1942 Fermanagh Herald. Belleek Attack.

8-8-1942. SMUGGLER ESCAPES BY RIVER SWIM. LARGE LOAVES SEIZURE BY NEWTOWNBUTLER POLICE. A seven a.m. chase of smugglers on the Monaghan-Fermanagh border last week led to the capture by Sergt. Blevins and Constable Freeman, Newtownbutler, of a large quantity of loaves. Sergt. Blevins, newly transferred to Newtownbutler from Belleek, where his customs work had gained him a wide reputation, surprised two men on the banks of the River Finn, which at this point is the border between the two States. The men were conveying loaves to a ‘’cot,” which is a large unwieldy float for carrying cattle across lakes and rivers in Fermanagh. On the arrival of the police, the cot, drawn up at the Six-County side of the river, already held a large consignment of loaves. As the police rushed to the “cot’’ one man made off across fields in the direction of the border. The other man, divesting himself of his clothes, put his pants around his neck and plunged into the icy-cold water and swam the thirty yards of river to Twenty- Six County territory. Both men made good their escape. The police seized all the loaves and the “cot’ which was later conveyed to Enniskillen. They also found and seized the jacket, waistcoat, boots and other clothing, excepting the trousers of the swimmer.

8-8-1942. TYRES SEIZED AT ENNISKILLEN. Seeing a man dragging two large bags along a railway line at Enniskillen, Sergt. McNally and Constable Walker investigated and found in the bags several doz. bicycle tyres which they seized.

8-8-1942. CUSTOM ACTIVITIES INTENSIFIED. Customs officers along the entire stretch of the Border (on both sides) from Pettigo to Clones are redoubling their efforts to prevent smuggling and the quantity of goods finding their way across from either side must have fallen to such an extent as to be a very small proportion of the former quantities. Trains and buses are gone through almost “with a fine comb” and many cross-border time schedules have been completely upset by the customs delay for months past, but more particularly of late. The intensified efforts, while naturally showing fair returns in seizures, are not producing nearly the same proportion of captures as in former times, the reason probably being that those with an inclination to smuggling are being ‘‘headed off” by the knowledge of what awaits them on arrival at the Customs post. This, of course, refers to ordinary travellers, and does not affect the professional smugglers who presumably have other means of getting across their consignments of prohibited goods. But even these find the more intensive police watch on both sides distinctly more discouraging.

5-9-1942. GLENFARNE NEIGHBOURS’ DISPUTE. AN ASSAULT CASE. “ Jealousy Over Land ” CASE AT KILTYCLOGHER COURT. At Kiltyclogher District Court on Tuesday, before Mr., Flattery, District Justice, Patrick McDermott, a minor, through his father, Peter McDermott, Lougnross, summoned Peter Clancy, of the same place, for alleged assault.

Mr. Alfred McMorrow, B.A., L.L.B., appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. P. O’Flynn, solicitor, Manorhamilton, appeared for defendant. Patrick McDermott, in evidence, stated that a few evenings before the alleged assault had taken place, Mrs. Clancy was milking a cow on the road and the cow had .its head across a gate leading into his (plaintiffs) father’s field. There had been some words between defendant’s wife and himself on that occasion about trespass, and a few days later, when he (plaintiff), was riding down the road on a donkey, Peter Clancy had come down the road meeting him and had knocked him off the donkey with a blow of a spade shaft and had got on top of him, pounding him with his knees. He had to take through another man’s land to escape as he could, not pass Clancy’s house.

Mr. O’Flynn—-Were you not prosecuted some time ago in this Court for stealing Clancy’s fowl?

Witness—It was my brother took the fowl; I only accompanied him.

Mr. O’Flynn—You were along with your brother, and for that reason you have spite in for Clancy. Do you know anything of a well between Clancy’s land and the land of a man named Flynn?—There is water in a shough; it is not a well.

Mr. O’Flynn — Why did you put bushes around that well from which the Clancy’s get water ?—I did it to stop trespass of cattle.

Mr. O’Flynn—On the evening of this terrible assault was Clancy thatching? — He was not.

Mr. O’Flynn—I put it to you that Clancy was thatching, and when you came down the road he came down the ladder and asked you what filthy language you had used to his wife. – He was not thatching.

Did you call Clancy a grabber?—-No.

You didn’t go home to tell your father about this terrible assault? A slap was all you got.

Peter McDermott, father of plaintiff, in evidence, stated that he suffered a lot with Clancy, all owing to jealousy over a bit of land he got. Clancy’s cattle were always on his land.

Mr. McMorrow-—You were going to town on the day of the assault? — I was going to the town, and I went to Clancy’s house and asked for a drink of water. Clancy came round the house with a knife in his hand, and said to me “When I get up to that son of yours it won’t be good for him.”

Mr, .O’Flynn — You went to the house of your greatest enemy and you asked for water. Did you get milk? — I did.

Mr. O’Flynn — You got more than you asked for. Was Clancy thatching?—I don’t know.

Mr. O’Flynn — You say he had a knife in his hand? Of course that knife was for cutting the scallops. Did he complain about the language your son used to his wife, and did you tell him to correct your son every time he heard him because he uses language like that at home?—I don’t remember.

5-9-1942. Clones Call for Reprieve—At the meeting of Clones Urban Council on the motion of Mr. McCabe, seconded by Mr. O’Connor, it was decided to send the following telegram to  the Duke of Abercorn:—“The newly elected Urban District Council of Clones composed of all shades of religion and politics, begs your Grace to use your prerogative of mercy for the reprieve of the six young men under sentence of death. By doing so you will ensure goodwill and friendship amongst the people on both sides of the border.”

 

5-9-1942. BELFAST YOUTH EXECUTED. WILLIAMS BORE UP WELL TO THE END. EARLY MORNING SCENES. POUCE PRECAUTIONS IN VICINITY OF PRISON. Thomas Joseph Williams, aged 19 was executed at Belfast Prison on Wednesday morning at 8 o’clock, all efforts to secure his reprieve having failed. At 8.15 a.m. a notice intimating that the death sentence had been carried out in their presence was posted on the prison gate and signed Robert Henderson, Sheriff for Belfast, George Stewart, Justice of the Peace, Thomas Moore Stuart, Governor of the prison, and Rev. T. McAllister, Chaplain.

Young Williams bore up well to the end. He had been visited by relatives a short time prior to the execution and his spiritual comforts were attended to by priests in attendance. Precautions against a demonstration were taken by the police and crowds who gathered at various points at the approaches to the jail and knelt in prayer.

No people were allowed into Crumlin Road for a distance of about 200 yards in front of the prison. A police car patrolled the area around the prison and a strong cordon of police was also drawn around the district.      .

As eight o’clock was striking there was an opposition demonstration in Old Park Road when about 100 women and girls gathered and sung ‘’God Save the King” and British songs and engaged in cheering. They were forced into side streets by the police.

Williams, with five others was convicted and sentenced at the Assize Commission in August on the charge of causing the death of Constable Murphy, R.U.C., by shooting in April. An appeal to the Court of Criminal Appeal over a week ago was dismissed. A Nationwide appeal for the reprieve of the youths was without result in the case of Williams. On Sunday last Lord Abercorn’s statement announcing the reprieve of five of the youths was issued but it stated that the law must take its course in the case of Williams.

LORD ABERCORN’S STATEMENT. The statement issued at Stormont Castle said that the Six-County Governor had considered the cases of Thomas J. Williams, William J. Perry, Henry Cordner, John T. Oliver, Joseph Cahill and Patrick Simpson, ‘’prisoners lying under sentence of death in His Majesty’s Prison Belfast,” and decided that in the case of Williams the law must take its course, that the sentences in the cases of Perry, Cordner, Oliver and Cahill be commuted to penal servitude for life, and that Simpson’s sentence, be commuted to15 years’ penal servitude. The Governor’s decision was conveyed to the parents of the five reprieved men by Mr. D. F. Marrinan, their solicitor.

 

5-9-1942. …. and that such consecration as may be desired by the Church of England or the Catholic Church should be carried out on the individual grave. It was found that this principle met the wishes of the fighting Services better than the use of denominational plots and that it corresponded to a very deep conviction that the graves of men of very different faiths, who died, however, in a single cause, should be side by side. “If the local conditions make it necessary for a Separate Catholic plot to be formed, will you please arrange this through our District Inspector.’’ The Chairman—I suppose the Council would have no objection to that. Mr. William-Kelly—It is all the same, I think. The Council decided to grant Archdeacon Gannon’s request.

5-9-1942. £100 FOR ENNISKILLEN GRAVEYARD CARETAKER. The caretaker of Enniskillen new Cemetery—Mr. Jas. H. Kerr—applied to Enniskillen Rural Council for an increase of salary. The application, made last May, was adjourned till Tuesday, when the members had received the report of the Committee relative to the acquisition by the Catholic people of their hitherto unused plot. Mr. Kerr, who has £50 a year with free house, coal and light, plus £7 10s 0d a year war bonus, said he was afraid of the extension throwing so much additional work on him that, with the scarcity of  labour, he would find it difficult to cope with it. On the proposal of Mr. J. J. Bowler, seconded by Mr. A. Wilson, the Council unanimously agreed to increase Mr. Kerr’s salary to £100 a-year and to make him wholly responsible for the carrying out of all work at the Cemetery. -The Clerk pointed out that on many occasions the Registrar was not given sufficiently early notice of burials.

Old Graveyards—Caretakers’ Replies. Recently complaints were made as to the state of the old graveyards in Enniskillen rural area under the care of the Rural Council, and the Clerk was directed to write to the caretakers drawing their attention, to the complaints. Here are three replies received by the Council from caretakers :— From the caretaker of the old graveyard in Kinawley—‘‘I have mowed it twice this summer—the last time less than a month ago—and am now going to mow it a third time. It is quite possible that the person or persons who complained to you about the appearance of the graveyard, made a mistake about .the identity of .the plot. You can enquire off  some local person around the village about the  appearance of the old graveyard.’’ Devenish graveyard caretaker stated  that he never had failed to mow the graveyard, while the caretaker of. Pubble cemetery, Tempo, said: ‘‘I mow it once every year, and at the same time I remove the weeds, and trim the hedge.”

5-9-1942. GARVARY PENSIONER’S ESCAPE. An old-age pensioner named Mary McQuillan, of Shankhill, Garvary, had a remarkable escape when she was knocked down by a military lorry. Found lying in a pool of blood, she was rushed to hospital where it was found that her injuries were superficial. When knocked down she was going for a jug of milk, and on reaching hospital she was still clutching the jug.

5-9-1942. CAVAN FARMER FOR TRIAL. At Cavan District Court, before District Justice Lavery, Patrick Greene (24) farmer, Enniskeen, Kingscourt, was charged with maliciously burning a quantity of hay, value £100 the property of Patrick Tinnelly, Enniskeen, and maliciously burning a cart and harness and other property, value £50. Accused was returned for trial.

5-9-1942. Rossinver Convent.—The Franciscan Sisters of the Atonement of the Mother Lurana Mary Francis House, Rossinver, County Leitrim, have pleasure in announcing that permission has been given by the Holy See to make the Mother Lurana Mary Francis House a Temporary Novitiate for the duration of the war. The time of receptions will be announced later.

5-9-1942. £2 5s for Graveyard Caretaker.—At Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Mr. J. Murphy enquired if the salary of the caretaker of Cleenish Old Graveyard had been increased recently. The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) said originally the salary was 30/-. Then about two years ago the salaries of all graveyard caretakers were increased by 50 per cent.

5-9-1942. Catholic Burials — Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., presiding, instructed its engineer, Mr. James Donnelly, to prepare a specification for carrying out certain works at the New Cemetery, where the local Catholic community are utilizing their plot in future owing to lack of space at the Catholic Cemetery.

5-9-1942. NOTICE TO OUR CUSTOMERS. THE DERBY CAFÉ,ENNISKILLEN, WILL BE CLOSED ALL DAY THURSDAY,10TH SEPT. RE-OPENING FRIDAY MORNING.

5-9-1942. BUNDORAN LADY DIES IN COUNTY FERMANAGH. The death occurred of Mrs. F. Maguire, late of’ Ocean View, Bundoran. Since the death of her husband she had resided with her son and daughter-in-law at Lattoon, Belcoo, Co. Fermanagh. At the funeral last week the chief mourners were—James Hackett, Clogher (brother); Mrs. P. Carty (daughter); John and Freddie Maguire (sons); Peter Carty (son-in-law); Mrs. J. Maguire and Mrs. F. Maguire (daughters-in-law); Miss M. Maguire (sister-in-law); Nano, Packie and John Maguire, Jose, Jack, Frankie, Paddy, Peter and Michael Carty (grandchildren).

5-9-1942. AMERICAN SOLDIER SENTENCED. SEQUEL TO FATAL STABBING. Found guilty by secret ballot of the manslaughter of a member of the British Pioneer Corps, an American soldier, Pte. William Davis (23), of Texas, was sentenced to eight years’ imprisonment by a United States Army courtmartial in the Six Counties on Tuesday.He was also ordered to be dishonourably discharged from the American Army. Davis, who was found not guilty on the original charge of murdering the Pioneer Private, Owen McLoughlin, of Motherwell, will be sent back to America to serve the sentence in a penitentiary. McLaughlin was fatally stabbed on August 1st during a row at a dance in Randalstown Orange Hall.

5-9-1942. THREE TYRONE SISTERS ENTER RELIGIOUS LIFE. Miss Agnes Murray (Sister Mary Laurence) was finally professed, and her sister Winnie (Sister Bernard Therese) made her first profession at La Sainty Union Convent, Bath, on 15th August. Another sister Miss May Murray, H. Dip., has entered the Loreto order in Llandudno, North Wales. She was educated at St. Louis Convent, Carrickmacross, and University College. Dublin. Miss Winnie Murray was educated at Loreto Convent, Omagh, and the Convent High School, Southampton. They are daughters of Mr. .and Mrs. Patrick Murray, Rathfragan, Fintona.

5-9-1942. TO FIGHT TUBERCULOSIS IN BRITAIN. A number of sets of miniature radiography apparatus-the new weapon to combat tuberculosis—has been ordered and may be ready about the end of the year, Mr. Ernest Brown, British Minister of Health, disclosed on Monday opening a sanatorium at Nottingham. We have many difficult problems to solve in finding how the best use can be made of this new weapon, he said. Ideally everyone ought to undergo a regular examination and look upon it as a normal health measure. The fight against tuberculosis—that scourge happiness and destroyer of manpower has a definite, and by no means unimportant, place in the nation’s war effort.

5-9-1942. TRANSACTIONS IN BRANDY. TWO MEN FINED AT BELFAST.

CASE AGAINST ENNISKILLEN MAN. Fines totalling £125 or in default three months imprisonment were imposed by Major Dickie, R.M., in Belfast Summons Court on Desmond McGratty, Ormond Road, Dublin, in Customs prosecutions arising out of transactions in brandy. Samuel Moore, Down St., Enniskillen, was fined in sums aggregating £101 and ordered 12 months’ imprisonment without hard labour. Immediate warrants were issued against both defendants. The summons against McGratty was for being concerned in dealing in 59 bottles of brandy and a bottle of wine, with dealing wholesale in .spirits without a licence, and for causing to be harboured 446 bottles of brandy. Moore was summoned for dealing in 59 bottles of brandy, delivering spirits without a permit, dealing wholesale in spirits without a licence, and causing spirits to be harboured.

Fines of £10 were imposed on R. M. McLane and John Watters, publicans, Belfast, for failing to make an entry in their stock books and other cases against them were dismissed. The former was summoned for being concerned in dealing with 59 bottles of brandy and a bottle of wine, with receiving spirits without a permit and failing to make the necessary stock book entries, and the latter for being concerned in harbouring 446 bottles of brandy, for receiving spirits without a licence, and for failing to make the necessary stock book entries.

Mr. T. J. Campbell, K.C., M.P. (instructed by Messrs. J. Donnelly & Co.) for the defence, said if there was any offence at all it was a Customs offence, and he submitted that his clients were innocent even of the Customs charge. Mr. R. F. Sheldon (Crown Solicitor), for the Commissioners of Customs and Excise, gave notice of appeal in the Excise Cases against these two defendants.

5-9-1942. POLICE RAIDS IN BELFAST. 200 PERSONS DETAINED. Belfast police raided various districts in the city early this week and as a result 200 men have been detained. The raids began at five o’clock on Tuesday morning and the district covered include Falls Road, Ardoyne, North Queen Street, the Dock area, the Markets area, and portions of Ballymacarret and Short Strand. A very large force of police was engaged and the swoop was made simultaneously in each district. The majority of the suspects were taken from their beds, and the men, having been allowed to dress, were removed in cage cars and taken under strong escort to the cells at Chichester Street. There was intense police activity in the Falls Road area of Belfast all during Tuesday night and into the early hours of Wednesday morning.

A number of houses were raided. One man is known to have been detained. In Lisburn district there were also extensive police raids and a number of persons taken to the local barracks were questioned and afterwards released. There were many raids on Thursday night and early on Friday morning. After a night of patrol activity by armoured cars, police in tenders and on foot carried out concentrated raids at dawn. It is understood that the people detained are mostly youths, but a number of girls are also under detention.    In one case a father and his five sons were taken, leaving the mother the only remaining member of the family. . Police waited outside factories and mills and questioned young men as they left at lunch hour. Some on arriving home were detained.

In one street in the Falls, police with drawn revolvers followed a number of youths and later another chase developed when a young man jumped out the back door of a house when the police entered, and ran across the Bog Meadows. The men detained comprised dockers, factory, mill and munition workers and some A.R.P. wardens and fire watchers were taken to the barracks.

12-9-1942. BELLEEK BARRACKS ATTACKED. BOMBS FAILED TO EXPLODE, SHOTS FIRED. ENNISKILLEN HOUSE SEARCHES. At 4 o’clock on Friday morning the R.U.C. Barracks at Belleek, a short distance from the .Border, was attacked. A homemade time bomb or bombs placed near the building failed to explode. Shots were fired at the barracks and to these the police replied. The telephone wires to Enniskillen were cut but the police got a message through to Kesh from which a police party under Head-Constable  Conlin rushed to the assistance of their Belleek colleagues. After less than half an hour, however, the firing ceased and the only damage caused was a few windows broken in the barracks. About fifty shots in all were fired. Considerable police activity followed, several men in the Belleek district being questioned. Police from County Head-quarters at Enniskillen, under County Inspector Gorman for several hours investigated and received reports on the occurrence.

ENNISKILLEN SEARCHES. In Enniskillen district during Friday six houses were visited by a party of armed police and detectives. Nothing was found it is believed. One mart, Mr. Bertie Love, of Mill St., Enniskillen, was painting on the roof of a hut several miles from the town when he was taken into custody. He was later released. In the interval, he was lengthily and closely questioned by several police officers. His house was one of those searched. Other houses raided included that of Mr. Sean Nethercott, Paget Square, well known Fermanagh Nationalist, and Mr. W. J. Monaghan, U.D.C., P.L.G. Several hours were spent in each search.

OFFICIAL STATEMENT. On Friday night R.U.C. headquarters issued this statement:—“At 4 a.m. to-day Belleek barracks, Co. Fermanagh was attacked by fire and bombs. About fifty shots were fired. Police returned the fire. After calling on the police to surrender, the assailants disappeared.

RANDALSTOWN AFFAIR. The explosion at Randalstown barracks, caused by a bomb placed on the sill, blew in one window and the surrounding brickwork, cut the heavy steel bars over the window, badly damaged adjacent houses and broke windows for a hundred yards on either side of the barracks. One of the injured policemen, Sergeant McCammond was flung across the day room and through a door opposite the window. He had been doing clerical work at the time. Constable Bunting, the other injured man, who was standing in the centre of the room was blown against another door and knocked semi-conscious. The sergeant was found to have a fracture of the left arm and severe abrasions to the left leg when he was removed to the Royal Victoria Hospital, where he was stated last night to be comfortable. The constable was not .seriously hurt. The day room is only 9ft. by 12ft. The floor was littered with bricks and other debris, while the walls were pitted with holes.

12-9-1942. ROSLEA COURT BORDER MERCHANT FINED. At Rosslea Petty Sessions before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., John Maguire, merchant, Lackey, Roslea (near Clones), was charged on three counts with being in possession of the following goods with intent to evade export prohibition— 8 cwts. rice, 5 cwts. barley, 2½ cwts. S/R flour, 3 cwts. currants, 2 stones sultanas, 96 tins salmon and 42 lbs. soap powder. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted, and Mr, Herbert, solicitor defended. Martin Shaw McMullen, of McKay and Leetham, Belfast, deposed to selling the goods to defendant on September 23rd, 1941. He had never seen defendant before. Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness said there were no restrictions on the goods at that time.

Sergeant Moffatt deposed to visiting defendant’s premises, which were about 20 yards from the border, on Oct. 29th. Defendant had a very small stock and the goods which were seized were found in defendant’s dwelling-house. At that time witness could find no trace of baking soda or lentils which defendant had purchased in Belfast. In a statement defendant said half the goods were for a Mr. Somerville who owned a shop about 1½ miles away. Defendant refused to sign the statement.

Defendant, in evidence, stated he was an ex-serviceman and had served in the British army in France and in the East during the last war. He had been in business for himself since 1934 and was on friendly terms with Mr. Somerville, Clones with whom he had previously been employed. His purchases from January, 1941 to August, 1942, were £910. Witness had never any intention of smuggling these goods across the border. Convicting, defendant of being in possession of the goods for export, the R.M, imposed a fine of £60, with time to pay. He dismissed the other two charges. He ordered the forfeiture of 2 cwts. of barley and 2 cwts. of currants.

12-9-1942. MISCONDUCT AT WEEKLY DANCES. AMERICAN OFFICERS’ COMPLAINT.  A letter was read from the officer in charge of U.S.A. military police, regarding dances held in the Minor Townhall—particularly those held on Saturday nights, under the auspices of the football club. It stated: “The door keepers have no limit in admission; the result being that the atmosphere is appalling. There is no room to dance and when evilly disposed. There is no room to dance and when evilly disposed persons start a “brawl’ the hall is so crowded it is impossible to pick out the participants. We suggest that the number of persons admitted be limited to 150 at the outside. We are agreeable to place joint police patrols at the door, who will be responsible for seeing that the service men do not gain admittance after the correct number had been reached, and also our patrols will enter the hall if there is any disorder among the service personnel at the request of the door keeper or a member of the dance committee. We take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation to all classes in Enniskillen for the hospitality and cooperation we have invariably received.” In a subsequent letter it was stated: “We can no longer provide police patrols for duty at the above mentioned dances as we are not getting the cooperation of the organisers.’’

The Chairman (Mr. Johnston) said the difficulty was 200 to 300 people go to this dance and the place gets choked up. One dance last week had to be stopped on account of the conduct. There was only one thing they could do and it would be a drastic remedy—close the hall altogether to these dances. The Council made an order that the number of persons to be admitted to a dance in the Minor Hall be limited to 150.

12-9-1942. LEITRIM COUNCIL SYMPATHY. THE BALLINAMORE TRAGEDY. Mr. Mooney proposed a vote of sympathy with the relatives of the victims of the Ballinamore drowning tragedy. He happened to be in Ballinamore the previous Tuesday, and he witnessed a scene of sorrow there which he hoped never to see again. It was a consolation to know that the children who lost their lives were daily attenders at Mass and communicants. Therefore they were well prepared to meet their Creator, and their parents had the whole-hearted sympathy of the Council in their bereavement. Mr, P. J. Reynolds, in seconding said it was his intention as a member of the Council for Ballinamore area to propose a vote of sympathy as he thought according to procedure the agenda had to be finished first before taking up consideration of such a resolution. The parents had the wholehearted sympathy of the Leitrim County Council in the great loss which they had sustained. The Chairman said the sad occurrence had cast a gloom not alone over the Ballinamore area but it caused a painful shock throughout “Eire.” They sympathised deeply with the relatives of those children.

12-9-1942. DEARER 26-CO. BREAD. The price of the 41b. batch loaf is to be raised in the 26 Counties from ls to ls 1d, delivered, as from September 21. The price will be Is when sold at bakers’ shops. The price of flour (including wheaten meal) will be increased South of the Border from 52s 6d a sack of 280 lbs. to 60s free on rail at port mills, as from September 14th. The flour price increase is attributed to the new guaranteed price of 50s a barrel for Irish wheat,

12-9-1942. GLANGEVLIN TRAGEDY. MAN FOUND HANGED. A distressing tragedy was discovered in Glengevlin on Friday afternoon when Peter McGovern, Bealballie, Glangevlin was found dead, suspended from a rope, in his home. A niece of deceased, who had acted as housekeeper for him, had left on the previous evening to visit her sister’s house, some miles away. On her return on Friday afternoon she found the door bolted and. was unable to gain admittance. Securing assistance the door was forced .and the grim discovery made. THE INQUEST. At an inquest held on Saturday a verdict of suicide while of unsound mind was returned. It was stated that deceased had not been in good health since a recent illness. Sympathy was extended to his relatives. The funeral, which took place to Glangevlin, was largely attended.

12-9-1942. BALLYSHANNON COURT. JAIL SENTENCES FOR ASSAULT. At Ballyshannon District Court, before Mr. J. O’Hanrahan, D.J., Patrick and John Rooney, Single Street, Bundoran, were each sentenced to two months’ imprisonment with hard labour for assaulting Charles Gorman, who said he was cut in several places, Lieut. James Mahony, National Army, said one of the Rooneys held Gorman as the other beat him. Witness interfered and took the man away. John Rooney said Gorman started the row.

12-9-1942. KESH MAN GETS DECREE. A decree for £25 was given in a civil bill brought by Francis Maguire, Derrynieve, Kesh, against Lena Gallagher, Tourist House, Bundoran, for that amount due for. cash lent and advanced by plaintiff to defendant on the 20tk October, 1938.

12-9-1942. 60 DOZEN EGGS SEIZED. Imposing a penalty of £100 with a recommendation that it be reduced to £5 in a case in which James McGonigle, Corlea, was convicted of attempting to smuggle 60 dozen eggs across the Border, the Justice said he hoped it would serve as a warning to people on this side of the Border not to be catspaws for those outside the jurisdiction of the State. Garda McGarvey said when questioned McGonigle, who was carrying three boxes of eggs, in a donkey cart in the direction of Corlea, said he was conveying them for a day’s pay from a shop in Cashelard to a man who lived in the Belleek district. The eggs were seized.

12-9-1942. DRUMKEERAN DISTRICT COURT LICENCE APPLICATIONS. Mr. M, J. C. Keane, District Justice, presided at this Court on Wednesday. DANCE LICENCE. Mr. H. Murray, solicitor (Mr. C. L. Flynn), Carrick-on-Shannon, applied on behalf of Mrs. Celia Crowne, Drumkeeran, for an annual dance licence in respect of Crowne’s Hall, Drumkeeran.

Superintendent McNamara, Carrick-on-Shannon, said there was no objection to the licence and the Justice granted the application as asked by Mr. Murray— twenty dances in the year from 8 p.m. to 12 midnight. Mr. Thomas Dowd, Gluckawn, was granted a licence to hold a dance at Gluckawn National School, the guards having no objection.

ANNUAL LICENCES. The publicans in Drumkeeran and district had their annual applications listed for the renewal of their licence and as there was no objection the applications were granted, as also exemptions for early opening on fair mornings.

Mr. Patrick Dolan, .Drumkeeran, applied for the renewal of his spirit grocery wholesale and retail licence, and the Justice inquired if there was any proof of valuation with regard to the wholesale licence. Mr. Early, court clerk, said the applicant was within the limitation and had been granted a licence on a previous occasion. The renewal of the licence was accordingly granted.

12-9-1942. D.J. SUGGESTS TRANSPORT FACILITIES TO COURT. MINERS’ ABSENCE HOLDS UP CASE. Fifteen miners, summoned to give evidence at Ballyfarnon in a series of cases under the Holidays (Employees) Act, 1939, against Michael Leydon, managing director Arigna Collieries, Ltd., failed to appear, and Mr. Keane, D.J., adjourned the summonses for a month for their attendance. It was alleged that Mr. Leydon had failed to give workers annual leave and public holidays, and had failed to pay, assessor pay when they quitted his employment.

Mr. M. Lavin, Inspector of Mines and Factories, said Mr. Leydon had told him that he thought the Act did not apply to his mines. Mr. Leydon, after the issue of the summonses, sent a letter to the Department enclosing receipts from the persons concerned stating that they had got payment in respect of assessor pay, annual leave and holidays. Mr. C. E. Callan, defending, said the inspector had prevented Mr. Leydon increasing the men’s wages. The men could not be present at court owing to transport difficulties. Mr. Keane thought that some effort to transport them to court might he made.

12-9-1942. SMALL FINES PROTEST. CROWN SOLICITOR AND R.M. When at Tynan Petty Sessions on Saturday, Mr. Austin, R.M., fined Patk. Carbery, Balteagh, Middletown, £15 for having been concerned in carrying 35 bottles whisky, uncustomed goods, Mr, J. P. Best (Crown Solicitor) said it was no use the Commissioners getting small penalties like that.He again protested when Fras. Hughes, Lislanley, was fined £3 in respect of two cycle tyres.

If these penalties were to continue he suggested to the Commissioners that they make the minimum fine £100. Mr. Austin — If you want to fill the prisons well and good. Mr. Best—Small penalties encourage smuggling. Mr. Austin—I don’t believe in imprisonment unless it is absolutely necessary. Mr. Best — You don’t seem to think there is a war on.

SUING FOR £1,000 FINE. When Patrick Hamill, John St., Portadown, was charged in respect of 2 lbs. tea. Mr. Best said that under a new Order the authorities were suing for a. £1,000 fine. The R.M.—Very well, I will fine him £1,000. Then he goes to jail. Defendant—I’ll go to prison rather than pay £1,000. Mr. Best, (to the R.M.)—If you want to make yourself ridiculous you can impose the fine. A fine of £3 was imposed.

12-9-1942. BLACK-OUT WARNING. “I would like people clearly to understand that penalties will be very heavy in the coming winter if they don’t blackout, said Major Dickie, R.M:, at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. Addressing District Inspector Peacocke, his  Worship said: “At the same time, Mr. Peacock, I might suggest, that it would be well to draw, the attention of the military authorities to the practice of military cars and lorries not only passing through Enniskillen, but parking in Enniskillen, with unscreened headlights full on. I counted six of them at midnight with blazing headlights. . The whole town of Enniskillen must have been blazing with lights visible from the air for miles away,” he said. D. I. Peacocke—That matter has been given attention already. Of course you understand we must approach the authorities. In, the black-out cases before the Court, his Worship imposed fines of 5/- and costs in the majority and in one a fine of 20/- and costs was ordered.

COCOA SALE: £31 FINE. Thomas Coogan, merchant, Ballybay, was fined £20 and his brother, Patrick Coogan, £5 when summoned at Ballybay for charging 3/9 for a lb. of cocoa. They were also fined £2 each for selling the  cocoa to a non-customer For refusing to give a. receipt a further fine of £2 was imposed on Patrick Coogan.

12-9-1942. ROSLEA DROWNING TRAGEDY. FATHER’S STORY AT INQUEST. How a horrified father watched his son drown in a lake a short distance from the shore was described at an inquest held in Rosslea on Wednesday of last week into the circumstances of the death of a boy named Frank Morton (18) son of Constable Francis Morton, R.U.C., Rosslea, who: was drowned in Drumacritten Lake on the previous evening. The inquest was held by Mr. James Mulligan, Coroner, sitting without a jury. District Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, conducted the proceedings for the Crown. The death of young Morton, who was a general favourite with everyone, caused a pall of gloom in the district. A lad of fine physique, measuring six feet in height, the deceased was about to be accepted in the police force, and his untimely death has evoked widespread sympathy. A native of Co. Armagh, his father was transferred from Derrylin about five months ago, Deceased was his second eldest child, fond, of all kind of sport and a remarkably strong swimmer.

At the inquest, Constable Horton, who was obviously overcome with grief, stated that on the evening of the tragedy witness left his home about 6.30 to have a shot with his gun. His sons, Frank (dead) and George, asked him where he was going, and witness told them so that they would know where to get him. Later witness shot two wild ducks rising off  Drumacritten Lake. Witness tried to get his setter dog to go out for the ducks, but the dog would not go, as it had not seen the ducks on the water. Witness gave up trying to get the ducks and was going away when his two sons arrived. Frank said he would go in for the ducks, and started to take off his clothes. Deceased was a strong swimmer. His son entered the water, and when he was about halfway turned to come back, shouting for help. Witness ran up to a .field to get assistance, but when, he returned he could only see bubbles where his son had disappeared. A verdict of accidental death was returned and sympathy expressed with the bereaved family and relatives.

12-9-1942. SYMPATHY WITH POLICEMAN. When Constable Frank Morton, R.U.C., was giving evidence in a black-out case, Major Dickie said he would like to mention how much they all sympathised with Constable Morton on the occasion of his recent sad bereavement. They were all extremely sorry. Mr. Cooper also, associated himself with the expression of sympathy and Constable Morton, returned thanks. Constable Morton’s 18-year-old son had been drowned in a lake hear Roslea a couple, of days previously. Fines were imposed in a number of cases against householders for not having their premises effectively blacked-out, and Major Dickie said the .penalties would be much heavier this winter if there were any complaints from the R.A.F.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s