1942. October. Fermanagh Herald.

17-10-1942.LICENSING PROSECUTION FAILS. IRVINESTOWN CASE. All five summonses issued in a licensing case heard at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday were dismissed by Major Dickie, R.M. The licensee Mrs. Elizabeth M. Shutt, was summoned on the usual five counts and her husband for aiding and abetting. Three men found on the premises were also defendants. D.I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL. B., defended. Constable Wright gave evidence that at 12.15 a.m. on 30th Sept. they heard noises in the kitchen of the licensed premises and at 12.20 were admitted by the licensee’s husband who said he invited the men in for a chat to await the return of the licensee who was at a dance. Two of the men had drink in front of them. Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness said the bar was closed and everything was in order. Constable Bradley corroborated. Giving evidence, the licensee’s husband said this wife was out at a dance and while awaiting her return, at one o’clock he invited three friends of his for a chat. The drink they had had been left out early in the .night for himself, and no money was paid for it. The bar had not even been opened to get it. After further evidence, the R.M. said he did not think there was any evidence and the explanation given was reasonable. He dismissed all the cases.

17-10-1942. TEN YEARS’ IMPRISONMENT. AMERICAN SOLDIERS’ SENTENCED. There was a dramatic conclusion to the General Court-Martial in Co. Down on Pte. Herbert G. Jacobs, aged 23, Kentucky, and Pte. Embra H. Farley, aged 27, of Arkansas, who were accused of the murder of Edward Clenaghan, of Soldierstown, Aghalee, who died in Lurgan hospital on September 23, shortly after being found with, head injuries, on the roadside near his mother’s public-house in Soldierstown, when at the end of the case for the prosecution, the defending officer stated that he would call no evidence for the defence. Following short statements by the officer for the prosecution and for the defence, the Court was closed. Within a few moments it reassembled to hear evidence of the character and military career of each of the accused, following which each of the accused was found guilty of manslaughter, and sentenced to 10 years’ imprisonment. The court consisted of four colonels and four lieutenant-colonels.

17-10-1942. CAVAN HALL BURNED. Killadoon Hall, situated in the Loughduff area of Mullahoran (County Cavan) Parish and erected by free labour in 1924, has been destroyed by fire. It was constructed of iron and timber with boarded floor seats and stage, and used as a meeting place by the local football club, L.D.F., Red Cross, etc.

17-10-1942.STORY OF ENNISKILLEN TRAGEDY BABY FOUND WITH THROAT CUT. MISSING MOTHER RESPONSIBLE WHILE INSANE. That five months old Claire Henderson died front shock and haemorrhage as the result of a wound inflicted on the throat with a carving knife by her mother while the latter was apparently, temporarily insane, was the verdict of a jury on Friday at the resumed inquest on the baby which had been found at 5.45 p.m. on the 24th Sept. lying dead on the settee in the sitting room of its parents temporary home 3, Erne View, Enniskillen, by its father Major Edward Henderson. Head-Constable Poots represented the police. Mr. B. L. Winslow appeared for Major Henderson and Mr. G. E. Warren, coroner, conducted the proceedings. Mr. W. F. Dewane was jury foreman.

FATHER S GHASTLY FIND. Major Henderson deposed that his wife and child resided with him at 3, Erne View Terrace, where they had rooms taken. On the 24th Sept. at 5.45 he returned from his office and went upstairs to the sitting room of their temporary home. He saw the baby lying on her back on the settee, with her throat cut and .a carving knife beside her on the settee. There was no one else in the room and he immediately went downstairs to the hallway and there saw Dr. McBrien and Miss Ellen Hands. He told them what he had seen, saying, as far as he could recollect ‘‘The baby’s throat is cut.”

Since the birth of the baby on 27th April last his wife had enjoyed good health. During a week or two prior to the tragedy, however, she appeared to be overstrung and suffered from sleeplessness. They had been on holidays at Bundoran from the 14th to the 21st Sept., and during that time his wife worried about the baby’s health. As a result of his wife’s condition and some remarks she made he called with Dr. McBrien on the morning of 24th September and asked him to visit his wife, who had said she thought herself and the baby were both ill. She also said she let witness down and would not go to heaven and that she was becoming mentally deranged. At 2 p.m. on the 24th Sept. he last saw his wife, when they were both coming out of the sitting room. Shortly before he left his wife went to procure a bottle for the baby. He had been at lunch between one and two o’clock and his wife appeared to be worrying unduly. He spent some time in cheering her up and comforting her. She appeared to cheer up while he was there. He had not since seen her and did not know where she was. The carving knife, which he identified (and which was produced bearing bloodstains) had been bought by him some time ago.

LAST TO SEE MRS. HENDERSON. Miss Rebecca Hands, who said she resided with her sifter at Erne View, deposed that the Henderson’s lived in rooms with them. Mrs. Henderson after the return from Bundoran complained that the baby was ill and looked worried. She complained several times that the baby was wasting away and had a cough. On the 24th Sept. she met Mrs Henderson on the stairs on her way to the sitting room. When out on a message later in the afternoon she met Mrs. Henderson in Belmore Street.

“I HAVE DISKED THINGS.’ Miss Eleanor Hands said she did not see Mrs. Henderson leaving the house. She described what took place when Major Henderson ran down the stairs. About: 4 p.m. witness was in Mrs. Henderson’s sitting room and saw Mrs. Henderson and the baby. Mrs. Henderson was sitting on the settee with the baby on her knee, and she seemed quite happy. She had not been too well and was a bit worried. Did she pass any remarks?—she said I have dished things. Witness did not know what she meant by the remark which was passed as witness was leaving the room and she attached no significance to it.

MAID’S STORY. Miss Joan Power, 9, New Row, Enniskillen, said she had been employed as a domestic servant by Mrs. Henderson between July 1942, and 24th Sept., 1942. On the latter date she left the Henderson house at 3.55 p.m. when she had her work finished, and went to her home. When she was going out Mrs. Henderson said her work was finished and told witness to come in at the usual time next morning. That was in the sitting room. Mrs. Henderson was sitting on a chair near the window and was feeding the baby. She appeared to be all right, and did not look worried. She complained to witness about her health shortly after she came back from Bundoran. She had not since seen Mrs. Henderson. The first she knew of the tragedy was at 8.45 the following morning.

DOCTOR’S EVIDENCE. Dr. M. E. McBrien said on the 24th Sept. Major Henderson called with him and asked him to visit his wife. He found the house occupied by Major Henderson about 5.45, that evening. The Major came down the stairs saying “She is gone and she has cut the baby’s throat.” Witness went upstairs to the sitting room and found the baby lying on her back on the settee. Her throat was cut across with the windpipe opened into and the principal vessels cut. The front of the child’s clothing was heavily stained with blood and a bloodstained curving knife was lying on the baby’s left side between the body, and the back of the settee. Life was extinct. Death was due to shock and haemorrhage resulting from the injuries described. Head-Constable Poots said a widespread search had been made for Mrs. Henderson since the tragedy but she had not been found. Sympathy with Major Henderson was expressed by Head-Constable Poots, the jury, foreman and the Coroner Mr. Winslow.

17-10-1942. CRIMELESS COUNTY LEITRIM. When Judge Sheehy was presented with white gloves at Carrick-on-Shannon he said he was glad to hear from Supt. McNamara that conditions in the county were very satisfactory.

17-10-1942. MOTHER S BODY FOUND IN LOUGH ERNE. SUICIDE VERDICT. The body of the dead child’s mother, Mrs. Mary Henderson (aged 26), was found in Lough Erne at the Weirs  Bridge, near Enniskillen, on Sunday afternoon, attired as she had been when last seen by Miss Rebecca Hands, in Belmore .Street, on 24th Sept. At an inquest held at the Workhouse, Enniskillen, on Monday morning by Mr. G. E. Warren, coroner, Capt. J. N. Hughes gave evidence of identification, and said deceased’s home address was Cheviot View, Ponteland, Newcastle-on-Tyne. Sergt. S. J. Sherrard said about 4.30 p.m. on Sunday an object was pointed out to him at the Weirs Bridge. On closer examination he found it to be the body of a woman fully clothed. He sent for assistance and had the body taken to the Workhouse mortuary. The body was found among the rushes near the bathing boxes at the swimming pond. Dr. M. E. McBrien said on examination he found the body in an advanced state of decomposition consistent with having been in the water about 17 days. There were no marks of violence and death was due to drowning. A verdict was returned of suicide by drowning while temporarily insane.

17-10-1942. OBITUARY MISS ANNIE McMANUS, ENNISKILLEN. Deep regret has been occasioned by the death of Annie McManus, Wellington Place, Enniskillen, which on Wednesday last following a short illness. Deceased gained the respect and esteem of everyone with whom she was acquainted. Of a quiet nature, she was deeply sincere in her friendships, and her unfailing good humour and kindness endeared her to a large circle of friends. During her illness she had the happiness of being frequently visited by the local clergy, and she made an edifying preparation for death. All along she retained her wonted cheerfulness, never uttering a word of complaint, .but patiently resigning herself to the Divine Will. The funeral took place on Friday following Requiem Mass in St. Michael’s Church, Enniskillen. Rev. C. O’Daly, C.C., who was celebrant, delivered a touching panegyric in the. course of which he referred to the deceased young lady as a model Catholic and one whose popularity in life was evidenced by the wide sympathy created by her demise. He expressed sympathy with, her relatives who had sustained a severe loss by her passing. The funeral cortege was large and paid eloquent testimony to the widespread regret caused by her death. Rev T. J. Meegan, C.C., officiated at the obsequies in the Catholic Cemetery, where the interment took place. The chief mourners were —Annie McManus (mother), Mary and Nellie (sisters), John and Patrick (brothers).

17-10-1942. HAD UNCUSTOMED CIGARETTES PENALTY AT DERRY COURT. A fine of £10 was imposed at Derry Petty Sessions on Charles McIntyre, 50 Creggan Road, who was prosecuted by the Customs authorities for aiding and abetting some person, unknown in the unlicensed sale of cigarettes. Constable Hinds said in a drawer in defendant’s room he found 1,450 American cigarettes, and the defendant, who was employed by the American technicians, said he bought the cigarettes from American sailors for his own use. No duty had been paid. Defendant, in reply to the R.M., said he was earning £5 13s a week, and had to pay 18s 4d a week income-tax. Captain Bell, R.M.—The more the Revenue is defrauded the more income-tax we will have to pay. Defendant—I was not defrauding the revenue. Captain Bell—Of course, you are. Captain Bell said he was determined to do his best to help the revenue and tobacconists, who had to make their living. A similar penalty was imposed on George Page, 7 Strand Road, who was summoned for being knowingly concerned in selling uncustomed goods, 3 3/16 lbs. cigarettes and 26 boxes of face powder. Police evidence was given that when defendant’s .premises were searched they found. 1,540 American cigarettes in a trunk marked “Eire’’ under a mattress. Defendant said he did not know who put the cigarettes in the trunk which was in a passage. The face powder was lying on a chest of drawers. There was no necessity to him to smuggle face powder when he could buy it in Derry at 6d a box.

17-10-1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER NEWS. During the absence of the family at church the dwelling house and shop of Mrs. E, Williamson, Clonagun, Newtownbutler, situated a few yards from the border, was broken into and raided. Following investigations by the R.U.C. in charge of Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, a man named John J. Connolly, Clonkeelan, Clones, was arrested. Later at a special court in Newtownbutler, before Mr. E. Reilly, J.P., Connolly was charged with breaking and entering the premises and stealing a gold watch and a quantity of cigarettes and tobacco. He was remanded on bail to Newtownbutler Petty Sessions. At the week-end Newtownbutler police in charge of Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, visited a house on the Cavan-Fermanagh border at Cleenagh and seized quantities of flour, candles, boots, horseshoes, thread, rice, loaves, and other articles suspected of being for export across the border. Constables H. Lowry and R. J. Freeman, Newtownbutler, seized a motor-car containing a quantity of rice at Summerhill. The car and contents were taken to Newtownbutler. On Sunday night, Sergt. Blevins, Newtownbutler, intercepted a motor-car coming from Co. Cavan direction at Parson’s Green and seized a quantity of whiskey from one of the occupants which was believed to have been imported.

17-10-1942. PETTIGO NOTES. A pretty wedding took place in St. Mary’s Parish Church, Pettigo, the contracting parties being Mr. William Baird, Dromore, eldest son of David and Mary Baird, Dromore, and Miss Teresa McGrath, youngest daughter of Michael and the late Mrs, M. McGrath, Belault, Pettigo. Miss Sadie McGrath, sister of the bride was bridesmaid, and Mr. John Baird, brother of the bridegroom, was bestman. The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by the Rev. P. McCormack, C.C., Pettigo.

On Friday night a very enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Hall, Lettercran, the proceeds of which were in aid of repairs to the church.

A sad burning-accident resulting in the death of Baby Marshall, the four-year-old daughter of James Marshall, Drumhorick, Pettigo, occurred on Monday. The child during her mother’s absence was in the vicinity of the fire when its frock became ignited; she ran on to the street to the mother who immediately extinguished the flames, but the child had received such severe burns as necessitated removal to hospital where she died a few hours later.

17-10-1942. BLACKLION DISTRICT NEWS. There was a full attendance of the committee at a meeting of the Red Cross branch in Blacklion on Thursday night. Mrs. Chas. Dolan presided. Mrs, Maguire, N.T., read correspondence and financial matters were arranged. A vote of sympathy was passed to. Miss Margt. McGovern, Loughan House, on the death of her father.

There was a large muster of the L.D.F. at Loughan on Sunday, when target practice took place. The highest three marks were recorded by Messrs. Fred Murray, Frank Maguire, Patk. Fitzpatrick, and Capt. Kelly. D.S.O. Magovern and Group Leader Farmer were in charge.

The Harvest Thanksgiving Service took place in Killinagh Protestant Church on Friday night. The special preacher was Rev. Canon Pratt.

D.S.O. Maguire, N.T., Sergt, Rock, and the local officers, were present at a meeting of the L.D.F. in Blacklion on Thursday night. Sergeant Rock read special communications and Group Leader of the L.D.F. was appointed to give lectures.

The wedding took place, with Nuptial Mass, at Drumshambo Church, of Francis, youngest son of the late John and Mrs. McGovern, Barran, Blacklion, and Margaret Teresa, third daughter of the late Mr. Peter Dolan and Mrs. Dolan, Crotty, Drumshambo. Rev. Father Cummins, C.C., performed the ceremony. Mr. Michael McGovern (brother of the groom) was best man, and Miss Dolan, (sister of the bride), was bridesmaid.

There was a large attendance at the funeral in Doobally of Mrs. Patk. McLoughlin, Tullinamoal. Rev. J. J. Murtagh, C.C., officiated in the church and at the graveside. .

17-10-1942. MANORHAMILTON NEWS. Forestry Officials—Mr. Curran who has been Forestry Inspector at Manorhamilton during the past two years has been transferred to Co, Cork, and is replaced by Mr. Madden who comes from Tipperary.

Teacher’s Appointment—Miss Dillon, assistant in the girls’ school, has been appointed assistant in Drumlease N.S., Dromahair. She possesses a lady-like charm, all her own and her departure from Manorhamilton is very much regretted.

Legion Of Mary—To mark the first anniversary of the formation of a branch of the Legion of Mary at Manorhamilton a very enjoyable function was held in the Technical School on Thursday evening (1st inst.). Tea was provided by the Legionaries and vocal, items were contributed, Bro. Ferdinand being the principal contributor. The guests at the evening were Rev. Fr. Brady, C.C.; Rev. Father McGrail, C.C.; Rev, Fr. Gilbride, and Bros. Ferdinand and Leonard. Rev. Fr. Brady congratulated the Legionaries on the good work they had performed during the year.

17-10-1942. SENIOR FOOTBALL FINAL. NEXT SUNDAYS GAME AT THE GAELIC PARK. At the Gaelic Park, Enniskillen on Sunday next Fermanagh’s two star teams— Lisnaskea Emmets and Newtownbutler St. Comgalls—clash once more in quest of county honours when they meet in the county final of the Fermanagh Senior Football Championship. So keen is the rivalry between these teams and so well are they .matched that this contest for premier honours should prove one of the best games seen in Fermanagh for a long time. The championship title has always been the most coveted in G.A. A. competitions and many memorable clashes have occurred in recent years between these teams for the blue riband of Fermanagh football.

Few teams can boast such an array of inter-county talent as the Emmets and St. Comgalls, for between them they comprise two-thirds of the Fermanagh county team. Lisnaskea have the services of such well-known players as T. Durnian, F. Johnston, A. Smith, F. O’Dowd, Duffy and Collins, whilst Newtownbutler have inter-county stars in E. McQuillan, B. Allen, M. McDermott and Murray. Two splendid additions to the .Newtown team lately have been the Smith brothers—M. Smith in particular being a, promising youth of inter-county status.

Only a month or so ago Lisnaskea triumphed over Newtown in the League final by a very narrow margin when the latter seemed favourites for the title. Newtown were short some of their regular team on that occasion however. The St. Comgalls’ victory over Clones-one of Monaghan’s best senior teams—in the Border League a fortnight ago greatly enhances their chances against the. Fermanagh Champions, but the Emmets have always proved they are a difficult combination to beat in championship struggles. Contests between Lisnaskea and Newtownbutler are invariably sparkling exhibitions of fast and clever football which have always attracted bumper crowds, and Sunday’s game should certainly draw a record crowd to the Gaelic Park. The throw-in will be at 4 p.m. and Rev. B. Mahon, Irvinestown, whose competency as a referee is widely recognised, will have charge of the game. Spectators are asked to note carefully that owing to the difficulty in stewarding the pitch at recent matches nobody except players and officials will be allowed inside the paling fences.

17-10-1942. ‘WIN BY STRATEGY BEST FOR ALL OF US” AN AMERICAN VIEW. “In the light of what you are doing in India, how do expect us to talk about principles and look our soldiers in the eye.”? This question is asked in an “Open Letter to the People of England” in the current issue of the magazine “Life.” The document demands one thing from Britain: “Quit fighting the war to hold the Empire together, and join with Russia and your allies to fight the war to win by whatever strategy is best for all of us. “After victory has been won, then the British .people can decide-what to do about .the Empire—for you may be sure we don’t want it. “But if you cling to the Empire at the expense of the United Nations’ victory you will lose the war … because you will lose us.” Briefly, there are two wars,’ the letter goes on “one we are actually. fighting and the other we must fight in order, to win. The war we are actually fighting is a war to save America. Nothing else. “Everyone here is prepared to fight this war to any extremes just as everybody in England will go to any extreme to save England. “But this kind of war of each trying to save himself is just the set-up for Hitler. If we are really going to overwhelm the Axis we must envision and fight for something bigger than either England or the United States. “We Americans are a strange people, maybe you think of us as rather practical. But you cannot understand us at all unless you realise what principles mean to us.” We fought you on principles in the first place. Once in our history we killed 600,000 of our own sons to establish the principle of freedom for the black man.” “Life ” suggests that the British may object that Americans have not defined these principles very well yet—“and that’s a fair objection.” “One reason we have not defined them is that we are not convinced yon would fight for them even if they were defined.” ‘’For instance, we realise that you have difficult problems in India, but we don’t see your “solution” to date provides any evidence of principles of any kind.’

17-10-1942. DISREGARD FOR TRUTH AMD HONESTY. PROTESTANT ARCHBISHOP PERTURBED. Speaking on Tuesday at the Joint Synod of Dublin, Kildare and Glendalough diocese, the Most Rev. Dr Barton, Protestant Archbishop of Dublin, referred to “the growing disregard for the sacredness of truth and honesty,’’ and said he had been, seriously perturbed of late by evidence of that disregard. Could a society be in a healthy state he asked in which a man would boast openly and without shame of how he had treated the Customs, or his neighbours, or in which there was graft and wire-pulling. He was convinced that a nation’s taxes could at once be reduced by 50 per cent, at the very least if its citizens could be trusted to tell the truth and to deal as conscientiously with Government departments as a man was expected to deal with his neighbours.

17-10-1942. NORTH LEITRIM FARMERS’ UNION. MEETING IN MANORHAMILTON. A special meeting of the above was held in McGloin’s Hall, Manorhamilton, on Oct. 7th. Mr. James Kerrigan, president, who presided, said that the appointment of a new Agricultural Commission which was composed almost entirely of professors boded ill for the poor farmers of Connaught. Such a Commission to be effective should be composed of practical farmers, and the Congested Districts should have representation as well as the plains of Boyle. Mr. Kerrigan said that North Leitrim was in a serious position owing to the bad harvest and the destruction of hay and crops by flooding and the drainage scheme which was turned down twelve, years ago should be revived. Mr. John McGarraghy, said that .much damage had been done in Mullies by flooding of the Bonet, and several farmers had lost large quantities of hay. Referring to the increased rates Mr. McGarraghy said the new County Council would be expected to work hard for a reduction in the rates.

Mr. P. J. O’Rourke, secretary, said that after working for four years in trying to establish a. Farmers’ Union  in North Leitrim, and after encountering many difficulties and disappointments he was glad to be able to state that his work and teaching had not been in vain because farmers all over the area were beginning to take a lively interest in the Union. Old prejudices, went on the speaker, are dying fast, and the workers on the land have come to realise the importance of their task in producing the food supply of the Nation. They have also learned after long years of disillusionment that the promise of politicians are made to be broken. I don’t mean to say that all politicians are selfish or dishonest, but I am not overstepping the mark when I say that men who are highly educated and claim to be intensely  patriotic have time and again made promises which they must have known could not possibly be fulfilled. I have it from usually well informed sources that a General Election will take place inside of a few months, and farmers will need to be on the alert if they are not to be fooled all the time. Thousands upon thousands of pounds have been spent for the past few years in building new houses in the cities tod towns, and in providing water schemes for the smallest villages, but when the farmers of North Leitrim apply for a grant to have a corn mill erected no money can be spared to facilitate them. When farmers who have lands which do not require drainage petition the Minister fop Agriculture to give grants for reclamation plots on the old system their appeal is turned down. They must make drains no matter what about the potatoes. The matter boiled down to one important point—that the farmer was disregarded because he generally supported politicians who knew nothing about farming. The farmers were dictated to by officials who had only a theoretical knowledge of farming. The Labour Party were now coming forward asking the people to return them to power at the next Election and hinting that they had a brand new plan for putting the agricultural community on their feet. Judging by letters which had appeared in the daily papers recently from men who are prominent in the Labour movement, the Labour Party expects farmers to produce food below the cost of production. I believe a Labour Government would fix the price of milk going to creameries at about 4d per gallon.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT. The relatives and friends of the Late Monsignor Soden, Manorhamilton, wrote expressing gratitude for the Co. Council’s vote of sympathy, and hoped the note would be accepted in acknowledgment.

NO OBJECTION. A letter was received from the Department stating that the Minister in pursuance of the Local Authorities (Financial Provisions) Act, 1921, had consented to the Leitrim County Council borrowing by way of temporary overdraft for the purpose of providing temporarily for current expenses, a sum not exceeding £15,000.

PARISH COUNCIL’S VIEWS. Mr. J. P, Eames, Secretary, Ballaghameehan Parish Council, wrote that at a meeting of that body on the 13th Sept., the following resolution was proposed by Mr. Joe Fox and seconded by Mr. Jas. Connolly—“That the Parish Council view with alarm the increase in rates, and they consider the time has come to reduce the rates,. and give an opportunity to the ratepayers to pay.” The communication was noted.

17-10-1942. RUBBER SHORTAGE “MAY STOP ROAD TRANSPORT” Major Eastwood, Yorkshire Road Traffic Commissioner, told road transport operators at Halifax on Saturday that if the country continues to use rubber at the present rate road transport will be brought to a complete standstill. Passenger services would have to be cut to the bone, and all road services in Yorkshire might have to be stopped after 9 p.m.

17-10-1942. PERMITS FOR SIX COUNTIES. BRITISH GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCEMENT. DRASTIC. REGULATIONS. STATEMENTS IN WESTMINSTER AND STORMONT. An important announcement regarding the control of emigrants into Northern Ireland from “Eire” and the reinstatement in employment after the war of demobilised soldiers was made in the British House of Commons on Thursday by Mr. Herbert, Morrison, Home Secretary. Mr.. Morrison said: ‘During the past two years there has been a considerable influx into Northern Ireland of persons normally resident elsewhere, and this influx is continuing to a considerable extent. “It has been decided to take power by a Defence Regulation to institute a system of control over persons who come to Northern Ireland from ‘Eire,’ Great Britain, or elsewhere, and to require such persons to furnish particulars as to their address and occupation.” “Subject to exceptions for children and persons in the service of the Crown, all British subjects who were not ordinarily resident in Northern Ireland on January 1, 1940, will be required if they desire to take up. residence there or to continue to reside there for longer than six weeks to obtain permits which will be issued on my behalf by the Ministry of Home Affairs in Northern Ireland. Unless there are security objections in individual cases, permits will be granted for so long as their services, are needed to applicants who are already in occupations and to those who in future come into Northern Ireland to take up work. “They will also be granted to those who ought to be allowed to remain there on compassionate or other special grounds.

“Each permit will bear a photograph of the holder, and will in all cases be issued for a period of six mouths or for the duration of the employment specified in the permit, whichever is the less. “These will be renewable on the same conditions as govern their issue. “Permit-holders will be required to notify the authorities of any change of address. The immediate objective of the schema is to deal with war conditions, but it is also contemplated that the scheme will be of value on the termination of hostilities for the purpose of facilitating the reinstatement in employment of demobilised men from Northern Ireland who join the Forces as volunteers. “At such a time it will be right to give to the demobilised volunteers, preference in the labour market of Northern Ireland over these newcomers, and for this purpose to have power to terminate the permits granted to persons who are in employment.

“It is, accordingly contemplated, that the scheme will be kept in existence for a reasonable time after the war and if the Defence Regulations should expire before the demobilised men have had reasonable opportunity of being absorbed into employment, it will, in the view of the Government, be right that the necessary legislation should be introduced in the United Kingdom Parliament for a temporary prolongation of the system.” Sir Hugh O’Neill-Can you say whether these Regulations will give power to deport people who have come in since Jan., 1940, and in respect of whom it is not thought desirable to give permits? Mr. Morrison.—Yes, there is no obligation on the Northern Ireland Minister of Home Affairs, acting for me, to grant a permit, and it can be withdrawn at any time. I am assured that the Minister for Home Affairs in Northern Ireland will be reasonable in the exercise of this power.

STORMONT ANNOUNCEMENT. A statement on similar lines was made by the Prime Minister, Rt. Hon. J. M. Andrews, in Stormont on Thursday afternoon, and was received with cheers. Mr. J. W. Nixon asked if the Prime Minister would continue the good work by restraining his Cabinet colleagues and other members from going to ‘Eire,’ sometimes in doubtful company?” The Prime Minister—I would remind the House that that was a statement made by the Secretary of State in the British Parliament and as a matter of courtesy I have read it to this House. I have nothing further to add.

24-10-1942. LISNASKEA POTEEN CASE. 23 GALLONS WASH SEIZED. FARMER TO SERVE THREE MONTHS. A farmer, who lives on a small mountain holding and has a wife and seven children, was granted a month at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, in order to get in his crop before serving a three months’ hard labour sentence imposed in connection with a poteen case. The defendant was James Wallace, of Carrowmaculla, Lisnaskea, who was charged by District-Inspector Smyth with having in his possession on 7th October at Carrowmaculla, twenty-three gallons of wash.

Sergeant Kirkpatrick, R.U.C., gave evidence that at 6.10 p.m. on 7th inst., in company with other police, he went to the dwelling house of the defendant to search for illicit spirits. In a bedroom off the kitchen, witness found a barrel containing twenty-three gallons of wash, the barrel being heavily covered with bags. Defendant was not present and witness went to where, he was working a mile away. On being told what the police had found and being asked for an explanation defendant, witness alleged, replied “It is mine. I am only a poor man and I suppose it will put me out of the place.” Witness, then brought him to the house and pointed out the illicit spirits be had found. Witness subsequently destroyed all the wash except the sample taken for analysis.

To Mr. Winslow, witness stated he agreed defendant lived in a very small farm up in the mountains and had a wife and seven children. When Mr. Winslow asked his Worship (Major T. W. Dickie, R.M.) to deal as leniently with the defendant as possible, District-Inspector Smyth said defendant had .been convicted and sentenced to four months’ imprisonment at Lisnaskea, on 10th December. 1927, for having in his possession a still and illicit spirits. Mr. Winslow—This unfortunate man lives on a very poor mountain farm. He had made the poteen and as a result he was now before the Court. He was married and had a lot of small children. In addition he had not got his crop saved. District-Inspector Smyth—It is all right, but he is not quite so innocent as he is made out to be. Our information is that he is making quite a lot out of illicit, spirits at the present time and that some of our visitors to this country have found out his dwelling house and are regular attenders.

His Worship said that having been convicted before defendant must have known perfectly well the risk he was running. In the circumstances he ordered a sentence of three months’ hard labour. On the application of Mr. Winslow, District-Inspector Smyth said he would not execute the order for defendant’s arrest for a month so that he could get his crop saved. Later, Mr. Winslow enquired if his Worship would substitute a monetary penalty which would be paid by some friends. His Warship refused the request stating that in these cases his iron rule was jail and so far as he was concerned he would not depart from that rule even if the defendant was ready to pay a £500 fine. It was the only way to stop it. He was sorry he could not accede to the request.

24-10-1942. SESSIONS ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. Several appeals before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C.,  at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Tuesday resolved themselves into pleas for leniency and a reduction of the penalty. £60 FINE SUBSTITUTED. Mark Prunty, Drumany, Lisnaskea, appealed against sentence of three mouths’ imprisonment for harbouring 6cwt. of white flour for the purpose of unlawfully exporting it. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, said after the conviction the defendant pleaded guilty. He stated that he knew the flour was there, and he had nothing to do with it and that he would not tell who put it there. Judge—He pleaded guilty, and that is an end of it as far as I am concerned. Mr. Cooper—Since then it came to my knowledge through another source—in fact, a party called on me and informed me that they were the real smugglers, and asked me if I would get a penalty of £60 put on this man. They said they would pay the money. I believe the money is in Court. I told Mr. Murphy was prepared to do that. Mr. J. Murphy (for appellant)—I had to advise my client that, there was no case to come before the Court. He was charged with harbouring and admitted he saw the flour put in an outhouse and raised no objection. The Judge withdrew the order for imprisonment and. substituted a penalty of £60. A man immediately walked forward and paid the amount of the fine in notes.

24-10-1942. PRISON SENTENCE TO STAND. Philip Swift, Lisnashillinda, Newtownbutler, for whom Mr. Black appeared, appealed against sentence of four months’ imprisonment without hard labour for harbouring 14cwts. of sulphate of ammonia and 12 stones of flour for the purpose of exporting it. Mr. J. Cooper said that after keeping Swift under observation and seeing three military tracks moving in certain directions Sergeant Green went to Swift’s house and in a byre found two lots in which were the sulphate of ammonia and flour. Soldiers pointed this out as the stuff they had brought there. They were promised £2 for their work. Both soldiers were reduced in rank. It was a bad day for them. The R.M. gave Swift- 6 months’ imprisonment. Mr. Black appealed to him and he reduced it to five months, and he appealed again, and it was reduced to four months.

Mr. Black—There is a further appeal to-day. I advised my client to plead guilty, and I appeal on this boy’s behalf for the substitution of a monetary penalty in lieu of imprisonment. He is 25 years of age, was married about year ago and has one little baby. He lives with his mother and looks after the farm. His mother has 25 acres under tillage, and this boy is responsible for the saving and harvesting of the crops. There will be nobody to work unless he is made available. This is the first time he has been charged with any offence of this nature. Mr. Cooper—He has been fined for making illicit spirits. Mr. Black said the young man was in delicate health, and he handed in a certificate from Dr. Dolan showing that for two years he had been treating him for gastritis and complications. The co-defendant (another man charged in connection with the same offence) had only been fined.

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