July 1843.

6-7-1843. ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST OF JULY;

Friday evening last being the eve of the First of July, the flags were as usual hoisted on the Church Tower and Town-hall at about eleven o’clock, and the Conservative Band of the town continued playing the accustomed loyal tunes till after twelve, the toils chiming out at intervals. A number of respectable persons promenaded the streets during the playing and, we are happy to add, there was the most marked decorum and quiet.

The Rev. Dr. Greham and Miss Greham returned, to Portora on Saturday from Dublin.

John Brien, Esq., arrived at Castletown last Thursday from Dublin.

43D. Depot.—Saturday last Lieutenant Herbert joined the depot from the service companies in Canada; Major Fraser and Lord Tullamore are expected very shortly to join the depot from the regiment.

Royal Engineers—Lieutenant McCausland re turned to this garrison on Saturday from sick leave, and, left this station yesterday for the head-quarter, Belfast, Captain Lloyd, from Derry, has relieved Lieutenant McCausland here.

The Hon. Major Spencer, 60th Rifles depot, Belturbet; visited his brother, the Hon. Captain Spencer, 43d depot, this week.

CHEVALIER SCHLICK – This celebrated artist left Castlecoole on Monday last for England. We are happy to find that he is now so far recovered from his serious accident, as to enable him to proceed to England, by the advice of his medical attendants, for the restoration of his health.

The Lord Bishop held his Annual Visitation on last Thursday in Monaghan. There was a very full attendance of the clergy of the Diocese. Rev. Mr. Tarleton preached the visitation sermon.

ENNISKILLEN ROYAL SCHOOL. The school resumed business on Monday the vacation having terminated on Saturday.

SERIOUS ACCIDENT. Saturday, as Dr. William Dane, Drumard, about two miles from this town, was alighting from his pony at his own gate, it moved at the instant and his foot catching in the stirrup he fell and broke his leg a little above the ankle.

THE WEATHER.—-Saturday evening last we had some heavy showers, and nearly the entire of Sunday was wet The Crops look much refreshed and promising. Yesterday evening it rained heavily again and continued all night. Hay-making was busily going forward.

NEW POTATOES. — New Potatoes are already beginning to pore into the market. Tuesday we saw a clieve of very fines ones, as large as any old ones and selling at 1¼ and 2d per lb.

CHEVALIER. SCHLICK. The stay of Chevalier Schlick with the Earl of Belmore, at Castlecoole has afforded us an opportune of noticing those powers of art which we find have gained for him the attention and reward of the principal Crowned Heads of Europe and all the leading families of distinction whose position has enabled them to appreciate his unrivalled talents. The Chevalier has devoted upwards of twenty years of uninterrupted and laborious application in studying the paintings and models of the ancients to be found of France, Milan, and Tuscany, Rome and the whole Roman States, Naples, and Paestum, the whole of Sicily with Herculaneum and Pompeii. Of the above he has, we learn, spent no less than twelve years exploring and studying the paintings of the celebrated ruins of Herculaneum and Pompeii cities destroyed by an eruption of Vesuvius in the year 79, since which early date they remained undiscovered till the former in 1711, and the latter in 1750. These paintings of the Grecian School, wonderful as to their design and execution, as well for the peculiarity and richness of their colouring, have been restored to perfect imitation by the pencil of Chevalier Schlick beyond all modern hands that have preceded him, as is satisfactorily proved by the attestation of the most learned men of the age. The following is the opinion of one the first Antiquarians of the day – “These painting have been executed by a process essentially different from any previously known, and which has produced a perfect representation of the original. In these paintings , as in ancient paintings, the contours are not defined by lines brought are brought out by the mere contrast of tints according to nature, as was well understood by the Greeks, and studiously followed up by them in their wonderful works. The colours have no body and are perfectly transparent, producing an effect very different from that of oil painting, pastel or body colour, in the latter of which, truth of expression may be attained.

Inkwell Gift. This wedding anniversary gift from Queen Victoria is a manifestation of the couple’s taste for the Antique, as well as Prince Albert’s fascination with the process of electrotyping. Being made of silver and partly gilded, it is one of the costlier versions of a popular design. Elkingtons had originally produced the model in 1844/5 and offered examples in solid silver or electroplate. Mintons later produced a version in porcelain. The inkwell was designed by the Danish-born architect Benjamin Schlick, who was made a Chevalier of the Légion d’Honneur in 1828 by the French King Charles X, in recognition of his architectural work in Paris. He seems to have attended the British court several times. He was listed in The Times among the guests at the Buckingham Palace Fancy Ball of 1842, and it was at his suggestion that the following year Prince Albert visited Elkington’s Birmingham premises, where his interest in the electrotyping process was born. Schlick’s relationship with George Elkington was vital to the company’s production at this period. His early life, spent in the courts of France, Italy and Denmark, meant that he had access to works of art which provided invaluable source material for electrotyping. Schlick and Elkington were also firm believers in the dissemination of classical source material for the development of good taste. In 1839 Schlick had visited Italy and become one of the leading figures in the preservation and restoration of the ancient remains being uncovered at Pompeii. He made close observations and sketches and developed a pantograph to create reductions of several of the objects uncovered. Although the inkwell was not directly based on an excavated lamp, it was inspired by the sketches Schlick made at that time. The Queen herself seems to have specified the addition of a lid to the inkwell, which was provided not by Elkingtons but by Garrard & Co., the royal goldsmiths, shortly before its presentation in 1850. Text from Victoria & Albert: Art & Love.

DREADFUL ACCIDENT.—On Saturday evening a most afflicting accident occurred on board the canal boat coming to Limerick from Dublin. When the boat was passing the lock near Clonlara, the Rev. Mr. Cousins, a dissenting clergyman from England who with his wife, were on their way to Killarney looked out at one of the side windows of the boat to observe their position when the boat received a sudden side move as it generally does by coming in contact with either side of the gateway and the head of the unfortunate gentleman was caught between the boat and the wall of the dock, and he received such dreadful injury that he died at the hotel in. Limerick a few hours after the occurrence. The accident, it may be supposed, threw a gloom over those present. Every attention that was possible was paid by the gentlemen present to his afflicted partner. The deceased was an aged man, between 60 and 70 years. Clare Journal.   \

USEFUL HINTS.—Never enter a sick room in a, state of perspiration as the moment you become cool your pores absorb. Do not approach contagious disease with an empty stomach, nor sit between the sick and the fire because the heat extracts the thin vapour.

HYDERABAD. The amount of treasure in gold, diamonds, &c., captured by Sir Charles Napier at Hyderabad, falls little short of three millions of money. The share of that gallant general is estimated at no less a sum than £200,000.

PRESENT FROM CHINA. The Chinese bed with the golden posts – the description of which reads so magnificently in the newspapers, is no such Splendid looking affair after all. The golden pillars are hollow, of course, and though covered with engravings of a very oriental character, yet the designs manifesto none of that elegance or fancy, which one would think might have been displayed by the artisans of a country whose pagodas and public buildings are generally so fanciful in their designs and picturesque in their effect. The hangings are of green silk, and worked in a shawl pattern in a manner to delight the hearts of some admirers of this sort of fabric, here and there, there is a little bullion fringe. There are several other cases of presents which have scarcely yet been unpacked, but which are said to contain some shawls of a most recherché character. — Cheltenham Looker-on.

BOY DROWNED. —On Sunday last a promising lad named Wilson, about 16 years of age, went with others to bathe at the West-quay, he swam up towards the Fall, and on returning, the stream, being rapid, was taking him out to sea. He accordingly attempted to swim across to the North quay but his strength failing him, he sank in death. His body has not yet been found although every exertion was immediately made, by his disconsolate parent and the inhabitants. He was the son of a very industrious and well-conducted man who came here from Enniskillen under the employment of Mr Creden, to superintend the building of the Poor-house. Ballyshannon Herald.

ANGLING — During the past week, the anglers had splendid opportunities of indulging in their gentle sport.’ The waters have considerably fallen and trout and salmon were killed in abundance. There are several gentlemen from various parts of Ireland and England at present staying in this town, enjoying the pleasure and amusement of angling. Cockburn’s hotel is nearly full. Ballyshannon Herald.

NEW POTATOES. A fine sample of early potatoes has been sent to our office by Mr. Likely McBride, of this town – they were grown in the open air on his farm; and he expects to be able to supply the market with new potatoes, in eight or ten days. We have also on our table excellent cherries, raspberries, strawberries, and cucumbers, grown in the gardens of several gentlemen in the vicinity of this town. — Ballyshannon Herald.

On Thursday a quantity of fire-arms were lodged in the ordnance store, Enniskillen. They bad been seized in the neighbourhood of Carrick-on-Shannon by the police. Ballyshannon Herald.

The barrack mastership of Boyle and Carrick-on-Shannon is vacant by the death of Lieutenant Allingham, a Waterloo officer who was interred by the 74th depot with military honours.

We feel much pleasure in being able to state that Henry Robert Crofton, Esq., of the Modeste, fifth son of Duke Crofton, Esq., J. P and D.L. of Lakefield, county of Leitrim, has, for his distinguished services in China, received his commission as lieutenant in the Royal Navy, dated the 23d of December, 1842. The following notice of his services is from the New Navy List. When Master of the Modeste his services were officially mentioned in the operations on the coast of China, including the capture of Amoy and Chinghae in 1841 likewise at the destruction of the Chinese fire-raft attack on their camp at Segahon, and the surveying of the river Yant se-Keing in anticipation of the advance on Pekin in 1842.

MARRIAGE OF THE PRINCESS AUGUSTA and the Hereditary Grand Duke Mecklenburg Strelitz.—The solemnization of the nuptials of the daughter of their Royal highness’s the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge with the Hereditary Grand Duke of Mecklenburg Strelitz, look place on Wednesday evening, at half past eight o’clock in the Royal Chapel at Buckingham Palace, The Bishop of London officiated. The King of Hanover gave the young Princess away in the presence of the Queen and Prince Albert, the King and Queen of the Belgians, the Queen Dowager, the Duchess of Kent, the Duchess of Gloucester, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince George, his, Serene Highness Prince Edward of Saxe Weimar, & Immediately after the ceremony the Hereditary, Grand Duke and his Royal bride departed for the Duke of Cambridge’s house at Kew, where they will pass the customary period in privacy, after which they will take their departure for Germany. Her Majesty the Queen gave a grand, banquet in the evening, and there was a very brilliant assemblage after the nuptial ceremony, for which invitations were issued to most of the Nobility.— The presents to the Princess Augusta on the auspicious event of her marriage, are said to be exceedingly numerous. The cadeau (present) from the Queen Dowager, a head-dress of diamonds and precious stones, is of great value. The Queen and the King of Hanover have likewise made valuable souvenirs. The leading Nobility have given several costly presents, a bijou from a fashionable Marchioness having cost 250 guineas. The Princess’s trousseau was most magnificent and in every respect corresponding to her exalted rank. A series of fetes are spoken of as on the tapis, at Cambridge House, in celebration of the happy event of the Princess’s marriage.

GREAT ANTI-REPEAL MEETING AT COLLON. — On Monday evening, a meeting of the Protestants of Derriaghy (Antrim) and the surrounding districts was held at Collon for the purpose of addressing her Most Gracious Majesty in reference to the present distracted state of the country, occasioned by the agitation of Repeal. Long before six o’clock, the hour appointed for the meeting, there were not less than 5,000 persons present. Every mountain path presented its hundreds flocking to the spot, and the roads leading from Belfast, Lisburn, and the adjoining towns and villages were thronged with individuals passing forward to meet their brethren in a common cause, and for a common end, so that at one period of the meeting there could not have been less than 8,000 or 9,000 present. The meeting having been addressed by several Gentlemen, and a number of appropriate resolutions agreed to, the assembly gave three cheers for the Queen, and three groans for O’Connell, and then separated in a peaceable and orderly manner, seemingly much gratified with the proceedings of the evening.— Belfast Chronicle.

DEATH FROM LIGHTNING.—-An inquest was held on the 19th instant, at Carranacross across, before Mr. O’Grady, on the body of James O’Donnell,; who was killed by the lightning in Sunday, the 18th. When he came by his death he was engaged in lighting fires, to burn land, in which, he intended to put potatoes. His body when found lying in the field was much burned by the lightning, and there was a stream of blood from a wound on the face. The jury found that deceased came to his death from injuries caused by lightning. If the unfortunate deceased had not been violating the commandment to keep the Sabbath holy, he might be alive today.—Mayo Constitution.

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