October 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

10-10-1942. SIX-COUNTY DAIRY INDUSTRY. FARMERS’ RESENT MINISTRY’S ACTION. CLOSING OF CREAMERIES. “CHANGES HAD CREATED INDIGNATION ”

The Ministry would get far better and more successful results by acknowledging the education which the farmer had gained by experience, and consult him and secure his co-operation in their new schemes before touching them, said Mr. J. Johnston, secretary of the U.A.O.S., at the annual meeting of Creamery shareholders. Mr. Thos. McCaughey referred to the changes the Ministry was making in the dairying industry, not only in closing such a large number of creameries, but in upsetting the existing transport arrangements for milk suppliers. Milk will now have to be transported by lorry whereas previously 70 to 80 per cent of all the milk in Northern, Ireland was delivered by horse and cart.

Several suppliers present said they had notice from the Ministry to leave their milk at collection points over two miles from their house and away from the creamery, although, their house was only three-quarters of a mile from the creamery. It was unanimously agreed to leave, their milk at the point where they had always left it. Mr. J. Johnston, secretary, U.A.O.S., said the changes that were now being introduced into the industry by the Ministry had created a wave of indignation from farmers throughout the country. Inexperienced officials with little local knowledge of the country had marked out on a map the collection points where suppliers were to leave their milk and they had just heard some of the results. The same thing had happened all over the country.

It had been stated that farmers approved of the scheme because there had not been any protest, but the farmer has learned that if he dared to protest his milk would not be paid for. In his opinion the new transport arrangements to be carried out under the Ministry’s control would require a very large increase in the amount of petrol used, and would ultimately cost a great deal more. The petrol increase was a matter for the Petroleum Board, but the increased cost would have to be paid by the farmer.

With regard to the closing down of 60 creameries in Northern Ireland at 1st October, Mr. Johnston said, it had always been the view of the practical dairyman that the earlier in the morning the milk could be collected at the farm, and the nearer to the depot or creamery at which the milk was to be treated, the better the quality of the milk to be delivered to the consumer. They were told the whole scheme was intended to process the milk at present going to the creameries to make it suitable for the liquid milk market. By closing two-thirds of the creameries the distance to the creameries retained for treatment was greatly extended. The larger quantity to be treated took much more time, and the new system meant that milk would be collected from some points up to 3 o’clock and later.

10-10-1942. NO LICENCE FOR DANCE HALL. “EXCUSE ME ” DANCES A MENACE. Objections were made to the renewal of the licence for dances at Jamestown Hall by Sergeant John McGrath, Drumana, at Carrick-on-Shannon; District Court when the adjourned application of

Mr. John Gaffney, one of the trustees, came before the fortnightly (District Court) for the renewal of the licence.  Last year they got 12 dances and the hours were from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m. and the rows did not start until 1-30 or 2 a.m., and accordingly this year they wished to curtail the hours to 1 o’clock. Continuing the applicant said that the committee, tried to settle the row and keep the opposing parties separated but the crowd was so big it was impossible to handle them. There were dances held in August and September and there were no rows at them. He asked for 12 dances 8 p.m. to l a.m.

Sergeant John McGrath, Drumana, said that unless the Guards were present the parties in attendance came to blows, the committee took no action to prevent disorderly scenes and law abiding citizens had to pay for admission while the disorderly crowd were sent out free tickets. Witness said that he saw the free tickets himself being sent out to the disorderly crowd. Sergeant Gallagher said arguments developed in the hall and caused people to crowd around the hall. He had warned the committee not to have “excuse me” dances, as they cause trouble, and there was not a dance, on the occasion of the row, but was an “excuse me.” Mr Keane said that on the evidence of the Sergeant he had no hesitation in refusing the application. Had the hall been governed by a proper committee he would grant the application.

17-10-1942. “BRAINWAVE” SCHEME RETURNS TO AID RED CROSS. It was reported at the meeting of County Fermanagh Committee of Agriculture on Saturday that the amount of money raised in the .Six Counties for the month of August on behalf of the Red Cross. Agricultural Fund in the scheme initiated by Fermanagh of 1d in the £ on cattle passing through the grading centre was £1,111 8s 11d and for the month of July the total raised from the milk deductions (also suggested by Fermanagh) was £188 18s 0d.

Mr. H. A. Porter said he had meant the scheme to include pigs. Major W. O. Nixon (chairman) said the scheme had been satisfactory so far, but if they took the percentage of people that really subscribed to the fund it was very disappointing. Mr. J. N. Carson—It is not brought to their notice. If it is brought to their notice they pay at once.The Chairman said it was printed on the cards. Fermanagh had the highest percentage of any county in the North. Although the fund was doing well, it could do better. Mr. J. E. Fawcett, J.P., thought if it were printed in red ink on the cards it would emphasise it better. Chairman—I think the scheme was a brain-wave of the people on this Committee who suggested it.

17-10-1942. BISHOP MAGEEAN BLESSES NEW CHURCH. The Catholics of the pariah of Aghagallon, three miles from Lurgan, went to Mass in their new £20,000 church for the: first time on Sunday. On Thursday last the Bishop of the Diocese, Most Rev. Dr. Mageean, had solemnly blessed .and dedicated the building, but on Sunday he formally opened the new edifice! It was a day of celebration in the parish, and everywhere there were manifestations of joy, practically every Catholic house in the district displaying Papal flags. The front of the new building was decorated with streamers of Papal colours. Right Rev. Mgr. Dean O’Hagan, P.P., V.G., celebrated High Mass, and Rev. A. Ryan, D.Ph., D.D., preached. Very Rev. J. Connelly, P.P., thanked the subscribers

17-10-1942. KINAWLEY ROAD NEEDS REPAIRS. At Enniskillen Rural Council meeting Mr. J. R. Crawford moved that the Council repair the old road in Drumbinnis and Corracrawford between Kinawley and Florencecourt. Ten or eleven ratepayers he said had their farms alongside this road which was in a very bad condition. Mr. W, Kelly said he had been informed that it was impossible to use this road. One man had two carts broken on it within two months. The county surveyor (Capt. Charlton) said the road was not in as bad a condition as stated. However, financial provision had been made for it in the estimates. After further discussion it was decided to leave the matter in the hands of the County Surveyor.

17-10-1942. “TYRANNY OPERATING AGAINST MINORITIES’’ BRITISH M.P.s AND STORMONT. Two M.P. in the British House of Commons on Tuesday said that tyranny was operating against minorities in the Six Counties and that there was ’disgraceful discrimination” against Catholics. Mr. McGovern (I.L.P.), when the Prorogation of Parliament Bill was considered in Committee, moved the rejection of a clause dealing with the duration of the Northern Ireland House of Commons, and, urging an election there, said there was overwhelming opposition to the Northern Government taking dictatorial powers over Belfast City Council. Unionists have told me that the Government should be purged of certain elements and undergo a drastic change. “Three or four hundred people are interned there—some without charge or trial for over five years—-and many believe that they are prisoners because of malicious and political intolerance. Tyranny is operating against minorities I there.’’

Mr. Stokes (Lab.) said: “There is disgraceful discrimination against Catholics in Northern Ireland. When six young men were charged with shooting a Belfast policeman, the Government refused to have a single Catholic on the jury. That Government is not fit to carry on.” The amendment was rejected by 220 votes to 6, and after ,a further amendment by Sir Richard Ackland (Ind.) to prolong Parliament for six months instead of 12 had been rejected, the Bill was read a third time.

17-10-1942. LADY SEARCHER AT BALLYSHANNON. Customs searches on the Belleek border have been intensified. Train and bus passengers are all searched—a practice hitherto unknown in that area. A lady searcher has been appointed in Ballyshannon and she was on duty for the first time last week at all the trains. On Saturday evening she carried out a search of all the lady passengers on the last bus leaving Ballyshannon. On both sides there is much greater Customs activity at all posts but the number of seizures from ordinary travellers are comparatively few.

17-10-1942. CLONES COUNCIL FINANCES.  At a special meeting of Clones Urban Council held on Friday night for the  purpose of considering the council’s finances it was unanimously decided to raise a loan of £2.000 by temporary borrowing by way of overdraft accommodation for the months of October-November to enable the payment of arrears of loans to the Commissioners of Public Works and to their treasurers.

17-10-1942.TO LET OR SELL. Farm OF 100 ACRES, good 2 story slated Dwelling-house (with hot and cold water) (Calor Gas}; splendid Office houses, all in good repair, about 1 mile from Irvinestown. The above place can be let for a number of years, with 70.acres if required.—F. SCALLON, Moynaghan, Irvinestown.

17-10-1942.70 PER CENT. OF OAT CROP HARVESTED. FERMANAGH FARMERS’ GOOD WORK. Despite severe harvesting conditions experienced this year, seventy per cent, of the 1942 oat crop has been cut and stacked in County Fermanagh, while ninety per cent. has already been cut stated Mr. W. T. McClintock, B. Agr., War Executive Officer, at a meeting of the County Fermanagh Agricultural Committee in Enniskillen on Saturday afternoon. He said the farmers had, in spite of adverse conditions, done a remarkable job and .their work had been heroic. One man had cut twelve acres of oats with hooks.

At the present time, he said, there were in operation in the county 150 tractors and ploughs, 72 disc harrows, 88 binders, 46 mobile threshing mills, and, in addition, hundreds of horses. Labour, which had been one of their chief problems in the past, would not now be such a problem owing to machinery which had been set up by the Government to direct men to the land and remain on it. Voluntary labour, which had been so successful in other counties, had not been a success in Fermanagh, and in this respect there would remain, a stain on the county which, it was hoped, would be wiped out by an improvement in the matter next year.

The new Tillage Order had been issued, and .farmers had been asked for an increased effort. Subsidy would be paid on four crops in the coming season, i.e., wheat, rye, potatoes and flax. Mr. John Graham complained of the price allowed for potatoes, contending that after the £10 per acre subsidy and the £3 15s 0d per ton fixed price were added together the return did not compare favourably with that received by the “Eire” farmers.

Mr. F. Doherty thought that the reason was to be found in that the price was the same as that fixed, for the English crop. Mr. Graham said farmers in Northern Ireland were not getting a fair deal in this respect. He added that in “Eire’’ the price given for potatoes was £8 per ton. They were not worth digging at the price now fixed in Northern Ireland. Mr. J. O. Rhynehart, of the Ministry of Agriculture, who was pressed for an explanation as to the discrepancy in prices stated he was not in a position to state what the prices were in another part of the country, but pointed out that in ‘Eire’ the scarcity of manures would possibly result in a poorer crop, so that in the end the return per acre in Northern Ireland might be higher. Mr. Graham – I think that is not an answer. Mr. Doherty said that in country places potatoes were not worth moving at £3 15a per ton.

Mr. A. Wilson—Better do away with the potato crop. Mr. McClintock objected to the question as to the price paid in “Eire” stating they were not concerned with it. Mr. J. N. Carson, J.P.—Indeed we are concerned with it. Mr Graham (to the Secretary) — Yes, so, I am not going to let you away with that. We are concerned if a better price is paid across the Border in the Free State. Mr. Graham then spoke of the number of fat cows, which were going across into “Eire,’’ where a better price was being paid than at home. Major W. G. Nixon, D.L., chairman, said he was sure Mr. Rhynehart would bring their views on these two questions before the price fixing authorities.

Mr. J. E. J. Fawcett, J.P., voiced the appreciation of the farming community at the efforts of Mr. McClintock and his staff in promoting the tillage drive in the county. It had been a difficult period but the farmers had come through fairly well on the whole, and the position was much more satisfactory than anyone could have imagined earlier in the season. Mr. J. R. Hamilton, J.P., stated Mr. McClintock did a wonderful job of work, and the farmers had scored a wonderful achievement. Supporting, Mr. Graham said he was still of the opinion, that the Ministry had given the farmers an unfair deal as regards the potato crop. He requested Mr. Rhynehart to convey to the Ministry the Committee’s expression of thanks to their officials. Mr. Rhynehart said he would be delighted to do so. In reply, Mr. McClintock said the farmers of Fermanagh had responded promptly to the appeal for more tillage, and it was only in a very odd instance that the officials encountered any difficulty.

17-10-1942. MINUTES AMENDMENTS. WAR BONUS FOR RELIEVING OFFICER. Mr. James Murphy objected to the signing of the minutes of Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday on the ground that they stated that an increase in war bonus be granted to Mr. P. MacManus, reliving officer, to bring the grant under this heading up to 5s a week. Mr. Murphy said his proposal on the last Board day was to increase Mr. MacManus’s war bonus by 5s a week which would bring the grant up to 6s 6d a week.  Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., chairman, stated he had the entry in his book which corresponded to what Mr, Murphy now said. Mr. J. Brown, cleric, said he understood Mr. MacManus was being treated in the same way as Mr. Fee, another relieving officer had been dealt with—i.e., an increase of 3s per week, half payable by the Board and half by the Rural Council.

Mr. Murphy said that what really happened was Mr. Beatty proposed 10s a week, and he seconded. Mr. Thornton proposed. 3s and that was why he (Mr. Murphy) had proposed 5s a week. Mr. J. Beatty, J.P.—I understood the 5s proposal was passed. Mr; James Burns said his recollection of what happened was that the bonus be made up to 5s a week as the Clerk had stated in the minutes. Mr. C- McKeown—Didn’t the Ministry sanction 10s a week for a nurse? Didn’t the ferryman get 10s? I do not see why the Ministry should object to it. Clerk—It is not a question of that at all—it is a case of the minutes being correct. That now makes the bonus a total of 6s 6d per week? Mr. Murphy—Yes. Mr. Beatty—I would like to know why he was only allowed 6s 6d. Clerk—That was the Board’s decision. Mr. Beatty — That was nothing to allow any man. Mr. McKeown—It would buy matches. The minutes were amended as Mr. Murphy suggested.

17-10-1942. GAVE CAR ON LOAN—LICENCE SUSPENDED FOR YEAR. Fines of 40s and costs with suspension of licence for twelve months were imposed on Patrick McGovern Grayport, Belcoo, user of the vehicle, and John McGale, Tattysallagh, Clanabogan, Omagh, owner, when at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday is was proved that McGovern was found using the car which was covered with owner driven insurance only. Constable McKimm was the police witness. McGale said McGovern asked him for the loan of the car and witness acceded to the request. Mr, R. A. Herbert, LL.B., for McGovern, said the latter had walked into a trap. Major Dickie, R.M. (to McGale)—What right have you to give your car and petrol to anyone to drive round the country? He told me he would put the petrol in to do the job. I was always allowed petrol to go to my work.

£10 FINE ON IRVINESTOWN MAN. FALSE REPRESENTATION CHARGE. At Irvinestown Petty Sessions, on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., James Keys, of Glenall, Irvinestown, was charged with having on 22nd December, 1941, for the purpose of obtaining a supplementary pension for himself under the Unemployment Assistance Act, made a false representation that, during the seven days up to and including the 18th Dec., 1941, he had not earned more than 5s, whereas during this period he was employed by Messrs. Courtney, Ltd., I, Shipquay Place, Derry, at an average daily wage of 6/11d. The case had been brought at the last Irvinestown, Court but was dismissed without prejudice. Alan McCullagh, an official of the Assistance Board, gave evidence that he received an application from defendant for a supplemental pension on 31st Dec., 1940. He stated that he was in receipt of 10s old age pension and had stock of about one dozen hens. Later defendant wrote to him asking him if he could do something about placing him in employment and witness referred him to the Ministry of Labour.

William Henry Howe, another official, said that on the 26th May he told defendant that information had come into the possession of the Board that he had been employed with Messrs. Courtney and witness gave defendant the dates. Defendant made the following statement: “I was never employed by Messrs. Courtney and have done no work since ceasing to be employed by Mr. Hermon of Necarne Castle, Irvinestown. I am not living on a holding and get no privileges from the owner of the house where I now live. My son Irvine does no work of any kind.’’ Witness identified defendant’s signature on a document produced. John Charles Burkey, of the firm of Messrs. Courtney, said defendant was employed as a labourer by his firm from the 2nd December 1941, till 20th December, 1942. For the week ending 18th Dec., 1941, defendant was paid £2 7s 6d. The week prior to that, he was paid £2 9s 7d and the week before that £1 7s 4d. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, M.P. (defending)’ —Did you pay the defendant?—I paid a “J. Keys.” When Desmond Mahon was called as a witness and did not appear, Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, who prosecuted, said he would ask for a warrant for his arrest if necessary.

Mr. Ferguson submitted that he was entitled to a direction on the grounds that the prosecution had not identified defendant as the man, but his Worship ruled against him on this point. Defendant swore that he got a supplementary pension first about the end of 1940 and drew it from then until the 31st October, 1941, when his book was taken away and kept till 18th December. During that time he had to go and look for some work. He worked for a week and left on the 11th December. Before he went into employment he actually wrote to the authorities and told them he was going to apply for a job. After he had worked for almost three weeks he had to give up. From December, 1941 he had been in receipt of a supplementary pension. He was not working for the week ending 18th December and did not earn more than 5s during that week. There were any amount of Keys in that country besides defendant. Mr. Cooper—You don’t mind telling a little falsehood now and again, do you? No, never to my knowing. Defendant added that he signed his name that he never worked with Messrs. Courtney while he was getting the pension. Mr. Ferguson said he did not see any particularly hidden fraud in the case. Defendant had written to the Labour Exchange and called three times. His Worship said that during the week for which defendant had been prosecuted he thought it had been proved beyond any reasonable doubt that he had actually earned the sum of £2 7s 6d. He imposed a fine of £10 and £2 2s costs, and allowed defendant-two months to pay.

17-10-1942.CARDINAL MacRORY AND THE WAR. PLEA FOR NEGOTIATED PEACE. ADDRESS AT MAYNOOTH. His Eminence Cardinal MacRory, speaking at the annual distribution of prizes in Maynooth College on Tuesday, pleaded for a negotiated peace. He said: – On various occasions I have expressed my hope for a negotiated peace, because I believed that only in this way is there any hope of peace with justice. I am convinced of that more than ever, seeing that cruel feelings are arising on both sides and prisoners are being put in chains. “If the war is fought to a finish,’’ said his Eminence, “there may possibly be a stalemate owing to utter exhaustion on both sides, but if either side win there will be a peace, not of justice, but of vengeance which will but sow the seeds sf future wars.” The Cardinal, continuing, said:—”I am not so foolish as to imagine that anything I can say will have any effect. However, I feel it a duty to say something.

17-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN BOARD AND QUESTION OF REPAIRS. When an account from a local garage proprietor for repairs to the ambulance came before Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday for payment, Mr. J. Brown, Clerk, said Mr. J. Cathcart, the ambulance driver, was not prepared to certify some of the items. Mr. Cathcart said some of the items were not in his book in which he kept a record of all repairs to the ambulance. The explanation was this: On 15th, January last Mr. Barton’s man was employed to bring a patient into the Hospital in this ambulance, he (Mr. Cathcart) being out at the time in the other ambulance. An accident happened to the ambulance in charge of Mr. Barton’s (the garage proprietor) driver. On one occasion since it would not start. He thought himself these repairs were made necessary by the accident. The ambulance never had been in order since. It would not charge until it was driven at 35 miles per hour—a speed too high for a vehicle of the kind, it should start charging at at least 20 m.p.h. The repairs were, therefore, in his opinion chargeable to the insurance company. He had some of the items of the account in his book.

Mr, Murphy—Do you keep an account as well as Mr. Barton? Mr. Cathcart—Everything I get is kept in my book. Mr. Murphy—Mr. Barton’s account does not correspond with yours? Mr. Cathcart — No sir. Mr. Murphy—Very well, I would not pay him. Mr. Beatty-Was it sent back to Mr. Barton? Mr. Cathcart—No; it is here for payment. Mr. Beatty—Can’t you send it back? Mr. Cathcart—No; it is a matter for the Board. Mr. Kelly—Mr. Brown will ask Mr. Barton, about it and get the thing squared up. Mr. Murphy—Did the insurance company pay for the accident? . Clerk—We have not got any bill for it anyway.

Mr. Murphy—The ambulance should be put right and the insurance company should be informed accordingly. Mr. Beatty—Mr. Barton’s attention should have been drawn to it. Mr. Murphy—That ambulance is giving far too much trouble here and there is something wrong somewhere. There has always been trouble with it since it came here. Mr. Beatty—When you found it not right, why didn’t you draw his attention to it? Mr. Cathcart—I am tired drawing his attention to it. The Chairman, (Hon. C. L. Corry) was proceeding to the next business when Mr. Murphy said: We are here as representatives of the ratepayers; the ratepayers’ money is being paid away and we are entitled to know what it is being paid for. I am not at all satisfied. Write to the insurance company and tell them the ambulance is not giving satisfaction. Mr. Beatty — Draw Mr. Barton’s attention to it. Chairman — The Clerk is going to do that. Mr. Murphy—The insurance company is the body.

17-10-1942.ILLEGAL USE OF COUPONS. STATEMENTS IN BELLEEK CASES. CHARGES AGAINST MERCHANTS. Eight summonses alleging the illegal use of coupons were heard by Major Dickie, R.M., at Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday. John Stephens, draper, Main Street, Belleek, and who also has a business in Ballyshannon, was summoned (1) for having, at Belleek between 7th and 16th March, 1942, without the authority of a licence granted by the Board of Trade and for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods, made use of rationed documents or coupons other than those issued to him or those surrendered to him; (2) had in, his possession, with intent to obtain goods, rationed documents or coupons issued to another person; and (3) using for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods, rationed documents, or coupons which did not bear the name, address and National Registration number of the person or persons to whom they were issued. Michael McGrath, Main, Street, Belleek, was charged with aiding and abetting in the commission of these offences. Thomas Daly, grocer, Main St., Belleek, was charged with transferring rationed documents or coupons, and Michael McGrath was summoned for aiding and abetting. Mr. R. A. Herbert, LLb., defended.

Mr. J. P. Getty, solicitor for the Board of Trade, who brought the prosecutions, said his instructions were that Daly had quite a number of customers who left their ration books with him. His Worship would remember that certain ration books which were issued in the first instance with regard to food had 26 margarine coupons in them. Those coupons were not valid and were not used. At the 1st June, 1941, when clothing was rationed for the first time, these: margarine coupons were then to be used for the purpose of acquiring clothing. Their case was that Daly, having got all these margarine coupons from his customers he transferred them to Stephens or McGrath (who managed Stephens’ shop in Belleek), or both. If he did so it was an offence.

He (Mr. Getty) was going to call a number of witnesses to prove that they left these margarine coupons with Daly and gave him no instructions or authority to transfer them to Stephens or anybody else and they did not use them themselves. A quantity of these coupons was sent to Stephens’ wholesaler in Belfast, Messrs. Moffitt and Co., whose agent would tell the Court that 500 coupons were delivered by Stephens to him in return for goods to be supplied. Having got those coupons, the practice was for Messrs. Moffitt to send them to the Post Office and they in turn sent them to the Board of Trade, When they got to the Board of Trade these margarine coupons were found in the bundle, and this started the inquiries. Miss Rosalie Aiken, chief assistant in the Food Office, Irvinestown, gave evidence that ration books containing margarine coupons were issued to a number of people, whom she named.

Sadie Agnes Keown said that Daly was her grocer, and she received .ration books for herself, and three daughters which she gave to her grocer. She did not use the margarine coupons, but her husband used some and bought clothes in Stephens’ using the margarine coupons for the purpose. William Dolan said he never purchased clothing with the margarine coupons and did not authorise his grocer to hand them on. Ernest W. Hall, area manager, of the Board of Trade, Belfast, said the coupons came to him from the Post Office and included margarine coupons. Statements made to Sergt. J. D. Cochrane by Stephens, McGrath and Daly having been read,

McGrath gave evidence and said he could not say when the coupons came into his establishment. He was not given the particulars of the coupons before the prosecution came on, and consequently he was unable to make any inquiries. Sadie Keown’s, husband left in margarine coupons in exchange for clothes, and whatever he handed in would be sent to Moffitt. Dolan’s father and also Daly bought clothes from him. He had some difficulty in getting any regulations and ultimately got part of the regulations from a traveller. He had written five times previously to the Board of Trade and never got an answer from them. So far as he could, he carried out all these relevant regulations. John James Dolan said he did the buying for all of his family, and used his son’s coupons too.

His Worship dismissed the charge against Daly and also the charge against McGrath for aiding and abetting him. Regarding the other case, he said he found it fully proved. He fined Stephens 20/- and 10/- costs on each of the charges of making use of rationed documents other than those issued to him and using  them for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods. McGrath was fined £10 and £3 3s 0d costs for aiding and abetting in the commission of the first offence, and 120/- and three guineas costs for aiding, and abetting in the second offence. The other summonses against Stephens and McGrath were dismissed without prejudice.

17-10-1942. £5 FINE AT BELLEEK. HAD FIVE STONES OF TWENTY SIX COUNTY SUGAR. £5 FINE AT BELLEEK. James Johnston, Aghamuldoney, County Fermanagh, was charged at Belleek Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., with having on 28th May knowingly harboured five stones of sugar imported from the 26-Counties into the Six Counties with intent to evade the payment of Customs duty thereon. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, told the court that in the defendant’s house the police found five stones of sugar, which was of 26-County origin. Mr. P. T. Flanagan, LL.B., who pleaded guilty, in mitigation of the sentence said that if it were possible for defendant to pay duty on the sugar he would very willingly have done so. In certain seasons of the year defendant had special work to do on his farm. He could not get any labour in the Six Counties, and had to get a man from the Free State, This man had no ration card and during the time his application was in for one, by arrangement between him and the defendant they brought over this sugar, for which they paid 5/3d a stone in the Free State, whereas it was obtainable in the .Six Counties for 3/6d per stone. It was really a matter of trying to get over a personal inconvenience. Saying that he did not think it was a bad case, his Worship imposed a fine of £5.

£15 FINE FOR SMUGGLING SPIRITS. John Farry, Monendogue, was charged of knowingly harbouring ten bottles of Irish whiskey, one bottle of Sherry, and one bottle of port wine imported from the 26 Counties into the Six-Counties! Mr. R. A. Herbert, L.L.B., (defending) said that defendant lived with his father and brother on a small farm on the mountain side. His father was an invalid, over 80 years of age; and they were constantly afraid of him dropping off when they would not have any stimulants to give him. Defendant said he hold the police it was for his brother in Belfast. That was not true. None of the local people would sell him (defendant) a bottle of whiskey. Some of the whiskey had been in the house since Christmas- He collected it from time to time and brought it over with him. Mr. Cooper-—-Were you going over the Border on different days and bringing it back—accumulating it?—-No. His Worship—There’s no proof he was dealing in it on a very large scale. I think £15 would meet it.

LORRY DRIVER FINED AT IRVINESTOWN. “The lorry came round Flack’s corner 40 at m.p.h. without slackening speed.” “My lorry is governed down to 25 m.p.h.” These two conflicting statements of evidence, the first one by a constable and the second by the driver of the lorry were given at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday when District Inspector P. Walshe summoned Charles McQuaid, of Drogan, for driving a motor lorry in Irvinestown on 7th Sept. without due care and attention and without reasonable consideration for other users of the highway. Constable McKimm proved the summons and was corroborated by Constable Bradley, neither of whom heard a horn sounded. Defendant said he sounded the horn and only accelerated when he got round the corner. His lorry was governed down to 25 m.p.h. Major Dickie, R.M., said the two constable were definite that defendant came round without due care and he imposed a fine of 10s and costs.

TWICE TORPEDOED MERCHANT NAVY MAN FINED £5. A wireless operator in the Merchant Navy, who, according to his solicitor, had been twice torpedoed and had also been in a tussle with the ‘Deutschland’ appeared at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., on a charge of being concerned in a fraudulent attempt at evasion of payment of Customs’ duty on two bottles of spirits, at Kesh, on 28th July, imported from “Eire” into Northern Ireland.

Defendant was Vincent Mahon, of Mill St., Irvinestown, and Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, said a Customs officer found defendant sitting reading a book in a third class carriage of the train. He asked defendant if he had any articles to declare and he did not reply. He then asked defendant, what he had in his pockets: and defendant produced. two camera films and said that was all he had got.

The Customs officer, proceeded Mr, Cooper, was very suspicious of defendant as this pockets seemed bulky and ordered him to stand up till he searched him, and found a bottle of whiskey in each of his trousers pockets. When asked why he did not declare the spirits defendant told the officer to “go to hell you and the spirits;” When asked to furnish proof he admitted he had not paid any duty and absolutely decline to recognise the Customs authorities in any way.  His Worship—In what way? Mr. Cooper-He said he did not recognise them. His Worship — A very unfortunate position, with two bottles of whiskey in his pockets.

Mr. E. C. Ferguson, LL.B., M.P., defending, said they admitted having the two bottles of whiskey. The circumstances were these Defendant was a wireless operator employed by the Marconi Company with the Merchant Navy. Since the outbreak of war he had been torpedoed twice and on one occasion had been in a tussle with the ‘Deutschland.’ As a result of these sea activities he had been invalided home at the end of July by the Company. He (Mr. Ferguson) was instructed by defendant that he had wanted these two bottles of whiskey to send to a friend of his. Defendant was a decent fellow who was now fit and ready to return to duty and was awaiting a call to his ship. Mr. Cooper said if defendant .had adopted a different attitude he would have been fined there and then. The duty on the spirits was £l 15s 5d. Mr. Ferguson said in the circumstances perhaps it was excusable. “I am asked,” he said, “to apologise for anything, that he did wrong. His Worship said defendant knew quite well he should not have done this. However, in view of his record he imposed a fine of £5.

SUNDAY CARTING DISAPPROVED. A meeting, under the auspices of the Six-Co. Farmers’ Union was held in the Townhall, Enniskillen on Saturday afternoon, when representatives from all over County Fermanagh attended. Addresses on the policy of the Union were given by Mr. H. Jamison, General Secretary ; Mr, J. H. Barbour, Organiser; Mr. Hughes. Farmers’ Union Insurance Company, and Rev. R. J. M‘Ilmoyle, Dervock. Resolutions were passed, viewing with apprehension the milk marketing scheme so far as payments were concerned and a unanimous expression of opinion was voiced against the carting of milk on Sundays. The main purpose of the meeting was the formation of new branches and progress in this direction was made.

FELLOW INTERNEE’S TRIBUTE TO CAHIR HEALY, M.P. By Frederick Bowman, Internee, Brixton Prison, London and 5, Bradley Place, Eastbank St., Southport; Lancashire, England.

TILL IRELAND UNITE IN PEACE

The years, untried, in prison passed,

Have made impressions sure to last,

Many are grim, but, I’ve a few

For which my gratitude are due.

One patriot I’m proud I’ve met

While tangled in the prison net,

Is CAHIR HEALY—always kind,

Whose noble heart and cultured mind

Inspires respect and strengthen all

Whose courage might incline to fall.

His fine example—smiles of cheer

Make prison walls less gloomy here

His shrewd remarks and sound advice:

Confer a boon beyond all price

On those whose prison .life he shades,

Smoothing their madness, easing cares.

His land and loved ones far away,

Are in his gentle thoughts all day.

But helping others makes him try

To keep suppressing any sigh.

A man of wit and worth and charm.

Sincere and steadfast, firm and calm;

To death for Ireland he would go—

This man whom I’m so proud to know.

Peace for the world is what I claim

And Healy’s object is the same.

His work for Ireland will not cease.

Till Ireland can unite in peace.

SIX-COUNTY VACANT SEATS. STORMONT REJECTS LABOUR MOTION. A motion by Mr. H. Midgley (Labour, Willowfield) at Stormont on Tuesday which asked that writs for vacant Parliamentary seats be issued not later than three months from date of vacancy was defeated by 24 votes to one. The  motion was described by the Minister of Agriculture as the most reactionary that had ever been brought.

 

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