1952 to December

5-7-52. Dedication of the new Church and Friary at Rossnowlagh. Leaders of Church and state at the historic ceremony including Mr. De Valera.

19-7-52. Don’t miss Mullaghmore Races next Wednesday at 3 pm. £200 in Stakes. Special buses from Bundoran on the day at intervals of 15 minutes.

19-7-52. Great progress is being made with the building of the new County Council cottages at Frevagh, Cashel.

19-7-52. Mr John Mc Gowan, Cashel House, Devenish has been unwell for some weeks but is recovering. He is one of the most popular businessmen in South Fermanagh.

26-7-52 An award of £3,600 was made to Mrs Agnes Wilson Cameron and her husband Neil Cameron a Customs Officer at Belleek. On March 18th, 1849 Mrs Cameron was permanently disabled by a rock which crashed through the roof of her house. This was the result of an explosion on the river Erne as part of the drainage works. The defendants were Mc Laughlin and Harvey Ltd. of York Road, Belfast.

26-7-52  Eamon De Valera visits Fermanagh. A crowd of about 20,000 gathered to meet him in Newtownbutler.

26-7-52  Fermanagh to play Cavan in the Minor Championship Semi-final next Sunday. Among those playing are C. Maguire, Ederney, S. Mc Manus, Belleek with M. Regan, Belleek substitute.

26-7-52  Miss Alice Mc Teggart of Derryhooly, Derrylin was given a six months suspended sentence for the infanticide of her infant son.

2-8-52. Aer Lingus have made a record profit in the past year of £92,180 up from £14,686 the previous year.

2-8-52.  At Ederney Sports on Sunday 20th Pettigo were defeated by Irvinestown by 4 pts to 3 pts.

2-8-52.  Fermanagh overwhelmed by Cavan in the Ulster Minor semi-final by 5-10 to 1-2. Only Claude Maguire and T. Deveney (Irvinestown) played at all well.

2-8-52.  Mr and Mrs Patrick Keown, Killybig, Garrison celebrated their Golden Jubilee of their wedding on July 18th. They received many congratulations. Mr Keown, a well-known traditional singer made a successful recording in McGovern’s Hotel, Garrison two days later of two old favourites, “The Brown Girl” and “I’ll wear the britches now.” His son, Mr. Francis Keown, the well-known entertainer made a recording of whistling and lilting. Mr. Keown had made a great recovery from near death a short time ago.

2-8-52. The death is reported of Mr. John Albert (Bertie) Siberry of Lakeland, Belcoo formerly of Manorhamilton who was born in Garrison. He was a well-known cattle dealer and much beloved in the countryside. A huge crowd attended his funeral to Manorhamilton so much so that the journey of 13 miles from Belcoo took five hours and many wept openly at the roadside and in the graveyard.

2-8-52. The death of Mr. Michael Feehily, Glen West, Garrison, removes a link with the early days of Sinn Fein. After meeting Sean Mc Dermott who was organising Sinn Fein in North Leitrim he became a well-known public speaker. He crossed and re-crossed the Atlantic five times organising for the movement.

2-8-52.  To mark the anniversary of the Christian Brothers in Australia all members of the Federal Parliament who had been educated by the Brothers planted a tree in the grounds of the new War Memorial College in Canberra. They have 80 houses and 110 colleges in Australia and about 1200 members.

9-8-52 At Scraghy annual sports Pettigo were the winners of a football match.

9-8-52 Belnaleck defeat Garrison in the first round of the Junior Championship by 1-9 to 1-3.

9-8-52 Fermanagh listeners will be listening keenly to the programme, “One Minute Please.” Ace speaker on the programme will be Mr. Jack Sherry of Arney, County Fermanagh timed at 286 words to the minute. He will be accompanied on the Mens’ Team on the programme by those stars of Radio and Television, Kenneth Horne and Philip Harben.

9-8-52  Eddie Gonnigle has been transferred back to Belleek after a spell in the colours of Carrickmore, Co., Tyrone.

9-8-52  Late Dr. P. J. Timoney. It was incorrectly stated in our report last week of the regretted demise of Dr. P. J. Timoney, Dublin (formerly of Enniskillen) that he was a native of Sligo; he was in fact a native of Garrison, Fermanagh. Dr. Timoney was a brother of the late Fr. Timoney, P.P. His widow Mrs Timoney resides in Dublin with her daughter Mary who is employed in the clerical department of Guinness’ Brewery. Another daughter Yvonne, is a medical doctor practicing in Belfast. She was for some time practicing in Omagh.

16-8-52 Annual Parochial Sports in St. Joseph’s Park, Cashel commencing at 2.00. 7-a-side football tournament for a set of medals (open) Teams: – Belcoo, Blacklion, Ballaghmeehan, Belleek, Devenish, Cashel, Glenfarne. Microphone relay on the field.

16-8-52 From midday Friday to midnight Saturday thousands made their way to Drumshambo, County Leitrim to avail of the Franciscan Indulgence of Portiuncola at the local Convent of Perpetual Adoration. Two barefoot nuns kept vigil before the Blessed Sacrament and changed with others every hour to the accompaniment of bells ringing out over the town.

16-8-52  Irvinestown Carnival Week. Reduction in Dancing Prices. Owing to a decrease in our estimated expenses we have pleasure in announcing the following reductions – All 7/6 dances reduced to 5/- and all 5/- dances to 4/-.

16-8-52 Irvinestown defeat Belleek in the semi-final of the Senior Championship 3-2 to 2-3 in one of the best games seen in Fermanagh in years. The deciding factor was the speed of the Irvinestown half backs.

16-8-52  Pettigo Sports (Under the auspices of the GAA, St. Mary’s Club, Pettigo) on Sunday 24th, August, Mc Hugh Park, Pettigo. Junior Championship Football match Pettigo V Donegl. And the Donkey Derby for 1952 plus from 5.00 to 7.00 a 7-a-side football tournament. N.B. Teas served at Field. Prizes exhibited one week before Sports in window of Mrs John Flood, Corner House, Pettigo. Admission to Park adults 2/-, children 1/-.

16-8-52 Plans have been approved to extent the Sewage System at Belleek at a cost of £900.

16-8-52 The death is reported of Mrs. Margaret Maguire, Lattoon, Tullyrossmearn, County Fermanagh, wife of Mr. Fred Maguire. She had spent a number of years of her early life in America.

23-8-52 A motor car, the property of Mr. Joe Maguire, Drumnasrene, Devenish, went on fire and was completely destroyed.

23-8-52  Cavanacross, 2-2, Devenish 0-1 in the Junior Football League with the home side waiting for an hour before Devenish arrived to take the field. Highlight of the game was a spectacular display in goals for Cavanacross by veteran, John McKervey, who received a great ovation on his return after 20 years retirement.

23-8-52 The wedding took place in Devenish of Mr. James Mulrone, Clyhore, Ballyshannon and Mary Kathleen Kerrigan, The Cottage, Devenish. The reception at which over 40 guests were entertained was held in the Melvin Hotel, Devenish.

30-8-52  Cashelnadrea Parochial Sports were held in beautiful weather, Devenish A defeated Belleek in the 7-a-side while Devenish B defeated Cashel. Devenish A won the final and were presented with their medals at the ceilidhe afterwards.

30-8-52   Irvinestown are the new County Champions by a score of 0-6 to 0-3. “I have seldom witnessed such close marking and such ruthless tackling as characterised this game straight through.” “It was a punishing hour’s football, a game of hard knocks, knocks that were given without bitterness and taken without flinching.” “For the winners I thought Billy Charlton, Liam Mc Kinney and Malachy Mahon were the men of the match.

30-8-52  Uncle from New York meets nephew from Australia. Thomas Mills, born 1861, and Edward Mills, born 1875, were the 2nd and 10th respectively, of the 11 children of Edward Mills of Aghnablaney, Letter, County Fermanagh. When Edward was 9 years old his brother Thomas, then in his mid-20s, emigrated to Australia in 1884 and never returned. He was killed in an accident there in 1909. He had, married Margaret Flanagan of Downpatrick. Edward, the 10th child, himself emigrated to New York in 1900. Edward remarked that when he had first went to America it took him 13 days and he had come over on this occasion in 13 hours. His wife, Mary Johnston of Kinlough, County Leitrim, died 3 years ago. He had come over for the wedding of his neice, Eva Mills, a London nurse, to Harry Elliott, a merchant navyman. As Harry’s time of leave was uncertain he had extended his holiday, otherwise he would have missed his Australian nephew. In August of 1952, Francis James Mills, aged 54, son of Thomas came to Ireland and there by accident met up with his uncle Edward, from America, aged 77, on his second visit to Ireland in 52 years, at the old homestead in Aughnablaney. Francis James (Frank,) is now co-owner in Australia with his brothers Hubert, Edward and Thomas of one of the largest furniture removal businesses in Sydney, Australia, founded by his father in 1899. The firm uses 40 vans and has 90 workers and covers everything except Western Australia. He came to Europe to a Furniture Remover’s Conference in Belgium and decided to be the first of his generation to visit the homeland of his parents and there met his sprightly uncle Edward who was out in the fields helping with the harvest. There was a joyful reunion between the Australian, American and Irish branches of the Mills family.

13-9-52 A juvenile was summonsed at Belleek Court for assaulting Michael John Cullen on 27th July at a football match at Cashel. Evidence was given of the defendant striking with an iron bar and causing a three inch cut in Cullen’s head. The juvenile was bound over for one year on his father’s bail of £10. A fine of £3 and costs was imposed on Thomas Maguire, Corramore, Garrison for stealing a piece of bog oak 8 ft long, value 15 shillings, the property of John Keaney, which Keaney had stored in a drain covered by sods. Sergeant Mc Quillan had found the item at Maguire’s house and the defendant said that he thought it was of no value. Keaney said he wanted it for a post.

13-9-52 Mr. T. Campbell, Belleek presided over a meeting of Fermanagh County Board last week. The Irvinestown, St. Molaise team asked for a postponement of the Senior Football Championship match against Roslea as Malachy Mahon, the Irvinestown captain, would not be available on that day. After discussion, and with Rosslea’s consent, the request was granted.

20-9-52  Irvinestown has scored another FIRST with the Carnival Week which was brought to a close on Sunday last. At least 10,000 patrons enjoyed the 8 day festival. This was the first ever Carnival held in Fermanagh and crowns a number of Irvinestown firsts of which a drama festival, inter-county football competition and the provision of a County Gaelic Park were others. The idea of a carnival was mooted a mere five weeks before it was actually held.

27-9-52 At Kesh Court, Martin Maughan, of no fixed abode was fined £5 and ordered to pay £16-17-6 damages for breaking a plate glass window and six glasses in the public-house of Edmund Armstrong, Kesh. For driving a lorry without ue care Francis Murphy was fined 10/- for reversing a lorry out of a gate and colliding with a passing car. He had been driving 12 years without any accident.

27-9-52  Rail services between Belleek and Bundoran on the Great Northern Line are suspended from Monday 22nd September until November 2nd while the bridge over the River Erne, west of Belleek, is repaired. Connecting omnibus and lorry services will operate in the interim.

11-10-52 Enniskillen Catholics to be faced with over £50,000 outlay in schools.

11-10-52 Major Lloyd George, British Food Minister, announced at Newcastle-0n-Tyne on Thursday last that tea is to be derationed and the price control of tea scrapped.

18-10-52 Cavan defeat Meath in the All Ireland Football Final by 0-9 to 0-5 on Sunday last. This is their fifth title.

18-10-52 The beautiful new National School being erected in Pettigo is nearing completion.

18-10-52 The provision of a pump convenient to Cashelnadrea village has supplied a long felt want in the district where clean water is hard to procure. The gratitude of the people of the district and particularly the schoolchildren is extended to Councillor Pat Casey, Devenish, who worked so hard to secure the concession. The work was efficiently carried out by Mr. Patrick Carty, Devenish.

18-10-52 Work on four cottages at Scribbagh, Cashelnadrea, is nearing completion.

25-10-52 At Lisnaskea on Sunday Irvinestown repeated their League final victory over Roslea and so annexed the Senior Championship as well by a score of 2-2 to 1-1. The game was played in Lisnaskea on a greasy muddy pitch in wintry conditions. A crowd of about 500 to 600 attended.

25-10-52 Fermanagh’s first Juvenile title has been won on merit by the Newtownbutler Club, a solid, compact, and lively team that did well to wear down a gallant Enniskillen, St. Michael’s defence which was sadly overworked. This was a splendid game played in the best sporting spirit – a pleasure to watch. Fermanagh’s minor team can recruit plenty of material for the next few seasons from the boys on view on Sunday.

25-10-52 James Eric Carson, Knocknashangan, Garrison was fined £1 with £2-10-0 costs for having drawn his wife’s rations during the time she was in an institution in Armagh. He was also fined 10 shillings for allowing his horse to wander on the road.

25-10-52 Lisnaskea branch of the British Legion unanimously passed a resolution to be put before the Area Council that the award of £15 to men who were prisoners of war under the Japanese, “is a complete and disgraceful insult.”

25-10-52  The finishing touches are being made to St. Joseph’s Hall, Cashelnadrea, which was commenced three years ago. It will be a fitting tribute to Very Rev. E. Canon Coyle, who gave a very large personal contribution to the fund.

25-10-52  The wedding has taken place of William Slevin, Ballinacarrick and Miss Katherine Campbell, of Cashelnadrea, Devenish, in St. Patrick’s Church, Ballyshannon.

1-11-52 Mr John Dolan, Carran West has beaten local records by growing a turnip weighing 10 pounds on his farm.

1-11-52 Seven head of cattle valued at over £210 were recently seized in the Rossinvermore district between Derrygonnelly and Cashel. Customs Officials have taken note of all farm stock along the Leitrim/ Fermanagh border in an all out drive against smuggling.

1-11-52 The wedding has taken place recently of Michael Collins, ESB official, Ballyshannon and Miss Susan Frances Grogan, SRN, WV, only daughter of Mr. Timothy Grogan, Knockaraven, Devenish and Mrs Grogan, Principal of Glen East School.

8-11-52 We are very glad and relieved to learn that TV is coming to the Six Counties within a few months.

15-11-52  Ballyshannon ratepayers of the East and West Ports oppose the construction of the new by-pass which is to cost £69,000.

15-11-52  Mid-Ulster M.P. Mr M. O’Neill, addresses the gathering at an Ederney Ceilidhe in St. Joseph’s Hall. Mr. B. Cunningham, N.T. was fear a toighe and a highlight of the programme was the dancing of Amadio and Giovanni Coyle, Main St. Castlederg, the former being Ulster and Tyrone step-dancing champion.

22-11-52 The committee of Ulster Folklife and Traditions wrote to Fermanagh County Council reforming a committee in Fermanagh to collect folklore and traditions of folklife in the county. Northern Ireland is the last area of the U.K. and Ireland to set up such an organisation.

 

29-11-52 “John Joe” O’Reilly is dead. At the age of 34 Cavan and indeed all the GAA community of Ireland has lost one of their most popular and chivalrous personalities after a short illness. He was one of a group of high-grade footballers who played for Cornafean. His father played for Cavan in 1908 and with his elder brother “Big Tom” he shared in Cavan’s All Ireland triumphs in 1933, 1935 etc. He was a native of Kilmorer, Killeshandra, and helped St. Patrick’s College, Cavan to win three Ulster College’s titles between 1935 and 1937. He helped Cornafean to win SFC titles in 1936, 1938, 1940 and 1943. He has two young children after his marriage to Joan Margaret Fox of Dublin four years ago.

29-11-52 Fermanagh’s share of the pooled Lagan Cup receipts this year amounted to £150.

13-12-52 Obituary, Miss Elizabeth Cullen, Rosculban, Kesh at the age of 28 died as a result of a motor accident on Main St. Kesh.

20-12-52  Representatives from the ESB, Sligo, gave a lecture illustrated by lantern slides in St. Mary’s Hall, Pettigo and St. Patrick’s Hall, Lettercran. In both halls there was a representative attendance and canvassers were appointed to visit homes with a view to having electric light and power brought to the area.

20-12-52 The Lord Bishop of Derry, Rev. D. Farren, warns against, “Evil and contemptable influences” as he attends the Golden Jubilee function of the Ulster Herald series of newspapers. Despite the heaviest snowstorm in the area in two decades the function in the I. N. F Hall in Omagh was packed. “He paid an outstanding tribute to the Catholic Press of his Diocese, and declared it very necessary that Irish Catholics should have a strong virile press to counteract the evil influences of an insidious press that would stop at nothing to destroy National ideals and make little of our Irish people, and it was necessary that Irish Catholics should have their own papers to combat such evil influences.”

20-12-52  Woman caught pilfering in Lisnarick Orange Hall. Mary Henry, of Shaloney, Lisnarick, was charged with stealing 2s-3d from a coat in the hall. Sergeant Hadden of Irvinestown had placed some coins coated with an invisible powder in a lady’s coat pocket in the cloakroom following complaints of money being stolen. At 1.15 in the morning the Sergeant ordered all the doors of the hall closed and asked the men to stand by the wall. All the ladies were gathered in a circle in the middle and a basin of water was then brought around and they were asked to dip their hands into it. The defendant’s hands turned the water blue from the effects of the powder.

 

1952 to June.

1952.

National Events.

An Aer Lingus aeroplane, the St Kevin, crashes in Wales with the loss of 23 lives
George VI dies (31 January); Elizabeth II accedes to the throne
Seán T. O’Kelly starts a second term as President (25 June)
Bord Fáilte (the Irish Tourist Board) is set up (3 July)
In the Republic, an act permits the adoption of orphaned or illegitimate children by couples of the same religious denomination (13 December)
Belfast and Dublin governments agree on joint control of Foyle fisheries
The Irish Greyhound Racing Board is established
The Irish Society (set up in early 17th century to organize Derry/Londonderry plantation) sells its last major asset – the Foyle Fisheries
13 issues of Kavanagh’s Weekly, edited by Patrick Kavanagh and published by his brother Peter, appear from April to June
John Ford’s film The Quiet Man is released

Births

Gerald Barry (composer) in Co. Clare
Angela Bourke (writer and scholar) in Dublin
Pierce Brosnan (television and film actor) in Co. Meath
Harry Clifton (poet) in Dublin
Eamonn Coghlan (athlete, world 5000 m champion 1983) in Dublin (21/11)
Evelyn Conlon (fiction writer) in Rockcorry, Co. Monaghan
Gerald Dawe (poet) in Belfast
Joey Dunlop (motorcycle racer) in Armoy, Co. Antrim (25/2)
Pat Eddery (jockey) in Blackrock, Co. Dublin (18/3)
Ciaran Fitzgerald (rugby player) in Galway (4/6)
Gabriel Fitzmaurice (poet and editor) in Moyvane, Co. Kerry
Gene Lambert (artist) in Dublin
Thom McGinty (‘the Diceman’; Dublin outdoor mime artist) in Strathclyde
John McKenna (broadcaster and fiction writer) in Castledermot, Co. Kildare
Dermot Morgan (comedian) in Dublin (31/3)
Michael Mulcahy (artist) in Cork
Nuala Ní Dhomnaill (poet) in Lancashire
Jonjo O’Neill (jockey) in Castletownroche, Co. Cork (13/4)
Malcolm Proud (harpsichordist and organist) in Dublin
James Scanlon (stained-glass artist) in Brosna, Co. Kerry (18/10)
Matthew Sweeney (poet) in Lifford, Co. Donegal

Deaths.

Molly Allgood
Kathleen Coyle
Frederick Crawford
Bernard Duffy
Sam Henry
Michael Kinnane
Edward O’Brien
Joseph O’Neill

Local Events.

5-1-1952 Sad deaths of Lisnaskea Garage owner and his two sons in a car accident in the Wattlebridge area. Samuel Kettyles age 41 and sons Derek age 6 and Mervyn aged 4 died when their car overturned into a flooded ditch and they were drowned.

12-1-52 Devenish Parish is in the forefront in the fight against imported dances and all the other pernicious influences, which are retarding the progress of the nation towards complete freedom equipped with two splendid halls. The young people are enthusiastic about Irish dancing and the picturesque little village of Devenish is justly proud of having produced the champion dancer of the nine counties of Ulster, Mr. John McDermott. The Robinson sisters are also talented step dancers and several other young dancers are coming into the limelight, we ask the Republic of Ireland to follow the example of their neighbours across the Border because at the moment, an Irish dance in a Leitrim hall is about as rare as a white crow.

12-1-52 Owen Melly of Loughall, Belleek was summonsed for assaulting his father Peter Melly in a domestic dispute. The father said it was as much his fault as that of his son. Paid 3 shillings court costs.

19-1-52 On the 5th day of hearings at a special court in Enniskillen of summonses arising from Westminster Election victory celebrations in Enniskillen on 5th November last 11 people have been fined between £1 and £10. Many alleged that they had been battened insensible by the police.

19-1-52  Sensational Features on the New Fordson Major. Choice of three new engines, many basic components common to all engines, six forward speeds and two reverse, new hydraulics, car type controls and steering, compact and maneuverable.

19-1-52 The death has occurred at an early age of Mrs. J. Dolan, The Island, Devenish, nee Elizabeth O’Reilly. She was the widow of the late James Dolan who met a tragic end by drowning in Lough Melvin a few years ago. (17 years)

19-1-52 Aer Lingus plane crashes in Wales at 7 pm last Thursday on a flight from London to Dublin. Most of the 23 people on the St. Kevin were from Dublin. The plane came down in a heavy storm of hail, rain and sleet.

26-1-52  Death of Mr. Michael Flanigan, Carran West, Garrison at the age of 85. He was a stout Nationalist and uncle of Mr. P. J. Flanigan, solicitor, Enniskillen.

26-1-52  Wedding in Pettigo of Mr Ronald Mc Crea to Miss Etta Aiken.

26-1-52  First Anniversary dance in the Rainbow Ballroom, Glenfarne on Wednesday night 30th January. Music – Stephen Garvey’s Band with Hammond Organ. Also featuring the man with the golden voice, Ronnie Howes, Radio Eireann resident singer. Admission 5 shillings.

26-1-52 In his review of the Fermanagh Gael’s year Mr. Fee stated that our Minor Team was probably the best that ever represented the county at this grade.

26-1-52  Mr. P. Keown, secretary of St. Mary’s GFC, Garrison, said 1951 was a year of progress. He said it would be advisable to bring in the Cashelnadrea area so as to have one strong club in the parish.

26-1-52 I.N.F. Modern Dancing in the Forester’s Hall, Enniskillen, on Sunday 27th, January. Dancing 9-2. Admission Ladies 2/6, Gents 3/- Patrons from Strabane will attend.

2-2-52 Sarah Sweeny of Gortnagullion, Kesh was fined £2 for stealing a book of 40 tobacco tokens.

2-2-52 Six drowned in Derry lake beside the convent of Mercy, Kilrea. John and Rosetta Deery, their son Louis and daughter Lavinia and grandchildren, Patrick and John. The children had been sleighing on a hillside beside the lake and their “run” got further and further out into the lake.

2-2-52 The GAA must be more than an athletic association said Mr Thomas Campbell, Belleek at the County AGM. He believed that there was not the same enthusiasm for National ideals as there had been twenty years ago. He alleged that some prominent GAA men were the best jitterbuggers in the country.

9-2-52  AGM of Cashel Branch of the Ulster Farmers Union in St. Joseph’s Hall, Cashelnadrea Feb. 14th. Mr. Asquith and Mr. Armstrong, group secretary will address the meeting. All farmers are invited to attend.

9-2-52 Burnhouse Services, Ireland. A quick, reliable service is offered to farmers for the immediate collection of all dead and worn out animals. Phone your nearest agent at Omagh 187 or Enniskillen 2270.

9-2-52 Visit of BBC talent scouts to Enniskillen. Auditions will be held in the Town hall on 21st and 22nd of February. The auditions will be held in private with the adjudicators listening in another room, exactly as in a BBC studio, and the performers known to them only by a number. The Childrens’ Hour programme will be open to choirs and young people who have written poems, short stories etc. There will also be auditions for the popular programme, “I want to be an actor.”

16-2-52 By a majority vote at a Convention at Omagh it was decided that Cahir Healy M.P. and Michael O’Neill, M.P. should take their seats at Westminster. Cahir Healy took his seat at Westminster from 1924 to 1935 and although winning in 1950 the convention decided on abstention at this time. He was imprisoned twice from 1922 to 1924 on the prison ship Argenta in Belfast Lough and from 1942 to 1944 in Brixton Prison.

16-2-52 Mr Edward Lawn, Scarden, Leggs P.O. was fined £1 for riding a bicycle while drunk, £1 for riding without due care and attention and 11 shillings and costs for having no lights and bell, that a pedestrian was knocked down, receiving facial injuries and having her false teeth and glasses broken. District Inspector Shea prosecuting said a Mrs Flanagan was walking out of Belleek and defendant was coming from the fair on his bicycle when he knocked her down.

16-2-52 One of the oldest and most popular residents of Garrison Parish has passed away. She was Mrs B. Burns, Rogagh, Cashel.

16-2-52 The funeral of the late King George VI will take place at Windsor on Friday. Messages of sympathy have been flooding in to the Queen Mother and the new Queen Elizabeth 11. One of the first was from the Pope.

23-2-52 Brendan Faughnan may soon be back in the Belleek team again. After a season with Pettigo he has applied for a transfer to the Young Emmets team.

1-3-52 On Sunday and Monday nights of last week the Brollagh Players presented “The Damsel from Dublin” in St. Mary’s Hall, Garrison. The large audience present were treated to a remarkable display of dramatic talent. Certainly the Brollagh Troupe are living up to a long established tradition of good acting.

8-3-52 The present bounty for killing foxes is 10 shillings for an adult and 5 shillings for a fox cub.

15-3-52 Death of Roger Maguire, Carran West, Garrison after a brief illness aged 20.

15-3-52 Regret is expressed in Pettigo and district at the departure of Mr. Brendan Faughnan from the district. Both he and Mrs Faughnan had made many friends in the area. He took a keen interest in promoting Gaelic Games in the locality.

22-3-52 Almost 400 people attended a lecture in Enniskillen on the subject of Fatima of the Apparitions given by Mr. L. Harvey, M.A. Oxon. He gave a graphic outline of the evil forces which threaten Christian Civilization.

5-4-52 Fermanagh fail against Donegal in the Ulster Junior Championship in Glenties by 3-9 to 2-8. M. Regan and S. Gonnigle, Belleek played and P. Casey, Devenish.

5-4-52 Join the army of Ireland. Many young men from the Six Counties have joined. Pay and conditions are now far ahead of most available in civilian life. Finner Camp, Bundoran is now open as a permanent recruiting depot. Any not accepted for the army will have their railway fare refunded and be given a railway warrant home.

5-4-52  Pettigo man Mr. Wm. Leonard had 39 head of cattle forfeited valued at £1,600. Constable Redpath, Tullyhommon gave evidence of seeing the animals incorrectly punched by Patrick Rogers.

12-4-52  Preliminary notice of Monster Football Tournament in St. Molaise Park, Irvinestown Sunday June 8th, 1952.

12-4-52  Tyrone defeat Fermanagh in poor McKenna Cup game at Irvinestown by 2-9 to 2-1 at Irvinestown. “There has never been a goal like that scored by Malachy Mahon in the County Ground, a long toe to hand dash ending with a smashing shot the Ulster goalie Thady Turbett never saw.

19-4-52  Belleek man John Mc Nulty of the Battery, Belleek, who is married and in his early 30s is missing presumably drowned. On Sunday 6th at 11 am a body was seen to fall into the river.

19-4-52   Derrygonnelly boy, 14 year old Brendan Walker, killed by wartime bomb which he found while playing on Innishlougher Island. The boy lived at Rosnafarson, Drumcose, Derrygonnelly.

19-4-52   Enniskillen on the radio. BBC broadcasts from the Town hall, Enniskillen. Childrens’ Hour and the popular quiz, “Up against it.” Also Joan and Valerie Trimble with the Ulster Orchestra. Admission free.

19-4-52  Modern Dancing in Bannagh Hall, Kesh on Wednesday 23rd 9-3 with music by Melody Aces (Newtownstewart) Ladies 4/6, Gents 5 shillings including supper.

19-4-52 New Ration Books being issued. Mc Cabe’s Hall, Belleek and Mc Govern’s Hall, Garrison.

26-4-52    The Ulster colleges team had an easy victory over Connaught in Croke Park. John Maguire of Ederney was the man of the match. Before ten minutes had elapsed practically every spectator was rooting for him. He set up scores for his colleagues, he dummied his way through a bewildered defense time and again, he sent over points from every angle and almost every position.

3-5-52 Almost 200 spectators travelled to the new football grounds at Tempo to see the locals take on Belleek. They defeated Belleek by 2-7 to 2-5 with Brendan Faughnan the star of his side.

3-5-52 The body of John McNulty, Moneendogue, Belleek, a pottery worker was recovered from the Erne on Saturday. He had been missing since April 6th. Constable McCutcheon gave evidence of finding the body. Patrick Feely gave evidence to the inquest of seeing a person jumping into the Erne on the day in question. Joseph McNulty, brother, gave evidence that John had been depressed and in failing health and said that he had told him that he had not slept for a fortnight.

3-5-52 The death is reported of Mrs Mary A. Feely, Slisgarron, Devenish at a comparatively early age.

3-5-52  Victory Ceili in Ederney where Mr Tommy Campbell, Belleek presented Ederney with the Junior Cup which they won last year. The hall was tastefully decorated and the national flag was flown from the stage. Mr. B. Cunningham, N.T. was fear a toighe. It was a notable success since the club had only been reorganised two years ago.

17-5-52  Henry Acheson, Gorteen, Garrison was fined £20 for obstructing the police in the exercise of their duty when they tried to seize three cattle from him at Belleek Fair on March 17th.

17-5-52  The death has taken place of Mrs George Elliott, 63, of the Bungalow, Tullyhommon, Pettigo She was the mother of Bert who was killed in Italy in the recent war and of another son who was killed in a submarine accident. Deceased who was married twice had a large family. Her first husband was killed in an accident in Canada and she later married G. Elliott, motor engineer and garage proprietor.

31-5-52 Fermanagh County Feis at Newtownbutler, Sunday 20th July with An Taoiseac Eamon De Valera in attendance. Bodyguard and National Flag Bearers confined to Fermanagh Old IRA.

31-5-52 Irvinestown defeat Belleek by 2-5 to 2-2 to win Divisional League honours.

7-6-52 Mrs Elizabeth Carson of Knocknashangan, Garrison, was charged with stealing items from a Youth Hostel and a neighbour Mrs Gallagher. Returned for trial at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions.

7-6-52 The death is announced of Mr D. Mc Manus of Moniendogue, Belleek at the age of 84.

14-6-52 Lord Bishop of Clogher Most Rev. Dr. O’Callaghan critical of teachers and their union the INTO. “Some of the modern teachers wanted to spend as little time as they could in the country and then go to the cities and towns as if they might be contaminated by living with the ordinary people. The teachers had become snobs. It was preposterous to think that in a little school, where they had only 30 or 40 children they should expect to have a caretaker cleaning it out “for these lords” who are coming in for a few hours.”

21-6-52 The death is announced of Mr. John Mulligan, Drumnasrene, Garrison, at the age of 75.

28-6-52 Cashelnadrea Sports. St. Mary’s Pipe Band in attendance. Cashel won the 7 a-side football competition by 2-3 to 2-1.

28-6-52 Fermanagh has a decisive victory over Donegal in the first round of the Minor Football Championship by 2-12 to 1-8 at Irvinestown. Claude Maguire, Ederney was the best back on the field.

28-6-52 Mrs Elizabeth Carson of Knocknashangan, Garrison is sentenced to two months imprisonment for stealing clothing from Kathleen Gallagher and receiving bedclothes stolen from the N. I. Youth Hostel Association. She had received a three year suspended sentence on five counts of breaking and entering and theft in 1949.

 

28-6-52 Scandalous housing discrimination against Catholics in Fermanagh was condemned by Mr. P.J. O’Hare in the Northern Senate.

Ballyshannon Herald. Famine 1848-1850.

1848/49/50. Ballyshannon Herald.
 
January 28th: Report and accounts of the Ballyshannon Destitute Sick Society and the minutes of the Ballyshannon Poor Law Union are printed. On January 22nd there were 550 in the Workhouse plus 150 in the additional Workhouse. There were 50 in the fever shed and 181 had been admitted during the week and 760 discharged. The huge discharged figure included those sent to outdoor labour and those who died. The people on outdoor relief were paid five pence to eight pence each per day, depending upon size of family. The paper this week also carried an advertisement for a dispensary doctor for Pettigo with the offer of a salary of £60 p.a.
 
February 4th: noted the comments of Mr. Allingham, one of the P.L.U. Guardians, who said that it was frightful to see the overwhelming number of applications for relief. At the rate matters were going the Guardians, ratepayers and all would soon be paupers.
 
February 11th carried a report on the Ballyshannon Temporary Fever Hospital for the week ending the previous Saturday. In the hospital were nineteen patients, nine had come in during the week, three had been discharged cured and one had died. Since the previous August 11th when this fever hospital had been set up 157 had been admitted and eleven people had died. (The settling of up this hospital was the work of Dr. Shiel the local Dispensary Doctor and was the forerunner of the Shiel Hospital in Ballyshannon, now a Nursing Home).
 
April 7th:- John Smith was elected dispensary doctor in Pettigo from Monday 28th March. Hundreds had crowded into the town to congratulate him and a celebratory meeting had been held in Hazlett Hamilton’s Hotel, (until recently the Cosy Bar, Pettigo).
 
May 11th carried news of a Repeal Meeting in Ballyshannon in Brown’s Hotel at which very few turned up. A Mister H (the paper’s description) was the only man of property to turn up. No one could be persuaded to take the chair; so a Mr. Crumlish, a tinsmith, (i.e. a gipsy as he would have been known at the time), was carried in from the street to be chairman. The meeting passed over peacefully.
 
1848. May 26th reported that all crops were looking very good and praised the excellent new potatoes from Mr. J. Tredennick of Camlin near Ballyshannon. There is nothing of local note reported in the paper all through the summer and the earlier hopes have gone badly astray as recorded on September 15th. The potatoes are not as bad as the blackened state of the stalks in the field suggest. The rot has got much worse in the past ten days than in months before. Perhaps half can be saved. The Harvest Fair in Ballyshannon was badly disturbed. There were many beatings and there was very little money circulating. All other crops are doing well.
 
The rest of the year passes with no comment on local conditions, although these were certainly bad. The last item of interest in 1848 was fortuitously noted ten minutes before the Library closed for the evening and ended at least a ten year search for concrete data about a tragedy which occurred near Lettercran about 5 miles from Pettigo, lying between Pettigo and Castlederg. It brightened the end of a long day. This is how the newspaper reported the matter on December 8th:
 
“On Friday last, James McGrath of Scraghy mountain had gone to Pettigo with his daughter of fifteen and boy of twelve. Their father had to stay in Pettigo for the night and the children went home on their own across the mountain. A storm came on and the children died of exposure. The boy had his shoes and socks off, possibly to walk more quickly. The children were found the next day with the girl’s heavy flannel petticoat wrapped around the boy’s feet and the girl lying with her arm around the boy’s head. It seemed that the boy was overpowered first and the girl was trying to preserve him at the risk of her own life.”
 
This tragic story survives in the folklore of the Pettigo area, but not quite in the form which the newspaper has the story. Basically the local version goes that the girl, Peggy McGrath was 17 years old and had a boyfriend that the father strongly disapproved of and had forbidden her absolutely to see him or go near his house. One lady’s account published in the Irish Independent May 22nd 1968, has it that the young pair had run away and been brought back. The local story has it that the father and children were in “Gearg Fair,” i.e., Castlederg Fair and that the children in coming home would have had to pass the house of the boyfriend or go across the mountain home and unfortunately took the mountain route. A blizzard arose and they perished and the same local details remain of the girl trying to save her little brother. The above account was (from a Mrs. Rose Haughey, Meenclougher who lived be to be 106 and died April 12th, 1936) printed in the Irish Independent has it that they perished not far from the house of an old, feeble woman who heard their cries as they grew fainter through the night, but who could not help because of her infirmity. Anyhow the unfortunate children are buried in Lettercran Chapel graveyard in a unmarked grave. But the local people can still point out a little grassy hollow in the townland of Carrigaholten, Co. Tyrone, on a heathery hillside where the children died. The strength of detail of this story is remarkable and it has had powerful reinforcement in that a school textbook carried the story under the title “The Tragedy of Termon Mount” — the Termon River flows nearby. Older people remember this story in their school textbooks.
 
1849. Ballyshannon Herald.
 
The scarcity of local news in the Ballyshannon Herald continues into 1849. The death of Colonel Conolly is reported at length in the issue of January 12th and his passing is much regretted. (Indeed he seems to have been a man who did as much as he could to alleviate famine conditions in his area).
 
February 16th tells of a boy caught in the machinery of a Belleek mill and killed instantly and February 22nd has the story of Owen Scullen arrested for stealing two pigs from his employer, Colonel Barton, and trying to sell them in Donegal Fair. March 9th has a brief report that seven were drowned in a fishing boat accident at Mullaghmore, Co. Sligo.
 
April 6th carries the story of the shooting of a boy of sixteen, James Tunney, who was shortly to go to America. With his brother he had gone to céili at the house of William Lynch at Shawnagh, near Laghey. He had stayed on when his brother went home and the paper said that he might have been murdered for his American money. Two Barclays were arrested and the possibility of a Ribbon conspiracy was also mentioned. The next issue of the journal corrected some of its earlier reporting and said that it was the wrong person who was shot. It was the other brother who was going to America and he had been the intended victim of the shooting. The shooting was the result of a row which the Tunneys had won. The boy’s father had awakened in the middle of the night with a vision of his son being killed by the Barclays and a man called McGlinchey standing by. These were later tried and found not guilty as reported in the July 27th issue.
 
Agrarian discontent is reported from the Pettigo area on May 11th. On May 3rd fifteen men carrying pistols and staves arrived at the house of Patrick McCaffrey at Crocknacunny near Pettigo at 10p.m. They fired three shots, one of which wounded McCaffrey and then beat him and his wife up for taking this farm “over another man’s head”. Molly Maguire, he was told, would not allow this crime to go unpunished and if he did not give up the farm they would be back. The intruders said that they had marched from Innishowen and they fired shots over the house before leaving. Patrick and Peter Conaghan and Owen Gallagher, a former tenant of the farm, were tried for this affray and Gallagher was transported for life.
 
May 25th:- Seven people were drowned at Rossnowlagh on Monday last, 21st. These were the four sons of James Tumoney of Drumlongfield and a farm servant, O’Donnell, and two girls, Madden and McGarrigle. They had gone to collect seaweed and dulse and the girls had been met along the way and had gone along for the fun. The boat had been too heavily laden and it sank only fifty yards out, due to inexperience.
 
1849. June 1st and the grim reality of the Famine bursts into the paper again, seemingly despite all the best efforts to keep it out: “The poor in this locality are in the most wretched state of starvation we ever remember them. They have no employment and therefore no
means of procuring food which is plentiful and cheap — but what is that to them when they cannot procure a penny? In the year of the blight they had public relief extended to them. Now there is no such thing. They are more like skeletons than living beings. A man last week carried a creel of turf from the Loughside, seven miles (near Garrison to Ballyshannon) for one penny and said that he had not eaten for forty-eight hours. There are innumerable petty thefts especially fowl of all descriptions and even beehives. There are signs of blight”
 
Apart from this unaccustomed outburst of local news there are only four worthwhile notes for the rest of the year. August 10th notes a huge fire in Ballyshannon which began in a barn loft of J. Bonner, a tanner. It began on Sunday last at two o’clock in the afternoon and despite the best exertions nine dwelling houses were burned down. August 31st carries a note of a local visit paid by a famous son of Ballyshannon, Sir Robert Campbell, a director of the East India Company. Sadly we only can use our imagination as the paper records Folliott Barton reducing his rents 25% (Nov. 16th) and Mr. Conolly reducing his rents 25% also (Dec. 14th). as these are the only visible signs of the condition of the locality.
1850. Ballyshannon Herald.
 
The meagre diet of local news carried on yet again in 1850. February 15th reports a violent storm recently which destroyed many beautiful trees at Magheramena and Castle Caldwell. There is scarce any spring work done.
 
March 29th:- Ballyshannon Quay and the whole shoreline is bustling with people buying and harvesting seaweed. Thousand of people here and in surrounding areas use seaweed as a fertilizer. October 11th gives the Poor House Returns for Ballyshannon. Last week there were 272 inmates; four were admitted last week, six discharged, and one died. Total: 297 and of this three were in the fever hospital and 26 in the Workhouse hospital.
 
October 25th gives an account of a partial re-run of the Tunney v. Barclay conflict. Denis Tunney was again going to America and he was in Donegal Town buying sea-stores. He got into a fracas in a pub with about thirty or forty of the Barclay connection. (Tunney seemed to start the row). Patrick Barclay wanted revenge on one of “Tunney’s Pets”. Barclay got four months in jail.
 
Thus ends the combing of the Ballyshannon Herald for the “Famine Years” 1845—1850 — maddeningly obscure or ignorant in many things but throwing very interesting sidelights on the manners, customs and general society of these troubled years. Not a journal to record the affairs of the poor or needy of the time — but then they could not afford the price of the paper.
 
Revised John B. Cunningham 7-5-2007.

The Famine 1847. Ballyshannon Herald.

1847. The issue of January 1st records a classic tale that ought to be filmed for it has all the ingredients of high drama or perhaps more accurately melodrama. On Christmas Eve a schooner lay just inside the Bar at Ballyshannon. The Bar is a high sandy ridge four miles down river from Ballyshannon that constantly threatens to block the exit of the Erne to the sea and the schooner was sheltering here waiting on a favourable wind. The ship was bound for Liverpool later with bacon and lard and had been charted by Mr. Edward Chism of Ballyshannon (Food was constantly being exported from Ireland during the famine). After a time a boat owned by Mr. Wade pulled alongside the vessel and men who claimed that they were from the saltworks at Ballyshannon asked to come aboard to light their pipes. (The real salt workers would have had to row outside the bar (sandbar) of Ballyshannon estuary) to the open sea to get saltwater which was then evaporated at Portnason, Ballyshannon, to get the salt for preserving the fish and meat exports from the area). Several men came on board and then produced guns, overcame the captain and crew and took a large quantity of bacon and lard from the ship. This is the Irish famine equivalent of Bob Cratchet’s Christmas turkey, especially when (as it turned out later that) it was hogsheads of ham and bacon that were on board. Many a starving household must have had an unexpectedly happy Christmas as a result of this piece of local piracy. By Christmas day the police recovered some of the booty buried in the nearby sand dunes and the soldiers were out combing the area. Three were arrested. Scarce a night passes by without a robbery in town or the vicinity, the paper reports.

1847.January 8th. There is great distress in the area. One man died after just being admitted to the Ballyshannon Workhouse. People won’t come in for aid until the last moment. The dead from the famine are not being buried properly in the Abbey graveyard in Ballyshannon as the graveyard has not deep enough soil. A man on his way from Ballyshannon to Donegal heard the sound of lamentation from a house along the way. Going into the house he found a girl of about sixteen dying and her parents trying to keep her warm. He gave money for food, etc., in the tradition of the good Samaritan, but the girl died in a short time.

January 22nd reported that Colonel Conolly and his family were staying at Cliff for the winter in order to give aid to their tenantry and a terrible increase of poverty, sickness and death was recorded by the paper. Unfortunately and damningly for the paper the above words were all they reported. It says volumes for their social attitude and incomprehension of the situation that they could write: “The details are too horrid to be published.” From Fermanagh the paper reports the action of the Rev. Grey Porter, whose principal estate was at Lisbellaw and who had brought in 150 tons of Indian meal at Derry per the ship Peru. He had bought in the grain at £10-10s-6d per ton and was going to sell it to his tenants at cost price which he hoped would be less than £12 per ton. This compared with £24-10-0 for Indian meal or £30 for oaten meal at market prices. Robberies for money, cattle or arms are a nightly occurrence.

On February 19th the Ballyshannon Herald published a very long letter from John Hamilton of St. Ernan’s near Donegal Town. This man was estate agent for the Conolly Estate around Ballyshannon and possibly for the Leslie Estate of Pettigo and other estates as well. In his own way he seems a man sensitive to the situation and practical for the future, although badly lacking in short term solutions. He seeks to combat apathy and fatalism in the tenantry which is admirable, if the person has the energy to look some distance ahead, but useless if starvation is a matter of days away.

John Hamilton begins by asking everyone to work hard in order to hold on to their tenancies. “Stir yourself and be doing. Drain a rood of ground and dig it eighteen inches deep and you will be paid for it if it done right and get many years to repay this money” (not a generous bargain and in the same vein) “seed will be provided and can be paid for later. Sow corn and not potatoes in rows nine inches apart and the seed two inches apart. This requires two stone of seed and repays 200 stone if the !and is well dug or well ploughed and is dry”. Tenants will be allowed to burn as much as they like and he (John Hamilton) will say nothing for this season (burning the dried sods of the land gave a short term fertility but was ultimately ruinous and absolutely forbidden normally). Tenants were urged to burn as much as they liked on black land i.e., bog land and to cart it to other ground to grow turnips. Sow “pease” (sic) and barley and field and garden beans (and mangle wozzels. Come to him for help. Uncommon work is required and he will not help anyone who holds land but will not work it. He, Hamilton, works hard himself and expects others to do likewise.

In the same issue Colonel Conolly has imported 500 tons of rice and one ton has been sent to the Bundoran schools and two to the Ballyshannon Relief Committee. The columns were illuminated by a row between the Vicar of Drumholm Mr. M. G. Fenwick and a local land agent. Alexander Hamilton, on the question of who should be allowed to get a place on the Relief Works. Should a man who has paid his rent get on the Relief? — if he is able to pay his rent does he need relief work? (as long as you managed the rent you could do what you liked afterwards and if you hadn’t the rent you could work until you could pay the rent — either way the rent was sacrosanct and Catch 22 was born long before Joseph Heller).

From now until April the Famine cannot squeeze into the Ballyshannon Herald and on March 12th we are informed that Fermanagh is improving and that petty thefts and slaughter of cattle had completely ceased, according to the Erne Packet. The reporting of the Donegal Assizes on March 12th at Lifford hints at what the newspaper doesn’t report. Bartley Loughlin, a former bailiff to Mr. H. Coane of Waterloo Cottage, Higginstown, Ballyshannon was alleged to have sent a threatening letter to Mrs. H. Coane saying that their family would be blown up with gunpowder for their oppression of the tenantry. Laughlin had been bailiff for Coane for fifteen years and his handwriting was familiar to his former master. In his capacity as bailiff Laughlin had been ordered to serve notice to quit on thirty tenants and ordered to distrain those persons who had not paid — as far as the landlord was concerned it would not be hard to seize fodder in lieu of rent. For inability or unwillingness to carry this out Bartley Loughlin was sacked. Councillor Doherty defended the ex-­bailiff and demolished the case by asking if Laughlin’s handwriting was so well known to Coane then why would he be so stupid as to write the letter in his own hand? A not-guilty verdict was returned. In the next case a John Donald got seven years’ transportation for stealing sheep from Michael Ward, but a woman, Rebecca Brack, (Brock?) was found not guilty of exposing a child to die at Finner, near Ballyshannon.

1847.In an echo of the Christmas Eve piracy in the Erne Estuary, James Currie, was accused of receiving a ham knowing it to be stolen. The ship’s name is now given as The Confidence and its Master as Joseph Davidson. The ship had been boarded by two boat’s crews and nine bales of bacon and hogsheads of ham had been stolen. Sub-Constable Davis arrested Currie walking through Ballyshannon on Christmas day carrying a ham. Currie said that he had found it in a hole in the ground among the sand dunes. He was found guilty with a recommendation for mercy and got nine months hard labour.

At Fermanagh Assizes at this time Daniel Nealy was convicted of stealing valuable property, plate, etc., from J. C. Bloomfield at Castle Caldwell. He was sentenced to seven years’ transportation. For a similar crime in the same area, the breaking into the house of Launcelot Corcoran near Castle Caldwell on the previous December 27th the following were tried:- James Mulrean, Maurice Connor, Peter Gallagher, Francis Gallagher, Maurice Lannon, William Lannon, George W. O’Connor and Edward Muldoon. All were found guilty and sentenced to fourteen years’ transportation except the last four, who got seven years’ transportation.

The March 26th issue details a brutal occurrence in the Pettigo area which happened on March 23rd. George Allingham with one Patterson and “the notorious Melanefy, the bailiff” came to the house of John McCrea of Clonaweel. Their purpose seemed to be to execute on order upon the person of John McCrea who wasn’t present. Only his two sons were there and after some persuasion they managed to get the three intruders out of the house. They seemed rather inebriated and threatened the sons and finally Melanefy fired at young Edward McCrea “wounding him dreadfully” in the head. Melanefy has run off and the countryside is now in pursuit!

By 2nd April, 1847 things have got so bad in the area as to force its attention upon this blinkered newspaper. It reports that the poor house is crowded to excess and fever and dysentery are spreading alarmingly. “Deaths are frightfully numerous. A fever hospital is urgently needed and its building would give employment to the poor.”

  1. April 23rd:- Captain Fortescue has arrived to take charge of the Commissariat Department, i.e., to give out food for the starving. A vessel with breadstuffs for this town and Enniskillen is waiting for a fair wind to get into port. It is hoped that she will get in today as the people discharged from the workhouse are in great distress. There is plenty of food coming in from America, but it is still at famine prices. Captain Lang is to superintend the public charities. Arrangements are in hand to setup a public soup kitchen to the plan of Mr. Sayer (but the paper notes with unaccustomed concern). “We fear it will not answer the purpose.”

Between Garrison, Derrygonnelly and Holywell many hundreds of acres wilt be left without crops because of the utter poverty of the people. Farmers and graziers cattle are being stolen nightly.

April 30th: There is a great fever sweeping Fermanagh especially in the country districts and arising largely from those who have left (or been sent out) of the workhouse and had now gone home and infected their friends who had generously but fatally taken them in.

  1. May 7th: Reports the hanging of Samuel Crumrner at Lifford. He was hanged for the murder of his father. His wife had also been sentenced for the same crime, but the sentence was commuted to transportation for life. It was the first hanging in Donegal for fourteen or fifteen years and about a thousand people came to watch. On the scaffold Crummer said (the name was not printed) swore his life away for small money in these times. He was a big man of 6’-2” and he said goodbye to his wife and children from the scaffold, although they were not present, before he was launched into eternity.

The steamship Albert under Commander Geary arrived in Ballyshannon with breadstuffs. It also towed in two ships which had been waiting outside the Bar for a favourable wind. The Albert is 147ft long, 42 feet wide, can carry 600 tons and has a capacity of 200 horse power. Many people have been shown over this ship.

On May 14th it is reported that the deaths around Clones, Co. Monaghan, are “inconceivably great”. In Enniskillen the poor and starving rushed the Board of Guardians meeting and all had to be admitted. Colonel Conolly has given his tenants eight tons of rice this week free plus free turnip seed. John and William Tredennick (local landowners between Ballyshannon and Belleek) are reducing their rents by 40% to 50%.

1847.May 21st reports the melancholy death of Captain Drake of the 92nd Regiment and a young local man, Henry Lipsett of Ballyshannon, who were drowned when their sailing boat was upset in the estuary.

Hundreds of the poor are being provided for by the Johnstons of Magheramena Castle near Belleek and their rents are reduced also.

There is great fever in Fermanagh and the well known Dr. Collum has recently succumbed. “God knows who will be next sacrificed on the altar of pestilence and death”. This last item is reprinted taken from the pages of the Erne Packet.

  1. May 28th: reports great fever in the locality of Ballyshannon and all classes were affected. People are warned not to feed beggars at their own door, especially strange ones. Heaps of manure must be removed from thoroughfares, lanes and alleyways as otherwise the Committee of the Ballyshannon Board of Guardians will cause them to be removed and prosecute the offenders. This is signed by M. Davis J.P., chairman.

In the June 11th issue the fever has greatly moderated and not a single death has been reported last week. There is a huge plague of snails affecting crops and people are advised to gather them as they are very suitable for feeding pigs.

June 18th: issue contains a very indignant letter protesting about a pauper with fever lying on Ballyshannon Bridge since Sunday last. The Board of Health should have put him in a lodging house and had a doctor visit him. Only one death has been reported in the past three weeks and that was of Matthew Donohue, an inoffensive, industrious man who kept a public house in Main St., Ballyshannon. There are very good prospects for the harvest. Enniskillen jail is said to be the most crowded in the kingdom.

At the Donegal Petty sessions reported on June 25th a little boy pleaded guilty to stealing a few ship’s biscuits from Messrs Bradshaw of Donegal Town. He was given six months’ jail. He cried as he was led away. Mary Ward got two months jail for stealing two hens.

Sept. 17th: reports that no rot can be seen in the potatoes and that a great fever rages about Enniskillen. The news from Fermanagh continues in the Oct 1st newspaper as it reports on the dissolution of Lowtherstown (Irvinestown) Poor Law Union. The immediate cause was the raising of the salary of the R.C. Chaplain to the Workhouse. In the row that followed the Protestant Chaplain’s salary was raised. Further rows caused the dismissal of the master of the workhouse and finally the Board of Guardians themselves were dismissed! This is the newspaper version of the dissolution of Lowtherstown P.L.U., but in fact there were much more grievous reasons why this

Union was taken over by a Government appointed Commissioner. The Guardians failed to levy anywhere near sufficient funds to support the poor and starving of the locality, thus causing the effects of the Famine to be even worse than need have been and the Workhouse which they were in charge of was very badly run. An inspector who visited Lowtherstown Workhouse wrote that he found people half naked dying in their own vomit and excrement, lying on the floor. He said that Lowtherstown was the worst workhouse that he ever visited. (See Parliamentary Papers: Irish Famine).

October 15th: reported the dissolution of Ballyshannon P.L.U. Commissioners and the appointment of a new government inspector. November 19th sees a letter saying that the people of the country are living on turnips and nothing else. The Gentlemen of the country must unite to stave off famine as they did last year.

The final note of 1847 reports the death of Mr. William Hassard of Garden Hill near Belcoo in Fermanagh. He was shot in the leg and died later. Suspicion pointed to one Creagh, (probably a Mc Grath from the Irish rendering of the name Mc Creigh) but there was insufficient evidence. Creagh’s father had been jailed by Hassard for non-payment of arrears of rent and had died in jail. (This is the type of indirect evidence of the Famine and its effects which makes one wish that this paper had made any decent attempt to write about the momentous events it was living through).

1845 – The Famine etc from the Ballyshannon Herald.

The Ballyshannon Herald. 1845-1850. John B. Cunningham.

The student of local history is often drawn to local newspapers in his search for historical material. This search, however, is more often than not rather unrewarding as the nature of local newspapers in the past was very different from today. Nowadays a local newspaper concerns itself with the events of the newspaper’s circulation area and rarely does a national issue get much coverage and still less an international issue or event, unless it has some local involvement. In the middle of the nineteenth century the local newspaper had a completely different concept of its role. The vast majority of what the newspaper printed concerned national and international issues; accounts of wars in remote parts of the world, disasters on land or sea, famous murders, murder trials and executions and social events and royal visits. Around 90% of the newspaper was taken up in this fashion and local events had to creep into little two or three inch columns and were seldom given a heading. It follows therefore that searching for snippets of local history in this type of newspaper is a very time-consuming, laborious process, involving great concentration and patience and inevitable eyestrain. However, the temptation is always too much for the nuggets of information that can be procured are invariably worth the effort.

This article is an account of the local information obtained from the Ballyshannon Herald between 1845 and 1850 and it was undertaken principally to garner information on the effects of the Great Famine in the counties and towns adjacent to Ballyshannon in this period. Other newsworthy items were also included, however, and what follows is a cross-section of the life and times of this area while the Great Famine raged through the land.

The Ballyshannon Herald was published and printed in Ballyshannon between 1831 and 1884 while in the ownership of the Trimble family. It sold at the sizeable price of four pence per issue, sixteen shillings per annum and at this price could only be afforded by the wealthy. This readership obviously influenced the editorial policy and the paper in present day parlance would be described as rigidly Establishment-orientated. It is through its eyes that we see this period. While absorbing the facts it reports we don’t necessarily have to embrace its conclusions.

1845. We begin with the issue of January 3rd. 1845 which carried an account of a kidnap attempt upon a girl of fourteen in Ballyshannon. She had been seized by two men who struck a plaster over her face and tried to abduct her, but however failed to carry her away. It was alleged that the men were trying to “Burke” her, i.e. after the notorious Burke and Hare, suppliers of corpses to aspiring surgeons. The town was in uproar and a man who lived near the Abbey graveyard said that he had heard muffled cartwheels going past in the night. He didn’t investigate as he thought that it was the “dead cart” going past carrying spirits from one house to another and so he blessed himself and remained indoors. There were rumours of graves at the Abbey being disturbed. The same issue noted the arrival in the port of Ballyshannon of the Dispatch and Sarah from Liverpool and the Steward from Bangor. Men from Irvinestown were in town selling hens and eggs to be exported to England (a very early reference to a practice which continued until recent times). The March 21st issue tells of Margaret Eves sentenced to six months hard labour at Enniskillen Assizes for stealing oats. This is one of the many major sentences which we will see for trivial offences. (Ed. an Eves relative of my own)

March 28th tells of Garrison Races and of a “Common Play” on Tullan Strand; (The word “Common” is an anglecised form of camán, meaning the Irish game of hurling). There were nearly 300 players on each side and some 2,000 spectators. The paper thought it worthwhile to write down that no riot occurred and that the strand was cleared by 6.00 p.m. This same issue has an account of a major drowning tragedy when a sailing cot was upset on Lough Erne and six people perished. The men were on their way with a load of turf to an island to do some illicit distilling and were named as William Beaty, John Burnside, Thomas Horan, Christopher Foster, John Foster and William Farrell. They were travelling in a Lough Erne cot when their boat struck a rock.

June 27th:— A new R.C. Church was being built at Ballintra and a large stack of turf was on the site with which to burn lime. A man called Travers was set to guard the stack (as turf was being stolen in the night) and a man called Magee was found in the act, but however, escaped. The following day  Travers went to apprehend Magee and had his arm severed when Magee resisted with a scythe. The countryside rose in pursuit of Magee. During the pursuit a man called Stafford who was “weakminded”, took a gun from Mr. Colville’s house. Colville pursued Stafford who turned and fired at him and fortunately the gun missed fire and Stafford continued to run. Sergeant Jeffers of Ballintra saw this occurrence and he began a pursuit of Stafford who turned again and fired wounding the Sergeant in the thigh. The policeman however caught his man and held him until help arrived, but shortly afterwards the sergeant died. The sergeant left a wife and eight children. Travers’s life was also being despaired of and Magee was still at large.

The old fortifications at Belleek (Belleek Fort) were being investigated by Col. C.B. Lewis of the Royal Engineers and his staff with a view to restoring them so that they could once again hold troops. The paper said this was because of the great amount of civilian disturbance in Fermanagh.

July 4th:— The 38th Regiment of Foot is stationed in Ballyshannon in the Old Artillery Fort on the Rock and it is hoped that a new barracks will soon be built. The present barracks can only hold one hundred and fifty men. The famous Mr. Robert Stephenson, of railway construction fame, had just finished his map and estimate for a railway from Ballyshannon to Belleek. (This is a mention of a very long running saga of canal versus railway to connect the Erne river system to the sea. Canal proposals had begun as early as the latter half of the eighteenth century and some sections had even begun. Now the railway was competing for the task of circumventing the last four miles of the Erne, which because they could not be navigated, deprived the Erne of direct sea communication). Unrest was spreading in the locality and nightly meetings of the peasantry were reported in the vicinity of the town, i.e. Ballyshannon and a large picquet of soldiers nightly scoured the countryside for some miles around. Following on from the events of the previous issue Sergeant Jeffers was buried and Magee, the fugitive, was arrested by Sergeant Maglade of Ballintra. Hundreds of people crowded into Ballintra to see the arrested man in “disgraceful scenes of triumph at the arrest”, and despite the doubts, the injured Travers was mending.

July 11th reports the arrival of a detachment of the 5th Fusiliers in Belleek under Captain Spencer and Lieutenant Hamilton and the soldiers were billeted in the Market House and in Rose Isle House. (This latter building has now vanished under the foundations of the present Belleek Pottery and had been built circa 1750 for the Dowager Lady Caldwell).

August 15th saw the publication of the prospectus of the rival railway companies, the Lough Erne and Ballyshannon Junction Railway and the Dublin and Enniskillen Railway. August 29th issue had notice of a reward of £1000 for any information regarding Molly Maguires or Ribbonmen subversives in Fermanagh. Information could be given to any Resident Magistrate. September 12th reported on ships arriving at Ballyshannon and also gave the cargoes and ships’ masters. These are all ships that have arrived and since they can hardly have come all at the one time it must be a record of ships over the previous month or more.

Ship                                              Master                               Cargo

The Gote Bothe                          George Matzy                      Timber

The Victory                                  David George                      Slates

The Venerable of Barmouth        James Jones                        Slates

The Ardent of Whitby                 Zachariah Fletcher        Coal and grindstones.

The Henry Volant of Ballyshannon                    Scotch bar iron, coal, castings.

The Jessey                                John Morrison    Oak staves, coarse and salt butter.

The Sarah of Ramsey              William McKinnon General cargo, plates, glass,

tarpitch, oakum and cordage.

Ships expected were – The Birman                                 James Cann       Deal, battens.

The Tafvale                                                           Bar iron, tin plate.

The Fearnot                          Mahogany, firebrick and windows, glass, salt and butter.

 

September 26th gives the first mention of blight when it tells its readers of reported potato crop failure in England. Locally it comments upon the abundance of herring this year and that prospects for the harvest look good, although some, the paper said, did complain of a partial disease. This minor notice heralded the beginnings of the famine in the Ballyshannon area and it was soon to be followed on November 7th by a report which regretted that a great rot had set in among the potatoes, even those that had been carefully stored. Unrest in the area was still prevalent and £100 reward was being offered for the assassin who had made an attempt upon the life of Mr. F. W. Barton J.P., who had been on his way home to Clonelly near Pettigo when he had been shot and wounded. More is to follow this story in the New Year and much more on the famine now poised to strike.

Fermanagh 1951.

21-7-51. Cashel GFC Sports. Cashel defeated Enniskillen Gaels in a Junior League match. The old age pensioner’s race was won by Jas. Gallagher with Michael Kelly second.

21-7-51. Fermanagh beaten at the post Cavan 3-5 Fermanagh 1-9 in the Ulster Minor Football Final.

28-7-51 Belleek defeat Enniskillen Gaels 1-1 to 3 points in the County Minor Championship. Near the end Shea scored the winning goal for Belleek. Enniskillen have appealed. Malachy Mahon proved an efficient referee though some of his decisions were very open to criticism. “I was shocked to see both Casey and Gonigle revert to unsporting tactics. I saw at least four fouls committed by these Belleek stars yet they were not penalised. Whether or no the referee seen this or not is the big question. Because Casey and Gonigle are county stars is no reason why the referee should be lenient with them.

4-8-51 Fermanagh’s gallant bid for victory at Clones fails – Armagh are Ulster Minor Football Champions by a score of  1-8 to 1-3. Pat Casey, star of the team unable to play due to being confined to bed with a heavy cold. S. Gonigle, Belleek on the team.

4-8-51  Franciscan Monastery nears completion at Rossnowlagh.

25-8-51 Belleek to meet the winners of Roslea and Lisnaskea in Minor Football Championship. Garrison defeat Derrygonnelly 2-5 to 10 points in the final of the Junior Championship. The Garrison team was P. Nealon, M. McGee, Phil Keown, J. P. O’Brien, J. Dolan, P. Dolan, J. Mc Coll, ? Gallagher, P. Casey, M. J. O’Brien, P. Keown, D McGee, Peter Dolan (on for Keenan)

8-9-51 Pettigo GAA Sports at Mullingoad. Ederney Pipe Band was in attendance. Prize winners – Donkey Derby – Mr. P. Gallagher, Mulleek. Cycle race, 1. Jim Mc Caffrey, Ballymacavanney; 2. John Mc Andrews, Billary. Mountcharles football team won the 7 a side.

22-9-51. Fermanagh go down to Derry by 5-6 to 3-5 but give a good performance. Day excursion tickets to the All Ireland final in Croke Park Sunday 23rd September. Adults £1, children half price departing Belleek 5.59 am returning from Dublin at 6.45 pm.

13-10-51 Ederney defeat Derrylin in the final of the Fermanagh Junior championship by 3-2 to 1-4. Derrylin has done well to reach the final in their first year. Ederney and Kinawley will now play Senior football next year.

13-10-51 Fermanagh Senior Championship Final unfinished between Belleek and Lisnaskea. The match took place in Irvinestown under ideal conditions. Lisnaskea, already League Champions, fell behind by six points after a bright start by Belleek. Approaching half time Lisnaskea were back within two points of Belleek when blows were exchanged between two players who were ordered to the sideline by the referee Johnny Monaghan of Ederney. During the interval the crowd, as is usual, entered the playing pitch. Over-excited supporters of the rival teams became embroiled in arguments which unfortunately developed and the referee called the game off.

13-10-51  Future of Railway to Bundoran and Pettigo in doubt. The policy in Belfast at the moment seems to be to abandon the railways in favour of transport by road.

13-10-51 The dance of the season in Mc Cabe’s Hall, Belleek, on Thursday 18th October. Dancing 10-3. First engagement in Northern Ireland of, Al Allen and his Dublin orchestra (late Embassy Ballroom, Dublin), featuring Carlton McKenzie, coloured saxophonist and vocalist.

27-10-51 Mr. Joseph Mc Grath, Rogagh has died at a comparatively early age. The following marriages have taken place; Patrick Mc Manus Molleybreen, Belleek to Miss Kathleen Mc Manus, Moonendoogue, Garrison. Mr. Bernard Keown, Devenish and Miss Kathleen Feehily, Glen West. In Ballyshannon, Mr. Patrick J. Treacy, Knockaraven to Miss Sheila A. Mc Cauley, Newtown House, Lisahully.

3-11-51  Almost a thousand patrons were attracted to Irvinestown to the replay of the Fermanagh Senior Championship final between Belleek and Lisnaskea. It was difficult to control the greasy ball on a treacherous pitch. The game was played in a sporting spirit contrasting with some of the unfortunate scenes of the previous abandoned meeting; not one regrettable incident occurring. “Sonny” Gunn was Lisnaskea’s star and Sean Gonnigle likewise starred for Belleek. Final score 4 points each. Replay next Sunday in Irvinestown.

3-11-51 Funeral of Mrs Ellen Foy, Devenish Villa, Garrison who died in the Shiel Hospital after a short illness. She maintained a thriving guesthouse in Bundoran until a few years ago which she ran since her husband’s death 30 years previously.

3-11-51 Mr. T. J. Keenan of Gortnalee had his pony bolt when being loaded with turf in Cornahilta Bog. It galloped for a distance of three miles before being overtaken by men on bicycles.

3-11-51 Still going strong is Mr John Mc Garrigle who is almost 90 and the oldest man in the Garrison district. He was for many years a member of Belleek Creamery Committee. He takes a keen interest in political matters and hopes to see Partition ended.

10-11-51 In the Garrison area the deaths of Mr. Denis O’Brien, Dernamew and Mr. Andrew Breen, Leigheid, has occurred.

10-11-51 Lisnaskea defeated Belleek in the County Championship final by 1-6 to 1-3. Forty eight hours of rain had left the Irvinestown pitch waterlogged and the goals Belleek defended in the first half was flooded to a depth of 6 inches. Lisnaskea’s fouls were mostly holding and tripping designed to save a goal at the expense of a free while Belleek’s infringements were mainly pushing or back-charging especially in midfield or among the forwards. The Belleek team was only a point behind with five minutes to go and shot a large number of wides towards the end of the game.

24 11 51  Congratulations to Master J. J. Mc Dermott, Devenish on winning the Ulster Championship in dancing. He is a son of Mr. John Mc Dermott, merchant tailor and brother of Miss Jenny Mc Dermott, Irish dancing teacher. A talented young Devenish musician is Master James J. Carty whose accordion playing has an almost professional touch.

24 11 51 Miss Rose A Duffy of Aghoo, Cashelnadrea has gone to England to enter the Novitiate of the Sisters of Perpetual Adoration.

24 11 51 The Bannagh Players (Kesh) entertained a packed house in St. Mary’s Hall Garrison. Other items were supplied by local musicians. The proceeds were expected to pay off the last of the debt incurred in equipping the local band.

24 11 51 When spotted by a Garrison RUC patrol a young man abandoned his bicycle and a parcel containing 21 lbs of tobacco.

01 12 51 According to a newspaper correspondent Lisnaskea Emmetts Club was founded in 1905. In the first round of the Championship they defeated Donagh Sons of Erin and remained undefeated until the final against Teemore. They were leading 1-1 to nil when a dispute arose and the game was abandoned. Teemore won the replay by 2 points to 1. Lisnaskea did not win a Championship until 1928.

01 12 51 Monsignor Gannon PP, Enniskillen performed the opening ceremony for Cashel new hall. It has been built through the initiative of Rev. Eugene Canon Coyle PP. The hall has a capacity of 400 and was designed by Mr. O’Doherty, Ballintra and built by Messrs Timony and Duffy, Cashel. Mr. O’Doherty’s wife, Miss Costello of Lisnaskea, is a niece of the late Monsignor Tierney PP, Enniskillen. (Later to teach in Belleek National School.) In his speech Monsignor Gannon said that with a beautiful church with central heating and electric light, a comfortable school and a new hall Cashel had everything they could possibly want. He deplored the current emphasis on the use of halls almost exclusively for dancing. He cited Enniskillen as bringing in a cross Channel band which he was told cost as much as £200 plus the cost of a relief band as this band did not play the whole night. Mr. Cahir Healy M.P. said that it was hardly a secret that Canon Coyle had given his life savings towards the erection of the two halls in Devenish West Parish.

22 12 51. Education. In the Fermanagh Education Office there are 15 officials at pretty large salaries. No Catholic was appointed.

22 12 51.  The funeral of Mr. John Ward, Editor “Donegal Vindicator” who died in Dublin took place last week. He was a deeply religious man who visited the church twice each day and was a daily communicant.

 

1951 to June. National & International.

 

The Northern and Southern governments agree on the running of the Great Northern Railway (9 January)
Ian Paisley co-founds the Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster (11 March)
On 23 March, Shannon Airport is the base for a rescue operation after a USAF C124 aircraft crashes into the sea – some wreckage is found 450 miles off the west coast, but all 53 people on board are lost
The Catholic hierarchy condemns the ‘Mother and Child’ scheme (4 April); Dr Noel Browne, Minister for Health, resigns; the scheme is abandoned on 6 April
A census (8 April) shows the population of the Republic to be 2,960,593; that of Northern Ireland on the same day is 1,370,921
The first demonstration of television in Ireland is held at the Spring Show in the RDS, Dublin (30 April)
The Arts Council is founded in the Republic (8 May)
Fianna Fáil regains power in a general election (30 May); Eamon de Valera becomes Taoiseach on 13 June
The Abbey Theatre, Dublin is destroyed by fire (18 July)
Ernest Walton of Trinity College Dublin is jointly awarded the Nobel prize for physics with Sir John Cockcroft
Liam and Josephine Miller found the Dolmen Press
T. J. Walsh establishes the Wexford Opera Festival
Samuel Beckett’s novels Molloy and Malone Dies, and Sam Hanna Bell’s novel December Bride, are published.

Births

Bertie Ahern (Fianna Fáil leader and Taoiseach) in Dublin
John Buckley (composer and teacher) in Co. Limerick
Dana (pseudonym of Rosemary Brown, singer) in Derry/Londonderry (30/8)
Peter Fallon (poet, founder of Gallery Press) in Osnabrück, Germany
Bill Graham (rock journalist and author) in Belfast (29/8)
Fred Johnston (poet and novelist) in Belfast
Paul McGuinness (manager of U2) near Hanover
Brian Maguire (painter) in Wicklow
Patrick Mason (theatre director)
John O’Keeffe (Kerry Gaelic footballer) (15/4)
Alan Shatter (Fine Gael politician) in Dublin (14/2)
Niall Stokes (founder and publisher of Hot Press magazine) in Dublin.

Deaths

Sir James Andrews
Daisy Bates
Joseph Warwick Bigger
Peter Cheyney
Joseph Chifley
Sir Ernest Clark
Louis D’Alton
Aodh de Blacam
George Gavan Duffy
Robert Flaherty
M. J. MacManus
Henry de Vere Stackpoole.

Local Events

13-1-1951. Death of Mr. Patrick Magee, Garrison, at an advanced age. Very Rev. Canon Coyle officiated.

27-1-1951. Sympathy is extended from the residents of his native Grouselodge to the brothers and relatives and to the clergy of the Diocese of Clogher on the death of the Very Rev. Denis Canon Mc Grath, P.P. of Bundoran last week. The late Canon Mc Grath was beloved by the people of Grouselodge in which townland he was born and reared.

3-2-1951. “You have often passed through a Woolworth store and marvelled how such a large staff can be maintained and goods sold so cheaply – or apparently so. In 1950 the firm set a new profit record of £5,355, 272.

3-2-1951. Much debate was occasioned at the County GAA Convention on the state of Gaelic Park and criticism of Enniskillen Gaels re state of Gaelic Games in the town and especially the Enniskillen pitch. Mr Jim Brady of Enniskillen excused the unplayable state of the pitch on account of a circus having been there for some time or perhaps because of the rising level of water from the adjoining Erne. Mr. Fee, County Secretary interjected, “It was because it was full of holes.” Mr. Fee welcomed the re-affiliation of Ederney and Kinawley to the association.

3-2-1951. Omagh man Mr. Maurice J. Hackett of Kevlin Road, Omagh, has bought six occupied dwelling houses at Prospect Terrace, Omagh for £80. The price represents the most astonishing bargain in house property. The former owner was Miss Louisa Crawford, Omagh.

3-2-1951. Enniskillen grocers request their customers to bring shopping baskets with them for general groceries, bread etc. and containers for potatoes owing to the increased cost of wrapping paper, paper bags and twine. Co-operation in this matter is urgently requested.

17-2-1951. The oldest inhabitant of Devenish has passed away in the person of James Mc Grath, 96, Rogagh, Cashelnadrea whose death occurred on Friday last. Also the death of Thomas Melaniphy, Frevagh, Devenish and of Mrs. M. Cassidy, wife of Mr. Michael Cassidy, Rossinuremore.

17-2-1951. Wedding bells for Tracey and Kelly at the Cathedral, Sligo. Miss Agnes Tracey, “Woodvale,” Kilcoo, Garrison to Gerald Kelly, Kiltimagh, County Mayo.

17-2-1951. Customs Fines at Belleek. Michael Ferguson, Drumbadreevagh, prosecuted for having in his possession a smuggled bicycle. He claimed he had got the bicycle from his brother-in law, Michael Gallagher, Rockfield, Ballyshannon to go to work on the Erne Scheme.

10-3-1951. An Ellen Donohue was fined £5 at Derrylin Court for concealment of 9 turkeys. She was suspected of having smuggled then by boat across a border river as tracks led from the river to the house of a friend.

10-3-1951. The death is announced of ex-senator John Mc Hugh of Pettigo at the venerable age of 92. He was chairman of Fermanagh Council from its inception in 1898 until it was dissolved by the Six County Government in 1922. He was one of two Nationalist M. Ps for County Fermanagh until the “gerrymander” of 1929 rearranged the boundaries to give two Unionist and one Nationalist M.P for a county which had a Nationalist majority.

10-3-1951. Lord Bishop of Clogher on the dangers of the Dance Craze. He wants amusements curtailed and the closing of all halls by midnight. He made a special appeal for prayer especially the Rosary.

17-3-1951.  Rabbits are not pests on Sunday. With an all-out war being waged on the rabbit pest it is, nevertheless, an offence in the Six Counties to kill rabbits on a Sunday. This was made very clear at Rathfriland Court when Patrick Travers, Lassize, was fined 10 shillings for the offence, and Kevin Travers, Lurgancahone, fined 20 shillings for using a net, “to kill rabbits on a Sunday.”

24-3-1951. Death of Master Ted Feely, Knockaraven, Garrison, aged 9. His coffin was carried on the shoulders of his classmates to his last resting place.

24-3-1951. Death of Mrs Maguire, ex-PT, Corgra House, Belleek. She retired last December after 44 years of service in Cornahilta School. Unfortunately she has passed away before the presentation organised for her by the local people. Two of her daughters are Sisters of Mercy.

31-3-1951. Tempo had an unexpected victory over Belleek in the Senior League by 2-5 to 1-4.

31-3-1951. The Ulster Farmer’s mart in Enniskillen celebrates its first birthday. Initially there were grave doubts in the minds of farmers as to whether the weekly sales would be a success but their fears proved unfounded. During the past 12 months 27,776 animals and total receipts for the period amounted to £672,147. The Farmers’ Mart Co. had helped put Fermanagh on the map as a centre for cattle sales.

7-4-1951. Fermanagh defeated in the Ulster Junior Championship by Donegal by 2-12 to 0-4.

14-4-1951. Death of Mr. John Flanagan, Glen West, Devenish. He had a long and trying illness.

14-4-1951. Derry defeat Fermanagh in the Dr. Mc Kenna Cup by 3-11 to 2-5. Playing for Fermanagh were M. McGurren, M. Regan, and J. Connors of Belleek.

14-4-1951.  E. F. Fairbairn, Ltd., Ireland’s best chicks. Accredited eggs only at Portadown, Enniskillen, Larne, Coleraine and Belfast. Pullets are dispatched in boxes bearing the name of the firm and marked, “Pullets.”

14-4-1951.  Ederney defeat Cashel 2-2 to 1-1. For Cashel best of a well-balanced defence was Timoney, Mc Garrigle and Ferguson. Of the forwards McGovern and Maguire were always dangerous and took careful watching. Despite the inclement conditions it was a good match. Ederney’s well merited win was mainly due to a very strong defence in which Kelly making his debut in goals made some really fine saves. F. Mc Hugh at centre back, the Lunny brothers and Durnian all played a major part. The forwards made good use of their scoring chances and had in B. Mc Hugh the outstanding player afield. Mc Carron also had a good game at right full forward. Scorers Ederney, Murphy (1-1), McKervey (1-0), Cassidy (0-1). Cashel, Maguire (1-0), McGovern (0-1).

14-4-1951. Opening Announcement. Funeral Undertaking. Messrs Magee and O’Connor, Mulleek, County Fermanagh wish to announce that they are in a position to supply, coffins, shrouds, wreathes etc. Modern Dodge motor hearse. Distance no object. Charges moderate. Phone Leggs No 1 or Ballyshannon 41 (Day or Night)

14-4-1951. YP Pools. Total Dividend for Saturday 7th April £8,112-12-6. There were two winners of the First Dividend with 23 goals each.

28-4-1951. Devenish defeated Enniskillen Gaels in Enniskillen by 5-1 to 3-4. The chief player responsible was Dan Magee, former stalwart of the Gaels team.

5-5-1951. Fermanagh Senior League Tie. Belleek defeat Irvinestown by 4-7 to 0-4 dispelling the fears that Gaelic football was on the decline in the area. A feature of the game was the sparkling display given by the homesters full forward P. Cox whose hat trick of three goals surely establishes a record among Fermanagh front line attackers.

5-5-1951. Tempo calling. Tempo calling, Tempo Calling. Old customers please bring in your ration books to be registered for meat. New customers invited Hugh Tunney, Tempo Established 1879.

19-5-1951. Irvinestown defeat Belleek by 1-4 to 6 points.

9-6-1951. The last County Board meeting was largely taken up with a debate about the result of the recent match between Belleek and Irvinestown. Irvinestown said that after the match the referee said that Irvinestown had won by a point while the official report sent in said that the match was a draw. The report has been sent back to the referee.

16-6-1951.In a challenge match Pettigo defeated Bannagh by 1-4 to 1-1. A fine match played in a splendid spirit was that between Pettigo and Bannagh, at Bannagh, on Sunday, refereed by Mr. Patrick Maye. The new Bannagh team formed as a result of the enthusiasm and organisational ability of Mr. Packy Calgy is serving up splendid football and promises to be heard of soon in prominent headlines. Scorers for Bannagh were Frank Armstrong (goal), and P. Mc Gibney (point), and for Pettigo P. Gallagher (4 points), and M. Reid (goal) Gallagher and Reid were outstanding for Pettigo and Nugent brothers, Keown brothers and Calgy for Bannagh.

23-6-1951. Fermanagh Minors best against Monaghan by 2-7 to 0-7. S. Gonigle, Belleek and P. Casey, Devenish played.

23-6-1951. Very Rev. Dr. P.J. McLaughlin, Professor of Experimental Physics at Maynooth is to be the next President of the college. He is a native of Ballyshannon.

30-6-1951. After an absence of some years, Seemuldoon, one time Fermanagh County Champions, made a reappearance on the field at Ederney on Wednesday evening winning by 3-3 to 1-2. By their superb display of good football despite the difficult playing conditions due to the wet evening, the young Seemuldoon team proved themselves no mean successors of the earlier players, and capable of giving a very necessary fillip to the game in NW Fermanagh if the difficulty attending the formation of a team drawn partly from an area partly in County Fermanagh and partly in County Tyrone could be overcome.

30-6-1951. Cashelnadrea, County Fermanagh is very much in the news, reason being that electric light has come to the district. Your correspondent had the pleasure of switching on the light in the spacious premises of Mr. John Mc Gowan, Cashel House, on June 29th. Mr Mc Gowan has got the first connection but in a short time the Catholic Church, the new hall and the school will be lit up, and after that the wants of the entire district will be attended to.

30-6-1951. Death of Lady Gallagher is announced. She was the widow of Sir James Gallagher a native of Aghavanny, Kiltyclogher who became a Dublin Alderman and later Lord Mayor of Dublin. He was knighted by King Edward V11. He was apprenticed to a tobacconist and ended owning several tobacconist shops.

30-6-1951. Speaking on Monday at the annual distribution of prizes at Maynooth, Most Rev. Dr. D’Alton, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All-Ireland explained why the Hierarchy intervened in the Mother and Child Scheme.