1951.

CHRISTMAS IN FERMANAGH COUNTY HOSPITAL.

CHRISTMAS is always a very happy time in Fermanagh County Hospital, where Miss McWilliam and her excellent nursing staff so well succeed in bringing an atmosphere of home and good cheer to the patients. As usual, the wards were delightfully decorated, streamers of holly and bunting and a profusion of flowers giving an appropriate effect of joy and happiness. Surgeon Fleming, Doctors Forester and Hamilton joined with Matron and nursing staff in dispelling the “away-from-home-for-Christmas feeling that patients might have had; and a happy, homely spirit made staff and patients one big happy family during the festival time.

A large Christmas tree was erected in the Children’s Ward, and this was laden with gifts and gaily coloured lights. The little ones entered into the spirit of the celebrations and, in a “ home-from-home ” atmosphere, enjoyed themselves immensely. An anonymous donor sent to Sister M. Maye, of the Children’s Ward, a parcel of gifts, “for some poor child” in the ward. These, and the other gifts, were distributed amongst the happy little ones, who quite correctly believe that for such as they, who are away from home for Christmas, Santa Claus has a special love and generosity. Other donors were generous in their supplies of holly, books, papers and toys. The Fermanagh. Male Voice Choir and the Methodist Church Choir visited the hospital before Christmas and provided nice selections of appropriate music.

ERNE HOSPITAL.

Masses of holly and bunting, used tastefully to provide an effect of beauty and gaiety, struck a happy note in the Erne Hospital, where almost, a hundred patients spent a very happy time during Christmas. Special Christmas fare was provided, Sisters Donaghy, Condell and Murphy joining with the Matron, Miss McKay, and the other members of the nursing staff to lighten the burden of illness with which the patients faced the festive season. Presents were sent in by kindly people and these were distributed Carol singers and choirs supplied an enjoyable programme of music in the days leading up to the Feast. Dr. M. E. McBrien and other helpers from outside the hospital assisted the nursing staff in making the patients’ Christmas time a happy one.

27-1-1951. PETTIGO. Pettigo monthly fair on Saturday was small but the demand for all classes, of cattle had improved from the previous fair and prices showed a marked increase. Springer cows sold from £29 10s to £36 10s each; three-year-old heifers sold from £27 10s to £34 10s each; two-year-old heifers sold from £21 10s to £27 10s each; fat bullocks sold from £29 10s to £32 10s each; year-old calves sold from £10 10s to £11 15s each; dropped calves sold from £1 to £1 5s each; young pigs sold from £5 to £7 5s each; farming horses were unsaleable.;

Sympathy is extended from the residents of his native Grouselodge to the brothers and relatives and to the clergy of the diocese of Clogher on the death of the Very Rev. Denis Canon McGrath, P.P., of Bundoran, last week. The late Canon McGrath was beloved by the people of Grouselodge in which townland he was born and reared.

On Friday night a well attended dance was held in St. Mary’s Hall, Pettigo, the proceeds being in aid of the poor and needy of the district, The function was generously supported by all the business people of Pettigo village.

On Saturday Sergeant M. McCabe, from Dublin, took up duty as sergeant in charge of Pettigo Garda station which had been vacant since the transfer of Sergt. Dominic Noone a few weeks ago.

During the past week all the schools in Pettigo village and surrounding districts have been‘closed owing to the flue epidemic which is raging in the area. Many of the business houses in the village are carrying on with depleted staffs. A few cases of pneumonia are reported in the area.

During the past week-end there was heavy flooding in the Lettercran, Cashelinney and Tullylark districts of Pettigo as a result of the long, wished for thaw which set in on Wednesday. In many parts of the district, roads were impassable for motor traffic owing to the floods.

Mr. Andrew Gallagher, of Grouselodge, is the first farmer in the district to have the ground ready for this Season’s potato crop.

3-2-1951. PETTIGO. On Monday a pretty wedding took place in St. Mary’s Church, Pettigo, the contracting parties being Mr. Michael McCrudden, youngest son of the late Patrick and Margaret McCrudden, of Woodlands, Dooish, Ballybofey, and Miss Rosaleen Hilley, third daughter of Patrick and Alice Hilley, of Lettercran, Pettigo. Margaret Hilley (sister of the bride), was bridesmaid, and Mr. Joseph Hilley (brother of the bride), was best man at the ceremony with Nuptial Mass. Rev. J. F. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo, officiated.

The epidemic of flu is still claiming many victims both in Pettigo village and the surrounding districts. In many areas whole families are confined to bed. All schools in the district have been closed as a precaution.

On Wednesday morning the death took place at her daughter’s residence, Main St., Pettigo, of Mrs. Catherine Geelan (75). Deceased was widow of Sergt. Edward Geelan, R.I.C., who prior to his marriage was stationed in Pettigo. At the funeral on Friday to St. Mary’s Cemetery, Pettigo, the chief mourner were—Mrs. J. Egan, Mrs. A. Cox, Pettigo. Mrs. Jim Gallagher. Newcastle (daughters); Eddie Geelan, Coventry, Jim Geelan, Donegal (sons); John Egan, G. Dorrian. J. Gallagher, A. Cox, (sons-in-law); John, Vincent, Seamus, Desmond, Dermot and Monica Egan; Liam, Andrew, Eamon and Maureen Cox, Alan, Dorrian, Jim, Eamon, Kathleen, Bernadette, Anne, Breda, Gertie and Marie Gallagher (grand-children); J. Fogarty, Cardiff (brother); Mrs. P. J. Flood, Pettigo (niece); Mr. John Watters (nephew). Rev. Jas. F. Brennan, C.C., gave an eloquent panegyric and celebrated Requiem Mass and recited the last prayers at the grave-side.

FERMANAGH S MINOR TEAM. John O’Neill (Lisnaskea); Owen Clerkin, (Roslea), Patrick Murphy, (Kinawley), Tom Callaghan (Roslea), Tom McManus (Kinawley), Paddy McComb (Lisnaskea), Jas. O’Hanlon (Newtownbutler), Sean Gonnigle (Belleek), Eamon O’Grady (Gaels), Tommy Devanney, (Irvinestown), Paddy Casey (Devenish), John Maguire (Ederney), Brendan Shannon (Newtownbutler), Tommy McDermott, (Roslea), Peter Murray, Roslea.

Subs. – Liam Slevin (Belleek), Thomas Donohue, Terry Donegan, (Newtownbutler), Hugh Maguire, (Irvinestown) and Kevin Donnelly and Bennie Fitzpatrick (Gaels).

17-2-1951. Tempo.

A MEETING of Fermanagh Co. Board. G.A.A., will be held in Parochial Rooms, Enniskillen, on FRIDAY, 16th FEBRUARY, at 8 p.m. sharp. All Clubs are requested to be represented.

TEMPO SYMPATHY. At a meeting of the Tempo G.F.C. on Tuesday night, a vote of sympathy was passed to the relatives and friends of the late Fr. D. McCaffrey, C.C.

CHANGES IN TEMPO TEAM? The year 1951 is expected to bring about changes on the Tempo team, as the better of the 1950 minors are anxious to fill the positions of their predecessors: These young players together with the remaining members of last years team should build up a fair defence and produce some good football:

Although Tempo. is officially a senior team, it would be unfair to grade them senior, as the result would prove to be a fiasco, and moreover, injuries which would be likely to occur would be the first step towards breaking up the team, which is beginning to prove its worth on the sports field.

The committee for the year 1951 is probably one of the largest of its kind in the county. Men who have hung up their boots are still in co-operation with the G.A.A. and devote, many of their spare hours in the club’s affairs. The officials are:—Eddie Connors (chairman); T. Doherty (vice-chairman), Phil McCarron (treasurer), and Hugh McCaffrey (secretary).

17-2-1951. PETTIGO. The death took, place at Tamlaght, Pettigo, on Tuesday after a prolonged illness of Mrs. Catherine Friel (82). At the funeral on Thursday to Carn cemetery the chief mourners were: James Dowd, Thomas Friel, Glasgow. Bernard Friel, do. (sons); Miss Mary A. Friel, Mrs. Catherine Simmons, Mrs. Winnie Friel (daughters); P. G. Simmons, James Friel (sons-in-law): Mrs. Thos. Friel, Glasgow (daughter-in-law); Thomas Herby, George, Cathleen, Maisie and Winifred Simmons (grandchildren). Rev. Fr. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo, celebrated Requiem Mass and officiated at the graveside.

On Monday night the last dance of the season was held in Cashelinney Hall, the proceeds being in aid of the hall repair fund. Mr. John J. Johnston, Skea, was fear a’ toighe.

Kesh monthly fair on Monday was very small, with practically no buyers in attendance; animals offered for sale were hard to cash.

The death took place at Montiaugh of Patrick McGoldrick (79), formerly a resident of Crilly, Pettigo. At the funeral on Friday morning to Lettercran, the chief mourners were Frank, Owen and James McGoldrick (brothers); Ellen Monaghan, The Cross (sister); Eddie Monaghan, Owne, Jas. J., Eugene and Jim McGoldrick (nephews). Rev. Fr. McKenna celebrated Requiem Mass and recited the last prayers at the grave-side.

On Monday of last week the heaviest snowfall of the season was experienced in the Pettigo district, where snow fell to a depth of 12 inches in a few hours. Many roads in the area are still unfit for vehicular traffic owing to drifts and ice.

On Ash Wednesday, February 7th, the Rev. James F. Brennan, C.C., Pettigo, distributed the ashes and recited the Rosary in Saint Mary’s Parish Church, Pettigo, and in Saint Patrick’s Church, Lettercran.

On Wednesday the death took place suddenly at Killeter of Thos. Irvine (57). The funeral took place to Killeter cemetery.

The flu is still claiming many victims in the Pettigo district.

Repair work by the Irish Land Commission on a bog road in the Grouselodge district had to be abandoned during the week owing to the heavy snowfall in the district.

24-3-1951. PETTIGO. The death took place at Ballymacavanny, Pettigo of Mrs C. Rooney (80). At the funeral to Pettigo Cemetery, the chief mourners were- Kathleen Rooney, Mrs. J Mulrine. Mrs. Mary J. Ward (daughters); Mr. J. Mulrine, Mr. Ward (sons-in-law); Miss Mary Mulrine (grandchild).

Prices at Pettigo monthly fair on Tuesday were—Springer cows, £35 to £39; three year old heifers, £31 to £34; two- year old heifers, £22 to £26; fat bullocks, £29 to £32; year old calves, £11 to £13 10s; dropped calves, 10s to 21s; young pigs, £5 to £7.

The death took place of William Vartue, of High Street, Pettigo (72). He was also well known to pilgrims to Lough Derg. At the funeral to Pettigo the chief mourners were; Mrs. Cochrane (sister); Henry and Geo. Morrow, Rebecca and Susan Morrow (cousins).

On St. Patrick’s Pay the annual pilgrimage took place to St. Patrick’s Well, Magherakeel. Almost 400 took part in the traditional station. The Rosary was recited by Very Rev. P. McGlinchey, P.P.

During the past week there have been losses of both cattle and horses in the Pettigo and Mullinmeen districts. It is believed that the shortage of fodder in. the district is the cause.

On Saturday the death took place at Belault South, Pettigo, after a short Illness, of John Martin (75). At the funeral to St. Mary’s Cemetery, Pettigo, chief mourners were: Thomas and Jas. Martin (sons,; Mrs. Catherine Martin (widow); Mrs. Mary MacMahon, Mrs. Peggy Ginn, Mrs. Jennie Wheatley (daughters); Patrick Martin (brother); John MacMahon, Bert Wheatley (sons-in-law); Phyllis, Marie, Kathleen, Margaret and Ann MacMahon (grandchildren); Wm. and Thos. Reilly (brothers-in-law); Mrs. W. Reilly, (sister-in-law); Thomas Reilly and John Reilly, (nephews) Mrs. P. Monaghan, Pettigo (niece); P. Monaghan, J. Friel (relatives).

Donegal Co. Council workmen are employed widening and paving the main Pettigo to Castlederg road at Grouselodge.

The death took place at her brother’s residence, Gortnessy, Pettigo, of Miss Fanny Porter, who had lived in the U.S.A., where she had spent her youth. The funeral took place on Thursday to Pettigo Cemetery; chief mourners being Bob and Willie Porter (brothers); Mrs. B. Porter (sister-in-law).

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1951 to June. National & International.

 

The Northern and Southern governments agree on the running of the Great Northern Railway (9 January)
Ian Paisley co-founds the Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster (11 March)
On 23 March, Shannon Airport is the base for a rescue operation after a USAF C124 aircraft crashes into the sea – some wreckage is found 450 miles off the west coast, but all 53 people on board are lost
The Catholic hierarchy condemns the ‘Mother and Child’ scheme (4 April); Dr Noel Browne, Minister for Health, resigns; the scheme is abandoned on 6 April
A census (8 April) shows the population of the Republic to be 2,960,593; that of Northern Ireland on the same day is 1,370,921
The first demonstration of television in Ireland is held at the Spring Show in the RDS, Dublin (30 April)
The Arts Council is founded in the Republic (8 May)
Fianna Fáil regains power in a general election (30 May); Eamon de Valera becomes Taoiseach on 13 June
The Abbey Theatre, Dublin is destroyed by fire (18 July)
Ernest Walton of Trinity College Dublin is jointly awarded the Nobel prize for physics with Sir John Cockcroft
Liam and Josephine Miller found the Dolmen Press
T. J. Walsh establishes the Wexford Opera Festival
Samuel Beckett’s novels Molloy and Malone Dies, and Sam Hanna Bell’s novel December Bride, are published.

Births

Bertie Ahern (Fianna Fáil leader and Taoiseach) in Dublin
John Buckley (composer and teacher) in Co. Limerick
Dana (pseudonym of Rosemary Brown, singer) in Derry/Londonderry (30/8)
Peter Fallon (poet, founder of Gallery Press) in Osnabrück, Germany
Bill Graham (rock journalist and author) in Belfast (29/8)
Fred Johnston (poet and novelist) in Belfast
Paul McGuinness (manager of U2) near Hanover
Brian Maguire (painter) in Wicklow
Patrick Mason (theatre director)
John O’Keeffe (Kerry Gaelic footballer) (15/4)
Alan Shatter (Fine Gael politician) in Dublin (14/2)
Niall Stokes (founder and publisher of Hot Press magazine) in Dublin.

Deaths

Sir James Andrews
Daisy Bates
Joseph Warwick Bigger
Peter Cheyney
Joseph Chifley
Sir Ernest Clark
Louis D’Alton
Aodh de Blacam
George Gavan Duffy
Robert Flaherty
M. J. MacManus
Henry de Vere Stackpoole.

Local Events

13-1-1951. Death of Mr. Patrick Magee, Garrison, at an advanced age. Very Rev. Canon Coyle officiated.

27-1-1951. Sympathy is extended from the residents of his native Grouselodge to the brothers and relatives and to the clergy of the Diocese of Clogher on the death of the Very Rev. Denis Canon Mc Grath, P.P. of Bundoran last week. The late Canon Mc Grath was beloved by the people of Grouselodge in which townland he was born and reared.

3-2-1951. “You have often passed through a Woolworth store and marvelled how such a large staff can be maintained and goods sold so cheaply – or apparently so. In 1950 the firm set a new profit record of £5,355, 272.

3-2-1951. Much debate was occasioned at the County GAA Convention on the state of Gaelic Park and criticism of Enniskillen Gaels re state of Gaelic Games in the town and especially the Enniskillen pitch. Mr Jim Brady of Enniskillen excused the unplayable state of the pitch on account of a circus having been there for some time or perhaps because of the rising level of water from the adjoining Erne. Mr. Fee, County Secretary interjected, “It was because it was full of holes.” Mr. Fee welcomed the re-affiliation of Ederney and Kinawley to the association.

3-2-1951. Omagh man Mr. Maurice J. Hackett of Kevlin Road, Omagh, has bought six occupied dwelling houses at Prospect Terrace, Omagh for £80. The price represents the most astonishing bargain in house property. The former owner was Miss Louisa Crawford, Omagh.

3-2-1951. Enniskillen grocers request their customers to bring shopping baskets with them for general groceries, bread etc. and containers for potatoes owing to the increased cost of wrapping paper, paper bags and twine. Co-operation in this matter is urgently requested.

17-2-1951. The oldest inhabitant of Devenish has passed away in the person of James Mc Grath, 96, Rogagh, Cashelnadrea whose death occurred on Friday last. Also the death of Thomas Melaniphy, Frevagh, Devenish and of Mrs. M. Cassidy, wife of Mr. Michael Cassidy, Rossinuremore.

17-2-1951. Wedding bells for Tracey and Kelly at the Cathedral, Sligo. Miss Agnes Tracey, “Woodvale,” Kilcoo, Garrison to Gerald Kelly, Kiltimagh, County Mayo.

17-2-1951. Customs Fines at Belleek. Michael Ferguson, Drumbadreevagh, prosecuted for having in his possession a smuggled bicycle. He claimed he had got the bicycle from his brother-in law, Michael Gallagher, Rockfield, Ballyshannon to go to work on the Erne Scheme.

10-3-1951. An Ellen Donohue was fined £5 at Derrylin Court for concealment of 9 turkeys. She was suspected of having smuggled then by boat across a border river as tracks led from the river to the house of a friend.

10-3-1951. The death is announced of ex-senator John Mc Hugh of Pettigo at the venerable age of 92. He was chairman of Fermanagh Council from its inception in 1898 until it was dissolved by the Six County Government in 1922. He was one of two Nationalist M. Ps for County Fermanagh until the “gerrymander” of 1929 rearranged the boundaries to give two Unionist and one Nationalist M.P for a county which had a Nationalist majority.

10-3-1951. Lord Bishop of Clogher on the dangers of the Dance Craze. He wants amusements curtailed and the closing of all halls by midnight. He made a special appeal for prayer especially the Rosary.

17-3-1951.  Rabbits are not pests on Sunday. With an all-out war being waged on the rabbit pest it is, nevertheless, an offence in the Six Counties to kill rabbits on a Sunday. This was made very clear at Rathfriland Court when Patrick Travers, Lassize, was fined 10 shillings for the offence, and Kevin Travers, Lurgancahone, fined 20 shillings for using a net, “to kill rabbits on a Sunday.”

24-3-1951. Death of Master Ted Feely, Knockaraven, Garrison, aged 9. His coffin was carried on the shoulders of his classmates to his last resting place.

24-3-1951. Death of Mrs Maguire, ex-PT, Corgra House, Belleek. She retired last December after 44 years of service in Cornahilta School. Unfortunately she has passed away before the presentation organised for her by the local people. Two of her daughters are Sisters of Mercy.

31-3-1951. Tempo had an unexpected victory over Belleek in the Senior League by 2-5 to 1-4.

31-3-1951. The Ulster Farmer’s mart in Enniskillen celebrates its first birthday. Initially there were grave doubts in the minds of farmers as to whether the weekly sales would be a success but their fears proved unfounded. During the past 12 months 27,776 animals and total receipts for the period amounted to £672,147. The Farmers’ Mart Co. had helped put Fermanagh on the map as a centre for cattle sales.

7-4-1951. Fermanagh defeated in the Ulster Junior Championship by Donegal by 2-12 to 0-4.

14-4-1951. Death of Mr. John Flanagan, Glen West, Devenish. He had a long and trying illness.

14-4-1951. Derry defeat Fermanagh in the Dr. Mc Kenna Cup by 3-11 to 2-5. Playing for Fermanagh were M. McGurren, M. Regan, and J. Connors of Belleek.

14-4-1951.  E. F. Fairbairn, Ltd., Ireland’s best chicks. Accredited eggs only at Portadown, Enniskillen, Larne, Coleraine and Belfast. Pullets are dispatched in boxes bearing the name of the firm and marked, “Pullets.”

14-4-1951.  Ederney defeat Cashel 2-2 to 1-1. For Cashel best of a well-balanced defence was Timoney, Mc Garrigle and Ferguson. Of the forwards McGovern and Maguire were always dangerous and took careful watching. Despite the inclement conditions it was a good match. Ederney’s well merited win was mainly due to a very strong defence in which Kelly making his debut in goals made some really fine saves. F. Mc Hugh at centre back, the Lunny brothers and Durnian all played a major part. The forwards made good use of their scoring chances and had in B. Mc Hugh the outstanding player afield. Mc Carron also had a good game at right full forward. Scorers Ederney, Murphy (1-1), McKervey (1-0), Cassidy (0-1). Cashel, Maguire (1-0), McGovern (0-1).

14-4-1951. Opening Announcement. Funeral Undertaking. Messrs Magee and O’Connor, Mulleek, County Fermanagh wish to announce that they are in a position to supply, coffins, shrouds, wreathes etc. Modern Dodge motor hearse. Distance no object. Charges moderate. Phone Leggs No 1 or Ballyshannon 41 (Day or Night)

14-4-1951. YP Pools. Total Dividend for Saturday 7th April £8,112-12-6. There were two winners of the First Dividend with 23 goals each.

28-4-1951. Devenish defeated Enniskillen Gaels in Enniskillen by 5-1 to 3-4. The chief player responsible was Dan Magee, former stalwart of the Gaels team.

5-5-1951. Fermanagh Senior League Tie. Belleek defeat Irvinestown by 4-7 to 0-4 dispelling the fears that Gaelic football was on the decline in the area. A feature of the game was the sparkling display given by the homesters full forward P. Cox whose hat trick of three goals surely establishes a record among Fermanagh front line attackers.

5-5-1951. Tempo calling. Tempo calling, Tempo Calling. Old customers please bring in your ration books to be registered for meat. New customers invited Hugh Tunney, Tempo Established 1879.

19-5-1951. Irvinestown defeat Belleek by 1-4 to 6 points.

9-6-1951. The last County Board meeting was largely taken up with a debate about the result of the recent match between Belleek and Irvinestown. Irvinestown said that after the match the referee said that Irvinestown had won by a point while the official report sent in said that the match was a draw. The report has been sent back to the referee.

16-6-1951.In a challenge match Pettigo defeated Bannagh by 1-4 to 1-1. A fine match played in a splendid spirit was that between Pettigo and Bannagh, at Bannagh, on Sunday, refereed by Mr. Patrick Maye. The new Bannagh team formed as a result of the enthusiasm and organisational ability of Mr. Packy Calgy is serving up splendid football and promises to be heard of soon in prominent headlines. Scorers for Bannagh were Frank Armstrong (goal), and P. Mc Gibney (point), and for Pettigo P. Gallagher (4 points), and M. Reid (goal) Gallagher and Reid were outstanding for Pettigo and Nugent brothers, Keown brothers and Calgy for Bannagh.

23-6-1951. Fermanagh Minors best against Monaghan by 2-7 to 0-7. S. Gonigle, Belleek and P. Casey, Devenish played.

23-6-1951. Very Rev. Dr. P.J. McLaughlin, Professor of Experimental Physics at Maynooth is to be the next President of the college. He is a native of Ballyshannon.

30-6-1951. After an absence of some years, Seemuldoon, one time Fermanagh County Champions, made a reappearance on the field at Ederney on Wednesday evening winning by 3-3 to 1-2. By their superb display of good football despite the difficult playing conditions due to the wet evening, the young Seemuldoon team proved themselves no mean successors of the earlier players, and capable of giving a very necessary fillip to the game in NW Fermanagh if the difficulty attending the formation of a team drawn partly from an area partly in County Fermanagh and partly in County Tyrone could be overcome.

30-6-1951. Cashelnadrea, County Fermanagh is very much in the news, reason being that electric light has come to the district. Your correspondent had the pleasure of switching on the light in the spacious premises of Mr. John Mc Gowan, Cashel House, on June 29th. Mr Mc Gowan has got the first connection but in a short time the Catholic Church, the new hall and the school will be lit up, and after that the wants of the entire district will be attended to.

30-6-1951. Death of Lady Gallagher is announced. She was the widow of Sir James Gallagher a native of Aghavanny, Kiltyclogher who became a Dublin Alderman and later Lord Mayor of Dublin. He was knighted by King Edward V11. He was apprenticed to a tobacconist and ended owning several tobacconist shops.

30-6-1951. Speaking on Monday at the annual distribution of prizes at Maynooth, Most Rev. Dr. D’Alton, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All-Ireland explained why the Hierarchy intervened in the Mother and Child Scheme.

March 1915.

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  ANOTHER ZEPPELIN WRECKED.  From the Hague comes a report that a Zeppelin, which engaged in guarding the bridges over the Rhine at Cologne, has been blown down and destroyed, though the crew escaped.  This is the third of these unwieldy gasbags that has been wrecked in the past fortnight, if the report is correct.

 

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  THE TAX OF TEA.  FEARS OF HIGHER DUTY.  There seems to be a strong probability of still it dearer tea in the near future, says the London Daily Express.  In November the duty was raised from five pence to eight pence per pound.  Some of the largest multiple shop tea firms are preparing for the possibility that the Budget will add a further 4d, making the duty one shilling a pound.  This would mean that the cheapest tea would be about two shillings and one penny per pound retail.

 

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  THE MARQUIS OF LONDONDERRY’S WILL.  The Marquis of Londonderry, K.G., P.C., who died on the 8th of February last, aged 62 years, left unsettled property provisionally valued at £500,000, “so far as at present can be ascertained.” Probate of his will has been granted to his son, the Most Hon. Charles Stewart Henry, now seventh Marquis of Londonderry, the sole executor.  He bequeathed £100,000, a carriage and pair of horses, and a motor car, as she may select, to his wife, together with the selection of any two of his thoroughbred brood mares, with either foals or yearlings; £150,000 to his daughter, the Countess of Ilchester; £100,000 to his sister Lady Allendale; and all other property to his son.

He stated: – “It is my wish that my said son should, out of the said gifts of residue, make such presents to my faithful agents, and also to such of my servants I shall have been in my service for 10 years and upwards at the date of my death, as in his absolute discretion he may think fit.”

He further stated – I wish that my death shall not be allowed to cast more gloom than is absolutely unavoidable upon those with whom I have been so long and so happily associated but that my relations and kind friends will not allow my death to make any difference in their arrangements, but that they will resume their engagements and diversions exactly as if that event had not happened.

 

Fermanagh Times March 4th, 1915.  SANATORIUM FOR FERMANAGH.  THE COUNTY COUNCIL ADOPTS DR. TIMONEY’S SCHEME BY A LARGE MAJORITY.  The vexed question of their provision of a Sanatorium for Fermanagh came up again for discussion at the meeting of the County Council on Thursday, when Dr. Timoney’s report came up for consideration.  Mr. Arnold said he was opposed to the scheme, and he was opposed to it for a very good reason.  If he could prove to him that the scheme was going to be the benefit that it was claimed to be he would agree with that.  If they could prove to him that sanatorium treatment was a cure or a preventative he would be with them.  He deplored the ravages which consumption was making in the country, but he had yet to learn of the advantages which would accrue from a sanatorium scheme in County Fermanagh.  It was said that the scheme would put £5,000 on the rates.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  THE CHANNEL TUNNEL SCHEME.  At present, owing to difficulties arising out of the war, there does not seem to be any possibility of the projected scheme for the construction of the channel tunnel between England and Ireland, materialising, but there are grounds for believing that the project will again come before parliament and after the sensation of hostilities.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  GOLD IN OUR BOGS.  Now that the price of coal is so high, people are asking why it is that up to date methods are not availed off for the production of more fuel from our Irish Bogs.  The bogs are the true gold mines of Ireland and infinitely more valuable than any inexhaustible supply of the precious metal.  Turf dried by machinery has a much higher heating power and will not burn away so quickly as ordinary air-dried turf.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  JOTTINGS.  Lady Erne has written expressing her thanks to the Fermanagh County Council for the resolution recently passed on the death of her husband, Lord Erne.

The various Volunteer Companies in Arney have been reorganised during the past few weeks.  As soon as the good weather sets in drilling will be resumed.

The report of the annual meeting of the Sligo, Leitrim, and Northern Counties Railway will be read with pleasure by the shareholders.  The company has passed through a time of stress and difficulty, and they have surmounted the difficulties successfully, and the directors have pleasure in recommending that the same dividend be payable this year as last year.  This is a matter of congratulation both by the directors and the shareholders, having regard to the fact that practically all of the railway companies in Ireland and Great Britain had to recommend a reduction in their dividends.

News has been received in Enniskillen of the death in Arbroath of Mr. William Alexander Harvey, a son of Mr. James Harvey, Belmore Street, Enniskillen.  The late Mr. Harvey was in Scotland visiting some friends, and death was caused by motor cycling.  At the time of the outbreak of the Boer War he joined the South African Constabulary Force, and in 1912 he returned home and afterwards left for Patagonia to share a ranch with a friend.  At the outbreak of war he disposed of his share, and set out for home with the intention of joining the colours.  His demise under such tragic circumstances will be learnt with regret, and sympathy will be extended to his father, mother and relatives in their great sorrow.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  ENNISKILLEN.  HOUSING SCHEME B.  Chanterhill Road West – 10 houses.  Here the committee propose to erect a row of better class dwellings on the left hand side of the roadway going from the town and beyond Alexandra Terrace.  The houses are to be of 18 feet frontage and to contain kitchen, three rooms, good attic, and bath accommodation with bay window.  The estimated cost of each house is £36 – 7 shillings and 11 pence.

 

Fermanagh Herald 6th March, 1915.  DEATH OF AN ENNISKILLEN SOLDIER.  A GOOD MAN AND A BRAVE SOLDIER LOSES HIS LIFE IN THE TRENCHES. We briefly announced in our last issue the death in action of Private Francis McKiernan of the 2nd battalion of the Inniskilling Fusiliers.  Private McKiernan was an employee of the Enniskillen Urban Council, and on the outbreak of war answered the mobilization call, as he was on the Special Reserve, and on the 31st of October he left for the firing line, and on the 10th of February he was shot by a sniper.  His mother has received the following letter from the Catholic Chaplain, Fr. McCabe and from the C.Q.M.S.: – Dear Mrs. McKiernan, – I have the sorrowful duty of informing you that your son, number 1724, Private Francis McKiernan, was killed in action on the evening of the 10th of this month.  I trust you will not take this heavy blow too much to heart, and I am sure it will console you to know that your son was well prepared for his death.  Only a few days ago I said Mass for the men of his company, and your son was amongst those who went to Confession and received Holy Communion.  The circumstances of us death were as follows: He was in the advanced trenches and was doing up his pack, when he raised his head above the tranches.  A sniper who was on the lookout immediately fired and hit your son in the head causing almost instantaneous death.  This German was soon after shot himself by his comrades.  Yesterday accompanied by as many men who could be spared I buried him with full Catholic rites in a little country cemetery not far from the firing line and this morning said Mass for the repose of his soul.  R.I.P.

Try then my dear madam to see even in this great sorrow the finger of God.  Your holy faith will comfort you and sustain you.  Your son was a good man, and brave soldier and a devout catholic.  He has died bravely, strengthened with the Sacrament he had received so shortly before.  No better ending can any man have.  God bless you and comfort you.  Yours very sincerely in J.C.  A. E. McCabe, R.C. Chaplain.

 

Dear Mr. McKiernan, – I am very sorry to have to convey to you the sad news of the death of your son.  He was killed on the 10th inst, and buried the next day, a clergyman being present.  I am sending you all the things that were found on him by post, and I hope you will see them safely.  There are other things which you will receive through the Record Office, Dublin.  We are making his grave as nice as possible.  If there is anything you want to know I will be only too pleased to give you any information.  I have just scribbled these few lines in a hurry.  W.  Thompson, C.Q.M.S., “C” company 2nd Bn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  1st Army.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  WITH THE NEXT ISSUE OF THE FERMANAGH HERALD there will be presented a beautiful half-tone portrait suitable for framing of Mr. Joseph Devlin, MP.  It has been reproduced from a special photograph and will be printed on Art Paper.  Orders from newsagents for extra papers should reach us at the latest on Monday next.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  JOTTINGS.  The Enniskillen Guardians have given a grant of £3 3s to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.

Mr. Justice Gibson was presented with white gloves at of the Fermanagh Assizes on Saturday.  His remarks in his address the schoolboys will be ready with interest.  He spoke about the six fruitful years spent in the classrooms of Portora and the “throb and thrill of memories which come over him when he visits Enniskillen.”

The depot Brass Band from Omagh arrived in Enniskillen on Wednesday morning for the purposes of giving a fillip to recruiting.  Wednesday was fair day in the town.

It has been decided that on completion of their tour through Antrim, Derry, and Fermanagh, the 36th Battalion of the Cycling Company will be stationed at Enniskillen until further orders.

Becoming frightened at the burr of a motor bicycle, a horse which was harnessed to a cart took fright on Tuesday night and galloped up Townhall Street.  The animal approaching the Imperial Hotel went in on the footpath and try to dash through the portals of the hotel and in the effort smashed the cart.  The horse continued to drag it up as far as Mr. Taylor’s window, where it fell in a heap.  Mr. Taylor’s windows had certainly a miraculous escape from had being broken.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  LIGHTING CLONES WORKHOUSE.  Clones in Guardians on Tuesday received an account for £7 – 5s – 9d, lighting for two months and 13 days.  Oil lighting for the corresponding period last year it was stated cost £4 – 13s – 4d.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915. NURSES’ CHEERY TASK.  Writing to the Clones Guardians regarding the alleged neglect of the dead, the Local Government Board state that is the duty of the nurse to wash and prepare a body for coffining, but not actually to coffin it.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  THE GAA FERMANAGH COUNTY CONVENTION.  On Sunday, the 7th of March the Fermanagh County Convention of the GAA was held at Derrylin –Mr. P. L. McElgunn, chairman of the County Board presiding.  The following clubs were represented – Shamrocks, O’Connell’s, Brian Borus, Rapparees, Brehons, and Maguires.  The report showed that during the year Fermanagh had made a very creditable display in the Ulster Championship, beating Tyrone and Cavan and thus qualifying for the final in which it was defeated by Monaghan.  In the semi-final of the Croke Cup Competition, Fermanagh was drawn against Louth, and was only beaten by this famous combination by the score of 1 point.  The credit for this is principally due to the Shamrocks, who selected the team.

In the competitions in the county good progress was made during the year.  The 1913 League competition, won by Maguires, had to be finished and all of the championship, which was won by Shamrocks.  In the 1914 championship all the matches were played except the final.  In the league, however, things are not so far advanced owing to unfavourable climatic conditions.

The convention next proceeded to make bylaws.  It was decided to play championships on a league system vis., home and away matches, the home team to take charge of the gate and field arrangements.  Only 10 minutes’ grace is to be allowed after the time appointed for starting matches and the entrance to the Junior League was fixed at had two shillings and sixpence.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  FOOTBALL.  Trillick Football Club and travelled to Brookeborough on Saturday last to play a friendly with the homesters.  A very enjoyable game was the outcome.  Trillick had rather the better of a hard game, which ended with the score: Trillick, six goals; Brookeborough, four goals.  The marksmen for Trillick were McElholm two, McGee two, Slevin and Brennan one each.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  BALLYSHANNON GUARDIANS.  The Master reported that owing to Dr. McMullen, medical officer of the workhouse, been called away on urgent private business, he was obliged to requisition the services of Dr. Gordon to temporarily discharge the duties of medical officer.  He also stated that he lodged a sum of £112 8s 7d to the credit of the Guardians, being repayment for the treatment of military patients.

An application was received from Andrew McShea for the grazing of the hospital field for 11 months at the sum of  £10 16s.  The application was granted.

 

Fermanagh Herald 13th March, 1915.  THE DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MRS. ANTHONY CASSIDY.  Her death occurred on Friday last the 5th, inst., at the age of 78 at her residence, 16 Upper Pembroke Street, Dublin.  Coming from Enniskillen some years ago with her late husband Mr. Anthony Cassidy, who predeceased her by a little over four years, she has since resided in Pembroke Street.  On Wednesday last she received with edifying piety and resignation the last rites of the church and on Friday morning she passed peacefully away in the presence of her daughter, Mrs. Gordon.

Of the most charitable disposition, the deceased lady will be very much missed by the poor of the parish of Westland Row.  From whatever quarter the appeals came – and they came in numbers – Mrs. Cassidy, once assured of their genuine worthiness, give them with open hand and willing heart and the prayers of the poor will be offered to the God of Mercy for her who was so merciful.  The remains arrived in Enniskillen by the 12.40 train, and the interment took place subsequently in the Catholic Cemetery.  The chief mourners were Dr. John Cassidy, London, and Dr. Louis Cassidy, RAMC, Dublin sons.  Mrs. Gordon, daughter and Mrs. Louis Cassidy daughter-in-law, Michael and Maurice Cassidy brothers in law. (Anthony Cassidy was the owner of a tobacco factory in Enniskillen and also the Graan Monastery farm, Enniskillen.)

 

Fermanagh Herald 20th March, 1915.  JOTTINGS.  Official intimation has just reached his mother in Enniskillen, that Private Sandy Hynes, of the Inniskillings has been killed in action.

The number of dozen eggs required in the Enniskillen Union for the current week is 25.  Some short time ago 60 dozen were required.

Mr. Donnelly was declared the contractor for meat, and Mr. Whaley the contractor for bread, at a meeting of the Enniskillen Guardians on Tuesday.

A case of spotted by fever was reported at a meeting of the Board of Guardians in the county during the past week.  Stringent measures have been adopted for the segregation of the affected person.

 

Fermanagh Herald 20th March, 1915.  THE RESIDENCE OF THE BELLEEK DOCTOR IS TO BE LIGHTED BY ELECTRICITY.  At a meeting of the Ballyshannon Board of Guardians on Saturday Mr. Felix Leonard vice chairman said he believed that it was the intention of the Guardians to have lighted by electricity Dr. Kelly’s house in Belleek, but he saw by the minutes that they were only going to put in the wire is etc., and Dr. Kelly was to supply the globes and shades.  He was of the opinion that as well as putting in the wires they should supply the globes etc., because Dr. Kelly’s residence was the property of the Guardians and they were receiving a big rent from him annually for it.  Mr. D. Gilfedder said in his opinion Dr. Kelly was a man who gave them very little trouble.  He never got a holiday for the past five or six years, which was the means of saving the Guardians a sum of almost £25.00.  If any man was worthy of consideration Dr. Kelly certainly was.

Mr. Gallacher said there was a scheme on foot for the public lighting of Belleek, and it was possible if the scheme matured it would be easier and cheaper to light the Doctor’s residence.  It was also stated that the current for the lighting of the streets of Belleek would be generated at Belleek Pottery.

 

Fermanagh Herald 20th March, 1915.  WAR PICTURES IN MANORHAMILTON FOR SIX NIGHTS IN SAINT CLARE’S HALL.  The people of Manorhamilton and surrounding district will be pleased to learn that Daniells Irish–American Animated Picture and Variety Company are here at present paying their sixth annual visit to Manorhamilton and will remain the whole week.  As everybody knows here, Mr. Daniells always gives a refined and up to date program and shows a complete change each night.  The subjects filmed by this popular company includes exceptionally fine pieces in drama and comedy, as well as the very latest war pictures, which win the unanimous approval of large and representative for audiences.  Mr. Daniels will show during the week, “War scenes in Belgium,” The Russian army in action,” “The Germans entering Brussels,” “The English army in France, etc. etc., which are all highly interesting and attractive.  The popular manager of this company – Mr. Happy Harry Harden – informed our representative that all films are quite new and have been chosen from the best kinematographic works procurable. In addition to the pictures and illustrated songs a variety concert will be given each evening by the following distinguished artistes: -Mr. Jack Seeby, Mr. Happy Harry Harden, Mr. Bert L. Dempster, Mr. Jimmy Greene, Miss S. Ryan, and the Brothers O’Brien, all of whom are great favourites.  A full orchestra will render high class music at each performance.  Doors open at 7.30 to commence at eight o’clock and admission is 6d or 1s with children half price.  Seats may be booked in advance. (Photograph of Mr. Braecy Daniells.)

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THE U.S. THEATRES HUGE SALARIES AND A REFUSAL.  Madame Melba will go to the United States in the autumn and will receive there £1,000 a week.  The New York Tribune which makes this announcement gives details of an interesting “star hunt” of Mr. Edward F.  Albee, who is offering huge salaries to attract the great ones of the concert hall over the Atlantic.  He received, it is said, a rebuff from the Irish tenor Mr. John McCormack, who when offered £300 for every appearance, with a percentage of the profits, or, failing this, £1,000 a week, intimated that the lowest terms in which business could be done where £5,000 a week. Mr. McCormick is the only singer whose price has been so high, and Mr. Albee is now said to be negotiating with Tetrazzini.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  FERMANAGH A SOLDIER KILLED.  Mr. Frank McGovern is the first of the Newtownbutler boys to fall on the battlefield.  A letter has been received from the War Office stating that he was killed in action on the 28th of February.  The following letter has also been received by his father: – “The King commands me to assure you of the true sympathy of the King and Queen. – Kitchener.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  ENNISKILLEN STREET TRAFFIC.  We think the time has come when the Urban Council should pass a by-law compelling all moving carts and vehicles to keep as close to the footpaths on their own side of the street as possible.  At present they seem to have an irresistible tendency to keep the centre of the thoroughfare.  Under any circumstances this leads to inconvenience but now when fast travelling has become one of the permanent facts of our traffic that leads to danger as well as to unnecessary annoyance.

The rule we suggest is being adopted and applied stringently everywhere else.  It gives drivers no extra trouble, but greatly relieves the strain and stress of street locomotion.  There is no reason why Enniskillen should lag behind other places in enforcing so sensible a regulation.  Indeed, our traffic is so concentrated and so continuous that there are few towns which more demand the most accommodating and safest method of travelling.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  OUR LOSS OF OFFICERS.  CASUALTIES NOW EXCEED 5,600.  Up to Saturday morning an analysis of the casualty list showed our loss in officers as follows: – Killed 1,808; Wounded 3,022; Missing or Prisoners 844.  Total 5,674.  Of the Irish regiments the Inniskilling Fusiliers; nine killed, 24 wounded, two missing or prisoners, total 35.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THREE WARSHIPS SUNK IN THE DARDANELLES.  BRITISH SAILORS SAVED.  FRANCE LOOSE 650 OFFICERS AND MEN.  In the Dardanelles operations on Friday H.M.S. Irresistible, H.M.S.  Ocean, and one of the French battleships Bouvet were sunk after striking drifting mines.  Practically all the crews of the British ships were saved, but the crew of the Bouvet, which foundered in three minutes after the explosion, were drowned.  She had a complement of 650 officers and men.  The ships lost were not of modern construction, nor of first class fighting value.  (From the Times.) The first sustained attempt to overcome the defences in the Narrows of the Dardanelles resulted in serious though not unexpected losses, and we must be prepared to lose still more ships before our object is completely achieved.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  MAINSPRING OF THE TRENCHES.  THE WONDERS OF THE BRITISH HEADQUARTERS.  The Special Correspondent (G.  Valentine Williams), of the Daily Mail, writes from the General Headquarters, British Army in the Field (France).  It is related that at one of the blackest stages of the retreat from Mons Sir John French astonished his entourage by announcing, after a long morning’s work at his headquarters, that he thought he would go for a stroll.  And, picking up a walking stick, the Field-Marshall calmly walked fourth to take the air as unconcerned as though he were going to stroll down to the War Office through the park.

That the British Commander–in–Chief should have been able to free himself momentarily from the enormous responsibilities of those days of stress is not only a remarkable instance of his mental detachment, of which I have already written, but it is also a most striking tribute to his absolute confidence in the perfect organisation of the British Army, without which even the undying heroism of the British troops would have availed nothing against the systematised frightfulness of the bosche.

Sir John French knows better than anybody else how admirably organised the British Army machine is.  He devoted his whole life to it when, emerging in a blaze of glory from the South African War, he was not content to rest upon his laurels but embarked on a long spell of silent, unostentatious hard work, the fruits of which are seen in the marvellously efficient army under his command today.

The amount of foresight required to feed an immense army serving on foreign soil may be imagined, yet so perfect are the arrangements of the Quartermaster Generals department that even during the great and glorious retreat from Mons when our troops were constantly on the move, the men never liked anything.  The Director of Supplies is kept daily posted on the number of men to be fed.  Each day the amount of rations required is sent up from the supply base to the nearest railhead, where it is met by the mechanical transport and conveyed to the distribution centre, where the regimental horse transports carry it up to the firing line.  The same procedure is followed with regard to ammunition.

An important part of the department’s duties concerns requisitioning and billeting.  There is a Claims Office at General Headquarters, whither the farmers and peasants of the region occupied by the British troops send in their requisition receipts.  Officers are provided with special requisition forms clearly printed in French and English contained in a book, which has a preface with some concise hints as to what an officer may and may not do when requisitioning from the civil population.

The Royal Army Medical Corps has now many motor ambulance convoys, each with 50 ambulance cars and repairing outfits, cars for officers, and motor cyclists, attached to the army in the field.  When a man is wounded he is taken to the regimental aid post which is just behind the firing line, where the regimental doctor, assisted by a corporal and five Red Cross orderlies, there tends to him.  He is then sent down by horse ambulance to the field hospital, whence he is removed by a motor ambulance to the casualty clearing station.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THE FLIES AS A DISEASE CARRIERS.  Medical authorities are urging the importance of a more energetic campaign than ever against flies in the coming spring.  It is pointed out that the existence of military encampments in all parts of the country must inevitably tend to provide breeding places for these pests, and where troops are billeted in cottages, where sanitary arrangements are primitive, the conditions must also be very favourable to them.  Another factor favourable to flies if the weather is dry will be the clouds of dust which we must expect in the months ahead were grass has been trampled down and roads cut up.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  MUNITIONS OF WAR.  NO STRIKE AGREEMENT.  THE GOVERNMENT AND DRINK.  The draft of an agreement between the workers’ representatives and the employers regarding the output of ammunition and equipment was published last night.  The important terms are: – Free employment of women’s labour.  No restrictions on output for the duration of the war.  In the meantime the government has decided that the profits of armament works shall not exceed 10 per cent during the war and that any surplus shall go to the state.  Mr. Lloyd George addressed the delegates on the excessive drinking among several certain sections of workmen in particular districts throughout the country.  He announced that the Government had under consideration the question of limiting the hours in these areas, and that they would be glad of the views of the conference on their suggestion to allow public houses to open only between 12.00 p.m. and 2.00 p.m. and 7 o’clock to 9 in the evening.

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  THE WON’T WORKS.  AN ENGLISH TOWN’S PRIDE AND SHAME.  The pride of Sunderland is its claim to be the biggest shipbuilding town in the world; the shame of Sunderland is its large body of shirkers, and that shame is paraded openly and almost ostentatiously in the main streets of the town, says a Times special correspondent.

“At 10.00 a.m. there are hundreds of men, hands in pockets, slouching idly along in little groups, standing talking at street corners, most of them smoking – many of them able bodied men of military age, and a fair proportion of older men, still capable of good work.  “Who are they?”  I asked a young constable.  “Wont works” was the laconic reply.  I put the same question later to an employer.  “My men, many of them,” he answered bitterly, “The Government work is being delayed because they’re taking a holiday.”

 

Fermanagh Times March 25th, 1915.  PATRIOTIC TYRONE POSTMEN.  Enthusiastic scenes were witnessed at Omagh Railway Station on Monday morning, when 11 postmen and post office officials left to join the Post Office Rifles.  The contingent, which consisted of six men from Omagh, four from Dromore and one from Castlederg, left by the 12.39 train for Dublin, and received a great send off from a large crowd of townspeople and their fellow employees of the Post Office.

 

Fermanagh Herald 27th March, 1915.  LICENCED PREMISES IN THE TOWN OF TEMPO FOR SALE.  I have received instructions from the executor of the late owner Mr. Bernard Maguire to sell by public auction on the premises at 1.00 sharp on Monday, the 29th of March, 1915 those valuable premises at present occupied by Mr. Bernard Breen and situated on the Main Street, Tempo subject to a head rent of £3.00 per annum.  The  property consists of a spacious two Storey dwelling house having four rooms on the first floor and five rooms on the second floor, a cellar 40 feet by 20 feet divided into three apartments and fitted throughout with an Electric Lighting System.  The out offices which are extensive and in good repair, consist of ample stabling accommodation, a byre, coach house, etc..  There is also a neat little garden attached.  The entire premises, which are now in occupation of Mr. Bernard Breen as yearly tenant, paying £12 15s yearly rent are well adapted to a Posting Establishment.  Tempo is a very progressive little town and has a good weekly market and a monthly fair.

 

Fermanagh Herald 27th March, 1915.  A REMARKABLE ENNISKILLEN MAN, JOHN MULLANPHY served in the Irish Brigade in France and later created a Cotton Corner in America.  John and Mullanphy was a pioneer in American commerce in cotton and came from Ireland in 1792 as an emigrant with his wife and a year old child.  He was born near Enniskillen, Co., Fermanagh in 1758 and at 20 he went to France and enlisted in the famous Irish Brigade in which he served until the Revolution drove him back to Ireland.  The emigrants remained a year in Philadelphia, and then went to Baltimore, where Mullanphy prospered in business until in 1799 he pushed further west to Frankfurt, Kentucky.  Here his store became the trading centre of the section, and his house the hospitable refuge of the missionaries who visited this district from time to time to minister to the scattered Catholics settled in the neighbourhood.

Mullanphy’s service in France had enabled him to learn the language of that country and St. Louis was then a French settlement. In 1804 Mullanphy fell in with one of its founders, Charles Gratiot, who persuaded him to locate in St. Louis.  As he spoke French he was soon at home there and the store he opened on Second Street was an object of wonder.  He had 15 children, eight of whom lived and continued his benefactions.  His only son, Bryan, who died a bachelor, in 1851, was Mayor of St. Louis in 1847.  Bryan Mullanphy’s will left one third of his estate, about $200,000, to a trust fund, “to furnish relief to all poor emigrants passing through St. Louis to settle in the West.”

John Mullanphy’s name is recalled to the St. Louis of today by the Mullanphy Hospital and the Mullanphy Orphanage Asylum as that of his daughter, Mrs. Anne Biddle is preserved in the Biddle Home and St., Anne’s Foundling Asylum. His life in St. Louis was one long deed of charity.