1942. Fermanagh Herald.

19-9-1942. HILL-TOP MONUMENT TO COONIAN’S FAITH. NEW ST. JOSEPH’S CHURCH DEDICATED AND OPENED. CEREMONY BY THE RIGHT REV. MONSIGNOR KEOWN. Raising its beautiful Irish Romanesque outlines on the crest of a hill overlooking a valley wherein between two hills is hidden a poor rude structure of the Penal days, which it succeeds, the new St. Joseph’s Church, Coonian, Brookeborough, solemnly dedicated and opened on Sunday by Right Rev. Monsignor Dean Keown, P.P., Carrickmacross, Vicar Capitular of Clogher Diocese, will be a landmark in South Fermanagh. It will serve 180 families of that mountainous portion of Aughavea parish whose ancestors were driven to those hills from the rich plains below by the invader.

Possessed of little but a strong faith and perseverance, the people have survived and flourished. Nearly a thousand of them on Sunday stood proudly by the new St. Joseph’s looking down the vista of years to the beginnings of the little edifice whose walls are tottering with the weight of age in the Valley. .It was with them through their trials and the trials of their fathers, and though for the past half century its damp, sodden walls and unheated interior held little of comfort, it must be with not a little tinge of regret that they part company from that rude home of their faith which has been hallowed by the prayerful gatherings and worship of their ancestors.

DAWNING OF HAPPIER DAY. But the faith has conquered, through many trials and bitter persecution, in this district, and with the dawn of a happier day in which worship .may be public and in which, through hard work, the people have attained to a reasonable standard pf comfort and prosperity, it was only right that the ancient and true faith should once more have its centre in a worthy home on some crowning mount. In July, 1959, the great work was undertaken. In August of the following year the foundation stone was laid, and on Sunday the people saw more than three years of strenuous and self-sacrificing effort brought to a happy consummation.

THE NEW CHURCH. St. Joseph’s will accommodate over 500 people. It is designed in the Irish Romanesque style, with, a deep semi-circular apse and an imposing tower rising almost fifty feet on the Gospel side of the building. The magnificent site overlooks the wide sweep of valley between Coonian and Colebrooke. The building was designed, by Messrs. J. Donnelly and Sons, architects, Enniskillen, and was erected under their supervision by Father Patrick McQuaid, P.P. A very considerable amount of the labour required was given voluntarily by the parishioners, and the site was given free of all charge by Mr. Dillon, a parishioner who lives close by. The cost totalled about £7,000 of which most has already been paid. Owing to the restrictions caused by the war, it was not possible to provide altars, communion rails, seats and other furnishings or to complete the grounds about the church. These must await the end of the war.

AUGHAVEA PARISH IMPROVEMENTS. Since Father McQuaid’s appointment to the parish over nine years ago, he has completely reconstructed Brookeborough parish church and erected new schools there. These buildings are convenient to one another and surrounded by Church property. He has also been responsible for the provision of a new cemetery at Brookeborough and of a new cemetery adjoining the present Coonian Church. This cemetery was solemnly consecrated on Monday by Dean Keown. Father McQuaid’s other works include the reconstruction of the parish priest’s residence and also the curate’s residence at Coonian.

THE OFFICIATING CLERGY. Sunday’s ceremony commenced at. 11 a.m. Assisting the Vicar Capitular at the dedication and opening ceremony were Very Rev. E. O’Hart, P.P., Tempo, as deacon; and Very, Rev. F. J. Donnelly, P.P., Lisnaskea, as sub-deacon, with Rev; T. J. Meegan, C.C., Enniskillen, as master of ceremonies. Dean Keown performed the ceremony of opening the church, with a key presented to him by Mr. Donnelly. Solemn High Mass, at which Dean Keown presided, was celebrated by Rev. P. McGloin, chaplain, Monaghan County Hospital, formerly curate at Coonian, with Father O’Hart as deacon, Father Donnelly sub-deacon and Father Meegan master of ceremonies. Also present were Father McQuaid and Rev. J. McMahon, C.C., Coonian. .

STATIONS OF THE CROSS ERECTED. After Mass, the Stations of the Cross were blessed and erected by Dean Keown, assisted by Father Meegan, and the ceremonies, which lasted almost three hours concluded with Solemn Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament imparted, by the Vicar Capitular. The music of the Mass, the Stabat Mater and the hymns, for Benediction were provided by the combined choirs of Coonian and Clogher, under Sisters Collette and Ephraim, of Clogher Convent.

PASTOR’S TRIBUTE. Addressing the people after Mass, Father McQuaid said, it was providential that a very great friend of Dr. Owens, a Bishop of Clogher who first saw the light in Coonian, should in the person of Dean Keown perform that solemn ceremony. The Church was very beautiful, but to his mind nothing was too good for the people of Brookeborough, who had been magnificent in their support. He had not paid one penny interest on money since he began the building. On one Monday morning he had not a penny piece, and he was wondering if he would, have to borrow money out of the bank, but by Saturday he had almost enough to pay the workmen. All work was done by direct labour. It was a privilege to have Monsignor Keown with them to perform the ceremony. Monsignor Keown knew some amongst the congregation, whom he had also known long ago in the spring-time of life when he was a curate in Coonian. Father McQuaid thanked all who had assisted in the erection of the Church, particularly Mr, Donnelly, the architect, who had designed that very beautiful church. It was well heated and would be comfortable for the people.

MONSIGNOR KEOWN. Monsignor Keown said he regarded it as a great privilege and a very solemn duty to assist in the dedication of this beautiful building to the honour and glory of God. It was just 54 years since he celebrated Mass in Coonian. It was his first curacy, .His was a very short stay, there, but it was long enough to learn to love and admire the people. Many, changes had taken place since, but there was no change in the strong faith of Coonian. Fifty years ago the old church was not suitable for its purpose, but circumstances were against the people. Theirs was a struggle for a bare existence, and church buildings and schools had to be put aside. A happier day had come and they had now a church that was a joy and delight to the district, the parish and, indeed, the whole diocese. Their late Bishop looked forward with great joy and happiness to performing that ceremony in Coonian. God had ordained otherwise, but he was sure Dr. McKenna was amongst those looking down on their ceremony and uniting with them in their day of joy. Dr. Owens, too, he was sure, was united with them in their happiness. He had been associated with the late Dr. Owens for many years and knew of his very deep interest iii the people of his native Coonian.

Their Church would be a rallying-place for the people for all time. It had been opened and the lamp had been lit before the adorable Sacrament on the Altar. It was how a centre for worship in the district, and he was sure, the people would take an interest and delight in going there and thanking God for the graces and blessings bestowed on them. The church was God’s own house. He loved it. “He loved the beauty of His house and the place where His glory dwelleth.” He loved this Church, which was a new proof of the love of the people of Coonian for God, and He would abide there and bless them and their children and their children’s children for the great work they had done. The Monsignor very warmly congratulated the people, and hoped the people would always remain the good and faithful Catholics they had in the past always shown themselves to be.

19-9-1942. JAIL FOR CYCLE THEFT. CASE AT CLONES COURT. At Clones District Court, on Wednesday of last week, before District Justice Lavery, Thomas Clarke, labourer, Muff, Cootehill, Co. Cavan, was charged with the larceny of a bicycle, value £12, the property, of Thomas, McFadden, Cornasuaus, Co. Cavan on September 14. Defendant was remanded in custody from a special court, and admitted the offence. Supt. B. O’Boyle, Bailieboro’ gave evidence. Accused was sentenced to three months imprisonment.

19-9-1942. BUTTER FOR EXPORT. George Scott, Crivelea, Clones, was fined £7 4s for bringing to a place for export a quantity of whiskey and 21b. of butter at Clones on July 20. Defendant pleaded guilty. Mr. J. B. Murphy (solicitor for defendant) said his client was not normal, and his clergyman had written to the Revenue Commissioners about him. When he came in to see him (Mr. Murphy) he burst into tears. Defendant was unfit to work. He could not pay the fine sought for and was not fit to go to jail. The Justice imposed the fine as stated, which was the penalty sought fo.

19-9-1942. CHEMIST’S ASSISTANT SUMMONED. UNINSURED MOTOR BICYCLE. . A young chemist’s assistant, John Douglas Irwin, of 42, Belmore St., Enniskillen, was charged at Enniskillen petty Sessions on Monday with using a, motor cycle on 13th August last, without being insured. Constable Walker said that defendant produced a certificate of insurance which had expired on 31st July. Defendant stated that he knew it was out of date but he had only gone for a short run to test the bicycle. Mr. J, Hanna, for defendant, said that defendant had not been using the bicycle for some time, and he intended to sell it and forgot to take out, the insurance. Major Dickie, R.M., imposed a fine of £4 and 2s costs, with automatic suspension of defendant’s licence for 12 months.

26-9-1942. JOTTINGS. Boho Sports.—Boho Sports Committee passed a resolution thanking the following who sent cash and prizes to the sports Mrs. McKinstry, Tullyholvin P.E.S.; Mrs. Rose A. Magee, Cornerk P.E.S.; Mr. J. J. Maguire, Derrygonnelly.

Monea Sports.—Postponed because of unfavourable conditions, Monea sports will be held this Sunday at Tullynargy. There has been a good entry, it is under-stood for the North Fermanagh Donkey Derby, an innovation which should prove a most attractive item. There is a big supporting programme, including a football, challenge match.

COMING EVENTS. Sunday, 27th Sept. Ceilidhe, Killyrover Hall, Monea Sports at Tullymargy. Dance, Foresters’ Hall, Enniskillen. Dance, A.O.H. Hall, Arney. Sunday, 4th Oct.—Dance, Tullyholvin School.

26-9-1942. CO. FERMANAGH CIVIL DEFENCE SERVICES. A Civil Defence Mobile Reinforcement Column, paid a visit to Ballinamallard on Monday evening, consisting of Wardens, Ambulance, First Aid Party, Rescue Party and a section of the; National Fire Service. The column was under the command of Mr. J. Lusted, County Training Officer, and the air raid incidents were under the control of Mr. Cecil Taylor, Chief Warden and Controller, Enniskillen. The practice, which consisted of reporting of incidents, treatment and removal of casualties, firefighting by the N.F.S. and rescue from a three storey house of supposedly trapped casualties, was carried out under, extremely difficult conditions.

The practice was under the general supervision of Capt. W. R. Shutt, M.C., County Civil Defence Officer, and his deputy, Major J. A. Henderson. After the exercise all the C.D. services proceeded to the Archdale Memorial Hall where they, were addressed by the County Civil Defence Officer, who paid tribute to the keenness of the Ballinamallard Volunteers and to their Chief Warden.

10-10-1942. FROM MOUNTJOY TO CRUMLIN. BICYCLE THIEF SENTENCED AT ENNISKILLEN. “I may say that in every case of larceny of a bicycle I intend to impose imprisonment,” said Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. He was dealing with a charge of the larceny of a bicycle by Thomas McGovern, of no fixed address, the machine being the property of Desmond Leonard, Garvary. Sergt. Kerr, Letter, gave evidence that on the 25th Sept. defendant was brought to the barracks by an R.U.C. patrol and witness asked him where he got the bicycle he had in his possession. After caution defendant stated he left Enniskillen at 11 p.m. on the previous day to go to James Chambers’ house in the Tempo district. When he got to Garvary he went to the house of Cahil Leonard, and without being given authority took away a bicycle the subject of the present charge. He then proceeded to Chambers’ house and was admitted by Edward Chambers, who said the ball bearings of his (defendant’s) bicycle he had given Annie Chambers, his sister, were broken. Defendant added that he intended to take up a job at Pettigo and used Leonard’s bicycle to get there, intending to leave it back. Desmond Leonard said that on the 23rd Sept. he left his bicycle at home and missed it two days later. He gave nobody authority to take it away. He had known defendant through seeing him at dances. Defendant, on being asked if he wished to give evidence, refused to go into the witness box but said his own bicycle was still at Chambers’ house.

In reply to the R.M., Head-Constable Poots, who prosecuted for D.I. Walshe, said that on the 25rd Sept. defendant was coming out of Mountjoy Jail after doing six months for the larceny of cattle. He had another conviction for the larceny of a horse in the 26 Counties. The R.M.—You have had two previous convictions, You had no right to take this man’s bicycle and I can only regard it as ordinary larceny. Six months’ imprisonment: His Worship then made the remark quoted at the outset.

10-10-1942. £10 FINE ON FARMER. EXCESSIVE CLAIM FOR POTATO SUBSIDY. What he described as a moderate penalty of £10, with five guineas costs, was imposed by Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday in a case in which George Johnston, a young farmer, of Derrykeeghan, Enniskillen, was summoned by the Ministry of Agriculture for making an alleged false claim in respect of subsidy on his potato crop.

Mr. James Cooper Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, said defendant claimed for eight acres, whereas he only had 4 acres 3 roods under potatoes. The amount involved was £32 10s. Samuel Johnston, Government Inspector, produced a statement alleged to have been given him by defendant on 30th June in which he (defendant) said the claim was completed and signed by him on the 13th June, and posted to the Ministry of Agriculture. It was witnessed by Constable McCreevy. The alleged statement went on: “I must have been wrong in my evidence of the measurements. I own a field which is about five acres, but there was an acre or more in turnips. The remainder is planted with potatoes, except for a few drills of cabbage. The other field belongs to my mother, in which have potatoes planted. I reckoned it contained three acres I had a notion of putting in potatoes in the whole field belonging to myself, but the last amount of potatoes did not grow. I had to plant turnips.” Witness added that in consequence of very exaggerated claims the Ministry had found it necessary to institute proceedings.

In reply to Mr. Ferguson, defending, witness said most of the claims sent in were approximate, but it was unusual to find such discrepancies in this instance. He did not think it was unusual for farmers to measure their potato plots before sending in their claims. It was true to say there had been a severe drought in the months of May and June, and there had in consequence, been misses in the potato crop, but he had not heard of wholesale failures in fields. Mr. Corr, Ministry’s Inspector, gave evidence of measuring the plot in Derrykeeghan field (defendant’s property), and he arrived at 2a. 3r. There was a slight doubt, the benefit of which was given by his superior officer (Mr. Gillespie) to defendant, and it was altered to three acres. In the Ballydoolagh field the potato acreage was estimated at la. 3r. Mr. Gillespie corroborated. To Mr. Ferguson, he admitted there were slight discrepancies in most cases. Last year in addition to the police inspection report, there was a ten per cent check by the Ministry on subsidy claims. His Worship-You complain this was grossly exaggerated?

Witness—Yes. Defendant, in evidence said he owned the farm in Derrykeeghan, and he cultivated his mother’s land in Ballydoolagh. He understood that the Ordnance Survey map gave the area of the Derrykeeghan field as 5½ acres. In the Ballydoolagh field, which was 4½acress in extent, he estimated there were three acres of potatoes, which was the acreage, allowed by Mr. Ritchie, Agricultural Officer for the county when he inspected the corn crop. Part of the potato crop in Derrykeeghan failed, and he pulled out the tubers, knowing there would be no result, and sowed turnips. Questioned by Mr. Cooper, witness said he did not consider he was overpaid, subsidy on last year’s corn crop. The claim was accurate as far as he knew, or he would not have submitted it. Richard Crozier, surveyor, estimated that the total acreage under potatoes in the Derrykeeghan field was 2a 3r. l5p, and in the one at Ballydoolagh la. 3r. 19p a total of 4a. 2r.34p. The Derrykeeghan field was very deceptive, as the Ordnance Survey measurement were larger than the field now actually was. Mr. Ferguson submitted defendant did not know the claim was false, and that he had no intention of defrauding the Ministry. The Ministry’s inspectors, unable to measure every field they inspected, had to take their measurements from the Ordnance Survey.

His Worship said that apparently defendant had guessed the area of the two fields, but guessed in his own favour. It was quite clear he did not inform the Ministry about the potatoes not growing, and putting in the turnips as a substitute. Mr. Ferguson—I do not know that he would be entitled to inform them. The (the Ministry) give the subsidy whether the potatoes grow or not. One of the inspectors was rising to speak when his Worship remarked that some farmers who did not even bother to take out their potatoes, were paid £10 per acre by a generous Government. He did not say defendant, whom he believed was a good farmer, did that. He did not think defendant really realised what he was doing. He must, however, have known that he was making a claim he could not possibly substantiate. It was not a bad case, and the penalty he had in mind was not substantial. His Worship ruled as already stated.

10-10-1942. AMERICAN SOLDIER’S DEATH. LORRY AND “ PEEP ” COLLIDE. COURT SEQUEL. There was a sequel to a fatal accident at Silverhill, near Enniskillen, at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, when, arising out of an accident in which an American soldier lost his life, John J. Bannon, of Mountdrum, Lisbellaw, was charged with having driven a lorry without due care and attention.

Bannon had been driving a lorry laden with about four tons of stones from Blaney quarry on 8th August when he came into collision with a Peep (an American Army vehicle). As a result of injuries received in the collision one of the passengers in the Peep—an American soldier—died next day. The only evidence tendered for the Crown was given by Sergeant Henderson, inspector of public vehicles, and Constable. A. Corry; and Head-Constable Poots said that the accident had been reported to the American authorities with a view to having the other driver brought before their Court. Bannon said that as he came to the bend on the road his lorry was in second gear, travelling at a speed of between seven and ten miles per hour, and about I5 feet from the grass verge on his own side. He saw the Peep corning along and the accident happened suddenly. He thought the other vehicle had plenty of room to pass. Dismissing the charges on the merits, Major Dickie, P.M., said he was extremely sorry that the death of a member of the American forces occurred as a result of the accident, and he was sure, they all tendered their sympathy to his relatives. Mr. Isaac Copeland, K.C. (defending), said that Bannon felt it very much. His Worship—I am quite sure he docs. Head-Constable Poots also tendered sympathy on behalf of the police force.

10-10-1942. BROOKEBOROUGH COURT CASES “Most Inveterate Smuggler.” Owen Beggan, clothes dealer, of Mullinavale described by Mr. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, as a most inveterate smuggler on both sides of the Border, was, at Brookeboro’ Petty Sessions on Tuesday, fined £20 for harbouring with intent to evade Customs duties, prohibited goods, including two men’s serge suits, 9 pairs’ men’s woollen underpants, 9 pairs men’s braces, 1 shirt, 1 aluminium kettle, and 5 dozen razor blades. Defendant admitted purchasing the clothing in “Eire.”

10-10-1942. ASSAULT CHARGE. When James Maguire, labourer, Corrylongford, charged Charles Boyd, farmer, of Tattymickle, with assault, Boyd alleged Maguire was continually denouncing the English, and that, declared the I.R.A. had not shot enough policemen. He also alleged that Maguire refused to recognise a British court. He (Boyd) admitted striking him in self-defence, and his Worship ordered him to pay £1 compensation to Maguire. Maguire denied the allegations made by Boyd.

10-10-1942. ALL NIGHT VIGIL AT PUBLIC HOUSE. ENNNISKILLEN LICENSING CHARGE. An all-night vigil by police outside a public house in Enniskillen was described at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, when Richard Johnston, publican, Market St., Enniskillen, was charged under the usual five counts with breaches of the licensing laws, and with failing to admit the police. Evidence was given by Sergt. Sherrard that at 12.45 a.m. on 26th Sept. when passing defendant’s licensed premises he heard the sound of voices speaking in a very low tone. He saw a light around the edge of the window blind at the bar and heard the sound of some liquid running. He knocked loudly on the door and shouted in through the letter box ‘‘Police on public house duty. Open up,” and heard the sound as if someone was walking on tiptoe. After that all was silent. Witness described how the police then kept the premises under observation all night and the demand for admittance to the premises was repeated at intervals. At 8.30 a.m. when he went into a house next door to the licensed premises he found a man in the kitchen and as a result of what the man told him he went to the rear yard and on examining the wall dividing the yard from the licensed premises he found fresh scrapes on the bricks on top of the wall, where there was a green slime.

At 8.45 a.m. when he returned to defendant’s licensed premises, defendant’s wife admitted him and he found defendant in bed. When asked to account for the long delay in admitting witness, defendant said he did not know he was out there it all. When told about seeing the light in the bar at 12.45 a.m. defendant said “That is a lie.” Witness brought the other man to the premises and read his statement. The man said he admitted being on the premises, and when asked if he had anything to say, defendant replied: “I know nothing about him-nothing.

Mr. E. C: Ferguson, LL.B., M.P. (for defendant)—More people than you are knocking at public house doors these times?—I can quite believe that. Witness said he did not think the marks on the wall had been made by a cat. Constables Walker and Williams also gave evidence. The man found in the adjoining house said that he met defendant on the night in question and went to his house to have a yarn with him. He was in defendant’s house about five minutes when he heard a knock and he went out the back and over the wall. His Worship—That’s Mr. Ferguson’s cat. (Laughter). Witness said that he stopped in the yard all night. Defendant denied that the man found by the police had been on his premise that night and he did not hear anyone shouting through the letter box or door. Asked about the knocking, he said they were fed up with knocking. His Worship fined defendant 20s and costs for failing to admit the police, and dismissed the other five charges.

10-10-1942. POLICE SERGEANT ASSAULTED. ENNISKILLEN INCIDENT. LISNASKEA MAN FINED. An assault on a police sergeant at a dance in the Townhall, Enniskillen was described at Enniskillen Petty Sessions an Monday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when Patrick Maguire, of Aghadrenan, Lisnaskea, was charged with disorderly behaviour, on 25th September and with assaulting Sergeant R. Torrance, R.U.C. An application was also made to have defendant bound to the peace.

Sergeant Torrance gave evidence that when on duty at the Diamond at 10.40 p.m. on 25th Sept. a complaint was made by a boy that he had been beaten by a stranger in the Townhall lavatory. He went with the boy into the Townhall, where there was a dance in progress and the boy pointed out defendant who was accompanied by six or seven American soldiers. He was adopting a fighting attitude and was very aggressive and when asked him his name he said it was Maguire. On request defendant produced his National Registration card and when witness took out his notebook to take particulars he was struck four heavy blows on the face and head, his cap being knocked off and his notebook knocked out of his hands. Witness got hold of defendant by the coat and an American soldier snatched defendant’s identity card out of witness’s hand. When witness saw the attitude of the American soldiers he could not do very much at the time.  Some civilians wanted him to take Maguire from the American soldiers and seemed to resent the interference of the Americans.

The soldiers took Maguire out and they got into a lorry. Other police arrived and they took Maguire out of the lorry. He lay down in the lorry and held on to the American soldiers, and was taken out of the lorry forcibly. When being brought to the barracks he resisted very violently. Defendant was not drunk but had drink taken. ‘I came off lucky, I must say,” added witness. “I think Maguire meant to hurt me.” To Mr. J. B. Murphy for the defence, witness said that defendant was kept in the barracks all night and when handed the summonses next morning said he apologised, that he had no intention of hitting a policeman. His Worship—Were you in uniform? — I was. Mr. Murphy—Defendant instructs me to express, his most sincere apologies to you here today.

Sergeant Sherrard said that defendant resisted arrest violently and succeeded in tripping him. He said he did not mind if he did 20 years penal servitude. Mr. Murphy said this was a most regrettable occurrence and one which defendant felt very deeply to-day. Explaining the circumstances, he said that defendant was engaged in war service and was attached to the American Army, and along with a number of American soldiers he came into the town on this particular night, had several drinks, and then went to the pictures where they only remained ten minutes. They went out and had more drink and went to the dance. The three of them went into the lavatory where this boy was. They did not assault him, they said, but the boy went out and complained he had been assaulted. Maguire, who was hopelessly drunk at the time, was asked for his identity card and apparently lost his temper owing to the fact that he felt he was being charged with assault. He realised the seriousness of the offence he had committed when he sobered up next morning.

Defendant, in evidence, bore out his solicitor’s statement. Next morning, when told what happened he apologised. Mr. Murphy — On your oath were you drunk or sober?—I was drunk. Head-Constable Poots—Do you not think this was a most unprovoked assault on the sergeant? Defendant—I do. His Worship said he thought it was a drunken spree and defendant had adopted a very wise course. Defendant at the earliest possible moment had apologised, to Sergt. Torrance for assaulting the sergeant he imposed a fine of 40s and costs and. bound over defendant for 12 months, himself in £10 and one surety of £5. His Worship added: ‘I would like to make it quite clear, in these cases I shall not have the slightest hesitation, in sending the people to jail, especially in cases where U.S. forces are involved. It may possibly drag them into a very unpleasant incident.”’

10-10-1942. ROWDY BEHAVIOUR AND VANDALISM. SCENES DESCRIBED AT COUNCIL MEETING. MINOR HALL DANCE BOOKINGS SUSPENDED. Serious complaints regarding misconduct, rowdy behaviour, drunkenness and vandalism in the Town Hall led to Enniskillen Urban Council on Monday, by the casting vote of the Chairman (Senator Whaley), suspending for three months the bookings of the Minor Hall for dances when present bookings expire. There were revelations regarding the consumption of intoxicants by women, who have been seen badly under the influence of drink in the Town Hall and on the streets. It was stated that “it is as much as the caretaker’s life is worth to talk to some of these rough and rowdy characters in the hall. When the Surveyor (Mr, J. reported that painting work had carried out in the Minor Hall, Mr. J. Logan said the Minor Hall that morning was mud from top to bottom. Criminal proceedings should be taken against someone, and there should somebody in the hall to protect it on the occasion of dances.

Chairman—You mean dirt on the floor? Mr. Logan—Oh the walls–it is mud right up to the top. There are all sorts of filth, not on one wall, but on all. The Surveyor r. Donnelly) said the hall was cleaned on Friday. .He had seen the dirt on Sunday. There had been a dance on Saturday night. Mr. Monaghan—When was that damage likely to have been done? Mr. W. Johnston—Saturday night. Mr. Monaghan—Is there any undertaking demanded by the Council, from the organisers of these dances that they will be responsible for their good conduct? Chairman— There is no supervision. Drink was not sold in the Town Hall. People brought in drink in their pockets, and no one could be expected to search, them to see that they had none. The first place they made for was the lavatory, where the drink was taken. How was that going to be stopped?

10-10-1942. EXCHANGE OF PLAQUES. Fermanagh County Council received from the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty a letter stating that as a result of the successful warship week Fermanagh reached its financial objective, thus enabling that area to adopt the destroyer Sir Lancelot. The commanding officer and ship’s company of the ship were being informed, so that a lasting association might be established between the ship and Fermanagh people. Instructions had been given to prepare a commemorative plaque for presentation to the area. If the Council had in mind to present in return a commemorative plaque to the ship, the Admiralty should be informed so that an occasion for the exchange might be arranged. The Secretary (Mr. Moffitt) said he had brought the matter before the Finance committee who had approved of the presentation of the plaque. The matter was left in the hands of the Chairman and Secretary.

10-10-1942. RELIGIOUS RECEPTION IN MONAGHAN. The reception took place at St. Louis Convent, Monaghan, of Miss Anna Foley (Sister M. Carmel Teresa) of Ballin Valley, Coolaney, Co. Sligo. The ceremony was performed by Right Rev. Mgr. Dean Keown, Vicar Capitular, P.P., V.G., Carrickmacross, assisted by Very Rev. J. J. McCaughey, Adm., V.F., and Rev. E. McGahan, C.C., Monaghan. Sister Mary St. Luke, OFM. (Finnegan), daughter of Mr. and Mrs T. Finnegan, Dernaglagh, Magheracloone Co., Monaghan who was professed in the Franciscan Convent, Holme Hall, Yorkshire, won distinction in the nursing profession before joining the community and was educated at St. Louis Convents, Monaghan and Carrickmacross. .

10-10-1942. LATE MR LEO HYNES. The death is reported from Port Arthur, Ontario, Canada, of Mr. George Hynes, second son of the late James and Frances Hynes, of 5, Orchard Terrace, Enniskillen. Deceased belonged to a family which will be well remembered in the district for its widespread popularity and the reputation gained by Mr. James Hynes and his sons in the building trade. As reliable and efficient building contractors, the Hynes firm was well known over a wide area. Many years ago, the deceased, left this country for Canada, where he established for himself a circle of sincere friends who will deeply mourn his passing.

10-10-1942. EXCELLENT RATES COLLECTION. Mr. H. J. Moffitt, secretary, told Fermanagh County Council on Friday that of the total warrant for the year of £18,784 13s 11d, a sum of £9,892 18s 5d , or 53 per cent, of the total, had been lodged by the collectors for the half-year up to 30th Sept., 1942. This was a very satisfactory return. All the collectors had closed the first half of the warrant.

10-10-1942. WELL-KNOWN WATER DIVINER’S DEATH. Early on Tuesday morning, well- known well-sinker and water diviner, ‘‘Bill’ Williamson, was taken suddenly ill at his home at Drummurry, Ballinamallard. An urgent message was sent for a doctor but before his arrival Mr. Williamson was dead. He had been living in the district for about six years prior to which he resided at Conerich, Enniskillen. He was a native of Tipperary and aged about 60. He is survived by his wife and family.

10-10-1942. RETIRED AND DIED IN SAME QUARTERS. COINCIDENCE OF RATE COLLECTORS’ PASSING. At Fermanagh County Council on Friday, Hon. C. L. Corry presiding, Mr. H. J. D. Moffitt, secretary, reported the deaths of Mr. John Patterson and Mr. John, Crozier, two superannuated rate collectors. He pointed out that Mr. Patterson had been appointed in 1906, and Mr. Crozier in 1907. Both retired in the same quarter in 1938, and now both had died in the same quarter of 1942. It was a peculiar coincidence he added.  Mr. George Elliott moved a vote of sympathy with the relatives of the deceased, who, he said, had given the Council very faithful service in their time. Lord Enniskillen seconded, and the proposal was passed in silence, the members standing.

10-10-1942. DEATH OF DR. KIDD. WELL-KNOWN ENNISKILLEN SURGEON. Dr. Leonard Kidd, D.L., one of the best-known medical practitioners in Northern Ireland and for many years medical superintendent of the Fermanagh County Hospital died on Friday of last week at his residence, Green Gates, Enniskillen, in his 80th year. He represented the medical profession of all Ireland on the Council of the British Medical Association in London for some time, and was a keen .advocate of the establishment of a Ministry of Health for Northern Ireland. During his long tenure of office at the Fermanagh Hospital he transformed that institution from a small poorly-equipped building into one of the most modern and best equipped in every respect to be found in the Irish Provinces. In recent years’ a new maternity and children’s wing has been added. Dr. Kidd had been in failing health for a considerable time, and had been confined to bed for many months prior to his death. He is survived by two daughters, Miss Edith Kidd, Co. Librarian, Armagh, and Miss Rita Kidd, secretary to the Fermanagh County Hospital.

10-10-1942. WAR WORK PERMIT REFUSED. In reply to Mr, H. Midgley, Labour) at Stormont on Tuesday, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry, of Home Affairs said that in the case of a Mr. J. Smyth, Mary Street, Enniskillen, a permit necessary to enable him ,to take up war work was refused by the Services Security Officer. The onus of deciding whether or not a person was suitable for employment in a military camp rested entirely with the appropriate military authority, and while he (the Parliamentary Secretary) could accept no .responsibility on this point, he was satisfied that the action taken was the proper one in the interests of public security.

10-10-1942. BORDER SEIZURE. A smugglers’ rendezvous utilized by black marketeers from both “Eire” and Northern Ireland, was discovered on Tuesday near the Border in a cemetery building adjoining Connon’s Church, Clones, Co. Monaghan. The “capture” included cases packed with, hundreds of bottles of brandy, gin and wines, bearing a Dublin mark, and bales of binder twine and chests of tea from Northern Ireland. Binder twine, which is extensively used in harvesting, is unobtainable in “Eire.”

10-10-1942. OLD PERMANENT WAY OF CLOCHER RAILWAY. Replying to Mr. Jacob Tavener, at Fermanagh County Council on Friday, Mr. H. J. D. Moffitt said it was the intention of the Council to remove the foundation of the now defunct Clogher Valley permanent way and utilise this ground for widening the roadway where it ran alongside the line. The cost of this work would be recouped to the Council by the liquidator. Answering Lord Belmore, Mr. Moffitt said the Council were not acquiring those portions of the line site which lay inside private property.

10-10-1942. LEAN TIMES FOR BOOKMAKERS. The decline, due to wartime restrictions,  in the betting business was referred to by Mr. P. J. Flanagan, LL.B., solicitor, when defending a number of bookmakers, summoned at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. He said that having regard to the small number of bets in these cases, he did not think, from the police point, of view, the business could be said to be a nuisance. He knew it was not right for him to speak of profits arising from an illegal business, but the racing programme at present was very limited. Certain wayside pulpits proclaimed that the “bookmakers always win.” In this particular case he thought it was correct to say that the bookmakers always lose. (laughter) Major Dickie, R.M. — But they remain in business. Head Const. Poots, (prosecuting) We are only attempting to make them disgorge some of their winnings. (Laughter) His Worship—I am afraid this is becoming a sort of annual tax. The principals in the case, John Jones, 24 Church Street; Lawrence McKeown, Belmore. Street and Patrick McCall. Market street, were each fined 40/- and costs, and each of the frequenters 3/- and costs. The complainants were Sergt. Codd and, McNally and Constable Kane.

10-10-1942. RAILINGS FOR WAR EFFORT. Fermanagh County Council on Friday decided to cooperate with the Ministry of Finance in the scheme to obtain railings for the war effort. When .the secretary read a letter from the Ministry on the matter, he said that representatives of the Ministry had had a conference with the County Surveyor and himself, and he (the secretary) consulted the chairman, and in the meantime the assistant surveyors were scheduling all the railings in the county. In reply to a member, the secretary said that, according to an advertisement which had appeared, objection could be lodged by owners against the removal of railings, but there was only a small chance of any objection being upheld. He thought that the only exemptions were in the case of gates on farms, and artistic and valuable railings.

10-10-1942. LATE CONSTABLE BOB SCOTT. The sudden death on Monday in Belfast of Constable Bob Scott caused deep regret in the Enniskillen district in which he had been stationed for nearly 12 years until his transfer to Belfast in the early months of this year. Shortly before his transfer he married Miss Doreen Bleakley, of High Street, and it is stated he was taken suddenly ill and died in his wife’s arms in their Belfast home. He was a popular and efficient police officer who knew the line of demarcation between efficiency and officiousness. A tall, well-built policeman, his death was wholly unexpected.

 

 

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