1942. August.

 

1-8-1942.ENNISKILLEN MAN SENTENCED. EXPORT OF LORRIES. John O’Connor, a 26-year-old motor trader, of Enniskillen, was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment when he pleaded guilty before a Special Criminal Court in Dublin to four charges arising out of the purchase and exportation of motor-lorries from the 26 county area to a six county border area. Mr. Trant McCarthy, solicitor, for O’Connor, pleaded for a fine instead of imprisonment and said that O’Connor had been followed by tragedy from his early days. He was suffering from tuberculosis from 1935 to 1937 spent two years in hospital and was, compelled to use crutches after his discharge. He was about to undergo, a serious operation in a few days. The Court said that they could not vary the sentence.

1-8-1942. GAELIC PILCRIMS TO LOUGH DERG. One hundred and. thirty Gaelic speaking pilgrims left Dublin on Saturday on a Pilgrimage to Lough Derg sponsored by Croabh na h-Aiseirghe. It has for its object “Siochain an Domhain agus Saoirse na h-Eireann. They were joined by a party of Gaelic speakers from Tyrone and other parts of the Six Counties. The spiritual directors were An t-Athair Raghnall MacGiolla Gunna, O.F.M., and An t-Athair Leonardo Mattimoe, O.F.M. The Dublin pilgrims arrived back in the city on Monday.

1-8-1942.SEIZURES NEAR KESH.CATTLE AND SHEEP. Head-Constable Conlin, R.U.C., Kesh, Co. Fermanagh seized 200 sheep at Drumarn, Lisnarick, on suspicion of being imported from the 26 counties. He also seized 7 head of large cattle at Coalisland, Tyrone, on suspicion of being imported at the Fermanagh border.

1-8-1942.FERMANAGH YOUTH KILLED. EVIDENCE AT INQUEST. Charles Johnston, aged 20 years, a shop assisting at Gola, Lisbellaw, was killed in a motoring accident at Gola on Sunday. At about 6.45 p.m. he was travelling on a motor-cycle from Lisbellaw direction and at the cross roads he collided with a motor car being driven from Lisnaskea by Mr. B. L. Winslow, solicitor, Enniskillen. Death was instantaneous. At the inquest on Monday evening evidence was given that deceased emerged from the side road at Gola creamery and dashed into the side of Mr, Winslow’s car, which was on its proper side of the road. Deceased struck his forehead against the hinge of the door on the right hand side of the car, and went on for 19 or 20 yards when lie fell off the bicycle. A verdict was returned that death was due to haemorrhage and severe laceration of the brain and no blame was attached to Mr. Winslow. Sympathy was tendered to the relatives of deceased. Deceased resided with his uncle, Mr. George Clingan, Belleisle. Formerly he lived at Ballycassidy, when his mother, the late Mrs. Johnston, taught at Shanmullagh School.

1-8-1942.21,000 BOOKS GIVEN. ENNISKILLEN PAPER DRIVE. The people of Enniskillen and district responded on Saturday to the appeal for 5,000 books to help to swell the total in the waste paper competition. The town hopes to get a £1,000 prize. A temporary receiving stall was erected at The Diamond, and during the day this became the Mecca for hundreds of people who deposited their cast novels, magazines, etc. The local hon. organiser for salvage, Mr. D. Devine, had the assistance of several ladies, the Enniskillen Boy Scouts, Wolf Cubs and Girl Guides, as well as the Urban, Council employees. During the entire morning a U.S. Army band rendered selections. Shortly after 2.0 o’clock it was announced that 15,000 books had been received, and at 6.0 p.m. the total was in the region of 21,000.

1-8-1942. MILITARY EXERCISES IN TYRONE AND FERMANAGH. Large scale and realistic combined exercises in which Home Guards, military and auxiliary services in the Counties of Tyrone and Fermanagh took place during last week. The opposition was provided by the United States Forces whose tanks units, police, and A.P.R. services were in action.The tests were carried out in regard to communications between Tyrone and Fermanagh and in the matter of general administration and efficiency. (Ed. Who won?)

1-8-1942. Gaelic Festival at Ederney. PRIEST’S APPEAL FOR THE LANGUAGE, MUSIC, SONG AND DANCE. AN INTERESTING PROGRAMME. The greatest concourse of people ever seen in St. Joseph’s Park; Ederney, assembled on Sunday last to witness and partake in a real feast of Gaelic song, dance and sport while the close association between Gaelic culture and religion was indicated by the inclusion in the programme for the day of competition in Plain Chant. Rev. P. McCarney, P.P., in opening the proceedings, first expressed his regret and the regret of the people in general at the enforced absence of Mr. Cahir Healy, and hoped that we would soon have him amongst us once more as, no doubt he was present that day in spirit. In the unavoidable absence, he said, of prominent Gaels better qualified than he to deliver the opening oration he would enumerate a few points of interest in connection with such events as he was called on to declare open. The work of the Gaelic League is too well known to require any explanation. One can easily see evidence of preservation of Gaelic culture in language, arts and sports. Such events as these serve to remind the people, that as Irishmen and women they have a heritage to be cherished and handed on intact to future generations. When the most of Europe was uncivilised Ireland was the seat of culture and learning —a culture dating right back to prehistoric times and the Gaels were one of the most civilised and cultured races that ever inhabited any part of Europe. When aggression and other misfortunes fell to the lot of the Irish people and they had a series of bitter trials to endure this culture was in grave danger of destruction. The national language was prohibited and a foreign one substituted; education was denied to Irish children and later teachers who knew no Irish were appointed to teach children, who knew no English. In spite of these misfortunes the language still lives to-day, thanks to the patriotism and devotion of our forefathers and, in later years, to the founders and members of the Gaelic League. Recent misfortunes, continued Father Mc Carney, taught the people of France to cherish the ideals of their country and aid in bringing about a revival of patriotism and realisation of the duty they owed to past generations, but it is to be hoped that we in Ireland may awake, without the bursting of shells or crashing of bombs, to a fuller realisation of the beauties and greatness of our country, its language, music and sport. (Applause).

MUSICAL SELECTIONS. Appropriate musical selections were rendered by Tummery Pipers under the direction of their able bandmaster, Mr. James Irvine, and their rousing music and colourful native costumes added much to the brilliance and enjoyment of the proceedings. In this connection too St. Dympna’s Ceilidhe Band, Dromore, provided first class entertainment. Priests and people from all the surrounding parishes were present and helped to make the event the success that it was.

COMPETITION RESULTS.

Plain Chant 1.  Sacred Heart Choir, Irvinestown; 2, St. Joseph’s Choir, Ederney.

Songs in Gaelic—1, Ederney School Choir; 2 Irvinestown Boys’ Choir.

Anglo-Irish songs—1, Irvinestown Boys’ Choir; 2, Ederney School Choir.

Lilting—1, Michael McCann, Dromore; 2, Patrick Maguire, Sydare.

Traditional violin—1, P. Maguire, Sydare; 2, P. McNabb, Tummery.

Melodeon—1, Jack McCann, Dromore; 2, Sean McVeigh, do.

Three-hand reel. — 1, Knocknagor Troupe; 2, Kilskeery Troupe.

Hornpipe (senr.)- l, Mairead Bennett, Dublin.

Jig and hornpipe (junr.) —1, Knocknagor Troupe; 2, Kilskeery Troupe.

Ceilidhe Band—St. Dympna’s, Dromore.

Father Burns, C.C., Devenish, contributed humorous recitations which were greatly appreciated.

FOOTBALL COMPETITION.

First round—Irvinestown (8 pts.) v. Edemey (7 pts.). Dromore(12 pts.) v Pettigo (6 pts.) Final—Dromore (15 pts.) v. Irvinestown (1 pt.)

Valuable prizes were presented to successful competitors. The organisation committee was in charge of Fr. M. Donnelly, C.C., Ederney.

To complete the festivities a very successful Rinnce Mor was held in St. Josephs Hall, under the direction of Rev. E. O’Flanagan, C.C.

Gifts were presented to Mr. James McDonnell, Cahore, Ederney, and Mr. Monaghan, Derrybrick, Kesh, and Mr. P. Rooney, Ardmoney, Brookeborough.

1-8-1942.FAILED TO PLOUGH. FARMER FINED AT DERRYCONNELLY. “I cannot see any excuse whatever,” said Major Dickie, R.M., at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions, on Friday, when he fined Robert Acheson, of Drumskimbly, £40, with £3/14/0 costs, on a summons brought by the Ministry of Agriculture, for failing in part to comply with a direction to plough.

Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Grown Solicitor, prosecuting, said that defendant was served with a direction on 2nd January, 1942, requiring him to plough ten acres of his holdings in Drumskimbly, Cosbystown, Glenwinny, Kilgarrow, and Sandhill by the 30th. January, 1942, and a further 15½ acres by 11th April, 1942. Mr. Jordan, Ministry’s Inspector, visited the holding on 4th July, 1941, and reported that the area was 186 acres, of which an area of 51 acres was arable. On the 17th June, 1942, when the holding was visited, it was found that the total area cultivated was 12 acres leaving a default of 13½ acres. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, LL.B., M.P., defending, said that defendant was over 80 years of age; and had a nephew living with him. They managed to plough, and crop 12 acres. In that area, as his Worship knows, owing to work of national importance, labour was very scarce, and in fact if they had not a tractor well on in January they were likely to be left without one. The only defence was that defendant could not get sufficient labour and the area of his lands was scattered all over. Defendant said if he could have got the labour he would have been willing to crop as much as wanted. His Worship—Other farmers are in exactly, the same position and they managed to do it. Mr. Cooper said there was a previous conviction, defendant having been fined £10 last year. Mr. Ferguson—I think he did his best in the circumstances. His Worship—I cannot see any excuse whatever. Every other farmer in the county is doing his best. They seem to make no effort. .Defendant was fined as stated above.

1-8-1942. MANORHAMILTON NEWS. County Council Elections. Very little interest is being shown in the forthcoming elections. Probably the old members will again come forward. Not for years has Manorhamilton had a representative on the County Council and it is rumoured that the town will put up a candidate.

Clerical Appointment—Rev. M. Gilbride, recently ordained, has been appointed assistant to Rev. T. F. Brady, C.C., pending the appointment of a successor to the late Rt. Rev. Monsignor Soden, P.P., V.G., P.A.

Recent Deaths—The death of Mr. Jas. McLoughlin, Ross, which took place at an advanced age is deeply regretted. All his sons were prominent in the old I.R.A. movement. The funeral was large and representative. Another regretted death is that of Mrs. Feely, Castlemile, which took place last week. There was a large attendance at the funeral.

 

1-8-1942. TRACTOR OFFENCES. BALLINAMALLARD MEN SUMMONED. At Clogher Petty Sessions on Thursday Henry W. West, of Mullaghmeen, Ballinamallard, was fined Is for failing to show the maximum speed and laden weight on a tractor at Killclay, Augher, on 9th July, l5s for failure to have a reflecting mirror on the vehicle and for having no silencer attached he was dealt with under the probation Act. Terence McCann, of Beagh, Coa, Ballinamallard, the driver, for using the vehicle without having speed and weight displayed, was fined 1s, for having no bell or horn Is, for failing to have a reflecting mirror 5s, and a summons for having no silencer on the machine was dealt with under the Probation Act.

1-8-1942. ENNISKILLEN COLLEGIATE SCHOOL FEES. The students should not be enrolled on the register of the Enniskillen Collegiate School for Girls until their fees had been paid was the suggestion of Mr. J. Coffey at the meeting of the Co. Fermanagh Education Committee in Enniskillen on Friday. He advocated that a number of defaulting parents should be sent their accounts through legal channels. Rev. J. B. Jennings said it was a far more satisfactory method to pay the fees through the bank.

1-8-1942. DEATH OF POPULAR YOUNG KILTYCLOGHER LADY MISS ANNIE McGOWAN. A gloom has been cast over a wide area by the death of Miss Annie McGowan, of the Mental Hospital nursing staff, Sligo, which occurred in the Surgical Hospital, Sligo on Thursday week, following a brief illness. The deceased lady, who was only 22, was the second daughter of Mr. Patrick McGowan, Co. C., and Mrs. McGowan, Kiltyclogher. She was a nurse in Sligo Mental Hospital for a period of years, and during that time her gentle disposition and great charm of manner won for her the esteem and affection of all with whom, she came in contact. On Friday, amid scenes of deep mourning the remains were carried from the Surgical Hospital to the borough boundary by doctors and members of the Mental Hospital staff. A guard of honour was formed along the roadside as the hearse moved into Leitrim. On approaching Kiltyclogher, the cortege was met by relatives and a large body of people, who accompanied the remains to St. Patrick’s Church, where they were received by Rev. Father Brady, C.C. The funeral which took place to Rossinver on Saturday, was the largest seen in the district for years.

1-8-1942. ROAD WORKERS’ WAGES IN LEITRIM. COUNTY COUNCIL MAKE A RECOMMENDATION. At Leitrim County Council special meeting on Saturday, Mr. S. Flynn, T.D., chairman, presiding, Mr. Hoey moved that all men employed by the Council be paid the same rate of wages as those working in the bogs. Mr. J. Flynn seconded. Mr. Hoey said that the reason he moved his motion was that the road workers in the county were treated unfairly. He said that those employed on minor relief schemes and those employed by the Land Commission were paid a higher rate. Road workers should be paid at the same rate as those employed on the turf scheme, 6/6 per day. He proposed that the road workers be given, an increase of 8d per day in order to bring their wages to 5/6 per day. Mr. Callaghan, a representative of the road workers, said that all they asked was that the matter be put up to the Department and place the matter on the right shoulders. They, had asked Mr. Hoey to bring the resolution, forward as he argued they gave as good work as any of the others who had been granted an increase. The County Surveyor said that the matter was discussed at a conference he attended in Dublin and they had no power to grant an increase to road workers. At the conference this was a burning question. The only thing to do was to make a recommendation, as this question hampered them, when work was going on. They were allowed to pay 5/6 to workers on roads off the main roads and those on main roads were only allowed 4/10. There was a differentiation between what they could pay on grant works and improvement works. He would be glad if this was settled, as the men were not inclined to come out and work on the roads. Finally it was agreed to recommend to the Department that the road workers’  wages be increased to the same basis as the bog workers, not to take effect until after the 31st March, next.

 

1-8-1942. SEQUEL TO DELIVERY AT DERRYCONNELLY. ALLEGED ATTEMPT TO EXPORT. COURT CASE ADJOURNED. The seizure of 250 lbs. of tea had a sequel at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when John James Maguire and Mary Maguire, of Derrygonnelly, were charged with having in the month of November, 1941, knowingly, harboured 250 lbs of tea with intent to evade the export prohibition applicable thereto. Teresa Rooney, who is employed as a book-keeper in Lavery’s Bar, 80 Chichester Street, Belfast, said that in August last a gentleman named Maguire ordered tea to be sent to his sister, Mrs. Charles Maguire, in Derrygonnelly. In consequence of that she got in touch with a Mr. Lyons, of Donaghadee, gave him the address of Mrs. Charles Maguire, and told him to send the invoice to her. An envelope which was left in the bar was handed over to Mr. Lyons. Mr. R. A. Herbert, DL.B. (defending), called defendant, John James Maguire, to come forward, and asked witness: “Did you ever see that man before?” Witness—No; that definitely is not the gentleman gave me the order.

 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 8th 1942. THOSE BUTTER PARADES. It seems that there are some people who can be fooled all the time. The Ulster Scot having got all he wanted, having cut himself off from the rest of Ireland and sat in embittered loneliness behind an embattlement of tariffs designed to keep Irish goods out of the “ Paradise’ having for years denounced the Irish State as being just no good and a monstrosity whose existence should not be permitted, is now finding out that war’s lean and hungry grip in so far as his own bailiwick is concerned has imparted quite another hue to the land of Republican Green and that profitable and useful excursions can be made there with little or no hindrance. Thus, in hordes, are the Scots dwellers of the Six Counties pouring across the Border in search of that which cannot be had for love or money in their own quarters, and that is saying quite a lot. Anything that is rationed and everything that isn’t is fair game for these loyal sons of the Six Counties who have so suddenly discovered the catering and other amenities of the hated “Free State.”

One would think that the rigorous action only all-too rarely enforced by the Irish Customs authorities would have the approval and support of all the citizens of the State, but it appears not. Certain well-meaning people are getting up in the National assembly and suggesting that the Border seizures are creating a feeling that will lead only to the perpetuation of Partition! Was greater nonsense ever talked! The argument is that the Orange excursionists, whom the merchant and business houses of the Irish State would never see were it not for the circumstances of the times, are being won over to the national side by the courtesy and generosity of the “Southerners” with whom they are temporarily trading and that any official action taken to discourage this dealing will inevitably react against the national interests. Such is far from the truth. Scenery (and especially the scenery and panorama of well- stocked shop fronts) is the Orangeman’s sole interest in the Irish State to-day.

8-8-1942. JOTTINGS. Died While Bathing. – Private McAndrews, Belmullet, died while bathing at Rossnowlagh, near Ballyshannon.

Fatal Injuries.—Patrick Kelly (65), Drummond, Magheracloone, Carrickmacross, was fatally injured when his bicycle collided with a motor van.

Shop Entered—The confectionery shop of Mr. W. H. Creighton, Church Street, Enniskillen, was broken and entered and a quantity of sweets stolen. Police are investigating.

An Appointment.—At a special meeting of Monaghan Vocational Education Committee, Miss Maureen Duffy, a native of Co., Monaghan was appointed a commercial teacher to succeed Miss Forde, resigned.

Irvinestown Lady’s Success- Miss M. T. Dolan, S.R.N., C.M.B. has been appointed Ward Sister in the Belfast Union Hospital. She is daughter of Mrs. Dolan and the late Mr. John Dolan, Drumschool, Irvinestown.

Special Court—At a special court in Enniskillen on Monday before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., Wm. Hynes, Nugent’s Entry, Enniskillen, was charged with a serious offence and was remanded, on £10 bail to next Enniskillen Petty Sessions on 17th inst.

New Head Constable. — Sergt. John F. Traynor, R.U.C., who, until a few years ago, was stationed, (for twelve years) in Enniskillen, has been promoted Head Constable and transferred from Mayobridge, Co. Down, to Clogher, Co. Tyrone.

Professed.—Sister St. Macarten, professed at Convent of Bon Secours, Cork, is the daughter of Mr, and Mrs. Patrick O’Daly, Lisnashannagh, Carrickmacross, and , sister of Rev. B. O’Daly, C.C, Tydavnet, and Rev. J. O‘Daly, C.C.. Los Angeles,

Band performances — In a letter to the Enniskillen Rural Council, on Tuesday the Six-County Tourist Development. Association, Ltd., stated it was felt every encouragement should be given to military and other bands to give performance at towns throughout Northern Ireland. Such performances would help to entertain the large number of people spending their holidays at home.

Alleged Desertion— At a special court in Enniskillen Benjamin Cyril Rees a serving soldier, charged with being an absentee from his unit, was remanded in custody to await a military escort. J. Freeman gave evidence of finding Rees in Newtownbutler sub-district wearing civilian attire. As a result of enquiries made and assistance given by Rees, witness located his uniform.

Council Workers’ Wage Increases. Enniskillen Urban Council, on Tuesday evening, adopted recommendations from the Finance and Lighting Committee that Henry Sadlier, for carting work granted an increase in remuneration of 5/- weekly, and that Frederick Walker while acting as roller-driver, be granted 3/- weekly increase. The application of Mr. Bracken, contractor for scavenging, for an increase was pending the supplying by him of further details.

SIX MEN SENTENCED TO DEATH RESULT OF BELFAST TRIAL. PRISONERS PLEAD “NO PREMEDITATION.” Six young Belfast men were sentenced to death at the Courthouse, Crumlin Rd., Belfast, on Thursday week, after a trial lasting three days. They were charged with the murder of Constable Patrick Murphy of 53, Cawnpore Street on Easter Sunday. The men who pleaded not guilty, were —Thomas J. Williams (19), house repairer, 46, Bombay Street, Belfast; Henry Cordner (19), fitter; 35, Malcolmson St.; William James Perry (21) labourer, 264, Cupar Street; John Terence Oliver (21) painter, 167 Springfield Road; Patrick Simpson (18), sheet-metal worker, 86, Cawnpore Street; and Joseph Cahill (21), joiner, 60, Divis Street.

The jury returned a verdict of guilty after an absence of 2 hours 5 minutes. The executions were fixed for Tuesday, August 18. In the case of Simpson the jury recommended mercy on account of his youth.

PRISONERS’ STATEMENTS. Asked if they had anything to say before sentence was passed, the prisoners, made the following statements CORDONER—“ I am not guilty. There was no premeditation to murder. I would like to thank my counsel, Mr. Lavery, Mr. Agnew and Mr. Marrinan for their splendid defence on my behalf.”

PERRY—“1.am not guilty of murder. There was no premeditation to murder. I also wish to thank Mr. Lavery and the other counsel for the manner in which they conducted the case.”

OLIVER—“Not guilty of murder. I had no premeditation to murder.” He also thanked his counsel.

SIMPSON—“I am not guilty of murder. I had no premeditation to murder, and I state that the operation at Kashmir Road was the only one to be performed. I also wish through the medium of the Press, on behalf of my comrades, to thank everyone who enabled us to have such a splendid defence in the case’

CAHILL—“I am not guilty of murder. There was no premeditation or intention to take life.”

WILLIAMS—“I am not guilty of murder. I am not afraid to die. There was no premeditation to murder. I want to thank my counsel for the splendid defence they put up on our behalf.’’

Before passing sentence, Lord Justice Murphy said: “I do not intend to say anything to you young men that would add to the horror of the position in which you find yourselves.”

He then passed the death sentence. The men remained standing at attention and calm during the proceedings. When warders and police were removing them from the dock to the underground passage the prisoners waved to friends in the Court. Several women sobbed and screamed. One made a rush to the dock crying “God help you, Tom.” Some of the prisoners shouted “Don’t be worrying.” Others, cried “God save Ireland.’ A number of British officers and other men in uniform were in the Court, which was heavily guarded by troops. Afterwards six women relatives were seen going across to the jail.

RECORDED SENTENCE ON GIRL. A further case arising out of the shooting of Constable P. Murphy was heard in Belfast on Friday, when a recorded sentence of one year was passed on Margaret Nolan (aged 17), 32 Bombay St., Belfast at the City Commission, when she pleaded guilty to being an accessory after the fact in the incident concerned.

Mr; J. Agnew, who defended, said that the police had spoken highly of the respectability of Miss Nolan’s family. He honestly thought that the girl did not realise the terrible consequence of the acts in which she had played a part, and he asked his lordship to consider that she would have a memory all her life of what happened on that Easter Sunday which would be more poignant than any punishment that could be inflicted.

Mr. J. C. McDermott said that the prisoner had been put forward on this charge because the Crown regarded the part which she had played on that Sunday as being a minor one.

Lord Justice Murphy said that he had recognised before he heard the evidence given on her behalf, that she had been led into that affair by older people.

PETITION FOR REPRIEVE SIGNED BY THOUSANDS. Forma of petition to the Six-County Governor asking for a reprieve of the six youths in Belfast Jail under sentence of death for the shooting of Constable Murphy are being extensively signed in Belfast, and arrangements are complete to secure signatures all over the Six-County area.

A representative committee of the Irish Unemployed Workers’ Association, which is taking part in the organisation of the petition, are seeking the co-operation of other sympathetic organisations, both in the Six Counties and in Great Britain, and has issued also an appeal to people in the Twenty-Six Counties to help.

Telegrams have been despatched to President Roosevelt, to the British Premier, to Mr. Herbert Morrison, British Home Secretary, and to the Clan na Gael, New York, asking them to use their influence in order to prevent the executions taking place.

Already arrangements have been; made by the reprieve organisations to have forms available in provincial centres next Sunday. Influential people on both sides of the Border, including Church leaders, and of every shade of political opinion, are to be approached to add their names to the list. Copies of the petition are to be sent to Cardinal MacRory and the Catholic Bishops, as well as the Protestant Primate and the heads of other Protestant Churches.

The Irish Unemployed Workers’ Organisation will, it is understood, ask the Belfast Trades Council to use their influence in the trade Union section of the community. At Masses in Belfast city churches the

TWO APPOINTMENTS DECIDED BY PARTY VOTES. Caretaker of Cemetery and Tenant of Cottage. DISCUSSION AT ENNISKILLEN RURAL COUNCIL. An appointment as a graveyard caretaker and the choice of a tenant for a labourer’s cottage were decided by party vote at the meeting of Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry (chairman) presiding. Proposing Mr. James Bartley, Cleenish Island, for appointment as caretaker of the island cemetery, Mr. James Murphy (N.) said the graveyard had been, neglected and was covered with weeds and nettles. It was a disgrace and he knew that in Mr. Bartley they would have a man who would look after the graveyard properly. Mr.W. Kelly (N.) seconded.

Mr. W. A. Thornton. (U.) proposed Mr. John Balfour, Cleenish, and Mr. J. Beatty (U.) seconded. Mr. Kelly—Should not this be advertised? Mr. Thornton — Sure it is only 30/- a year. Mr. Murphy. — The previous man got £2 a year. Mr. Beatty—It isn’t a big thing, not worth advertising. Mr. Murphy —The graveyard was neglected and we were throwing away £2 of the ratepayers’ money. Mr. Thornton—Nearly all are neglected. By 10 Unionist votes to 4 Nationalist, Balfour was appointed. Mr. E. Callaghan asked who supervised the cleaning of these graveyards. Mr. Murphy—No one at all-they get their money for doing nothing.

Mr. Callaghan said there were ricks of hay on Pobal (Pubble?) cemetery, which was a disgrace in any civilised community. Mr. Beatty- I saw it .as well as you and there was nothing wrong with it. There was only a handshaking of hay on it. Mr. Murphy- But it is hay, Mr. Beatty. Mr. Beatty—He told me he would take it away next day. The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) said he would write to caretakers saying they must clean up the graveyards at once.

This was agreed to. Mr. Callaghan — A graveyard is no place for winning hay. Mr. Cathcart – Isn’t the hay won on any graveyard.

CINEMA PRICES-NO INCREASE. ENNISKILLEN URBAN COUNCIL DECISION. In the absence through indisposition of Mr. W. J. Monaghan, the following motion standing in his name, was proposed by Mr. T. Smyth at the meeting of Enniskillen Urban Council on Tuesday evening. “That the absolution of 1st June, 1942, refusing consent to the Regal Cinema Co. to raise the price of admission to balcony seats on Sundays by one penny to meet increased taxation be rescinded and that the application of the Company be granted.”

Mr. C. Patterson seconded Mr. T. Algeo moved the rejection of the motion, stating that if the cinema shows on Sunday the proprietors had the remedy in their own hands. The cinema, he said, should never have been allowed to open the cinemas on Sunday during the summer and he would propose later on that this be not allowed.

Mr. P. Kelly seconding, said he was opposed to the motion on the ground that he thought that there should not be particular seats for officers in the rear while the private soldier was as well entitled to sit in the balcony as anyone else. He thought the Regal Cinema should write to the Taxation Authorities on the matter instead of the Council.

Mr. W. E. Johnston (chairman), said he did not think there was any particular place in the Regal Cinema for officers. Mr. Kelly asserted that the balcony was being reserved for people with an inferiority complex. The Chairman replied that any soldier could go to whatever part of the cinema he liked. Mr. W. H. Creighton supporting Mr. Algeo’s amendment, said that when the Regal was granted permission, to open on Sundays the Council was informed the opening was purely to provide entertainment for the troops and that they did not want to make money out of it. He knew the proprietors were not running the shows at a loss. “If they were patriotic enough,’’ he added, ‘‘they would let them have the entertainment free, but instead of this they are trying to  make money out of it on Sundays.”

Mr. J. Logan said in wartime all businessmen had to contend with extra Expenses, such as extra wages. He understood that not one hundred officers would be frequenting this cinema so that the total amount involved would be 8/4. It was a very poor war effort. They should not charge anything on Sunday if it was for the benefit of the troops. He was afraid it was for  their own benefit. Mr. Patterson said he was given an explanation for. the suggested change—the  scarcity of coppers. Instead of the 8d seat as at present the 9d seat would exclude the use of coppers in payment, 6d and 3d pieces.

Mr. Algeo — They have their own remedy to close down. Mr. Creighton – That is right. The voting resulted- For the motion- Messrs. Fitzsimmons, Patterson, Smyth and the Chairman—4. Against—Messrs. Lee, Elliott, Logan, Creighton, Algeo, Kelly, Fox and McKeown—8. Mr. Weir did not vote. The Chairman declared the motion lost.

WIFE’S MAINTENANCE CLAIM AT BROOKEBORO’ HUSBAND SUED. Mrs. Mary Little, of Coolnakeklly, sued her husband, George Little, farm labourer, of Latnafree for maintenance, at Brookeboro’ Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M. Mr. Ferguson, M.P., solicitor, was for the wife, and Mr. Patterson for the husband.

Mrs. Little, who said she and her husband were over 30 years married, gave evidence of her husband having left her for no reason whatever that she knew of last May, and had not since returned. She lived with her grown up son and daughter, aged 16 and 13½ years. Defendant took his ration book with him and he paid nothing towards the upkeep of the family. All she had to live on with the family was 10/- a week brought in by her son. Answering Mr. Patterson, witness said her husband left her 18 years ago and again two years ago, but he came back afterwards. He was in the habit of walking away and leaving her for what reason she did not know. Defendant at present lived with his mother, and last March she and her family raised £15 to pay a fine imposed on him at Irvinestown Petty Sessions for the larceny of tools. James Little, a son, gave evidence of his parents not having got on well together for years back.

For the defence the husband alleged unfaithfulness on the part of his wife for 18 years back and said it was time for him to leave the house when the door was closed against him and his clothes thrown out on the street. He was earning 33/6 a week with board as a farm labourer. His Worship said it was perfectly clear a case of desertion was established and the defendant was entitled to maintain his wife and family. The question was one of the amount of contribution and he (his worship) thought a weekly allowance of 17/6 would be reasonable and he would make an order to that effect. Mr. Ferguson agreed the amount was reasonable as they did not want to take all defendant’s money from him. Defendant was ordered to pay in addition 28/- costs.

8-8-1942. MINISTRY WANTS IRON-ENNISKILLEN HAS IT. The Ministry wrote to Enniskillen Urban Council on Tuesday evening that it was requisitioning all available iron and steel railings in the Six Counties for the war effort, and it asked for the co-operation of local authorities. M. T. Algeo — There is 50 tons of cast iron railing lying outside the town for the last three years: why don’t they commandeer it? Chairman, (Mr. W. E. Johnston)—Mr. Donnelly (the surveyor) will assist the Ministry as far as possible. Mr. Donnelly said Mr. Ritchie and himself pointed out the iron, referred to by Mr. Algeo twelve months ago, and it was still there. Chairman—They will come now to take more stuff and may take it.

8-8-1942. Smuggling Charges—Terence McKeown, High St., Monaghan, was .fined £10 at  Aughnacloy for smuggling two cycle tyres, six cycle repair outfits, and three cycle wheel catches on July 20 at Mullaghtinney. Patrick McGlone, Belgium. Park, Monaghan, who was with the last defendant and who was charged with smuggling the same number of articles, did not appear. Both defendants had been out on hail, sureties being fixed at £10 each. The recognances in the case of McGlone were certified by Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., with a view to proceedings against the surety.

Clones Man Killed in Air Raid.—Mrs. J. McDonald, Roslea Tec., Clones, has been  informed that her husband, Mr. John McDonald, was killed in an air raid on Birmingham last week. He had been working there for the past year. He leaves a widow and two young children.

8-8-1942. R.A.F. MAN DROWNED. Aircraftsman A. Ernest Taylor, R.A.F., Killadeas, a native of Stoke-on-Trent, was drowned while bathing in Lough Erne during the week-end. At an inquest on Saturday, held by Mr. G. E. Warren, Coroner a verdict of accidental drowning was returned. It was stated that, with a companion, Tyler, went to bathe at Killadeas and the companion asked him could he swim. He said he could swim a little. The companion entered the water first and had only gone a short distance when he looked back and saw Tyler in difficulties. He went to help him, but Tyler caught him by the neck and was pulling him down, so that he had to let him go. He went out and shouted for help, which arrived, but Tyler had disappeared and could not be found. It was two and a half hours later when the body was recovered from a fifteen feet hole.

8-8-1942. CHURCHILL WILL NOT INTERVENE. CONDEMNED BELFAST YOUTHS REPRIEVE PETITION EXTENSIVELY SIGNED. Mr. Winston Churchill, British Premier, through his secretary, has replied to the recent telegram sent from, a conference of Nationalist Senators and Members of the Six-Co., Parliament in connection with the petition for the reprieve of the six young men under sentence of death in Belfast prison to the effect that “it is not a matter in which it is possible for him to intervene.” APPEAL. No date has yet been fixed for the hearing by the Court of Criminal Appeal of the appeal of the six young men. It is unlikely that it will come before the Court early next week.

THE PETITION. Satisfactory reports of the signing of the reprieve petition have been received at the Reprieve Committee’s headquarters in Belfast by Mr. Eamon Donnelly, Approximately 200,000 have signed the petition up to date and the campaign is still in progress. Thousands of signatures are being received daily at the Reprieve Committee’s office. The Duke of Abercorn, acknowledging the telegraphic, appeal, by the Lord Mayor of Cork (Ald. J. Allen) on behalf of the six men states, (through his private secretary, Mrs. S. Lewis Haslett) that it will have his careful consideration.

THE CONDEMNED YOUTHS. The six young men are attending Mass and receiving Holy Communion, each morning in a cell specially furnished for the purpose. They are visited daily by Rev. P. McAllister, Catholic chaplain to the prison Father Oliver, C P., and Father Alexis C.P., of Holy Cross Monastery, Ardoyne.

8-8-1942. Bundoran is having a record year. For the past month the resort has been crowded fully to capacity and hundreds failed to travel because of information that accommodation was not available. Nearly all visitors are from the Six Counties and County Fermanagh, especially Enniskillen, supplied a large proportion of cross-border holiday makers. The August weekend was the most crowded Bundoran has had in many years. Enniskillen sent hundreds of the visitors by train and bus while at least a dozen made the journey (32 miles) by bicycle.

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1942.

28-3-42. PETTIGO FARMER’S DEATH. During the latter end of February 1942 in a stately home situated on a farm in the townland at Springtown, Pettigo, there passed to his eternal reward that  hard-working and prosperous farmer, Mr. Thomas McCrea, widely known and greatly respected, throughout the county, who although advanced in age continued to work on his farm in a manner and with such skill as to put many of the present and much younger farm hands to shame, and practically up to the time of his death; yes, he had undoubtedly splendid attributes in the family sphere and what an inspiration to those of us who had the good fortune to watch his zeal and activities in order to maintain the reputation he inherited from his ancestors. He was my greatest friend of a lifetime; he who for so long served as the last link to a chain of equally good farmers and friends within, the five adjoining townlands, all of whom have preceded him in death, and how when I last paid a visit to his home some three years ago we talked around the fireside of the many little episodes occurring in our earlier days when during the long dreary and wintry days we made our nocturnal visits to the neighbouring farm houses to engage in a game of cards or some other form of entertainments and journeying home along the lonely roads and paths with an atmosphere of silence save the barking of a dog away at some isolated farmhouse. His home of which he always felt so proud was not always regarded as a home, rather would I say an institution, because I well remember the days’ when, that stately home was filled to overflow with patrons who had paid their pence and in some cases a shilling for what was then generally known as a “tea meeting” or “soiree” to provide funds for the lone widow, the aged or infirm, who dreaded the sight of a poor law institution. Yes, this was the home of big hearts, filled with kindness and sympathy; most charitable and indeed hospitable in the fullest measure. The deceased was the son of a great sporting family. Indeed there are many, people, like the writer, who can recall the annual races held at Ederney, and the great event which was won by a horse called “Wire In,” bred by father, William. This was heralded as a great victory for Pettigo and was celebrated too. Indeed almost every hillside had its bonfire or tar barrel illuminations, but those were the good old days and enjoyed by the grand old men of that time. His wife and family together with numerous and widespread friends are left to mourn a happy ending to a life full of sacrifice, love and admiration for his family circles. The writer has suffered an irreparable loss by one of the most outstanding and staunchest friends he had the good fortune to associate with and little did I imagine that on my last visit some 3 or 4 years ago when I received a most cordial reception followed by his ever increasing hospitality that such a stately and. cheerful home should be overshadowed with death.— (R.I.P.). P. McC.

4-4-1942. PETTIGO NEWS. On Monday of last week an Inspector from the Department of Supplies visited Pettigo village and met and interviewed members of the Parish Council with regard to the shortage of flour in that area. At the suggestion of the official it was decided to ask all householders to hand in the names of all residents in these households to their grocers so as to arrange that all may receive a fair quantity of flour per week.

On Thursday night a very enjoyable concert was held in Pettigo Hall. The entire programme was produced by, local artistes. The sketches which were humorous created much mirth. Songs were rendered by Mr. J. Elliott and Mm. F. M‘Crea, the accompanists being Miss Dorothy Mulhern and Miss Patsy Galligan.

POLICEMAN SHOT DEAD IN BELFAST. SHOTS EXCHANGED IN STREET. Assailant Wounded. SIX MEN CAPTURED. On Sunday afternoon in an exchange of shots in a Belfast street, a policeman was shot dead and one of his assailants wounded.

An official report issued from Stormont Castle, Belfast, stated: “About 3.15 this afternoon (Sunday) a police car containing four members of the R.U.C., was passing along Kashmir Rd., when it was fired at from behind an air-raid shelter. The car was hit, and the driver promptly pulled up. The policemen got out and pursued the armed men, who took refuge in No. 63 Cawnpore St. The police were fired at again, and the fire was returned. Constable Patrick Murphy (3090), attached to Springfield Rd. barracks, was shot dead after wounding one of his assailants. Having entered the house, the six men ran up to the top floor, where they were captured. One of them, who had been wounded, was taken to hospital. Two women were also, detained.”

The wounded man’s name was given as Robert Williams, aged 19, Cawnpore St., Belfast. Intense police activity followed and several houses were searched. There was a large attendance at the funeral of the deceased constable which took place on Tuesday from St. Paul’s Church to Milltown Cemetery. Deceased leaves a widow and nine children.

MURDER CHARGE. FIVE YOUTHS AND TWO GIRLS REMANDED.

Charged with the wilful murder of Constable Patrick Murphy on Easter Sunday, following a gun-battle between the police, and civilians, five youths and two girls appeared at the Belfast Police Court on Tuesday before Mr. J. H. Campbell, K.C., R.M. A sixth man, Thomas J. Williams, Bombay St., is under arrest in the Royal Victoria Hospital, suffering from gunshot wounds. Joseph Cahill (21), of 60 Divis Street, one of the accused, had his head heavily swathed in bandages. Margaret Nolan, of 32 Bombay St., was aged 16 years.

The other accused were Henry Gardner, 35 Malcolmson Street, 19 years, fitter; William James Perry (21), 264 Cupar St., labourer; John Terence Oliver (21), 167 Springfield Road; Patrick Simpson (18), 86 Cawnpore Street, sheet metal worker; Margaret Burns, 39 Cupar St., an 18-year- old waitress. The accused were remanded for three weeks in custody.

Mr. John Deeny, who appeared for the accused reserved has defence.

GIFTED FERMANAGH MAN’S DEATH – MR. PHIL MARTIN. Something of a sensation was caused throughout County Fermanagh on Wednesday by the news of the death, at a comparatively early age, of Mr. Phil Martin, Kilturk, Lisnaskea, the gifted Uileann piper, Radio. Eireann artiste and

£650 SETTLEMEHT. Enniskillen Bootmaker’s Death Recalled. At Fermanagh Assizes a suit was mentioned in which Mrs. Mary McDonald, 5, Down St., Enniskillen, on behalf of herself and children, Bernard and Mary, sought damages for the death of her husband Patrick, who died following an accident on 20th May, at the Hollow, opposite Dickie’s shop. The defendants were Lieut. Robin F. Fryer, then stationed near Enniskillen, who was motor-, cycling and. was seriously injured, and John A. Armstrong, 17 High St., Enniskillen, shop manager.

A settlement was announced under which £650 and costs would be paid by the defendant Fryer, and the claim against Armstrong was dismissed. The £650 will be divided as follows:—£375 to the widow, £175 to the daughter, and £30 to the son, with £20 for funeral expenses. Mr. Justice Megaw made the settlement a rule of court.

BELLEEK GIRL’S INJURIES. Mary Catherine Timoney, a worker in the Belleek Pottery, of Garvery,. Leggs P.O., sued Richard G. Roe, Lake View House, Letter, P.O., for damages sustained by reason of defendant’s negligence in the control of a motor car at Ballymagaghran Cross (Belleek-Kesh road) on the 18th August. Plaintiff stated she was cycling from her home in the afternoon and emerging on the main road at Ballymagaghran Cross she was proceeding over to her proper side when the car suddenly appeared and bore down on top of her. She remembered nothing further.

Dr. Daly, Ballyshannon, stated plaintiff suffered serious injuries, including a fractured skull. Defendant stated he was coming out of Belleek fair with three passengers when, approaching the cross, plaintiff came out about ten yards in front. He braked and swerved to avoid her. The car was almost stationary when plaintiff ran into it. The three passengers also having given evidence, Mr. Justice Megaw said he had every sympathy for the plaintiff, but unfortunately he had to decide the case on law and not on sympathy. He was satisfied there had been contributory negligence and that the defendant had no opportunity of avoiding the collision.

CYCLING ACCIDENT NEAR BLACKLION. SEQUEL AT DOWRA COURT. Two Women Knocked Down. YOUNG LADY FINED. At Dowra District Court, before Mr. M. J. C. Keane, D.J., Supt. Jackson prosecuted Lizzie McManus, Mullaghboy, Blacklion, for cycling on 31st August last in a dangerous manner at Killyglasson, Blacklion. Miss Annie Mason said she was going to Mass at Killinagh. At Killyglasson Cross She met Mrs. Dolan and they walked together. She had only stepped on to the road, and was on her right side. She heard no bell, and the next thing was that they were knocked down by a bicycle which was ridden by Miss McManus. She fell off the bicycle, and when she got up she cycled off. Witness was in a Dublin hospital for three months as a result of the accident. Mrs. M. Dolan,  who was with the last witness on the occasion, said Miss Mason came out to the road from the stile when witness met her. Miss Mason was on the right-hand side of the road and witness was on the left. She was knocked on the road, and Dr. Horkins advised her to go to hospital, and she did not.

Guard Mahaffy said the road was 17ft., wide at the point of the accident, and the person going towards the church would have a view of 70 yards.

Guard Hegarty said he interviewed Miss McManus who made a statement. She said she sounded the bell, and she was passing between the two women. She cycled off after the accident as she was too frightened.

John Sheerin said he was walking to Mass on the occasion on his correct side of the road. He saw Miss Mason coming on the road. He saw the accident. Mrs. Dolan was on the left-hand side and Miss Mason came over and shook hands with her. Mrs. Dolan went to move to the left, and Miss McManus tried to pass between them, and the next thing was that they all fell.

To Mr. Keane—Only for Mrs. Dolan moving Miss McManus could have passed on her correct or left-hand side of the road.

To Supt. Jackson—I cannot say I heard a bell sounded.

Miss Maguire deposed that she was with last witness and Mr. Dolan on the occasion going to Mass. Mrs. Dolan was on the wrong side of the road and went to cross, and when she heard the bell she turned around. Witness heard the bell sounded. If Mrs. Dolan had kept her own side of the road there would have been no accident. Mrs. Dolan was responsible for the accident. Miss McManus tried to pass between the two women.

Miss L. McManus, defendant, stated she was 16 years :of age. She passed John Sheeran, and before doing so rang the bell, and did the same passing Mrs. Dolan and Miss Mason. She rang the bell for them to keep their own place. Only for Mrs. Dolan crossing the road there would be no accident. Her bicycle was broken.

To Supt. Jackson—I went away after the accident, and my sister stayed with the two women.

To Mr. Keane—I live with my parents, and no compensation was paid the two ladies. I am cycling a few years, and am still cycling. I did not report the

JAIL FOR NEXT OFFENCE R.M.’s WARNING IN R.A.F. BLANKETS LARCENY CHARGE. “ I would like it to be known that, the next person I find taking Air Force or Army property from airmen or soldiers will be sent to prison for a lengthy term, and I shall send them to prison without the slightest hesitation.” This stern warning was issued at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday by Major Dickie, R.M., when dealing with a case in which Mrs. Mary Dolan, 27 Market Street, Enniskillen, was charged with receiving six blankets, one sheet and one roller towel, property of the Air Ministry, and value £4 14s 10d, knowing same to have been stolen; her husband; Francis Dolan, was charged with receiving a pair of Air Force trousers, value 15/6, knowing them to have been stolen and Bartholomew McKeown, a lodger with, the Dolans, was charged with aiding and abetting Mrs. Dolan in receiving one Air Ministry blanket, value 12/6, by carrying it from a place of concealment to Dolan’s, knowing it to have been stolen.

Head Constable Thornton said on information received he obtained a warrant on the 9th March and went to Dolan’s house, accompanied by Sergeant Lockhart and Corporal Clarke, of the R.A.F. security police. He met Mary Dolan, wife of Francis, and told her he was going to search the house for Air Force property, and asked her had she any, and she said no. Then she said: “I will tell you the truth, I have; come on and I will show them to you.” She took them upstairs, and from, a number of lodgers’ beds she took blankets, sometimes one, sometimes two, totalling seven in all. Mrs. Dolan kept a lodging-house. They went into the room occupied by the Dolans, and from a chest of drawers she produced a sheet and roller towel. The corporal pointed out, hanging on the bedroom wall, a pair of Air Force trousers. All these were taken. Later, at an identification parade, Mrs. Dolan identified Quinn as the man who sold her the blankets and her husband the trousers. Her husband also identified Quinn. The R.A.F. man who had sold the first blanket had since been transferred to another station.

In a statement, Mrs. Dolan said she bought one blanket from an airman named Walsh. The remaining six blankets and one sheet and towel were bought from Airman Quinn, who Charged 18/- each for the first two, 15/- each for the second pair, and 8/- for the sheet, with the towel thrown in. She knew they were Air Ministry property, but did not know that there .was any harm in taking them, as Quinn, said they had been given to him. The husband, Francis Dolan, said Mr. Quinn, an Air Force man, who lived in Enniskillen about four or five weeks ago sold him a pair of trousers for 8/-. The head constable added that Quinn was a native of Enniskillen. In a statement, Keown said he was a lodger in Dolan’s, and two months ago he brought a parcel into Mrs. Dolan from a house in the country. He did not know what was in the parcel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Flanagan, the head constable said the price paid for the blankets by Mrs. Dolan would probably be£69s 0d in all. The value of the blankets would appear to be £4 14s 0d so she paid a bigger price than the actual value Yes, bigger than