, dropped one of them, and said calmly “See, I have dropped your egg.”

It was the Irish financial egg that was dropped in 1910, and nothing at all was said about the rights of the case or the blame for dropping. Of course in that particular year the finance of both countries was disturbed by the failure of Lloyd George, to carry his famous Budget, and there were uncollected arrears of taxation both in England and Ireland—in Ireland these arrears amounted to almost one million pounds. They have been collected since. The money was there safe, but we were assured in spite of that that as a nation we were financially down at heels, and we ought to be ashamed of ourselves. But in reality, it was the English egg if any which was dropped.

Our congratulations to Dr F W Condon, F R C S I, on his appointment as Medical Officer to the County Donegal Railway’s joint committee, and also to the representatives of the Admiralty in Ballyshannon.

In a petition to the Local Government Board it is stated that there is not one vacant house in Carrickmacross. Happy landlords!

On Tuesday last, a man named McGuinness, a carpenter, residing at Bundoran, died suddenly from heart disease. Deceased who was very popular, leaves a wife and family, for whom the deepest sympathy is felt. The funeral took place on Thursday.

The Brass and Reed Band competitions at Derry Feis take place to-morrow (Saturday). Where is Ballyshannon Brass Band? Only yesterday and our Brass Band might have stood against any, now where is it? We invite a reply. It required a great and steady effort to have a band worthy of the town, and the members owe it to themselves to give an explanation of the reason for the collapse. A little plain speaking may clear the atmosphere—let us have it.

Very Rev Canon Keown, P. P., V G Enniskillen, blessed the foundation stone of a new hospice in Lough Derg last week, under the patronage of St Patrick and the Blessed Virgin Mary, It is intended for the exclusive use of women pilgrims, and will accommodate considerably over 200. The existing hospice will be entirely set apart for men in future. The building was designed by Mr W. A. Scott, architect, Dublin, and is of the most modern type. It is being built, of iron and concrete, and will be fireproof. The contractor, Mr Connolly, of Dublin is proceeding rapidly with the work, and hopes to have the increased accommodation available for this season’s pilgrimage, His foreman Mr Mulligan, and Mr Stell, who represents the company supplying the iron materials, courteously assisted Canon Known and Rev. Father Gormley, C. C., in the work of laying the foundation stone.

Donegal Vindicator. 3rd February 1911. CAPTAIN COLLUM DEAD. KILLED BY THE ELECTION. All over Co., Fermanagh universal regret was felt on Saturday when it became known that Captain A. P. T. Collum, J P, D L, had died at his residence, Bellevue, Enniskillen. The deceased gentleman, it will be remembered, unsuccessfully contested North Fermanagh in the Liberal interest at the General Election last month. For over a year past he had been indelicate health, and the anxiety and worry entailed in fighting a contested Parliamentary election told seriously against his reserve of strength, with the result that immediately after it was over he took seriously ill, and from the first but little hope was entertained of his ultimate recovery.

A son of the late Captain William Collum, Bellevue, he inherited a very considerable property in the county, on the death of his father including house property in the town of Enniskillen. He was a kind and indigent landlord, and none will more sincerely mourn his death than his tenants. He was born at Bellevue in 1866, and was educated at Cheltenham and St John’s College, Cambridge.

For some time he was Captain in the 3rd Batt Royal Irish Fusiliers, and was also a member of the Irish Bar. He disposed of his agricultural land to his tenants under the c1903 Act, but retained in his possession the demesne grounds at Bellevue, comprising some 600 acres. On two occasions he filled the office of High Sheriff of Co Fermanagh.