September 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

19-9-1942. 72 PACKS OF FLOUR. CUSTOMS CAPTURE AT NEWTOWNBUTLER. An Unusual Case. R.M, HOLDS GOODS LIABLE TO FORFEITURE. A most unusual Customs ease was heard at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major T. W. Dickie, R..M., when William P, Lucas, 15 Fade St., Dublin, and Matthew D. Rooney, 44 Temple Bar, Dublin, were charged in connection with 4 tons 4 cwts. 3 qrs. and 14 lbs. of flour, being goods of which, the export was prohibited, and which were found in the possession of the G.N.R, at Newtownbutler on April 14th, 1942 and in respect of which an order for forfeiture was sought. Mr. James Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted; Mr. J. Hanna, solicitor, appeared for the two defendants; Mr. M. E. Knight, solicitor, held a watching brief on behalf, of the G.N.R

Mr. Cooper said it was rather all unusual type of case. On April 3rd there arrived at Newtownbutler station 4 tons 4 cwts. 3 qrs. 14 lbs of white flour. This flour had been consigned by the Co. Derry Railway from ‘‘Eire” and was consigned to Dublin. The bags of flour were examined by Mr. Chapman, Officer of Customs. One bag was marked Belfast, another Australia, while the others were differently marked and appeared to have been taken out of the original, bags. The flour was put in a sealed waggon. Proceeding, Mr. Cooper said the Customs authorities, required the station master at Newtownbutler to furnish proof under Sec, 3 of the Customs Defence Act, 1939, as amended by the new regulation. Following the demand of proof from the stationmaster, word was received from the railway companies that this flour had been originally handed in at Stranorlar and that it was consigned from Stranorlar by a man named McFadden. The railway company also stated that Mr. McFadden had never sent any other flour by that route and appeared to be a small country shopkeeper who lived at Breena, about 20 miles from Letterkenny. The freight in sending it from Strabane to Stranorlar would be £1 16s per ton and to send it by Ballyshannon would he £2 Is per ton.

It was re-consigned from Ballyshannon by a man named J. McDonald. Nobody knew who McDonald was. The Customs authorities directed the flour to be seized. It was seized, and notice of the seizure was served on Rooney Bros., Dublin. Mr. Fitzpatrick, solicitor, gave formal .notice that Mr. Lucas claimed ownership, and also wrote on behalf of Rooney, who claimed two tons of the flour. The railway company then informed them part of this flour was first sent from Buncrana to Letterkenny by a man called W. Porter. A man named Bradley then came in and made a claim against the railway company for £228 for loss in respect of the flour. This flour was unobtainable at the time in the Free State and they suggested it was smuggled through the Customs somewhere about Strabane, because it would have to be unloaded and put on the train to have it sent down to Ballyshannon. In any case, it had no business to be exported from Northern Ireland at all.

19-9-1942. IRVINESTOWN PETTY SESSIONS. CYCLE LARCENY CHARGE. BICYCLE THEFT PRISON FOR SOLDIER. At Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., District-Inspector Walshe charged Private Kerrigan, Pioneer Corps, formerly of Boho, Co. Fermanagh with the larceny of a bicycle value £10, the property of Curry Beatty, Ballinamallard. Henry Armstrong, Coolisk, was charged with receiving the bicycle. Kerrigan stated that he was returning to England from leave, when he bought the bicycle from a man named O’Donnell, of Sligo, for £1 15s. He then sold the bicycle to Armstrong for £2 10s. A sentence of six months’ imprisonment was ordered. For Armstrong it was said that he was under the influence of drink when he bought the bicycle and the case was dismissed on the merits.

19-9-1942. £120 IN FINES CALEDON MAN MULCTED. At Dungannon Petty Sessions, Thomas A. Clark, Ballagh, Caledon, was prosecuted for dealing in the following prohibited goods—85 loaves of wheat flour bread, five -0-st. bags wheat flour 420 lb. candles, 446 packets and 14 lb. of soap flakes and soap powders, 3¾ cwt. soap, 24 lb. custard powder, one quarter and 2½ lb. cocoa, and 1 qr. 22 lb. coffee. On a second count he was prosecuted for having the following uncustomed goods—large iron kettle, one aluminium teapot, one enamel teapot, two enamel dishes, one enamel saucepan, and 38 dozen eggs. Mr. Long, R.M., said the Clarke family seemed to be engaged in the wholesale distribution of these prohibited articles Owing to defendant’s age and ill-health he would not send him to prison. In the first case he would be fined £115 12s 3d. For harbouring the uncustomed goods he was fined £5.

19-9-1942. REFUSED TO GIVE NAMES TO B SPECIALS. Five Men Before Trillick Court. At Trillick Petty Sessions on Monday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Francis Donnelly, Derrymacanna; Francis Woods, Moorfield, Trillick; John P. McGrade, Shanmullagh; Philip McGrade, Tallymacanna; and Frank McColgan, Stralongford were charged with disorderly conduct and refusing to give their names to members of a “B” patrol. S. D. Commandant Beattie, gave evidence that early on Monday morning, Aug.,

19-9-1942. £30 FINE ON IRVINESTOWN MOTORIST FAILURE TO TAX CAR. Daniel McCrossan, Main Street, Irvinestown, appeared at the local Petty Sessions last Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., to answer a summons brought against him for using a motor vehicle on the public road on 7th April last without a licence. The summons was brought by Fermanagh County Council per Herbert J. D. Moffitt, taxation officer.

Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, said that Constable Cander found defendant’s car on the public street on 7th April, 1942 without being licensed. The matter came before the County Council, and they decided to allow defendant off with a mitigated penalty of £1. Mr. Moffitt wrote to defendant on the 6th May informing him that proceedings would be stayed if he paid £1. No answer was received, and Mr. Moffitt again wrote, but no answer was received from defendant. Constable Cander gave evidence of finding a public service vehicle, the property of defendant, on the street on 7th April. It was not licensed. Defendant said “It was just an overlook at the time.” John Moffitt, who is employed in the taxation office, said the car was licensed at the present time. The annual duty was £10 a year. He sent a notice to defendant that the County Council had considered the matter, and that if he paid £1 proceedings would not be taken—if he took out a licence. There was no reply. Witness sent a further note on 7th July. Mr. Cooper—In this case the penalty is £20, or three times the amount of duty payable, whichever is the greater. The County Council I understand, have power to review it when it goes back to them. The greater penalty is £30. Defendant said that the car was out of order at the time, and he was looking for parts for it. His Worship — Why did you not answer the letter? I did not think the offence was very serious. Defendant added that if he did not tax the car he would get no petrol. His Worship imposed a penalty of £30, and £1 ls 9d costs, with a stay till next Court. Mr. Cooper — We want to get the penalty your Worship, to show these people they must pay attention to these things.

19-9-1942. TO STAND FOR STORMONT SEAT MR. EAMONN DONNELLY, Ex-T.D. Mr. Eamonn Donnelly, secretary of the Green Cross Fund, and formerly T.D. for Leix-Offaly, is to be a candidate for the Northern Ireland Parliamentary by-election for the. Falls Division, Belfast. He was also M.P. for South, Armagh from 1925 to 1929. Mr. Donnelly told a Press man that he had been asked by a number of representative men to stand for the Division in the interests of unity. His chief aims would be to try to bring together all sections of the minority. “I know,” he said, “there are many who will support the candidature of one espousing the principles that I would like to see established. We have been wandering more or less in a morass for the last, number of years, at sixes and sevens, with no definite guidance as to the ultimate realisation of the objective, that everyone cherishes dearly, namely, the unification of our country.

“I have always held, and still hold, that it is possible to re-unite our country by constitutional means. I believe the Irish people as a whole, given an opportunity, will stand for the bringing together again of the old Constituent Assembly, the first Dail under the aegis of which the advances were made which Southern Ireland today enjoys, but which do not apply to us.” “I assured the delegation,” he said, “ that my aim, if elected, would be to concentrate on the release of political internees. “There can be no peace while internment without trial exists. It is contrary to every principle of justice and citizenship, and certainly contrary to what the Allied. Powers profess to be fighting for. I have never compromised and never will on the unity of Ireland. I believe the unity of the country is more necessary to-day than ever, more particularly as its defence as a unit in the present world conflict should be the first consideration of every Irishman. I have no doubt as to the result in West Belfast. It often gave a lead before to Ireland, and God knows we want leadership now more than ever.”

19-9-1942. CHARM ING DERRY WEDDING. OMAGH POSTAL OFFICIAL WED. HYNES —YANNARELLI. A charming wedding took place on Thursday morning in St. Eugene’s Cathedral, Derry, with Nuptial Mass and Papal Blessing, when two well-known Derry and Tyrone families were united. The contracting parties were Mr. Patrick Hynes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hynes, of Campsie, Omagh, Co. Tyrone, and Miss Isabella Yannarelli, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Yannarelli, Strand Road, Derry City. Both bride and bridegroom, are well known and highly esteemed, the bridegroom being a very popular member of the clerical staff of Omagh Post Office, while the bride is prominent in local social circles. The ceremony was performed by Rev. T. Devine, C.C.. Castlefin, Donegal.

19-9-1942. ASSAULT CASE. DEFENDANT FINED AND REMOVED FROM COURT. IRVINESTOWN STORY. Summonses against father and son were heard at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when Thomas McLaughlin, Coolback, brought a summons against James Hamilton Martin (father), Cabragh, for defendant’s neglect to pay for trespass of his cattle on complainant’s land at Doogary on 3rd inst.; and also a summons against Ernest Martin (son), Cabragh, for assault. Mr. A. Herbert appeared for complainant, who gave evidence that he had taken part of a farm, the other, part being taken by the senior defendant; Plaintiff alleged that on the 3rd inst. Martin senior put, seven head of cattle on to the land he (plaintiff) had taken. Later, when plaintiff met defendant and his four sons defendant asked him did he drive the cattle off, and plaintiff replied in the affirmative. Plaintiff then described what followed, and said that Ernest Martin struck him on the mouth, which bled.

Francis McMulkin, owner of the farm gave evidence as to the letting. When he had finished his evidence there ensued an argument between the senior defendant and witness.       Sergeant M, Kelly said that when plaintiff called with him on 3rd inst. there was blood trickling from the side of his mouth, and his lip was slightly swollen. Defendant said that plaintiff made all shapes to stick, him with a pitchfork. One of his sons caught, the pitchfork, and whatever injury plaintiff got was in the wrangling over the pitchfork.

This man, declared defendant, “is a bad man—a dangerous man. Would you not know the look of him? Ernest Martin denied striking plaintiff. Plaintiff and his brother were wrestling for the pitch fork on one side of the road, and witness was standing on the other side of the road. Kenneth Martin said plaintiff followed them with a pitch fork and attempted to stab his father with it. Witness caught the pitch fork, and during the tussle plaintiff got a crack on the face.His Worship—How many of you were there? — We were going to our work, and there were five of us. Henry Emery also gave evidence.

His Warship held that Martin, Sen., was guilty of trespass, and that his son was guilty of an unprovoked assault. He fined the son 40/- and 4/- costs, and made an order for the trespass by scale, with £2 2s 0d costs. Addressing Martin, Senr., his Worship said that from his behaviour in Court, if he had any more trouble with him he would bind him over in heavy sureties to keep the peace. Defendant—I will appeal the case. His Worship then directed the police to remove defendant from Court.

19-9-1942. ROSSINVER PARISH COUNCIL. FARMERS’ GRIEVANCE. THE TEA SUPPLY. A meeting of Rossinver Parish. Council was held in St. Aiden’s Hall on Sunday, Rev. Father McPhillips, P. P. (chairman) presiding. Other members present included: Messrs. Michael Sheerin, V.C., John Gilligan, P.C.; Joseph Fox, James Connolly, Sean Eames, N.T. (secretary), and Padraic J. O’Rourke.

DRAINAGE. A deputation appeared before the meeting on behalf of farmers residing in the townlands of Corraleskin, Gortnaderry, Gubmanus, Lattoon and Cornagowna, whose lands have been flooded by the Kilcoo River. Mr. Patrick Meehan, Latloon, who acted as spokesman said that many farmers along the border from Kiltyclogher to Garrison had suffered great losses in hay crops and pasture for the past two months. The damage done had been unprecedented. Nine floods, coming in quick succession had effected the complete ruin of a huge amount of hay and oats. The floods had been the worst in living memory. A lake in the Six Counties had been drained a few years ago, and the extra water from this area was now coming into the border river, making the flooding much worse than it used to be. Rev. P. McPhillips- The people have been trying for the past 50 years to get the border river drained, and the removal of a narrow bed of rock from the river bed near Garrison would solve the whole difficulty at a very small cost. A. few sticks of gelignite would; do the whole thing.

Mr. O’Rourke—Farmers on both sides of the border are affected, and our Government were prepared to have the river drained four years ago provided the Six-County Government would co-operate. The required co-operation was not forthcoming, and so the scheme fell through.

Mr. Denis Keaney (a member of the deputation) stated that as all the good grazing lands, lay along the river the cattle had failed in milking since they were put on the hard hills, and farmers had lost from £5 to £10 in their creamery Cheques for the two months, and the flooded hay was likely to kill the cattle during the winter.

The following resolution, proposed by Mr. P. J. O’Rourke, seconded by Mr. M. Sheerin, was passed unanimously (copies to be forwarded to the Minister for Local Government and local T.D.s): “That we, the members of Rossinver Parish Council, request the Minister for Local Government to take into, consideration the serious losses in hay crops and pasture suffered by farmers living along the border river, particularly in the townlands of Corraleskin, Gortnaderry, Lattoon, Gubmanus and Cornagowna, and to grant them a rebate in the rates, for the coming year. Wo also consider it very necessary that immediate action be taken by the Government to have the rock at Cornagowna, which is the prime cause of the whole flooding, removed.” Mr. Sheerin—We want the T.D.s to back us up in this matter.

19-9-1942. BELLEEK SESSIONS. At Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday, Before Major Dickie, R.M., Eric Carson, Knocknashangan, Garrison, was fined 10s for failing to produce his identity card when asked to do so by an authorised person. Michael O’Shea, Drumanillar, Belleek, was summoned for leading two horses on the public highway during the hours of darkness without having a light in front of the animals. The case was dismissed.

19-9-1942. WAR DEPARTMENT PETROL. Thomas Gallagher, Aghoo, Garrison, was charged with having in his possession on 23rd July a quantity of petrol—5 gallons— the property of the War Department. (N.I.), which, he bought or received from a soldier or person, acting on his behalf. He was also charged with not being a servant of the Government acting in the course of his duty as such, or a person acting in accordance with the authority of a Government Department had in his possession a quantity of Government petroleum spirit contrary to the Emergency Powers Order. Constable McMullin, examined by D.I. Walshe who prosecuted, said that on 23rd July he stopped Gallagher, and subsequently went to inspect defendant’s garage, and found the petrol in a tins there. In a statement Gallagher said he got two gallons of petrol from a soldier on the road a few weeks previously. Sergt. Bailey gave evidence of testing the petrol, which he found reacted to the test for Army petrol and Cpl. Geelan said he dispatched a sample of the petrol to the public analyst at Belfast. D.I. Walshe said that owing to the enormous expense entailed they had not brought the analyst from Belfast, but had obtained his certificate. Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solr., Enniskillen, pleading guilty on behalf of his client, said that this was the type of offence any person, being human, would fall into. The defendant had acted with extrema foolishness, and he asked the Resident Magistrate to deal leniently with the matter. The R.M. said he could not treat the matter lightly, and imposed a fine of £93 on the second summons, the penalty to rule both charges. He allowed two months to pay.

CASE DISMISSED, George Connor, Aghoo, Garrison, was also charged with having army petrol in his possession. D.I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr, P. J. Flanagan defended.

19-9-1942. SIX COUNTY POTATO PRICES. MORE MONEY FOR GROWERS. (Ed. “Ware Potatoes” is a term mostly used within the potato industry. Sometimes, it is used in a generic sense for any potatoes destined for human consumption in potato form, as opposed to seed potatoes or potatoes that are primarily valued for the amount of starch that can be extracted from them for industrial processing.)

Growers’ prices for ware and seed potatoes of the 1942 crop as from 1st October have now been announced. The districts will be District 1—Counties Antrim., Down, Armagh (Newry No. 2 Rural District only), Tyrone (Strabane Rural District only) and Londonderry, and District 3—-Counties Fermanagh, Tyrone (except Strabane Rural District), Londonderry and Armagh (except Newry No. 2 Rural District).

In District I. the price of ware potatoes during October will be 90/- per ton tor the varieties Golden Wonder, King Edward, Red King and Gladstone; 75/- per ton for Kerr’s Pink, Redskin, Up-to-Date, Dunbar Standard, Arran Peak, Arran Victory and any other variety grown on red soil, and 70/- per ton for any other variety not grown on red soil. In District II. the price will be 5/- per ton less in each case. These are fixed prices for delivery f.o.r. grower’s railway station, or on buyer’s lorry at the farm.

Growers’ prices per ton for Class I. certified seed will be until further notice: Arran Crest, Catriona, Di Vernon, Doon Early, Immune Ash leaf, May Queen, Ninetyfold, Witchhill,  Ulster Chieftain, 205/-; Arran Pilot, Ballydoon, Duke of York. Ulster Monarch, Arran Scout, Sharpe’s Express, 155/-; Doon Pearl, Dunbar, Robar, Eclipse, Dargill Early, Suttin’s Abundance, Arran Signet, 140/ -; Ally, Alness, Arran Comrade, Arran Peak, Ben Lomond, British Queen, Dunbar Standard. Edzell Blue, Gladstone, Golden Wonder, King Edward VII, Red King, Beauty of Hebron, Herald, Bintze, (Muizen) – 120/-: Arran Banner, Arran Cairn, Arran Chief, Arran Consul, Arran Victory, Bishop, Champion, Doon Star, Dunbar Archer, Dunbar Cavalier, Field Marshall, Great Scot, Irish Queen, Kerr’s Pink, King George V., Majestic, President, Redskin, Rhoderick Dhu, Royal Kidney {Queen Mary), Tinwald Perfection. Up-to-Date, Baron, Arran Luxury, 110/-.

The price for Northern Ireland Report Certificate Seed will be 20/- per ton less in each case. A top riddle of and a bottom riddle of 1¼ will apply to all varieties of seed of the above classifications.

CONSUMER TO PAY LESS. A reduction in the maximum wholesale and retail prices for ware potatoes has been announced. To offset this reduction a subsidy will be paid to licensed “first buyers’ and in certain circumstances licensed grower-salesmen. The maximum wholesale price in District I. from 24th to 50th September will be 4/- per cwt. for Grade A and 3/6 per cwt. for Grade B. In District II the price will be 3d per cwt. less in each case. From 28th September to 3rd October the maximum retail price in both districts, will be 5d per half-stone for Grade A and 4½d per half-stone for Grade B.

19-9-1942. Department and Monaghan Appointment. At a meeting of the Co., Monaghan Vocational Education Committee, a letter was read from the Department intimating that the Ministry was not prepared to approve of the appointment of Miss M. Duffy, as commercial teacher in Monaghan Technical School. By 14 votes to 4, a resolution was carried requesting the Minister to sanction the appointment temporarily pending Miss Duffy securing certificate for instruction in typewriting.

19-9-1942. NOTICE TO FARMERS.  We wish to inform our customers and the general public that we have received a large consignment of Men’s, Women’s and Boys’ Kip Nailed Boots for the winter season. These are exceptionally good, reliable Boots, and up to pre-war standard. We would advise the early purchase of same, as we may not be able to repeat the superior quality of these lines. FLANAGAN’S, Enniskillen.

19-9-1942. DESERTED FROM TWO ARMIES. A stranger stopped by a policeman in Enniskillen was found to be a deserter from the Irish Army. It later transpired that the man had deserted from the British Army. The man, Michael D’Arcy, of the A.M.P.C., was charged with being a deserter at a special court before Mr. W. F. Dewane, J.P., and was ordered to be handed over to the military authorities.

19-9-1942. LISNASKEA ASSAULT CASE. When Mary Jane Melanophy, of Lisnaskea, summoned Margaret Burns, Erne Terrace. Lisnaskea, for assault, at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, plaintiff alleged that defendant threw two stones at her, one of them striking her on the ankle. Defendant, said she threw a stone at plaintiff, but she did not believe it hit her. She threw the stone in self-defence when plaintiff raised a broom over her head. Major Dickie, R.M., said he did not believe there was anything to choose between them from what he heard in Court. He imposed on Mrs. Burns a nominal penalty of 2/6, with £1 Is 0d costs, and advised the parties to try to live in peace.

26-9-1942. CONSTABLE SUMMONED AT LETTERBREEN. RECKLESS DRIVING CHARGE DISMISSED. Constable James Mulqueeny, formerly of Kinawley, Co. Fermanagh, and now of Bessbrook, Co. Armagh, appeared at Letterbreen Petty Sessions on 16th inst., before Major Dickie. R.M., on the usual three counts; the reckless driving of a motor car on 2nd May last at the cross roads at Florencecourt Creamery. Mr. P J. Flanagan, LL.B., defended. Two constables who had been with defendant in the car on the occasion gave evidence that on the way out from Enniskillen defendant mentioned about the steering of the car being stiff. About 50 yards from the creamery cross they passed another car. Defendant was driving on the left-hand side of the road at a speed of from 25-30 miles per hour, and in the words of one of the witnesses “all of a sudden the car just gave a ‘double’ on the road and struck the far ditch.” Keith Farlow, aged 13 who witnessed the accident, said he saw the car come round the cross and skid on the gravel. The car had been travelling at a medium speed.

Sergeants Ryan and Henderson also gave evidence, the latter, who is inspector of public service vehicles, describing the condition of the car following the accident, and said the right front wheel was buckled and the tyre burst. Defendant said that at the time of the accident was stationed at Kinawley, and was the driver of the Customs car.. The car in which he had the accident was his own, and his brother had been using it in the city. When it came back he noticed there was something wrong with the steering. Describing the accident, defendant said the steering seemed to lock. He put pressure on it, but could not get it straightened again. The steering did not answer at all, and he struck the bank. His Worship-—There are so many, theories one could advance of how this accident happened. I don’t know which to accept. I don’t think it is a case in which I ought to convict. He dismissed the case.

19-9-1942. WRONGFUL USE OF PETROL. LISNASKEA CASE. The first case of its kind in the district was heard at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when Imelda Evelyn Beggan, of Tattycam, Newtownbutler, was charged, with having used motor fuel on 3rd August at Kilygullion for a purpose other than that specified. Constable Kelly gave evidence of stopping a Ford motor car driven by defendant on 3rd August, and in reply to questions she said she was getting three gallons of petrol per month for going to Mass on Sundays, and bringing eggs to Lisnaskea market every Saturday and that she had been leaving her sister to the 5.30 p.m. train for Belfast. Mr. J. B. Murphy, defending, said that defendant lived six miles from a railway station and in one of the forms she stated that there was no public transport. He suggested that defendant was entitled to use the car to bring her sister, who worked, in a Government office, to the railway station in order to get back to work. His Worship—She is given this for certain purposes in strict law. He added that one thing that was wrong was the statement that there was no public transport.

Mr. Murphy—It is three miles away. He said that it was the first case of its kind, and he would ask his Worship to apply the Probation of Offenders Act. When applying for a renewal of the three gallons defendant could mention this journey. District Inspector Smyth said it was the first case in the district. They were going to delve into this business very carefully, and the prosecution had been brought to air activity in the matter. His Worship—I understand that if a person is convicted for improper use of petrol automatically the petroleum officer: will not give them any further supplies. District Inspector—They refer it to the police first and ask their opinion. Dealing with defendant under the Probation of Offenders Act on payment of costs of Court, his Worship said that did not mean that the next person would get the benefit of the Probation Act.

26-9-1942. FALSE REPRESENTATIONS CHARGE AT KESH. Thomas Duncan, Water Lane, Letterkeen, was charged at Kesh Petty Sessions an Tuesday with having on the 1st Jan., 1942, at Kesh, for the purpose of obtaining for himself a supplementary pension under the Unemployment Assistance Act, knowingly made a false representation that during the seven days up to and including, 1st January he had not earned more than 5s, whereas, during this period he was employed by Messrs. H. and J. Martin, Ltd., 163, Ormeau Road, Belfast, and in the week ended 31st December, 1941, earned 76/3d,: this sum being paid to him on 3rd Jan., 1942. There was a second charge against defendant of making a false representation, for the same purpose, for the week ending 8th January, the amount he was alleged to have earned  being 67/9d. Alan McCullagh, an official of the Assistance Board, gave evidence of receiving defendant’s application on 16th October last. Major Dickie, R.M. “(to defendant) — Have you any explanation to give? Defendant—I have not indeed. I know nothing about it. His Worship-—You knew enough to draw £3 16s.

James Weir, another official, gave evidence of filling up the application for defendant on 14th Oct. He read over the application to defendant and explained it to him and witnessed defendant’s mark. Another official, William Henry, Howe, told of interviewing defendant on 4th. Feb., and following caution, defendant said he had done “only an odd hour’s work inside, the last three years.” He denied having been fully employed. John L. Duffy, of the firm of Messrs. Martin, said that for the four weeks from 16th Dec.—10th January, defendant was paid 15s 6d, 75s, 76/3, and 67/9. Miss Mildred Thompson, postmistress, Kesh, said when defendant brought these paying, orders to her, she read them over to defendant and explained them to him. Sergt. Horgan said defendant was a labouring man of good character. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown solicitor, prosecuting—These cases are giving a lot of trouble. These men are drawing large sums of money and are getting this money at the same time. His Worship—I am afraid it is not a case in which there could be any possibility of a mistake. He would not send defendant to jail but imposed on the first charge a fine of £5 and 40s costs, and on the second charge 40s and 20s costs. In default, in the first case two months’ imprisonment and in the second case one month, to run consecutively. Addressing defendant, his Worship said —“That is a fairly substantial penalty, but I am afraid you deserve it.”

19-9-1942. ANTRIM MAN KILLED. TWO U.S. SOLDIERS IN CUSTODY. Soldierstown, Aghalee, South Antrim, has been the scene of a horrible crime which has resulted in the death of Edward Clenaghan, aged 46, who was found lying unconscious on the roadside about midnight on Monday and who died on Tuesday in Lurgan District Hospital. Two American soldiers; 20-year-old Embra H. Farley, from Arkansas, and 26-year-old Herbert Jacobs, from Kentucky, are being held by the U.S. military police in connection with the affair. At an inquest a verdict was returned that Clenaghan died from injuries caused by some person or persons. The dead man was an A.R.P. warden and was unmarried. He lived with his mother at Soldierstown and helped her to manage a public-house, he was a kinsman of the famous artist, Sir John Lavery under whom, he studied art for a time, and was a cousin of the late, Rt. Rev. Mgr. Canon Clenaghan, P.P., V.G., St. Malachy’s Church, Belfast, and of Rev, George Clenaghan, P. P., Armoy.

At the inquest, Dr. James O’Connell, R.M.O., Lurgan Hospital, said that deceased was admitted at 1.50 on Tuesday morning. He was unconscious on admission, and remained so until his death, about 7 o’clock that morning. He had a lacerated wound over the left eye, a lacerated wound on the left side of the chin, and bruising on the right side of the head. The cause of death was cerebral laceration following a fracture of the skull. James Joseph Clenaghan, farmer, a brother of the dead man, said that on Monday evening he was in the bar of his mother’s licensed premises. There were a number of U.S. soldiers there, and he particularly noticed two of them, who seemed to be in or about all afternoon.

All the soldiers left except the two. The soldier in command seemed to be more or less scared of these two but he eventually got them out. All the others left and witness got the bar closed.  About 9.20 p.m., he heard the sound of breaking glass and went out to the hall door and found that a pane of glass in the bar window was broken. He heard footsteps running and overtook two American soldiers. He tried to reason with them, but they started using filthy language and waving two beer bottles and insisted on having more drink. Witness refused, advising them to go on up the road and they might get another drink elsewhere. They still kept walking about on the road some twenty yards or so from the house. He went back home, and his brother, Edward, said he would go up and see the commanding officer of the camp.: He left on his bicycle about 9.30 or 9.45 p.m. About 12.15 a.m. in consequence of a message, he went along the road towards Aghalee, and about a quarter of a mile from home found his brother lying on the grass on the left-hand side of the road going towards Aghalee. He seemed to be in terrible pain and was unconscious. Witness obtained a motorcar and accompanied him to Lurgan Hospital.

26-9-1942. FEEDING STUFFS RATIONING Laggards Should Lodge Ration Books At Once. Livestock owners and farmers have now had their ration books for the fifth period under the feeding stuffs rationing scheme in their possession for three weeks, but, strange to say, many have not yet lodged the books with their chosen suppliers. The Ministry of Agriculture has issued to those who have not done so a timely warning that feeding stuffs cannot be allocated to them until their, suppliers have received their buying permits, and, of course, no supplier can obtain a buying permit until he has forwarded his customers’ nomination forms to the Ministry. If, therefore, you do not receive feeding stuffs because of your failure to lodge your ration book, do not blame your supplier, or the Ministry. Blame yourself because you will be the only person worthy of blame.

26-9-1942. UNSCUTCHED FLAX. MINISTER AND THE 1941 CROP. The proportion of the 1941 flax crop as yet unscutched is 472 acres, and everything possible is being done to assist in having these crops processed. This was stated by Lord Glentoran (Minister of Agriculture) in reply to Mr. Brown (South Down) at Stormont on Tuesday. Lord Glentoran said a survey of scutch mills had shown that in two areas facilities for handling the crop were inadequate. He was satisfied there would be adequate facilities for 1942 crop, and steps were being taken to ensure that any increase in the 1943 crop would dealt with.

26-9-1942. BREAD PRICES INCREASED ON BOTH SIDES OF BORDER. Britain’s bread is to be dearer, but potatoes cheaper, under a new order, which also affects the Six Counties. From Sunday, the 4lb. loaf went up from 8d to 9d, with the 21b. loaf up by a halfpenny. Potato prices will from September 28 be reduced to an average of 1d a lb. The price charges are part of the campaign to reduce bread and increase potato consumption in Britain. The British Food Ministry has kept the price of bread almost stable since the outbreak of war by subsidies costing some £80 000 a year. Increased bread prices came into effect in the Twenty-Six Counties on and from Monday last.

26-9-1942. TEACHERS’ DEMAND FOR WAR BONUS. QUESTION AT STORMONT. At Stormont on Tuesday, the Minister of Finance told Mr. J. Beattie (Lab., Pottinger) that a demand for a war bonus of £1 a week for all teachers had been received by the Ministry of Education. He was informed that in Britain the Burnham Committee has recommended that war bonuses for teachers should be increased as from the 1st July, 1942, the new rates being £45 per annum for men and £36 per annum, for women on the lower scales of salary, and £35 and £28 for men and women respectively on higher scales. Certain matters were at present under investigation by the Ministry of Education with a view to the application of these rates of bonus to teachers’ salaries in Northern Ireland, and, of course, as the member was aware the policy of their Government had been to give to Northern Ireland teachers the same war bonuses— and no more—as had been granted to their colleagues in Britain.

26-9-1942. MISUSE OF PETROL LISNASKEA MAN’S OFFENCE. Charles Magee, hackney car owner, of Lisnaskea, was, at Caledon Petty Sessions on Monday, fined 10/- for using petrol in his car for purposes other than intended. It was stated by the police that defendant was intercepted on a recent Sunday driving his wife and family to Newry to see friends. Mr. J. J. Rea, solicitor (for defendant) admitted defendant used the car to drive his family to Newry to see his mother-in-law, who was ill, and his client did not know it was an offence to use the car in this way.

26-9-1942. TRACTOR WITHOUT LICENCE KE$H COURT FlNE. When William J. Hamilton, Kilmore, was prosecuted at Kesh Petty Sessions on Tuesday for permitting a young boy to drive a tractor without a policy of insurance, Sergeant Bradley stated that the boy gave his age as 13 years and had no licence to drive. Hamilton said that the young lad had been pressing him to learn to drive and he yielded to the boy’s request. Hamilton was fined £3 and costs and a case against the boy was withdrawn. No order was made as to suspension.

26-9-1942. UNPRODUCED IDENTITY CARD. When Dorothy Grimsley, Feddans, Kesh, was charged with failing to produce her identity card to a police constable in uniform, it was stated that defendant elected to produce the card at Kesh but had not done so within the prescribed period. Defendant said she was sorry about the whole thing. Major Dickie, R.M. – You have given everybody a lot of trouble. I am afraid you will have to pay for it. Fined 5s.

26-9-1942. GAELIC SPEAKING PRIESTS. As a result of a motion by Riobard A. Bramharm (An Ard Craobh), adopted by the Dublin Executive of the Gaelic League, the Annual Congress is to be called on to request his Eminence Cardinal MacRory to ensure that at least one Gaelic-speaking priest be appointed to each church in Ireland, to attend to the spiritual needs of Gaels..

26-9-1942. FISHERY CASE AT KESH. Hamilton Shaw, jun., Ardshankill, Boa Island, was charged before Major Dickie, R; M., at Kesh Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, with having had an otter in his possession at Mullans, Boa Island, on 1st June last. Mr. J. Hanna appeared, for Enniskillen Fishery Board, and Mr. Murnaghan defended. William Irvine, water bailiff, gave evidence that when on the shore of Mullans Bay he observed two men fishing on the side of Lusty Beg. Later the boat headed for the Boa Island shore where the men got out. Witness took cover and saw a man—whom he failed to identify—walking from the boat. The other man (defendant) walked out of the boat with something under his arm and hid it in a whin bush. Defendant walked back to the boat, picked up some sticks, and headed off. Witness approached him then and asked him where he had got the fish and he did not give any definite answer. Witness searched the whin bush and found an otter and a line of flies in a wet condition. He followed defendant and took the fish from him. Defendant denied having had the otter. His Worship said he was afraid there was not much doubt about it and imposed a fine of 20s and £2 10s costs, with an order for the forfeiture of the otter and line.

26-9-1942. DISTRESSING FIVEMILETOWN AFFAIR CHILD LOSES LEGS. A distressing accident occurred during harvesting operations on Wednesday evening of last week, when a child aged two years, daughter of Bernard McMahon, Breakley, Fivemiletown, had both legs severed.  It appears the child crept into the corn and became entangled in the reaper. The child was immediately removed to Fermanagh County Hospital, where its condition is still regarded as rather critical.

26-9-1942. INFANTILE PARALYSIS OUTBREAK. Nine deaths from infantile paralysis have been reported since July 1, the Dublin Department of Local Government announced on Tuesday. Apart from the five cases in Dublin city during the week ended September 19, there were 26 cases in the rest of the country for that week. Every possible precaution against the spread of the disease is being taken, the Department adds.

26-9-1942. TWO £10 FINES AT KESH. James Brimstone, Pruckliss, was fined £10 at Kesh Petty Sessions on Tuesday, for knowingly harbouring one head of cattle. A similar charge against John Brimstone, Bannagh, Kesh, was dismissed. Wm. John Mulholland, Derrylougher was fined £l0 for importing or bringing one head of cattle into the United Kingdom.

26-9-1942. £275 AMBULANCE PRESENTED TO A.R.P. SERVICE. The new £275 ambulance provided by Enniskillen subscriptions was presented to the County Fermanagh Civil Defence authorities, on Monday evening by Mr. W. Maxwell, organiser of the committee (consisting of Messrs. J. Ryan Taylor, J. Lusted and D. Devine), who collected the subscriptions. Mr. Maxwell said the committee was formed about 12 months ago, and aimed to collect £250. They exceeded the total by £100. The ambulance cost approximately £275, which left a balance that the committee had decided to keep for running expenses. After the war it was intended to present the ambulance to the Co. Hospital. The Civil Defence authorities would have the use of it for the duration of the war. He thanked all who had assisted in making the project a success. They had a lady driver and lady attendant for the .ambulance—Miss Scott and Mrs. Clarke; and he would like other ladies to join the Civil Defence organisation. Senator G. Whaley, chairman of. Enniskillen U.D.C., receiving the vehicle on behalf of the Civil Defence authorities, said he hoped the ambulance would never. be required in the district for war casualties. There was a very small attendance at the ceremony on the Jail Square. Those present included Capt. Shutt, county organiser of Civil Defence, and Major Henderson; Enniskillen’s A.R.P. chief. The ambulance has accommodation for four stancher cases and is extremely well fitted.      ‘

26-9-1940. FATALITY NEAR BELLEEK. OCTOGENARIAN’S FATAL INJURIES.A fatal motor cycling accident at Brollagh Hill, Belleek on Tuesday of last week was investigated by Mr. G. Warren, coroner and a jury at an inquest on Wednesday. The deceased was Andrew Roohan, aged 86 of Brollagh, who died eight hours knocked down by a motor-cycle at Brollagh Hill at three o’clock approximately. Andrew Roohan, son gave evidence of identification and of seeing his father lying injured on the side of the road. To Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solicitor, for Peter Francis McGovern, Garrison, who was riding the motor cycle. Witness said his father could hear when the voice was raised a little.

Dr. George Kelly, Belleek, stated that he examined deceased on the roadside after the accident. Witness described deceased’s many wounds and gave his opinion that death was due to haemorrhage following injuries together with senility. Witness had treated deceased in the last six months for deafness. Mrs. Teresa Keown, Tullymore, gave evidence that when walking along the road with her daughter and with a baby in her arms, deceased overtook. They walked up the hill and her daughter warned them that a motor-cycle coming behind. Deceased, who was on the outside, looked round partly to his right and the next thing she saw was deceased lying on the road ten yards ahead. The motor-cycle was ridden by McGovern and he had a passenger on behind. To Mr. Flanagan, witness said her opinion was that the motor cyclist had plenty of room to pass on the right without hitting deceased.

Corpl. Francis Hugh Green, R.A.F., who was in the vicinity, stated he heard the sound of brakes being applied. Constable George S. Acheson, R.U.C. deposed to finding deceased lying on the side of the road. The road at the point of impact was eighteen feet wide with an 18-inch grass verge on either side. The motor cyclist (McGovern) pointed a spot five and a half feet from the right-hand side of the road as the point of impact. Witness put in a statement alleged to have been made by McGovern, who stated a pillion passenger and he were coming from Belleek. At Brollagh he saw the man, woman and child on the road in front. As he was about to pass them deceased, he alleged rushed straight to his right. He pulled the machine to the right in an effort to avoid deceased, but the front wheel struck him and deceased and the two men on the machine fell. The reason he did not sound a warning of approach was because he had no bell or horn on the motor cycle. He had two years’ experience of motor cycling. Hr could not have pulled to the left as it would thereby have endangered the lives of the woman and child. McGovern told the jury he had nothing to add to the statement. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony and the Coroner, Head-Constable Briggs and the foreman of the jury expressed sympathy with the relatives of the deceased.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s