1953 January to June.

1953.

 National Events.

27 people die when a BEA Viking aircraft crashes at Belfast Airport (Nutt’s Corner) on 5 January
Samuel Beckett’s En Attendant Godot (Waiting for Godot) is first performed at the Théâtre Babylone, Paris on 5 January
The ferry Princess Victoria capsizes off the coast of County Down: 133 people die (31 January)
Insured workers in the Republic become eligible for medical benefit
The library of Alfred Chester Beatty, containing his unique collection of oriental manuscripts, opens in Dublin (8 August)
The Health Act provides for a free mother-and-child healthcare scheme in the Republic (29 October)
Michael Scott’s acclaimed Busaras (central bus station) is built in Dublin
The last Blasket Islanders are resettled on the mainland
John Bernal is awarded the Lenin Peace Prize.

Births.

Raymond Deane (composer, pianist and novelist) on Achill Island, Co. Mayo
Theo Dorgan (poet) in Cork
Hugo Hamilton (fiction writer) in Berlin
Mary Harney (politician; leader of the Progressive Democrats and Tánaiste) in Ballinasloe, Co. Galway (11/3)
Garry Hynes (theatre director) in Roscommon (10/6)
Rita Kelly (poet) in Galway
Frank McGuinness (playwright) in Buncrana, Co. Donegal (?/7)
Liam Neeson (film actor) in Ballymena, Co. Antrim
Patricia O’Donovan (trade unionist) in Cork
John Rocha (fashion designer, based mainly in Dublin since 1978) in Hong Kong (23/8)
Ronan Sheehan (fiction writer) in Dublin

Deaths.

Sir Arnold Bax
Henry Dixon
Richard Downey
F.L. Green
Beatrice Grimshaw
James Hamilton (3rd Duke of Abercorn)
Grace Henry
Maud Gonne MacBride
Alice Milligan
Eugene O’Neill
Joseph O’Neill
T.F. O’Rahilly
Robert Lloyd Praeger
James Scullin

Local Events.

3-1-53 Blackbog Parochial Bazaar in St. Joseph’s Hall, Ederney 4th-11th January in aid of a new church.

3-1-53 During the past week the most severe frost remembered for 15 years has held the Pettigo district in its grip. Lakes and rivers in the area were frozen over. The accompanying cold was intense as a result of which many people were confined to bed with influenza.

3-1-53 Kinlough. On Christmas Eve the countryside was illuminated by the Christmas Candles which lit up every house. Churches were crowded for Midnight Mass at which large numbers of the faithful received Holy Communion.

3-1-53 Regret has been occasioned in the Devenish district by the death of Mrs E. J. Mc Guinness, Corramore.

3-1-53.The death is reported at a comparatively early age of Mrs D. Duffy, Fassagh, mother of John and Joseph Duffy.

3-1-53 The inaugural meeting of the Clogher Historical Society was held on December 28th in St. Macartan’s Seminary, Monaghan, with Bishop O’Callaghan presiding. It is to produce an annual journal recording the religious, social, economic and political history of the Diocese of Clogher.

3-1-53 Two gypsies, Martin Ward and Bernard Reilly, were found guilty of breaking open the poor boxes at the Graan, Enniskillen and stealing the contents. The two who were at a gipsy encampment at Rossory, Enniskillen were jailed for six months each.

10-1-53 Thirteen men, who attended Mass for 35 minutes on the morning of New Year’s Day, were dismissed from the Winter Relief Scheme by Enniskillen Borough Council.

17-1-53 Regret has been occasioned by the death of Mr. Bernard Flanagan, Devenish, a member of an old respected family.

17-1-53 Successful Devenish Play. An audience of over 600 people packed into St. Mary’s Hall, Devenish to see the wonderfully realistic Nativity play presented by the children of the parish. A high tribute is due to Rev. Victor Marron C.C. and the teachers for the careful and diligent training that they gave to the children which resulted in the presentation of such an awe inspiring spectacle.

24-1-53  Dublin Dance aids Pettigo Memorial. A very successful dance was held on January 6th, in St. Peter’s Hall, Phibsborough, Dublin, in aid of the Pettigo Memorial Fund. The monument which will be in the shape of an Irish Volunteer on the march is being executed by a famous Dublin sculptor. It is hoped it will be ready to be unveiled early in June of this year. The Dublin Committee intend to issue a booklet containing an account of “The Battle of Pettigo.” It will also contain an account of the efforts made by successive British Governments from 1912 onwards to ensure for Britain a permanent hold on Northern Ireland.

24-1-53 The Pettigo 1922 Memorial Committee received £200 from the Pettigo Men’s Committee in New York also over £100 from members of the Old IRA in Dublin.

24-1-53 Writing in the Eire Society Bulletin of Boston USA, Miss Mary Frances Fox, one of the founders of, “The American League for an Undivided Ireland,” recalls her last visit to Garrison last year. Her mother was a native of Devenish Parish. She believes that “Garrison” is a name best forgotten and a return to the name of Devenish West. She applauds the efforts made in this direction by Rev. Canon Coyle, “patriot priest in the great Irish tradition, jailed during the fight for freedom, and now in the 52nd year of his priesthood.”

31-1-53 A total of £170 in fines was imposed at Kesh Court on five Dromore women who were stopped in a taxi coming from Pettigo smuggling cigarettes and tobacco on 30th August 1952. Rose Mc Cann was fined £20, Mary Donnelly £30, Sarah Donnelly £40, Rose Mc Caffrey (with a previous conviction) £50 and Jenny Gallagher £30. They were given three months to pay.

31-1-53 Bid to save Cloy School near Lack and avoid the bussing of the 18 pupils to Lack Primary School. Mr. Cahir Healy M.P. believed in the retention of small rural schools as it was a hardship for children to travel long distances to school which involved early rising and waiting on the roadside under trees in wet weather waiting for buses.

31-1-53 Fermanagh Conference agrees on the idea of a new abattoir. The present Enniskillen abattoir is out of date and the lease almost ended. Mr. Harry West proposed the export of meat from the new abattoir via St. Angelo Airdrome. Enniskillen Rural District Council is to give £5,000 to the new project.

31-1-53 Fermanagh widow, Mrs. Sarah Jane Elliott of Lisbellaw and her five children are granted £1,500 for the loss of her husband in a car accident. She was also granted an additional £400 on account of her own personal injuries arising from the collision with, Gerald McGrath, Post Office worker and Union official of Station Rd., Randallstown. The accident occurred on October 25th, 1950.

7-2-53 Corporal Tom Harte, of the US Army, arrived home on Christmas Eve after serving two years in Korea, giving his parents of Raheelan, Kiltyclogher a wonderful Christmas surprise. He brought home with him some beautiful examples of Japanese and Korean art and craft. He has returned to America last Friday to resume work with the Edison Company with whom he had been employed before enlisting.

7-2-53 Heavy loss of life as motor-vessel founders. Larne-Stranraer boat sinks in a gale. The Princess Victoria sank in a raging sea five miles off the County Down coast on Saturday afternoon on the way from Stranraer to Larne. There were only 44 survivors, 128 people drowned and 65 are still missing.

7-2-53 More than 1,000 people are feared drowned in extensive floods in south-east England and the Low Countries in a weekend of sea-driven floods. One hundred people are drowned and 400 missing on Canvey Island in the Thames estuary when a 17th century sea wall was breached. Bodies have been found on the tops of houses with water lapping at their feet and others entangled in the branches of trees.

7-2-53 The death is announced of Mrs Kate Gallagher of Tullygravarth, Cashelnadrea, Devenish in the Erne Hospital, Enniskillen at the advanced age of 71.

7-2-53 Thomas O’Reilly of Coramore, Lisnaskea was sentenced at Lisnaskea Court to a month’s imprisonment with hard labour for stealing 9 hens valued at £6-15-0 from Miss Bridget Mc Brien, Drumlone, Newtownbutler.

14-2-53 Kesh Boy’s Sad Fate. James Joseph Douglas, aged 18 ½ of Gortnagullion, Kesh, had been missing since Christmas Day, and his body was discovered drowned in Lough Erne between Portinode Bridge and Hare Island on 5th February. His bicycle, overcoat and army cap had been found on Portinode Bridge on Christmas Day. At the inquest in Kesh on Monday held by Mr. George Warren, coroner, a verdict of suicide was returned.

19-2-53 Belleek Property Sale has Court Sequel. Decree of £25 made against an Enniskillen auctioneer re the sale of No. 7 Rathmore Terrace, Belleek. Mr. Edward Ellis of Main St. Belleek was plaintiff and the defendants were Dr. Rollins of Croydon, Surrey administrator of the estate of Charlotte Emily Rollins, and Walter Brown of East Bridge St., Enniskillen. The houses in the row had been sold for £800 or £80 each. Mr Ellis had bought No 7 for £300 but had not been able to obtain possession. The houses had been advertised as freehold and turned out to be only leasehold with only 18 years left on the leases.

21-2-53 From Bishop O’Callaghan’s Lenten Pastoral. Seminary for Enniskillen. We have to provide a minor seminary in the Six County portion of the diocese for those boys who wish to follow the Northern Ireland Grammar School Course. We have already secured a suitable site at Enniskillen and hope to have the building commenced as soon as the permit from the Northern Ireland Government is obtained. I appeal to all who are in a position to make bequests for religious or charitable purposes to remember the new seminary.

14-3-53 At the AGM of St. Mary’s GFC the secretary Mr. P. Keown, expressed the view that efforts should be made to reunite Cashelnadrea area to the club so that a strong Parish Club be formed. He paid tribute to the help from the Cashel boys during 1952.

14-3-53 Cavanacross travelled to Devenish on Sunday for their first Junior League game and emerged victors after a gruelling hours’ football. Played in brilliant sunshine on an ideal pitch the game was keenly contested right to the end. The closeness of the scores is indication of the eveness of these two teams both of which can be commended for the clean sporting manner in which the game was played. The scoring opened after about 10 minutes play when J. Cassidy had a point for Cavanacross followed about five minutes later by a point for Devenish leaving the score at half time at 1 point each. After the interval Cavanacross had a further two points leaving the final score 0-1 to 0-3 in favour of the visitors. Mr. J. P. Meehan was a strict and impartial referee.

14-3-53 The newly formed Cashelnarea Club wish to remain independent and not sink their individuality by playing for another team.

21-3-53 “The Quiet Man” led to trouble at the cinema. The manager of the Regal Cinema, Enniskillen was “warned and severely reprimanded” for alleged overcrowding and obstruction of the passageways at a showing of this popular film.

21-3-53 At Belleek Court on Tuesday James Mc Laughlin, Corrakeel, Belleek was fined 8 shillings with costs for being drunk in charge of a pedal cycle.

21-3-53  Garrison Farmer’s Union meeting ends in disorder after a meeting in McGovern’s Hall on March 3rd. Mr. White, General Organiser, presided at the election of officers after Mr. Grogan, J.P. declined re-election as Chairman. He welcomed the huge attendance and stressed the motto of the Farmer’s Union “Defence and not Defiance,” and stressed that the organisation was non-political and non-sectarian. Mr. Wesley Acheson, vice chairman was proposed as chairman and Mr. Francis Timoney was also proposed. Without a vote Mr. White went on to ask for proposals for a vice-chairman. When challenged by Mr. Benny Dolan, Mr. White said he was not going to be dictated to and that only members could vote. Mr Dolan said he was a member and had paid his fee of 10s and  held his membership card which he had got a month ago from Mr McGee, the secretary. After examination Mr White said the card was invalid as it had not been signed by the Group Secretary, Mr. Armstrong.

In a heated discussion Mr. Joe Elliott said that the Garrison branch was a private branch where everything was done behind closed doors and Mr. Dolan said that there never was a meeting except at Christmas, that the secretary had no list of members nor had he any minutes of the last meeting. A voice in the body of the hall observed that the Chairman has no land and Mr White said he was going ahead with the election of officers. He then asked Mr Dolan and Mr. Elliott how much land they had and they replied respectively 110 and 180 acres. Mr. White said he was going on with the meeting and that that they would obey him or leave the room to which Mr. Dolan replied that they would stay and he would leave. Loud cheering drowned out Mr. White as he tried to proceed and he threatened to fetch the police to which Mr. Elliott said that they were not afraid of the police to more cheers.

Mr White told the meeting that if they would not submit to him he would have to wipe Garrison off the map and said he had come from Belfast not knowing the difference between farmer and farmer and said he detested the spirit that had been revealed at the meeting. When he again called for a vice-chairman he was told from the audience he would get no vice-chairman and he said he regretted having to close the branch. He then left the hall.

28-3-53 An Eire Customs Patrol under Mr. M. Dawson, P.O. seized a lorry and 50 small pigs which were being taken from Eire to Northern Ireland. The seized bonhams were later sold in Pettigo and the vehicle removed to Custom’s Headquarters. The value of the pigs is about £350.

28-3-53 The death is announced of Mr. J. P. Dunne, P.T., Teemore, has robbed the GAA in Fermanagh of one of the best known and respected members of the Association. He was playing for the County team when he was sixteen and after gaining every honour a Fermanagh player could he went on to serve his county with the same ability and loyalty in the Council chamber. He became chairman of the Co., Board at a time when its very existence was threatened by financial troubles and internal distension. Thanks to his energetic efforts and his wide guidance a healthy organisation and a respectable credit balance in cash made the way easier for his successor in 1943 when he decided to retire from what had been a most tiring and exhausting office.

28-3-53 Enniskillen’s last thatched house in a blaze. The two story five room house of Mr. Thomas Maguire, The Orchard, Enniskillen was gutted by fire recently. It was the last thatched house in Enniskillen. Mr. Maguire, aged 83, is organist in St. Michael’s Church, Enniskillen.

4-4-53 Cashelnadrea V Cavanacross played in a gale force wind ended with a win for the Cavanacross visitors by 1-2 to 1-1. Packy and Richard Tracey scored a goal and a point respectively for Cashelnadrea.

4-4-53 Despite a gale force wind Belleek and Irvinestown produced many fine passages of football in a close game in Irvinestown which ended 1-3 each. Sean Mc Caffrey fisted to the net for Belleek and John Doogan levelled the scoring with the last kick of the game.

4-4-53 These people can see through you. X-Ray Mobile Unit for Enniskillen. Have you got T.B.? The chances are about 100 to 1 against but if you happened to be the unlucky one you would be foolish not to learn about it so that you may be cured in a short time. Anyone above the age of 13 is entitled to a free x-ray at the Minor Townhall, Enniskillen.

11-4-53  Enniskillen’s new bridge joining the town to the Cornagrade Estate is to be called The Johnston Bridge in recognition of the part played by the Mayor of Enniskillen Ald. W. E. Johnston in getting approval from the Government for its construction.

11-4-53  In the new English Sewing Cotton Company’s factory over 300 are to be employed in Lisnaskea.

18-4-53  At a challenge football match between Pettigo and Belleek on Sunday at the football grounds, Pettigo were winners.

18-4-53 At Belleek Court Henry Acheson, Kevin McSherry both of Gurteen, Garrison and Andrew Sweeny of Kilcoo, were summonsed for disorderly behaviour in the public house of George Mc Manus, Belleek on 17th of February. Sergeant T. Cordner gave evidence of separating the three men struggling in a passage which led to the kitchen. He put Acheson out but later found that he had returned and had the proprietor by the throat and put him out again. McSherry questioned the authority of the Sergeant and said “there would be no peace until the green, white and gold is flying here.”  He also said to the publican and his two daughters that they were fine neighbours for phoning the police to which they replied that if they had not they would have wrecked the place. Mc Sherry was fined £1, Sweeny £2 and bound to the peace for a year and Acheson fined £4. Only McSherry appeared at the court.

18-4-53  Judge Troy at Ederney. Great Welcome for American friend of Ireland. Judge Mathew Troy, chief of the Irish-American, “Minute Men,” accompanied by Senator J. G. Lennon, was met by St. Joseph’s Band, Ederney and escorted to the Hall where he addressed the crowd. Rev. Fr. Mc Kenna P.P. praised him for the great work he was doing in the United States for a united Ireland. About 30 police were on duty in the vicinity.

18-4-53  Mary O’Reilly, a tinker was sentenced to two months in prison for stealing money on two occasions from Mrs Ellen Treacy, Fossagh. She had arrived pedalling her wares and snatched the money from the table. She was caught on the second occasion. The sentence will not take effect if she leaves Northern Ireland immediately. Aged 17, she was married since she was 15.

18-4-53  The death is announced of Dr. Alice Milligan, noted Irish Nationalist, poetess, essayist and dramatist at Lislap, Omagh, where she was born 80 years ago.

18-4-53  Bundoran’s An Tostal Attraction. On next Sunday a record off-season crowd for the Dr. Mc Kenna Cup game Donegal V Armagh at the Gaelic Park, Bundoran. This fixture, which is billed as a Tostal event of importance is arousing considerable interest and special trains and busses will bring their complement to the seaside on that day. Everyone who witnessed last season’s National League game between the same counties at Ballybay and the replay at Clones, when Donegal qualified for the semi-final, and won their first Lagan Cup, will agree if the same fare is provided, we are assured of a close and exciting hour of football. Donegal, with a home venue, will field a strong fifteen, which included a few young and promising stars, but will have a hard nut to crack in this experienced and well-balanced Armagh team.

18-4-53  Fermanagh Health Committee is pleased that at long last the Northern Ireland X-Ray Unit has visited the county. It was officially welcomed by Enniskillen Major Ald. W. E. Johnston, J.P. Some 300 people were x-rayed at the first session.

18-4-53  The introduction of Summer Time always brings with it a certain amount of confusion with it regarding the time of games. Next Sunday all games will begin at 4.00 p.m.

25-4-53  Devenish. Almost £200 worth of sheep and lambs have been destroyed by a dog on Kilea Mountain. If the animal is not traced and destroyed the sheep will have to be brought to the lowlands for safety.

25-4-53 The sympathy of a wide circle of friends is extended to Miss Briget Keenan and Mr. P. F. Keenan on the regretted death of their mother Mrs. P. Keenan.

2-5-53 On April 20th, Pettigo GAA Club purchased a large field which they are converting into an Athletics Park, from Mr. William Porter of Kimmid at the sum of £500.

9-5-53 At a football match between Pettigo and Donegal teams at Rosefield Park, on Sunday, after a well-played and strenuous game, Pettigo was the winner by two points. The recently formed Pettigo youthful team is showing great promise and if the spirit continues they should be able to make a name for themselves in the football field.

16-5-53 Devenish. The death of Mr. Thomas Johnston, Devenish, which occurred suddenly while he was carting on his farm is deeply regretted.

16-5-53 First in the Cashelnadrea district to have turf saved is Mr. Thos. Treacy, Woodvale House, Kilcoo.

16-5-53 Obituary of Mr. F. Keogh of Drumadravey, Lisnarick, electrician at RAF Station, Castle Archdale. He was disconnecting low tension wires when he was electrocuted. He is survived by his wife Veronica and sons Brendan, Peter and Desmond. He played goals for St. Molaise, Football Club, Irvinestown, for several years.

16-5-53   Regret is felt in the Lettercran district at the death of Mr. J. Mc Kenna, Proughlish, near Drumquinn aged 79 years. He was well known in the Lettercran district and was husband of Brigid Mc Kenna, a native of Lettercrann. He was father of Mrs John Sweeny, The Rock, Ballyshannon and of Mrs J. White, East Port, Ballyshannon. Internment took place in Longfield Cemetery.

23-5-53 John Tracy, Corramore, Garrison, Co., Fermanagh was fined £5 with £5-18-1 costs and expenses at Belleek Court for falsely claiming a grant of £1-4-6 towards the cost of fertilizers purchased from Belleek Cooperative Agricultural and Dairy Society.

23-5-53  Mr Vincent Keown, Killybig, had a narrow escape when he fell into the Erne at Belleek where he is employed  on the Erne Development Drainage Scheme. The presence of mind of a fellow worker Mr. Cyril Gibson saved him from possible drowning. Using a piece of wood on which there was a bent nail, he succeeded in hooking the nail in Keown’s clothing and pulling him to safety.

23-5-53 On Sunday matches were played in Rosefield Park between Pettigo and Barnesmore Minors and Juniors. The games which were played under very unfavourable conditions owing to a strong south-westerly wind were keenly contested. Barnesmore won the minor game and the most promising players for Pettigo were, Vincent Egan, Vincent McCrea, Joseph Moss and Joe Mc Fadden. Pettigo were the winners in the Junior match and in this game Vincent Egan, B. Maloney, J. Moss and Tony Mc Grath were always in the right place at the right time. Another promising player is Josie Mc Fadden. Mr. F. Muldoon refereed.

23-5-53 St. Mary’s Pipe Band has been equipped with new instruments. An interesting visitor to Devenish on Sunday was Senator Lennon, who was the guest of Mr. Fogarty, Cardiff, at the Melvin Hotel.

23-5-53 Success of Devenish Sports held in St. Mary’s Gaelic Park on Sunday 10th inst were an outstanding success and a crowd of several hundreds were drawn from Fermanagh, Leitrim and Donegal. They were delighted by the fine demonstration of athletics given by the schoolchildren of the parish in conjunction with the exquisite music provided by St. Mary’s Pipe Band. The tastefully dressed members of the children’s Irish Class gave a figure drill display under the direction of Miss Gilbride, Rosinver, and also gave displays of Irish dancing the music for which was provided by two talented young accordion players, J. J. Carty and P. Feehily. The latter is the son of Mr. P. Fehily, the well-known traditional fiddler. We congratulate Re. Victor Marron C.C. who was chief organiser of the event and marvel at the success of his efforts to give the children of Devenish a real Irish Ireland outlook. Without compulsion these children are as enthusiastic to learn the Irish language as Fr. Marron is to teach it. Mr. O’Donoghue, Ballyshannon, teaches them Irish dancing and Irish music and there is in this outpost of occupied Ireland we find youth enthusiastically embracing the culture that was the treasured possession of our forefathers and which has entirely disappeared from many parishes in the Republic of Ireland. I only pray that God may give to other parts of Ireland prototypes of Fr. Marron so that the spirit of real sincerity may be infused into the real Irish Ireland Revival Movement. In the football match which was between Belleek and Ballaghameehan St. Aiden’s the latter lead the heavier Belleek team by a point but Belleek with the aid of the wind in the second half won by 2-6 to 0-5 with Fr. Marron C.C. as referee.

23-5-53 Religious Profession of former Devenish Playright. Some years ago the name of Alfred G. Mc Govern, Aghoo, Tullyrossmearn, Devenish was known from end to end of Ireland as the author of several popular and  successful plays including, “Smuggling on the Border,” which had a great run in the Midlands and South: “Paddy Reilly from Ballyjamesduff,” a play founded on the popular song “Come back Paddy Reilly,” and “I will repay,” a historical play representing the life and times of Fr. Sheehy which may well be regarded as the masterpiece of this gifted son of Fermanagh. Your correspondent had the honour to be present at the first productions of all these plays, and reviewed them in turn. Brother Peter is a brother of Messrs. Francis J. Mc Govern, monumental sculptor, Kiltyclogher and of Mr. Leo Mc Govern, postmaster, American House, Bundoran and cousin of Rev. Patrick Stewart, S.M.A., Nigeria, and of Mr. John Sweeny, prominent New York businessman, and Mr. P. Mc Govern, P.C., Curran House, Kiltyclogher, and Mr. J. Sweeny, Latoon. He was reared within a mile of Kiltyclogher. A former playing member of Cashelnadrea Gaelic Football team he was also a gifted musician and his violin selections of traditional dance tunes and airs were frequently heard on concert platforms and Feiseanna all over the North-West. Six years ago Mr. Mc Govern decided to leave the world behind and entered religion as a novice at the Cistercian Monastery, Roscrea, Co., Tipperary. On Wednesday of last week he made his final profession at an impressive ceremony in the Monastery, taking the name in religion of Brother Peter, son of the late Mr. and Mrs John Mc Govern, Aghoo, Cashelnadrea.

30-5-53 A verdict of suicide whilst of unsound mind was returned at an inquest in Ballyshannon on Monday on Edmond P. Condon (44) solicitor, who was found hanging in an out office of Mall House, Ballyshannon, his late mother’s residence, on Thursday evening. He was a former chairman of Ballyshannon Town Commissioners and had been missing since Sunday. Sergt. P. Flynn, who made the discovery, said that Condon seemed to be worried and had been unusually quiet recently.

30-5-53 Enniskillen Rural Council’s Victory over Lonely Spinster. Sheriff’s bailiffs Henry Coalter, Chanterhill, Enniskillen and Thomas Higgins, Enniskillen accompanied by Mr. A.W. Dinnen, Assistant Welfare Officer for Fermanagh, and two policemen, Sergeant Calderwood, Florencecourt and a constable evicted Margaret Nolan of Toneyloman, Belnaleck at 11 am on Tuesday. She was removed from the house built for her father the late John Nolan and had tried in vain to hold on to this family home in the 17 months since he died.

30-5-53 Only six months in existence the Ballyshannon Musical Society has taken a big step in arranging a concert at which the Radio Eireann Light Orchestra of 40 pieces will be guest artistes along with the eminent American mezzo-soprano, Patricia Thomas fresh from the New York Metropolitan Operatic Society, and Liam Arches, wizard of the accordion. This is the first time that the Radio Eireann Light Orchestra has come so far north, and the announcement of their visit has excited considerable interest all over the North-West. It will be the biggest musical event ever held in the North-West, a fact which is indicated by the steady demand for tickets.

30-5-53 Sunday’s memorable close to Irvinestown Carnival. Four thousand spectators thronged the streets for the fancy dress parade in which 100 children and 150 adults took part. In the children’s section the most original prize went to Edward, Stephen and Colum Mc Garrity as a Mau Mau Gang.

6-6-53 A continual downpour of rain which lasted practically all day marred Cashelnadrea’s annual sports which were held in St. Joseph’s Park. The rain partly nullified the efforts of Rev. Fr. Victor Marron, C.C. and his energetic helpers to make it a memorable success. St Mary’s Pipe Band woke the echoes amidst the mist obscured hills of historic Cashel and a number of events were run off including a juvenile match despite the sodden condition of the Park. A huge crowd of patrons danced at the sports ceilidhe to the music of Malachy Sweeny’s Ceilidhe Band, all the way from Armagh.

6-6-53  Belleek beat Irvinestown last Sunday by 2-4 to 0-7. Jim Diver, in goals for Irvinestown, was caught napping for Belleek’s simple first goal. Hughie Connors is the latest of our retired players to come out of retirement. The ex-Mulleek forward still knows where the posts are as he notched 1-2 against Irvinestown.

6-6-53  Cardinal D’Alton’s hope for Ireland during new British reign. In a statement he said, “I am sure that Irishmen of all shades of opinion, with their innate sense of chivalry, will join in good wishes to the young Queen who was called to the throne in circumstances of great personal sorrow. It is my earnest prayer that God may protect and guide her in her exalted office and that he reign may be the opening of a new era of prosperity for her people. All of us who love the old historic Ireland sincerely hope that during it we may see our country restored to its natural unity.

6-6-53 Everest has been conquered by 34 year old New Zealander E. P. Hilary and a Sherpa guide. The expedition was led by Colonel John Hunt.

6-6-53 Mr De Valera and his ministers refuse to attend the British Minister’s Garden Party on Coronation Day. No films of the Coronation will be shown in Dublin Cinemas as a result of threats from Sinn Fein.

6-6-53  Police are maintaining a 24 hour a day watch on the labourer’s cottage at Toneyloman, Belnaleck, from which the 47 year old spinster Margaret Nolan was evicted by bailiffs on a Court Order by Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday last. A Protestant tenant was selected for it 17 months ago has been given another house in the meantime although he lived in a better house when he made his first application than hundreds of Catholics today.

6-6-53 The world’s longest strike ended on Saturday. It lasted from March 6th, 1939 and for the first time since no pickets marched up and down past the 30ft frontage of Mr James Downey’s public house in Dun Laoghaire since James (78) is now dead. Fourteen years ago he sacked one of the barmen and the Irish National Union of Grocers, Vintners and Allied Trades Assistants demanded his reinstatement. The union withdrew the other barmen and James advertised for non-union men and got 400 replies. Down the years it is estimated that the pickets walked about 41,000 miles and it cost the union £8,500 in strike pay. Some of the original pickets died and others moved away or took other jobs but the union kept sending new pickets. Every night as James locked up he bade the union men good night as he went home and hired a sweeper whenever it snowed to make life easier for the pickets to walk. He was very particular about their punctuality and if there was no pickets present when he opened in the morning he rang the union to demand to know why they were not there and on each 6th of March he held an anniversary party, with drinks on the house to celebrate the strike. The faded “Strike on here” placards have been folded up as the pickets withdrew.

13-6-53  Looking forward to the League Final between Belleek and Lisnaskea there are several surprises in the Belleek line-up not the least being the choice of Brendan Faughnan as goalie. He was an outstanding centre forward until his retirement two seasons ago. Patsy Rooney at corner back is another surprise. He has not played a lot of late but he is such an accomplished player that he would be an automatic choice at centre half for most teams.

13-6-53 The death is announced of Mr. Mary A. Gallagher, Fassagh, Belleek, relict of Mr. John Gallagher.

13-6-53 Monster Sports Meeting to be held at St. Joseph’s Park, Cashel on June 21st. Football challenge for a set of medals, Ballyshannon V Belcoo/Cashel/Devenish selection. Admission 1/6, children 6 pence.

13-6-53   After extensive repairs the Erne Hospital, Enniskillen, was re-opened by Dame Dehra Parker, Minister of Health and Local Government in Northern Ireland. The work had changed the whole character and appearance of the hospital from the dull, gloomy character of the former Workhouse. The Hospitals Authority had wonderful plans for a new hospital which would mean sixth new beds in Fermanagh.

13-6-53 Bishop Eugene O’Callaghan, visits Black Bog Parish, Ederney, to decide, from four sites proposed, where Ederney’s new Church is to be built. He addressed several hundred parishioners in St. Joseph’s Hall, Ederney and introduced Mr. Padraic Gregory, Belfast, who will design the new church and supervise its erection. The present St. Joseph’s Church is 200 years old and is of the cruciform style typical of the post Penal Days with rows of seats in front and on both sides of the altar and with galleries above. It has stood the tests of two centuries and is a remarkable tribute to its builders. Very Rev. Felix Mc Kenna, Blackbog, began to build up a fund for its replacement four years ago and a substantial sum has already been collected. The Bishop remarked that it was a long time since a Church had been erected in Fermanagh. Mr. John Monaghan, R.D.C, expressed thanks, on behalf of the people, to His Lordship, Monsignor Gannon and Fr. Mc Kenna of Irvinestown, for having come to assist in this important selection.

13-6-53 Fermanagh Senior League Final was poor. Belleek defeated Lisnaskea by 1-9 to 1-2 in St. Molaise Park, Irvinestown in what must have been one of the poorest exhibitions of its class ever played in the county. J. P. Mc Cann at centre-field completely dominated the sector for the entire match. It was quarter way through the second half before Lisnaskea made their second serious attack of the game. Rooney starred for Belleek in a grand solid line at the back. Belleek last won this title in 1949.

13-6-53 John Magee, Derryrona, Leggs, Belleek was fined a total of 33 shillings plus costs at Belleek Court for being drunk in charge of a bicycle and £4-8-2 compensation for damaging Constable McCutcheon’s uniform. The constable was bringing him to the barrack when he began to resist and both fell on the ground damaging the constable’s waterproof coat, his trousers and lanyard. Two other constables assisted in taking the defendant to the barrack. He was fined 10s for being drunk in charge, 10s for assaulting the constable, 10s for damaging his clothes and 3s for having no lights or front brake.

13-6-53 Laurence Spratt, aged 19, of Bunaninver, Lisnarick, was charged before Mr. Justice Curran, with forging a £5 note and attempting to pass it to an Enniskillen shop assistant. He was said not to be leading a natural life for a boy as he spent most of his time at home reading and did not engage in sport as most other boys of his age did. A sample of his unusual reading material was a book on psychology in six easy lessons. As his parents were hardworking, honest people the judge imposed a suspended sentence of six months jail.

13-6-53 Senator O’Hare raised matters in connection with the Erne Scheme at Belleek which were annoying local farmers and others in the locality. As the dredging machinery operated day and night the waters of the Erne were constantly dirty and unsuitable for the farmers’ cattle to drink. Blasting was throwing large boulders into farmer’s fields which were an obstacle in making hay and this blasting also affected the livelihood of farmer/anglers who took guests out to fish on the Broad Lough.

13-6-53   “It is outrageous and ridiculous” said Mr. J. Coffey at Lisnaskea Rural Council on Saturday when the Council decided to accept by 11 votes to 5 the tender of John Mc Carron to act as caretaker of Derrylin urinal for £1 per week. He thought the urinal should be cleaned when necessary and added that the Lisnaskea caretaker was doing far more for far less.

20-6-53  Cardinal D’Alton blessed and opened the new £70,000 GAA stadium dedicated to Roger Casement in Andersonstown, a suburb of Belfast. He addressed 25,000 people inside the stadium and told them that he regarded the park as a sample of their patriotism and of the indestructible spirit of the Irish nation.

20-6-53 Michael Tate (32) of Bridgend, Ballyshannon, who had been in Crumlin Jail, Belfast, since 1st June for having had in his possession in Belleek one .45 bullet. He was fined £5 at Enniskillen Court. The defendant is believed to be originally from Co., Tipperary and resident in Ballyshannon for the past three or four years.

20-6-53 Mr. Robert Loane, of Rushindoo, Pettigo, has 100 ricks of hay saved.

20-6-53 Owners to blame for the Princess Victoria disaster. The Princess Victoria was unseaworthy when she sailed from Stranraer to Larne on the morning of January 31st to meet disaster in the Irish Sea. This was the verdict of the enquiry which investigated the loss of the ship with 133 lives.

20-6-53 Suspensions imposed at Fermanagh County Board include Seamus O’Connor, Belleek, one months and Sean Mc Caffrey, twelve months. Mc Caffrey’s case is to be appealed to the Ulster Council. Patsy Keown, formerly secretary of the Devenish Club, reported that the old Devenish Club had been disbanded and a new one formed. A minor team was being entered for competition in place of the Junior team. The SFL final between Belleek and Lisnaskea was fixed for 12th July at Irvinestown.

20-6-53 The death took place on Thursday of last week at Lettercran, Pettigo, of Mrs Catherine Haughey aged 88. In August of 1913 two of her children were accidentally drowned in a lake near her home. She was predeceased many years ago by her husband.

20-6-53 William Mc Mahon, Belleek was given the benefit of the Probation Act at Belleek Court for being drunk in charge of a bicycle.

20-6-53 A Garrison cattle dealer, Thomas Allingham, was fined £2 with costs for driving in such a manner as to prevent Henry Acheson, Gurteen, Garrison, from passing his cattle lorry.

27-6-53 In a Junior Football match Knocks defeated Kesh by 2-1 to 1-4. Kesh were best served by the goalie T. Maguire, full-back J. Montgomery, Clifford at centre field and Mc Mahon, left full forward. The referee was Mr. B. Mc Elroy.

27-6-53 In their first season in Senior Football, Derrygonnelly Harps oust the newly crowned Senior League Champions, Belleek, by 3-6 to 1-4. It was a hard tackling, fast encounter with keen marking and many bone-shaking clashes. On a slippery pitch with a greasy ball, Derrygonnelly lead by 3-3 to 0-3 at half time. Best for Belleek were M. Regan, J. P. Mc Cann, J. and M. Tunney and E. and P. Mc Caffrey. Mr. M. Cullen controlled the game admirably.

27-6-53 On Tuesday night heavy rainfall was experienced in the Pettigo area, continuing until mid-day on Wednesday. Not for 40 years did such flooding occur. Meadows of hay on the banks of the Termon River were swept away. Mr. Wm. Leonard, (cattle dealer), had almost 20 ricks of hay taken away by the flood.

27-6-53 The wedding took place recently in St. Mary’s Church, Devenish, between Mr. Michael H. Gilligan, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Gilligan, Cow Park, and Miss Elizabeth Dolan, second daughter of Mrs T. Dolan, Knockaraven. Mr. P. F. Gilligan, brother of the groom was best man. The bride was attended by her niece, Miss Marie Timoney. The honeymoon is being spent in the south of Ireland.

27-6-53 Two cases of infantile paralysis in Ballinamallard were reported to Fermanagh Health Committee.

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Fermanagh Times November 4th 1915.  MONSTER PIKE CAUGHT IN LOUGH ERNE.  The information reaches us from Kesh of the capture within the past few days of a pike which weighed 39 lbs in Lower Lough Erne off the mouth of the Kesh River. What makes the catch more interesting is the fact that it was secured by the ordinary method of fishing with rod and line from a boat, the lucky angler being Mr. P Keown of Portinode, Kesh.  It appears that but for the skilful handling of the boat by Mr. C. J. Keown, who is an expert oarsman and enthusiastic angler, it would have been impossible to land such a large fish. A according to the oldest fisherman in the locality it is by far the biggest pike ever taken from the Erne.

Fermanagh Times November 4th 1915.  SLIGO MURDER TRIAL.  GIRL SENTENCED TO DEATH.  Mr. Justice Dodds and a city common jury in the Four Courts concluded yesterday the trial of Jane Reynolds for the willful murder in Sligo on the 8th of December last of an Italian woman, Rose de Lucia,  the wife of an ice cream vendor, Angelo, who is awaiting trial on the same charge.  The motive which the Crown alleged was that Angelo de Lucia and Jane Reynolds were in love and conspired to do away with Mrs. de Lucia.  The jury, after half an hour, returned to Court, and in replied to a question by the foreman His Lordship said the girl would be guilty of murder if the jury found that she was present during the murder, and consented to death though she took no part in the actual murder. The jury again retired and after an absence of another half an hour, returned to Court with a verdict of guilty and a strong recommendation to mercy.  His Lordship, who was deeply moved, passed sentence of death, the execution to take place in Sligo Jail on 2nd of December next.  The prisoner here broke down and exclaimed, “I am innocent.  De Lucia killed his wife, have mercy on me”.

His lordship – “May the lord have mercy on you”.

Prisoner – “My Lord do not hang me.  Oh, my little child; my little child.” The Court was then cleared.

Fermanagh Times November 4th 1915.  OBITUARY.  MR. J. C. C.  MASON, J. P.  Although he had reached the ripe old age of over 79 years the late Mr. J. C. Mason, J. P., Moy, Letterbreen, and appeared to his many friends to be in his usual health up until a few weeks ago.  Time, of course, was beginning to tell its inevitable tale on his physique, but all who knew him expected that he had still a good spell of life before him.  On Wednesday the 27th ult., however, he took suddenly ill, and although medical assistance was immediately procured very shortly afterwards passed away, heart failure being the immediate cause of death.  The deceased gentleman was well known throughout this part of Fermanagh; he was a prominent Nationalist, and took a leading part in the land agitation in bygone years, but was always honest and straightforward in his views, and thus gained a the esteem of both his political enemies and friends.  In 1894 he was appointed to the Commission of the Peace for the County, and for some years served on the Enniskillen Board of Guardians.  It is only a short time ago since we had to chronicle the death of his brother, Mr. F. Mason, who had reached the exalted position of the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Victoria, Australia. Of a kindly, genial disposition Mr. Mason was a very popular neighbour and made many friends among the Protestants in the district, and sincere sympathy has been extended to his son and three daughters in their bereavement.

Impartial Reporter.  November 4th 1915.  THE RIGHT TO CHOOSE A WIFE.  At the quarterly meeting of the Gweedore and Rosses Teachers Association, the following resolution was adopted – ‘that we, the young unmarried teachers of this association, regret to find out that in a certain locality a teacher must subject his choice of a wife to the censorship of his manager.  We fail to see how that manager can claim the power he exercises so drastically, for in this particular line of business every eye must negotiate for itself.’

Fermanagh Herald November 6th. 1915.  MEN OF FERMANAGH. A GREAT VOLUNTARY RALLY. NOW OR NEVER. YOUR FELLOW IRISHMEN AT THE FRONT WANT YOU.  Big recruiting meetings will be held as follows 4th of November Kesh; 5th of November, Fivemiletown; 6th of November Lisnaskea; 8th of November; Irvinestown; 10th of November Enniskillen 11th of November Lisbellaw and on the 12th of November Donegal. Bands of the Fourth Battalion Inniskillings (Fermanagh) will be in attendance. (Ed. Half page advertisement.)

Fermanagh Herald November 6th. 1915.  A COMING RECRUITING MEETING.  It was my intention to ignore Mr. Trimble’s peccadilloes for some time to come, as I had arrived at the conclusion that my readers were well able to understand Mr. Trimble’s frame of mind without my analysing it, and moreover I had intended to refrain from filling this column with the vagaries of Trimbilism, because of the fact that the wisdom preached by the Reporter is heeded by no one and on this account there were more important matters on which I could deliberate.  However I cannot resist writing a few words on a statement made in last week’s East Bridge oracle.  Judging by the writings, speeches, and conversations of Mr. Trimble one would conclude that he, and he alone, was the last word in politics, religion, literature – and recruiting.  In last week’s issue of his paper he has an article – a very malignant article – under the heading of “A Last Effort.”  In the course of this article – a diatribe against a recruiting meeting to be held in Enniskillen – he says THE FORMER RECRUITING COMMITTEE, BADLY MISMANAGED, DID NOTHING; AND IF WE ARE TO JUDGED BY THE LUKEWARMNESS OF, AND THE PAUCITY OF ATTENDANCE AT, AND THE PERSONNEL OF TUESDAY’S MEETING, WE CANNOT EXPECT MUCH.

Now this meeting was convened by Mr. John E Collum, H.M.L., to make arrangements for a big rally and thereby hangs a tale.  The fact that Mr. Collum called the meeting was quite sufficient for Mr. Trimble to write it down.  Had it been convened by Mr. McFarland, of “handy man” fame, we would have been greeted with columns of eulogy, and the meeting would, in Mr. Trimble’s perspective, have been associated with all that was grand, noble, and perfect in patriotism.

EAST BRIDGE STREET NOT THERE.  He says if we are to judge by the personnel of Tuesday’s meeting, we cannot expect much.  What does Mr. Trimble mean by the word personnel?  Does he know the meaning of it?  Here are the gentlemen who attended the meeting: – Mr. John McHugh, J. P., Pettigo, Chairman of the County Council, presided, and those present included: the Right Hon. Edward Archdale; Mr. John Collum, H.M.L.; Major Johnston, Captain W.  Nixon, and Messrs.  James O’Donnell, Brookeborough; Francis Meehan, John Maguire, Newtownbutler; John Nixon, D.L., Belcoo; J.  Porter-Porter, D.L., Belleisle; H. Kirkpatrick, Lisnaskea; J. F. Wray LL.B., Enniskillen; Felix Leonard, Belleek; H. A. Burke, D.L.; E. M. Archdale, D.L.  Everyone will readily admit that the gentlemen who were present were representative of all shades of politics, and practically every district in the county.  But Mr. Trimble was not there.  And fact that the East Bridge Street Division of Enniskillen was not represented lowered considerably the social and political and intellectual status of the gathering.

  1. TRIMBLE’S ADMISSION. Let us pass on from this statement of silly and ignorant egotism. Having made of this charge against the gentlemen named, he says: – FOR OUR OWN PART, IT IS WELL KNOWN THAT WE HAVE BEEN CONCERNED IN BRINGING MANY MORE MEN TO THE ARMY, AND THAT WHATEVER OUR SHORTCOMINGS MAY BE IN OTHER RESPECTS, OUR EFFORT IN THIS DIRECTION HAS NOT BEEN SURPASSED IN THE COUNTY FERMANAGH NOR APPROACHED BY ALL THE COMBINED EFFORTS OF THE RECRUITING COMMITTEE.

What strikes the average reader on perusing this sentence is the discovery that Mr. Trimble, on his own admission, has shortcomings.  He states that he has no shortcomings on the question of recruiting – but he has in other respects.  One of the other respects we will presume, is the maligning of Nationalists and Catholics – and Mr. Trimble has admitted it!  Wonders will never cease!

THE EXPLANATION.  The recruiting meeting which is to be held in Enniskillen shortly has been the cause of weeping and wailing in the Editorial sanctum of the Reporter because of the fact that Mr. Trimble has not been asked to speak.  The names of the speakers are: – Lord Lieutenant, Colonel Wallace, Joseph Devlin, M. P.; J. Collum, H.M.L.; J. F.  Wray, LL.B.; S.  C.  Clarke, solicitor; William Ritchie, George Whaley, E. M., Archdale, D. L., and others.  There are some names on the list that caused Mr. Trimble a pang, and were the cause of all the narrow-minded invective.  “Some men are born great some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them.”  Mr. Trimble had visions of being the very lifeblood of this meeting, as he was born great, and could do great things, while others are having greatness thrust upon them, and according to Mr. Trimble, will be unsuccessful in even securing one recruit.  “We shall see what we shall see.

  1. E. M.

Impartial Reporter.  November 11th 1915. AEGEAN SEA DISASTER.  A BRITISH TRANSPORT SHIP SUNK.  The British transport Ramazan was sunk by an enemy submarine by a shell fire at 6.00 AM on the 19th of September of the island of Antecythera in the Aegean.  There were about 380 Indian troops on board of whom 75 were saved.  28 of the crew were also saved. A number of boats were smashed by shell fire.  The survivors reached Antecythera in their own boats that night and were kindly and hospital treated by the inhabitants.

Impartial Reporter.  November 11th 1915.  LORD KITCHENER HAS GONE ABROAD IN A NEW FUNCTION.  IT WAS FEARED HE HAD RESIGNED.  The public mind was greatly perturbed during the end of last week on learning that Lord Kitchener had left the War Office, and a great fear was that he had resigned his post as Secretary of State for War.  The rumour that had gone abroad was promptly denied. It is now learned that Lord Kitchener paid a visit to the French War Office that he may go further afield to the east.  There is reason to believe that Lord Kitchener mission of war is not entirely of a military nature.  His main task is to explore the whole field of that vast and complex area of warfare in the east and to coordinate the operations of the British armies in the Balkans, in Gallipoli, in Egypt and on the plains of Mesopotamia, while at the same time taking fully into account the important India aspect of that gigantic war situation.  Mr. Asquith is to be his successor.

Impartial Reporter.  November 11th 1915.  THE LAST CALL FOR RECRUITS TO AVOID CONSCRIPTION.  VOLUNTARYISM ON TRIAL WITH SOME SCATHING COMMENTS BY PROMINENT SPEAKERS.  The present recruiting campaign in Fermanagh has not been the success one would wish.  It had borne out the words of Colonel McCloughry, who at Kesh spoke of present recruiting methods as ‘a gigantic and expensive sham’ and Mr. E. M. Archdale, D. L. as the ‘Voluntary Humbug.’  The pipe band and the drums of the 4th Inniskillings (Fermanagh’s) took part in the tour under Captain Nixon.  The first meeting of the tour in County Fermanagh was held at Kesh and the reception meted out to the military and cold indifference of the young men of that locality was a bad augury for the present campaign.  There was a small crowd present to listen to the speeches, mostly old men and women but not above 50 in number.  It was said that there were a number of Protestant old men who evidently felt aggrieved that the Roman Catholics have not responded in Ireland in proportion to their population as well as the Protestant.  One farmer who has seven sons at home, when asked to send some of them to enlist replied ‘Damn the one I will send till the Nationalists ago.  Colonel McCloughry, Ederney said Lord Kitchener wanted 50,000 men from Ireland at once and the proportions from the registration districts of Ederney, Clonelly and Pettigo were 50, 18 and 25 respectively or 93 men between the ages of 19 and 45.  Considering the poor response as a result of previous meeting held he doubted whether they would get these men.  It was only his Majesty’s proclamation which induced him to take part in that meeting which he believed the hopeless.  Recruiting had been boycotted by the farmers and shopkeepers in rural districts and nowhere was this more pronounced than in that locality. (Kesh).  One party said we cannot join and leave those aggressive Orangemen behind to murder our people.  And the other, if we go the Nationalists will pinch our farms and shops.  The true reasons for the want of enthusiasm regarding the war were economic.  The people were enjoying a period of unparalleled prosperity.  Farmers were getting anything from 50 to 80 per cent more for their produce and shopkeepers were having their bills paid.

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  THE RECRUITING RALLY.  MEETINGS IN FERMANAGH AND DONEGAL. KESH.  The Rt.  Hon.  Edward Archdale, P. C., presided at the recruiting meeting held at Kesh on Thursday.  The Chairman, who was well received, said that they had 272,000 men of military age in Ireland, and surely they could send 50,000 in answer to Lord Kitchener’s appeal.  Irish regiments had been doing very well both in France and at the Gallipoli Peninsula but their ranks had been depleted, and they wanted them made up again with Irishmen and Irishmen alone.  Thanks to the splendid work of the British Navy our country had been spared the horrors which were suffered in Serbia, Belgium, France, and Russia and it was in order to beat back the enemy that threatened their liberty that was why they were appealing for recruits that day.

Colonel A.  McCloughry, Ederney, said Lord Kitchener wanted to 50,000 men from Ireland at once and the proportion for the registration districts of Ederney, Clonelly and Pettigo were 50, 18 and 25 respectively for 93 men between the ages of 19 and 45.  Considering the poor response as a result of previous meetings held, he doubted whether they would get those men.  It was only his Majesty’s proclamation which induced him (the speaker), to take part in that meeting, which he believed the hopeless.  Were they are not taking part in a gigantic and expensive sham?  Recruiting had been boycotted by the farmers and shopkeepers in rural districts, and nowhere was this more pronounced than in that locality.  Antipathy, not apathy, expressed their feelings.  When he contrasted the martial ardour of 16 months ago with the frost there that day what could he say?  He could not say it was the want of courage, because that would not be true, nor did he believe in the seriousness of an old farmer who said to him, ”What, fight Germany, the only Protestant country in Europe.  (A voice – nothing of the kind.”  The people were driven to the last ditch and what was the defensive position?  One party said, “We cannot join and leave those aggressive Orangemen behind to murder our people,” and the other, “if we go the Nationalists will pinch our farms and shops.”  He had not much confidence in the apologists, but if they thought that any danger really existed it could be easily obviated by one party, the Unionists, sending 47 and the Nationalists 46 men.  (Hear, hear.)  The true reasons for the want of enthusiasm regarding the war were economic.  The people were enjoying a period of unparalleled prosperity.  Farmers were getting anything from 50 to 80 per cent more for their produce, and shopkeepers were having their bills paid.  However, this was the last chance so far as the voluntary system was concerned, and if they did not get the numbers of men conscription would be put in force.  He concluded by appealing to the farmers and shopkeepers to make the present rally a success.  (Applause.)

Mrs. Barton in a brief address, appealed to the young men to go out and protect the women.  They could not defend themselves, their place was in the home which they would keep, but they wanted the men to out and fight for them.

Lieutenant Kendrick said that he was sorry to see so many young men there that day in mufti when they should be fighting their country’s battles.  He would ask the farmers to get their sons to go, telling them it was their duty to help the boys in the trenches.  Applause.  Private Barton, Australian contingent also spoke. (Ed. A relative of the Bartons of Clonelly.)

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  REV. CHARLES BYRNE, C. P., THE VICAR OF “THE GRAAN”, ENNISKILLEN, IS APPOINTED CHAPLAIN TO THE BRITISH FORCES.  He was born at June Giltown, Co., Kildare, and ordained at Mount St., Josephs, London in 1901.  For eight years he did missionary work in that city, and he was then transferred to Glasgow where he was chaplain to the infirmary for four years.  In 1914 he was appointed vicar of “The Graan” Enniskillen, where he remained until this year, when he with a number of others from the same Order, volunteer their services as chaplains for the army.

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  THE COMING OF CHRISTMAS.  AN ADVANCE WORD TO OUR READERS.  We have begun preparations for our annual double number and invite the cooperation of our readers to make it excel even last year’s, Irish stories, Irish sketches, Irish articles, Irish poems, and Irish legends which admittedly beat all records in a Christmas publication in Ulster.  One Guinea will be awarded to the writer of the best original story in English.  This contribution must be a real living story of Irish Life and must not exceed 1800 words.  Four prizes, one of five shillings and three of half a crown, are offered for the best numerous storyletters written on postcards.  None larger will be considered.

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  PRIESTS IN THE TRENCHES.  It is estimated that there are between 60,000 and 70,000 priests engaged in one capacity or another at the various fronts, says the Weekly Dispatch.  Of these from 10,000 to 20,000 are in France actually fighting in the trenches.  Such scenes must have burnt themselves in the memories of all who witnessed them.  But even these do not make so great an impression as the deeds of personal heroism accomplished by the chaplains.  The death of Fr. Finn, chaplain of the 1st Dublin’s, is a typical example.  It was on the occasion of one of the landings at the Dardanelles, under heavy machine gun fire.  He saw some Tommies fall on the beach and asked for permission to go down to them, getting hit in the shoulder as he ran down the gangway of the liner, the River Clyde.  Bleeding profusely, he managed to crawl to the men, to whom he managed to administer extreme unction.  Hardly had he finished however when a bullet caught him in the head.  Before help could be got he had expired, his last words being, “Are we winning boys?  Are we winning? “ Fr. Lane Fox, of the London Irish is described in another letter as actually taking part in the famous charges at Loos, absolving those who were shot as they fell and arriving in the German trenches along with the battalion.

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  MR. E.  HUGH ARCHDALL, SECRETARY TO THE FERMANAGH COUNTY COUNCIL, Enniskillen, has received the following message of condolence from their Majesties the King and Queen on the death of his brother, Major Nicholas James Mervyn Archdall, 5th Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders, who was killed in action in the recent great British offence in France: -Buckingham Palace, – E.  Hugh Barton, Esq., Drumcoo, Enniskillen, – the King and Queen deeply regret the loss you and the Army have sustained by the death of your brother in the service of this country.  Their Majesties truly sympathise with you in your sorrow.  – Keeper of the Privy Purse.

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  EMIGRATION TO AMERICA.  SCENES AT LIVERPOOL.  Exciting scenes were witnessed in Liverpool on Saturday outside the of the Cunard offices when a party of young Irishman were emigrating to America, says a Press Association telegram.  About 650 of these emigrants arrived in Liverpool from Holyhead early this morning, and proceeded to the Cunard offices for their passes for a ship which sails this afternoon, the men having booked their passages in Ireland.  The queue of emigrants entered the office.  At tremendous crowd assembled and taunted the emigrants with unpatriotism.  The crowd surged around them, calling them “Cowards” and asking them to show some pluck.  The police had to keep the crowd back.

THE ACTION OF THE SAXONIA’S CREW.  The Liverpool correspondent of the Freeman says – a dramatic development occurred shortly before noon on Saturday when the crew of the Curnarder Saxonia, held a meeting amongst themselves, conveyed to their Captain their determination not to sail for in the ship if the fleeing emigrants were permitted to come on board.  This decision was at once communicated to the Cunard directors, who, for once, found themselves in entire agreement with a resolution taken by the crew, and decided not to allow any men of military age to set foot on the steamer.  This step was taken avowedly in the interests of the country.  The information to the emigrants naturally caused much chagrin, and even dismay.  Its effect, however, was softened by the announcement that all those who desire would have their passage money returned.  They thereupon trooped back in a body to the Cunard Offices, and the process of repaying them was proceeded with, after which they disappeared fifth.

A GREAT MISUNDERSTANDING.  One of the Irish men interviewed declared that very few of those whom he knew were eligible: and he added: – but that apart, how many of our families have laid down their lives in this fight against the German militarism?  I had two brothers killed in landings at Gallipoli and the third at Suvla Bay and I can introduce you to scores of us who have given at least one member of the family to Britain since the war started.  That people in Ireland have joined the colours in remarkable numbers, and our record is one all Britain should be proud of.  In addition to that, there is hardly one of us sailing today but would have done so if there had been no war.  As a matter of fact, we would have sailed earlier, only with so many of our folks joining the ranks we had to wait at home and struggle all the harder to save all the money to enable us to get to America, where all our relatives are.  The rash statements that are being made as to the object we have in sailing are due to a great measure understanding.

MANY YOUNG ENGLISH SLACKERS.  The passport department of the Foreign Office is crowded daily, and all sorts of excuses are being offered by the young English slackers anxious to go abroad.  The average number of passports issued before the war was about 30 a day; the applications now are near 500.  Many of the applicants have discovered relatives in the United States or some other part of the world says the London Evening News, and in over 300 instances fit men of military age, have given seemingly satisfactory reasons for being granted passports, have been put back to allow the Government to consider what shall be done in the matter.

Fermanagh Times November 18th 1915.  THE DEATH OF LIEUTENANT COLONEL G. H. C. MADDEN.  Very profound regret was occasioned in Clones and district on Saturday, when it was learned that Lieut. Colonel Gerald H. C.  Madden who had commanded the 1st Battalion Irish Guards had died as the result of the terrible wounds he had received in the fighting near Bethune on the 11th of October.  Readers of this column will remember that the late officer had to have his left leg amputated above the knee in a Calais hospital.  On the 5th inst. he had so far recovered that he was removed to hospital in London where, to the general regret of a host of military and civilian friends, he succumbed.  He was a brother of Lieut. Colonel P.  C.  W.  Madden, D. L., Hilton Park, Clones, who is in command of the 4th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, Victoria Barracks, Belfast.

Fermanagh Times November 18th 1915.  Much sympathy is felt in Newtownbutler and district with Mrs. Hannah Elliott, who has been notified that her husband, Private William James Elliott, 11675, Scottish Rifles was killed in action in Flanders on September 25th.  Around Lisbellaw and neighbourhood this notification has also been learned with widespread regret as deceased was the third son of Mr. Forster Elliott, Lisbellaw, who has two other sons in France.

Fermanagh Times November 18th 1915.  A DOUBLE TRAGEDY IN FERMANAGH AS THE SILLIES RIVER CLAIMS TWO VICTIMS.  The most distressing drowning fatality involving the lives of Mrs. Sarah Flannigan, aged 70 years, a widow, of Corr, and Miss Lucy Anna Elliott, her niece, aged 18 years of Rossculton, occurred on Thursday evening some miles from Enniskillen at the Sillies River. How the accident actually occurred is enveloped in impenetrable mystery.  It has been gathered that Mrs. Flanagan went to visit her brother, Robert Elliott who lived ½ mile distant.  She crossed the river as a shortcut at a point where it is 20 yards wide, a man named William Henry Eaton rowing her across.  When she returned about four o’clock in the evening, Miss Elliott went with her to row her back across the river, and, as she did not return after some time her friends went in search of her.  No sign of either was found or a boat could be seen.  The matter was reported to the police at Carngreen Barracks that night but as the river was in a flooded condition and darkness had then set in they could make no effort to search for the bodies then but later in the following day both bodies were recovered.

The funeral of Mrs. Flanagan, which took place on Sunday to Monea was very largely attended, there being no fewer than 57 cars besides those on foot.  The Rev. W. B. Steel officiated at the graveside.

The remains of Miss Eliot were laid to rest in Monea Churchyard on Monday, and the funeral was of very large proportions.  The customary Pilgrims Service, with hymns, was conducted at the graveside and was taken part in by Messrs.  B.  Donaldson, Derrygonnelly; John West, Crocknacrieve; James Bothwell, Monea; John Dane, Tuberton, and a number of other Pilgrims from the surrounding districts.

Impartial Reporter.  November 18th 1915.  On Saturday Lieutenant Colonel Gerald H.  C.  Madden, late officer commanding the 1st Batt., Irish guards who had been severely wounded in the fighting near Bethune on the 11th of October died after he had his leg amputated above the knee in the base hospital at Calais.  He had so far recovered that on Friday the fifth he was removed to Princess Henry of Battenberg’s Hospital, Hill Street, London where it was thought his chances would be better.  He was terribly upset by the journey across but rallied after a time.  However his constitution was unable to bear the strain of so many shocks and he unfortunately succumbed as stated.

The deceased was a brother of Lt. Colonel J. C. W.  Madden, D. L., Hilton Park, Clones now commanding the 4th Batt. Royal Irish Fusiliers at Victoria Barracks, Belfast, and brother in law of Major the Marquis of Ailesbury, D.S.O.  He has been warmly congratulated on the splendid conduct of his battalion by Major General the Earl of Cavan, C. B., doubt, M.V.O., commanding the Guards Division who expressed ‘his deepest and truest gratitude for your splendid services.’

The remains of the late Lieut-Colonel G.H.C. Madden arrived at Clones from London on Monday and were met at the station by a guard of honour of the R.I.C. under District Inspector M. J. Egan, Clones, and a large attendance of the townspeople of all classes.  Some magnificent wreathes accompanied the coffin.  All the shops were closed and the blinds drawn as a mark of respect.  The remains were taken to Hilton Park, Clones, from which the funeral took place on Wednesday at 12.00 with full military honours.  The internment took place in the family vault at Currin Parish Church, Scotshouse, Clones.

Fermanagh Herald November 20th. 1915.  ACCIDENT NEAR PETTIGO.  CASE DISMISSED AT QUARTER SESSIONS.  James Spence, Clonelly, sued Miss Emily Athill for damages in respect of a cow, the property of the plaintiff, which, it was alleged, had been killed by a pony and trap driven and owned by Miss Athill.  Mr. Spence gave evidence to the effect that some 8 cows belonging to him were being driven out of a field when a pony and trap driven by Miss Athill, who was coming from the direction of Pettigo, drove among the cattle and so injured one of the animals than a died some time later.  The shafts of the trap ran against the ribs of the cow, the injuries resulting in mortification.  The cow was worth £20 or more.  Cross examined he said that the incident took place on the 14th of June and the cow died on the 23rd of October. Miss Athill in evidence said that the point of the shaft struck one of the animals and having passed by the herd she looked back and saw the animals were moving along as if nothing had happened, and at the time witness was not aware that she had done any injury as the drovers did not call after the car.  It was an Iceland pony she was driving.

Fermanagh Herald November 20th. 1915.  AT LISBELLAW ON LAST THURSDAY, BEING THE OCCASION OF THE HIRING FAIR a recruiting meeting was held.  Lieutenant Kennedy having given figures as to the number and percentage of recruits required said that the percentage required from Ireland under the latest scheme was 1,100 men a week.  Considering the number of eligible young men who were still in the country, he was sure that would be easily forthcoming.  Some people said that Ireland had done her share: but the speaker declared that Ireland taken as a whole, had not done well enough.  The Lord Lieutenant had said that the number of men engaged on work not connected with the war was 260,000.  Of that number a large number of young men were of the shop-keeping class – the young men who stood behind counters measuring half-yards of cloth and giving out pints of porter.  (Cries of they are cowards.)  It was a shame that they should be allowed to walk about at such a time. (Cowards.)

Fermanagh Herald November 20th. 1915.  FERMANAGH BOATING TRAGEDY.  TWO WOMEN DROWNED.  Quite a sensation was occasioned in Enniskillen on last Saturday when it became known that on the previous night about 9.15 o’clock, Mrs. Sarah Flanagan, residing in Carnagreen, and aged 70, and her niece, Miss Lucy Anne Elliott, aged 18 years, living at Rosscultan both lost their lives in the Sillies River.  From the enquiries made it would appear that the elder lady desired to pay a visit to her brother, Mr. Robert Elliott, who lived not far from her own residence.  In order to reach her brother’s house, it was necessary she should cross the Sillies River on the outward journey.  She was rowed across the river at the point where it is some 20 yards wide, by Mr. William H.  Eton.  When returning, Miss Elliott went with the old lady to row her across the river.  They departed, and when the young lady did not return, a search party was organized but no trace of either woman or of the boat could be seen.  The spot where it is presumed the boat crossed is nine feet deep, and consequently in the recent heavy rains was very much swollen.

Fermanagh Herald November 20th. 1915.  The death of Lieutenant-Colonel Madden.  News was received on Saturday afternoon in Clones of the death of Lieutenant-Colonel Gerald H. C. Madden, 1st battalion Irish Guards who was severely wounded in the fighting near Bethune, on the 11th of October, and afterwards had his left leg amputated in the Base Hospital, at Calais.  He had recovered to such an extent that on Friday the 5th inst., he was removed to the Princess Henry of Battenberg’s Hospital, Hill Street, London, and although terribly upset by the journey, he rallied somewhat, and there was reason to hope he would soon get strong.  However his constitution was not equal to the strain.

There deceased was a brother of Lieutenant-Colonel John Madden, D.  L., Hilton Park, Clones, Co., Monaghan, now commanding the 4th battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers at Victoria Barracks, Belfast, and a brother-in-law of Major the Marquis of Ailesbury, D.S.O.  Major-General the Earl of Cavan C.B., M.V.O., in a letter to Colonel Madden, after he had been wounded, congratulated him on the splendid conduct of the battalion he commanded and expressed his deepest and truest gratitude for this officer’s splendid services.

Fermanagh Herald November 20th. 1915.  MR. REDMOND LEAVES FOR THE FRONT.  London, Wednesday morning, Mr. John Redmond has left on his visit to the Irish troops at the front.  He is accompanied by his private Secretary, Mr. T. J.  Hanna.

Fermanagh Herald November 27th. 1915.  AT DUNGANNON PETTY SESSIONS A FERMANAGH CLERGYMAN IS FINED FOR MOTORING WITHOUT A LICENCE.  The Rev. James Wilson, Tempo, Co., Fermanagh, was charged with reckless driving of a motor car on the public streets in Dungannon; secondly driving at a dangerous speed; thirdly with driving a motor car not having a licence to do so, and fourthly with driving a motor car and not using proper precautions by blowing the horn so as to safeguard the public.  He had also knocked down a young lad named Patrick Hughes, Ann Street.

Fermanagh Herald November 27th. 1915.  FERMANAGH RECRUITING INCIDENT.  A mild sensation was occasioned in the village of Ederney on last Thursday night.  The recruiting party at present touring Fermanagh, and having their headquarters at Enniskillen, decided to hold a recruiting concert in Ederney.  Accompanied by a band, the officers left Enniskillen.  On arrival at the village the band paraded the street for a short time and later repaired to a hall owned by a gentleman named Mr. Irvine, where it was understood the concert was to be held.  A large crowd were waiting for admission, but on the officers applying for admission, they were informed by the porter, who was in possession of the key, that Mr. Irvine had given instructions that no concert was to be held in his hall, because of the fact that the military authorities had not applied to him for permission to use the hall.  The performers and officers had therefore no other alternative but to abandon the concert.  Hearing this discussion some members of the local branch of the Ancient Order of Hibernians placed their commodious hall at the disposal of the military and a very successful concert and recruiting meeting was held.  Most of the officers of the recruiting party are Nationalists, and the owner of the hall is a prominent Unionist.  There is much comment on his refusal to grant of the use of the hall.