Fermanagh Times November 4th 1915.  MONSTER PIKE CAUGHT IN LOUGH ERNE.  The information reaches us from Kesh of the capture within the past few days of a pike which weighed 39 lbs in Lower Lough Erne off the mouth of the Kesh River. What makes the catch more interesting is the fact that it was secured by the ordinary method of fishing with rod and line from a boat, the lucky angler being Mr. P Keown of Portinode, Kesh.  It appears that but for the skilful handling of the boat by Mr. C. J. Keown, who is an expert oarsman and enthusiastic angler, it would have been impossible to land such a large fish. A according to the oldest fisherman in the locality it is by far the biggest pike ever taken from the Erne.

Fermanagh Times November 4th 1915.  SLIGO MURDER TRIAL.  GIRL SENTENCED TO DEATH.  Mr. Justice Dodds and a city common jury in the Four Courts concluded yesterday the trial of Jane Reynolds for the willful murder in Sligo on the 8th of December last of an Italian woman, Rose de Lucia,  the wife of an ice cream vendor, Angelo, who is awaiting trial on the same charge.  The motive which the Crown alleged was that Angelo de Lucia and Jane Reynolds were in love and conspired to do away with Mrs. de Lucia.  The jury, after half an hour, returned to Court, and in replied to a question by the foreman His Lordship said the girl would be guilty of murder if the jury found that she was present during the murder, and consented to death though she took no part in the actual murder. The jury again retired and after an absence of another half an hour, returned to Court with a verdict of guilty and a strong recommendation to mercy.  His Lordship, who was deeply moved, passed sentence of death, the execution to take place in Sligo Jail on 2nd of December next.  The prisoner here broke down and exclaimed, “I am innocent.  De Lucia killed his wife, have mercy on me”.

His lordship – “May the lord have mercy on you”.

Prisoner – “My Lord do not hang me.  Oh, my little child; my little child.” The Court was then cleared.

Fermanagh Times November 4th 1915.  OBITUARY.  MR. J. C. C.  MASON, J. P.  Although he had reached the ripe old age of over 79 years the late Mr. J. C. Mason, J. P., Moy, Letterbreen, and appeared to his many friends to be in his usual health up until a few weeks ago.  Time, of course, was beginning to tell its inevitable tale on his physique, but all who knew him expected that he had still a good spell of life before him.  On Wednesday the 27th ult., however, he took suddenly ill, and although medical assistance was immediately procured very shortly afterwards passed away, heart failure being the immediate cause of death.  The deceased gentleman was well known throughout this part of Fermanagh; he was a prominent Nationalist, and took a leading part in the land agitation in bygone years, but was always honest and straightforward in his views, and thus gained a the esteem of both his political enemies and friends.  In 1894 he was appointed to the Commission of the Peace for the County, and for some years served on the Enniskillen Board of Guardians.  It is only a short time ago since we had to chronicle the death of his brother, Mr. F. Mason, who had reached the exalted position of the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Victoria, Australia. Of a kindly, genial disposition Mr. Mason was a very popular neighbour and made many friends among the Protestants in the district, and sincere sympathy has been extended to his son and three daughters in their bereavement.

Impartial Reporter.  November 4th 1915.  THE RIGHT TO CHOOSE A WIFE.  At the quarterly meeting of the Gweedore and Rosses Teachers Association, the following resolution was adopted – ‘that we, the young unmarried teachers of this association, regret to find out that in a certain locality a teacher must subject his choice of a wife to the censorship of his manager.  We fail to see how that manager can claim the power he exercises so drastically, for in this particular line of business every eye must negotiate for itself.’

Fermanagh Herald November 6th. 1915.  MEN OF FERMANAGH. A GREAT VOLUNTARY RALLY. NOW OR NEVER. YOUR FELLOW IRISHMEN AT THE FRONT WANT YOU.  Big recruiting meetings will be held as follows 4th of November Kesh; 5th of November, Fivemiletown; 6th of November Lisnaskea; 8th of November; Irvinestown; 10th of November Enniskillen 11th of November Lisbellaw and on the 12th of November Donegal. Bands of the Fourth Battalion Inniskillings (Fermanagh) will be in attendance. (Ed. Half page advertisement.)

Fermanagh Herald November 6th. 1915.  A COMING RECRUITING MEETING.  It was my intention to ignore Mr. Trimble’s peccadilloes for some time to come, as I had arrived at the conclusion that my readers were well able to understand Mr. Trimble’s frame of mind without my analysing it, and moreover I had intended to refrain from filling this column with the vagaries of Trimbilism, because of the fact that the wisdom preached by the Reporter is heeded by no one and on this account there were more important matters on which I could deliberate.  However I cannot resist writing a few words on a statement made in last week’s East Bridge oracle.  Judging by the writings, speeches, and conversations of Mr. Trimble one would conclude that he, and he alone, was the last word in politics, religion, literature – and recruiting.  In last week’s issue of his paper he has an article – a very malignant article – under the heading of “A Last Effort.”  In the course of this article – a diatribe against a recruiting meeting to be held in Enniskillen – he says THE FORMER RECRUITING COMMITTEE, BADLY MISMANAGED, DID NOTHING; AND IF WE ARE TO JUDGED BY THE LUKEWARMNESS OF, AND THE PAUCITY OF ATTENDANCE AT, AND THE PERSONNEL OF TUESDAY’S MEETING, WE CANNOT EXPECT MUCH.

Now this meeting was convened by Mr. John E Collum, H.M.L., to make arrangements for a big rally and thereby hangs a tale.  The fact that Mr. Collum called the meeting was quite sufficient for Mr. Trimble to write it down.  Had it been convened by Mr. McFarland, of “handy man” fame, we would have been greeted with columns of eulogy, and the meeting would, in Mr. Trimble’s perspective, have been associated with all that was grand, noble, and perfect in patriotism.

EAST BRIDGE STREET NOT THERE.  He says if we are to judge by the personnel of Tuesday’s meeting, we cannot expect much.  What does Mr. Trimble mean by the word personnel?  Does he know the meaning of it?  Here are the gentlemen who attended the meeting: – Mr. John McHugh, J. P., Pettigo, Chairman of the County Council, presided, and those present included: the Right Hon. Edward Archdale; Mr. John Collum, H.M.L.; Major Johnston, Captain W.  Nixon, and Messrs.  James O’Donnell, Brookeborough; Francis Meehan, John Maguire, Newtownbutler; John Nixon, D.L., Belcoo; J.  Porter-Porter, D.L., Belleisle; H. Kirkpatrick, Lisnaskea; J. F. Wray LL.B., Enniskillen; Felix Leonard, Belleek; H. A. Burke, D.L.; E. M. Archdale, D.L.  Everyone will readily admit that the gentlemen who were present were representative of all shades of politics, and practically every district in the county.  But Mr. Trimble was not there.  And fact that the East Bridge Street Division of Enniskillen was not represented lowered considerably the social and political and intellectual status of the gathering.

  1. TRIMBLE’S ADMISSION. Let us pass on from this statement of silly and ignorant egotism. Having made of this charge against the gentlemen named, he says: – FOR OUR OWN PART, IT IS WELL KNOWN THAT WE HAVE BEEN CONCERNED IN BRINGING MANY MORE MEN TO THE ARMY, AND THAT WHATEVER OUR SHORTCOMINGS MAY BE IN OTHER RESPECTS, OUR EFFORT IN THIS DIRECTION HAS NOT BEEN SURPASSED IN THE COUNTY FERMANAGH NOR APPROACHED BY ALL THE COMBINED EFFORTS OF THE RECRUITING COMMITTEE.

What strikes the average reader on perusing this sentence is the discovery that Mr. Trimble, on his own admission, has shortcomings.  He states that he has no shortcomings on the question of recruiting – but he has in other respects.  One of the other respects we will presume, is the maligning of Nationalists and Catholics – and Mr. Trimble has admitted it!  Wonders will never cease!

THE EXPLANATION.  The recruiting meeting which is to be held in Enniskillen shortly has been the cause of weeping and wailing in the Editorial sanctum of the Reporter because of the fact that Mr. Trimble has not been asked to speak.  The names of the speakers are: – Lord Lieutenant, Colonel Wallace, Joseph Devlin, M. P.; J. Collum, H.M.L.; J. F.  Wray, LL.B.; S.  C.  Clarke, solicitor; William Ritchie, George Whaley, E. M., Archdale, D. L., and others.  There are some names on the list that caused Mr. Trimble a pang, and were the cause of all the narrow-minded invective.  “Some men are born great some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them.”  Mr. Trimble had visions of being the very lifeblood of this meeting, as he was born great, and could do great things, while others are having greatness thrust upon them, and according to Mr. Trimble, will be unsuccessful in even securing one recruit.  “We shall see what we shall see.

  1. E. M.

Impartial Reporter.  November 11th 1915. AEGEAN SEA DISASTER.  A BRITISH TRANSPORT SHIP SUNK.  The British transport Ramazan was sunk by an enemy submarine by a shell fire at 6.00 AM on the 19th of September of the island of Antecythera in the Aegean.  There were about 380 Indian troops on board of whom 75 were saved.  28 of the crew were also saved. A number of boats were smashed by shell fire.  The survivors reached Antecythera in their own boats that night and were kindly and hospital treated by the inhabitants.

Impartial Reporter.  November 11th 1915.  LORD KITCHENER HAS GONE ABROAD IN A NEW FUNCTION.  IT WAS FEARED HE HAD RESIGNED.  The public mind was greatly perturbed during the end of last week on learning that Lord Kitchener had left the War Office, and a great fear was that he had resigned his post as Secretary of State for War.  The rumour that had gone abroad was promptly denied. It is now learned that Lord Kitchener paid a visit to the French War Office that he may go further afield to the east.  There is reason to believe that Lord Kitchener mission of war is not entirely of a military nature.  His main task is to explore the whole field of that vast and complex area of warfare in the east and to coordinate the operations of the British armies in the Balkans, in Gallipoli, in Egypt and on the plains of Mesopotamia, while at the same time taking fully into account the important India aspect of that gigantic war situation.  Mr. Asquith is to be his successor.

Impartial Reporter.  November 11th 1915.  THE LAST CALL FOR RECRUITS TO AVOID CONSCRIPTION.  VOLUNTARYISM ON TRIAL WITH SOME SCATHING COMMENTS BY PROMINENT SPEAKERS.  The present recruiting campaign in Fermanagh has not been the success one would wish.  It had borne out the words of Colonel McCloughry, who at Kesh spoke of present recruiting methods as ‘a gigantic and expensive sham’ and Mr. E. M. Archdale, D. L. as the ‘Voluntary Humbug.’  The pipe band and the drums of the 4th Inniskillings (Fermanagh’s) took part in the tour under Captain Nixon.  The first meeting of the tour in County Fermanagh was held at Kesh and the reception meted out to the military and cold indifference of the young men of that locality was a bad augury for the present campaign.  There was a small crowd present to listen to the speeches, mostly old men and women but not above 50 in number.  It was said that there were a number of Protestant old men who evidently felt aggrieved that the Roman Catholics have not responded in Ireland in proportion to their population as well as the Protestant.  One farmer who has seven sons at home, when asked to send some of them to enlist replied ‘Damn the one I will send till the Nationalists ago.  Colonel McCloughry, Ederney said Lord Kitchener wanted 50,000 men from Ireland at once and the proportions from the registration districts of Ederney, Clonelly and Pettigo were 50, 18 and 25 respectively or 93 men between the ages of 19 and 45.  Considering the poor response as a result of previous meeting held he doubted whether they would get these men.  It was only his Majesty’s proclamation which induced him to take part in that meeting which he believed the hopeless.  Recruiting had been boycotted by the farmers and shopkeepers in rural districts and nowhere was this more pronounced than in that locality. (Kesh).  One party said we cannot join and leave those aggressive Orangemen behind to murder our people.  And the other, if we go the Nationalists will pinch our farms and shops.  The true reasons for the want of enthusiasm regarding the war were economic.  The people were enjoying a period of unparalleled prosperity.  Farmers were getting anything from 50 to 80 per cent more for their produce and shopkeepers were having their bills paid.

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  THE RECRUITING RALLY.  MEETINGS IN FERMANAGH AND DONEGAL. KESH.  The Rt.  Hon.  Edward Archdale, P. C., presided at the recruiting meeting held at Kesh on Thursday.  The Chairman, who was well received, said that they had 272,000 men of military age in Ireland, and surely they could send 50,000 in answer to Lord Kitchener’s appeal.  Irish regiments had been doing very well both in France and at the Gallipoli Peninsula but their ranks had been depleted, and they wanted them made up again with Irishmen and Irishmen alone.  Thanks to the splendid work of the British Navy our country had been spared the horrors which were suffered in Serbia, Belgium, France, and Russia and it was in order to beat back the enemy that threatened their liberty that was why they were appealing for recruits that day.

Colonel A.  McCloughry, Ederney, said Lord Kitchener wanted to 50,000 men from Ireland at once and the proportion for the registration districts of Ederney, Clonelly and Pettigo were 50, 18 and 25 respectively for 93 men between the ages of 19 and 45.  Considering the poor response as a result of previous meetings held, he doubted whether they would get those men.  It was only his Majesty’s proclamation which induced him (the speaker), to take part in that meeting, which he believed the hopeless.  Were they are not taking part in a gigantic and expensive sham?  Recruiting had been boycotted by the farmers and shopkeepers in rural districts, and nowhere was this more pronounced than in that locality.  Antipathy, not apathy, expressed their feelings.  When he contrasted the martial ardour of 16 months ago with the frost there that day what could he say?  He could not say it was the want of courage, because that would not be true, nor did he believe in the seriousness of an old farmer who said to him, ”What, fight Germany, the only Protestant country in Europe.  (A voice – nothing of the kind.”  The people were driven to the last ditch and what was the defensive position?  One party said, “We cannot join and leave those aggressive Orangemen behind to murder our people,” and the other, “if we go the Nationalists will pinch our farms and shops.”  He had not much confidence in the apologists, but if they thought that any danger really existed it could be easily obviated by one party, the Unionists, sending 47 and the Nationalists 46 men.  (Hear, hear.)  The true reasons for the want of enthusiasm regarding the war were economic.  The people were enjoying a period of unparalleled prosperity.  Farmers were getting anything from 50 to 80 per cent more for their produce, and shopkeepers were having their bills paid.  However, this was the last chance so far as the voluntary system was concerned, and if they did not get the numbers of men conscription would be put in force.  He concluded by appealing to the farmers and shopkeepers to make the present rally a success.  (Applause.)

Mrs. Barton in a brief address, appealed to the young men to go out and protect the women.  They could not defend themselves, their place was in the home which they would keep, but they wanted the men to out and fight for them.

Lieutenant Kendrick said that he was sorry to see so many young men there that day in mufti when they should be fighting their country’s battles.  He would ask the farmers to get their sons to go, telling them it was their duty to help the boys in the trenches.  Applause.  Private Barton, Australian contingent also spoke. (Ed. A relative of the Bartons of Clonelly.)

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  REV. CHARLES BYRNE, C. P., THE VICAR OF “THE GRAAN”, ENNISKILLEN, IS APPOINTED CHAPLAIN TO THE BRITISH FORCES.  He was born at June Giltown, Co., Kildare, and ordained at Mount St., Josephs, London in 1901.  For eight years he did missionary work in that city, and he was then transferred to Glasgow where he was chaplain to the infirmary for four years.  In 1914 he was appointed vicar of “The Graan” Enniskillen, where he remained until this year, when he with a number of others from the same Order, volunteer their services as chaplains for the army.

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  THE COMING OF CHRISTMAS.  AN ADVANCE WORD TO OUR READERS.  We have begun preparations for our annual double number and invite the cooperation of our readers to make it excel even last year’s, Irish stories, Irish sketches, Irish articles, Irish poems, and Irish legends which admittedly beat all records in a Christmas publication in Ulster.  One Guinea will be awarded to the writer of the best original story in English.  This contribution must be a real living story of Irish Life and must not exceed 1800 words.  Four prizes, one of five shillings and three of half a crown, are offered for the best numerous storyletters written on postcards.  None larger will be considered.

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  PRIESTS IN THE TRENCHES.  It is estimated that there are between 60,000 and 70,000 priests engaged in one capacity or another at the various fronts, says the Weekly Dispatch.  Of these from 10,000 to 20,000 are in France actually fighting in the trenches.  Such scenes must have burnt themselves in the memories of all who witnessed them.  But even these do not make so great an impression as the deeds of personal heroism accomplished by the chaplains.  The death of Fr. Finn, chaplain of the 1st Dublin’s, is a typical example.  It was on the occasion of one of the landings at the Dardanelles, under heavy machine gun fire.  He saw some Tommies fall on the beach and asked for permission to go down to them, getting hit in the shoulder as he ran down the gangway of the liner, the River Clyde.  Bleeding profusely, he managed to crawl to the men, to whom he managed to administer extreme unction.  Hardly had he finished however when a bullet caught him in the head.  Before help could be got he had expired, his last words being, “Are we winning boys?  Are we winning? “ Fr. Lane Fox, of the London Irish is described in another letter as actually taking part in the famous charges at Loos, absolving those who were shot as they fell and arriving in the German trenches along with the battalion.

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  MR. E.  HUGH ARCHDALL, SECRETARY TO THE FERMANAGH COUNTY COUNCIL, Enniskillen, has received the following message of condolence from their Majesties the King and Queen on the death of his brother, Major Nicholas James Mervyn Archdall, 5th Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders, who was killed in action in the recent great British offence in France: -Buckingham Palace, – E.  Hugh Barton, Esq., Drumcoo, Enniskillen, – the King and Queen deeply regret the loss you and the Army have sustained by the death of your brother in the service of this country.  Their Majesties truly sympathise with you in your sorrow.  – Keeper of the Privy Purse.

Fermanagh Herald November 13th. 1915.  EMIGRATION TO AMERICA.  SCENES AT LIVERPOOL.  Exciting scenes were witnessed in Liverpool on Saturday outside the of the Cunard offices when a party of young Irishman were emigrating to America, says a Press Association telegram.  About 650 of these emigrants arrived in Liverpool from Holyhead early this morning, and proceeded to the Cunard offices for their passes for a ship which sails this afternoon, the men having booked their passages in Ireland.  The queue of emigrants entered the office.  At tremendous crowd assembled and taunted the emigrants with unpatriotism.  The crowd surged around them, calling them “Cowards” and asking them to show some pluck.  The police had to keep the crowd back.

THE ACTION OF THE SAXONIA’S CREW.  The Liverpool correspondent of the Freeman says – a dramatic development occurred shortly before noon on Saturday when the crew of the Curnarder Saxonia, held a meeting amongst themselves, conveyed to their Captain their determination not to sail for in the ship if the fleeing emigrants were permitted to come on board.  This decision was at once communicated to the Cunard directors, who, for once, found themselves in entire agreement with a resolution taken by the crew, and decided not to allow any men of military age to set foot on the steamer.  This step was taken avowedly in the interests of the country.  The information to the emigrants naturally caused much chagrin, and even dismay.  Its effect, however, was softened by the announcement that all those who desire would have their passage money returned.  They thereupon trooped back in a body to the Cunard Offices, and the process of repaying them was proceeded with, after which they disappeared fifth.

A GREAT MISUNDERSTANDING.  One of the Irish men interviewed declared that very few of those whom he knew were eligible: and he added: – but that apart, how many of our families have laid down their lives in this fight against the German militarism?  I had two brothers killed in landings at Gallipoli and the third at Suvla Bay and I can introduce you to scores of us who have given at least one member of the family to Britain since the war started.  That people in Ireland have joined the colours in remarkable numbers, and our record is one all Britain should be proud of.  In addition to that, there is hardly one of us sailing today but would have done so if there had been no war.  As a matter of fact, we would have sailed earlier, only with so many of our folks joining the ranks we had to wait at home and struggle all the harder to save all the money to enable us to get to America, where all our relatives are.  The rash statements that are being made as to the object we have in sailing are due to a great measure understanding.

MANY YOUNG ENGLISH SLACKERS.  The passport department of the Foreign Office is crowded daily, and all sorts of excuses are being offered by the young English slackers anxious to go abroad.  The average number of passports issued before the war was about 30 a day; the applications now are near 500.  Many of the applicants have discovered relatives in the United States or some other part of the world says the London Evening News, and in over 300 instances fit men of military age, have given seemingly satisfactory reasons for being granted passports, have been put back to allow the Government to consider what shall be done in the matter.

Fermanagh Times November 18th 1915.  THE DEATH OF LIEUTENANT COLONEL G. H. C. MADDEN.  Very profound regret was occasioned in Clones and district on Saturday, when it was learned that Lieut. Colonel Gerald H. C.  Madden who had commanded the 1st Battalion Irish Guards had died as the result of the terrible wounds he had received in the fighting near Bethune on the 11th of October.  Readers of this column will remember that the late officer had to have his left leg amputated above the knee in a Calais hospital.  On the 5th inst. he had so far recovered that he was removed to hospital in London where, to the general regret of a host of military and civilian friends, he succumbed.  He was a brother of Lieut. Colonel P.  C.  W.  Madden, D. L., Hilton Park, Clones, who is in command of the 4th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, Victoria Barracks, Belfast.

Fermanagh Times November 18th 1915.  Much sympathy is felt in Newtownbutler and district with Mrs. Hannah Elliott, who has been notified that her husband, Private William James Elliott, 11675, Scottish Rifles was killed in action in Flanders on September 25th.  Around Lisbellaw and neighbourhood this notification has also been learned with widespread regret as deceased was the third son of Mr. Forster Elliott, Lisbellaw, who has two other sons in France.

Fermanagh Times November 18th 1915.  A DOUBLE TRAGEDY IN FERMANAGH AS THE SILLIES RIVER CLAIMS TWO VICTIMS.  The most distressing drowning fatality involving the lives of Mrs. Sarah Flannigan, aged 70 years, a widow, of Corr, and Miss Lucy Anna Elliott, her niece, aged 18 years of Rossculton, occurred on Thursday evening some miles from Enniskillen at the Sillies River. How the accident actually occurred is enveloped in impenetrable mystery.  It has been gathered that Mrs. Flanagan went to visit her brother, Robert Elliott who lived ½ mile distant.  She crossed the river as a shortcut at a point where it is 20 yards wide, a man named William Henry Eaton rowing her across.  When she returned about four o’clock in the evening, Miss Elliott went with her to row her back across the river, and, as she did not return after some time her friends went in search of her.  No sign of either was found or a boat could be seen.  The matter was reported to the police at Carngreen Barracks that night but as the river was in a flooded condition and darkness had then set in they could make no effort to search for the bodies then but later in the following day both bodies were recovered.

The funeral of Mrs. Flanagan, which took place on Sunday to Monea was very largely attended, there being no fewer than 57 cars besides those on foot.  The Rev. W. B. Steel officiated at the graveside.

The remains of Miss Eliot were laid to rest in Monea Churchyard on Monday, and the funeral was of very large proportions.  The customary Pilgrims Service, with hymns, was conducted at the graveside and was taken part in by Messrs.  B.  Donaldson, Derrygonnelly; John West, Crocknacrieve; James Bothwell, Monea; John Dane, Tuberton, and a number of other Pilgrims from the surrounding districts.

Impartial Reporter.  November 18th 1915.  On Saturday Lieutenant Colonel Gerald H.  C.  Madden, late officer commanding the 1st Batt., Irish guards who had been severely wounded in the fighting near Bethune on the 11th of October died after he had his leg amputated above the knee in the base hospital at Calais.  He had so far recovered that on Friday the fifth he was removed to Princess Henry of Battenberg’s Hospital, Hill Street, London where it was thought his chances would be better.  He was terribly upset by the journey across but rallied after a time.  However his constitution was unable to bear the strain of so many shocks and he unfortunately succumbed as stated.

The deceased was a brother of Lt. Colonel J. C. W.  Madden, D. L., Hilton Park, Clones now commanding the 4th Batt. Royal Irish Fusiliers at Victoria Barracks, Belfast, and brother in law of Major the Marquis of Ailesbury, D.S.O.  He has been warmly congratulated on the splendid conduct of his battalion by Major General the Earl of Cavan, C. B., doubt, M.V.O., commanding the Guards Division who expressed ‘his deepest and truest gratitude for your splendid services.’

The remains of the late Lieut-Colonel G.H.C. Madden arrived at Clones from London on Monday and were met at the station by a guard of honour of the R.I.C. under District Inspector M. J. Egan, Clones, and a large attendance of the townspeople of all classes.  Some magnificent wreathes accompanied the coffin.  All the shops were closed and the blinds drawn as a mark of respect.  The remains were taken to Hilton Park, Clones, from which the funeral took place on Wednesday at 12.00 with full military honours.  The internment took place in the family vault at Currin Parish Church, Scotshouse, Clones.

Fermanagh Herald November 20th. 1915.  ACCIDENT NEAR PETTIGO.  CASE DISMISSED AT QUARTER SESSIONS.  James Spence, Clonelly, sued Miss Emily Athill for damages in respect of a cow, the property of the plaintiff, which, it was alleged, had been killed by a pony and trap driven and owned by Miss Athill.  Mr. Spence gave evidence to the effect that some 8 cows belonging to him were being driven out of a field when a pony and trap driven by Miss Athill, who was coming from the direction of Pettigo, drove among the cattle and so injured one of the animals than a died some time later.  The shafts of the trap ran against the ribs of the cow, the injuries resulting in mortification.  The cow was worth £20 or more.  Cross examined he said that the incident took place on the 14th of June and the cow died on the 23rd of October. Miss Athill in evidence said that the point of the shaft struck one of the animals and having passed by the herd she looked back and saw the animals were moving along as if nothing had happened, and at the time witness was not aware that she had done any injury as the drovers did not call after the car.  It was an Iceland pony she was driving.

Fermanagh Herald November 20th. 1915.  AT LISBELLAW ON LAST THURSDAY, BEING THE OCCASION OF THE HIRING FAIR a recruiting meeting was held.  Lieutenant Kennedy having given figures as to the number and percentage of recruits required said that the percentage required from Ireland under the latest scheme was 1,100 men a week.  Considering the number of eligible young men who were still in the country, he was sure that would be easily forthcoming.  Some people said that Ireland had done her share: but the speaker declared that Ireland taken as a whole, had not done well enough.  The Lord Lieutenant had said that the number of men engaged on work not connected with the war was 260,000.  Of that number a large number of young men were of the shop-keeping class – the young men who stood behind counters measuring half-yards of cloth and giving out pints of porter.  (Cries of they are cowards.)  It was a shame that they should be allowed to walk about at such a time. (Cowards.)

Fermanagh Herald November 20th. 1915.  FERMANAGH BOATING TRAGEDY.  TWO WOMEN DROWNED.  Quite a sensation was occasioned in Enniskillen on last Saturday when it became known that on the previous night about 9.15 o’clock, Mrs. Sarah Flanagan, residing in Carnagreen, and aged 70, and her niece, Miss Lucy Anne Elliott, aged 18 years, living at Rosscultan both lost their lives in the Sillies River.  From the enquiries made it would appear that the elder lady desired to pay a visit to her brother, Mr. Robert Elliott, who lived not far from her own residence.  In order to reach her brother’s house, it was necessary she should cross the Sillies River on the outward journey.  She was rowed across the river at the point where it is some 20 yards wide, by Mr. William H.  Eton.  When returning, Miss Elliott went with the old lady to row her across the river.  They departed, and when the young lady did not return, a search party was organized but no trace of either woman or of the boat could be seen.  The spot where it is presumed the boat crossed is nine feet deep, and consequently in the recent heavy rains was very much swollen.

Fermanagh Herald November 20th. 1915.  The death of Lieutenant-Colonel Madden.  News was received on Saturday afternoon in Clones of the death of Lieutenant-Colonel Gerald H. C. Madden, 1st battalion Irish Guards who was severely wounded in the fighting near Bethune, on the 11th of October, and afterwards had his left leg amputated in the Base Hospital, at Calais.  He had recovered to such an extent that on Friday the 5th inst., he was removed to the Princess Henry of Battenberg’s Hospital, Hill Street, London, and although terribly upset by the journey, he rallied somewhat, and there was reason to hope he would soon get strong.  However his constitution was not equal to the strain.

There deceased was a brother of Lieutenant-Colonel John Madden, D.  L., Hilton Park, Clones, Co., Monaghan, now commanding the 4th battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers at Victoria Barracks, Belfast, and a brother-in-law of Major the Marquis of Ailesbury, D.S.O.  Major-General the Earl of Cavan C.B., M.V.O., in a letter to Colonel Madden, after he had been wounded, congratulated him on the splendid conduct of the battalion he commanded and expressed his deepest and truest gratitude for this officer’s splendid services.

Fermanagh Herald November 20th. 1915.  MR. REDMOND LEAVES FOR THE FRONT.  London, Wednesday morning, Mr. John Redmond has left on his visit to the Irish troops at the front.  He is accompanied by his private Secretary, Mr. T. J.  Hanna.

Fermanagh Herald November 27th. 1915.  AT DUNGANNON PETTY SESSIONS A FERMANAGH CLERGYMAN IS FINED FOR MOTORING WITHOUT A LICENCE.  The Rev. James Wilson, Tempo, Co., Fermanagh, was charged with reckless driving of a motor car on the public streets in Dungannon; secondly driving at a dangerous speed; thirdly with driving a motor car not having a licence to do so, and fourthly with driving a motor car and not using proper precautions by blowing the horn so as to safeguard the public.  He had also knocked down a young lad named Patrick Hughes, Ann Street.

Fermanagh Herald November 27th. 1915.  FERMANAGH RECRUITING INCIDENT.  A mild sensation was occasioned in the village of Ederney on last Thursday night.  The recruiting party at present touring Fermanagh, and having their headquarters at Enniskillen, decided to hold a recruiting concert in Ederney.  Accompanied by a band, the officers left Enniskillen.  On arrival at the village the band paraded the street for a short time and later repaired to a hall owned by a gentleman named Mr. Irvine, where it was understood the concert was to be held.  A large crowd were waiting for admission, but on the officers applying for admission, they were informed by the porter, who was in possession of the key, that Mr. Irvine had given instructions that no concert was to be held in his hall, because of the fact that the military authorities had not applied to him for permission to use the hall.  The performers and officers had therefore no other alternative but to abandon the concert.  Hearing this discussion some members of the local branch of the Ancient Order of Hibernians placed their commodious hall at the disposal of the military and a very successful concert and recruiting meeting was held.  Most of the officers of the recruiting party are Nationalists, and the owner of the hall is a prominent Unionist.  There is much comment on his refusal to grant of the use of the hall.

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