1942.

28-3-42. PETTIGO FARMER’S DEATH. During the latter end of February 1942 in a stately home situated on a farm in the townland at Springtown, Pettigo, there passed to his eternal reward that  hard-working and prosperous farmer, Mr. Thomas McCrea, widely known and greatly respected, throughout the county, who although advanced in age continued to work on his farm in a manner and with such skill as to put many of the present and much younger farm hands to shame, and practically up to the time of his death; yes, he had undoubtedly splendid attributes in the family sphere and what an inspiration to those of us who had the good fortune to watch his zeal and activities in order to maintain the reputation he inherited from his ancestors. He was my greatest friend of a lifetime; he who for so long served as the last link to a chain of equally good farmers and friends within, the five adjoining townlands, all of whom have preceded him in death, and how when I last paid a visit to his home some three years ago we talked around the fireside of the many little episodes occurring in our earlier days when during the long dreary and wintry days we made our nocturnal visits to the neighbouring farm houses to engage in a game of cards or some other form of entertainments and journeying home along the lonely roads and paths with an atmosphere of silence save the barking of a dog away at some isolated farmhouse. His home of which he always felt so proud was not always regarded as a home, rather would I say an institution, because I well remember the days’ when, that stately home was filled to overflow with patrons who had paid their pence and in some cases a shilling for what was then generally known as a “tea meeting” or “soiree” to provide funds for the lone widow, the aged or infirm, who dreaded the sight of a poor law institution. Yes, this was the home of big hearts, filled with kindness and sympathy; most charitable and indeed hospitable in the fullest measure. The deceased was the son of a great sporting family. Indeed there are many, people, like the writer, who can recall the annual races held at Ederney, and the great event which was won by a horse called “Wire In,” bred by father, William. This was heralded as a great victory for Pettigo and was celebrated too. Indeed almost every hillside had its bonfire or tar barrel illuminations, but those were the good old days and enjoyed by the grand old men of that time. His wife and family together with numerous and widespread friends are left to mourn a happy ending to a life full of sacrifice, love and admiration for his family circles. The writer has suffered an irreparable loss by one of the most outstanding and staunchest friends he had the good fortune to associate with and little did I imagine that on my last visit some 3 or 4 years ago when I received a most cordial reception followed by his ever increasing hospitality that such a stately and. cheerful home should be overshadowed with death.— (R.I.P.). P. McC.

4-4-1942. PETTIGO NEWS. On Monday of last week an Inspector from the Department of Supplies visited Pettigo village and met and interviewed members of the Parish Council with regard to the shortage of flour in that area. At the suggestion of the official it was decided to ask all householders to hand in the names of all residents in these households to their grocers so as to arrange that all may receive a fair quantity of flour per week.

On Thursday night a very enjoyable concert was held in Pettigo Hall. The entire programme was produced by, local artistes. The sketches which were humorous created much mirth. Songs were rendered by Mr. J. Elliott and Mm. F. M‘Crea, the accompanists being Miss Dorothy Mulhern and Miss Patsy Galligan.

POLICEMAN SHOT DEAD IN BELFAST. SHOTS EXCHANGED IN STREET. Assailant Wounded. SIX MEN CAPTURED. On Sunday afternoon in an exchange of shots in a Belfast street, a policeman was shot dead and one of his assailants wounded.

An official report issued from Stormont Castle, Belfast, stated: “About 3.15 this afternoon (Sunday) a police car containing four members of the R.U.C., was passing along Kashmir Rd., when it was fired at from behind an air-raid shelter. The car was hit, and the driver promptly pulled up. The policemen got out and pursued the armed men, who took refuge in No. 63 Cawnpore St. The police were fired at again, and the fire was returned. Constable Patrick Murphy (3090), attached to Springfield Rd. barracks, was shot dead after wounding one of his assailants. Having entered the house, the six men ran up to the top floor, where they were captured. One of them, who had been wounded, was taken to hospital. Two women were also, detained.”

The wounded man’s name was given as Robert Williams, aged 19, Cawnpore St., Belfast. Intense police activity followed and several houses were searched. There was a large attendance at the funeral of the deceased constable which took place on Tuesday from St. Paul’s Church to Milltown Cemetery. Deceased leaves a widow and nine children.

MURDER CHARGE. FIVE YOUTHS AND TWO GIRLS REMANDED.

Charged with the wilful murder of Constable Patrick Murphy on Easter Sunday, following a gun-battle between the police, and civilians, five youths and two girls appeared at the Belfast Police Court on Tuesday before Mr. J. H. Campbell, K.C., R.M. A sixth man, Thomas J. Williams, Bombay St., is under arrest in the Royal Victoria Hospital, suffering from gunshot wounds. Joseph Cahill (21), of 60 Divis Street, one of the accused, had his head heavily swathed in bandages. Margaret Nolan, of 32 Bombay St., was aged 16 years.

The other accused were Henry Gardner, 35 Malcolmson Street, 19 years, fitter; William James Perry (21), 264 Cupar St., labourer; John Terence Oliver (21), 167 Springfield Road; Patrick Simpson (18), 86 Cawnpore Street, sheet metal worker; Margaret Burns, 39 Cupar St., an 18-year- old waitress. The accused were remanded for three weeks in custody.

Mr. John Deeny, who appeared for the accused reserved has defence.

GIFTED FERMANAGH MAN’S DEATH – MR. PHIL MARTIN. Something of a sensation was caused throughout County Fermanagh on Wednesday by the news of the death, at a comparatively early age, of Mr. Phil Martin, Kilturk, Lisnaskea, the gifted Uileann piper, Radio. Eireann artiste and

£650 SETTLEMEHT. Enniskillen Bootmaker’s Death Recalled. At Fermanagh Assizes a suit was mentioned in which Mrs. Mary McDonald, 5, Down St., Enniskillen, on behalf of herself and children, Bernard and Mary, sought damages for the death of her husband Patrick, who died following an accident on 20th May, at the Hollow, opposite Dickie’s shop. The defendants were Lieut. Robin F. Fryer, then stationed near Enniskillen, who was motor-, cycling and. was seriously injured, and John A. Armstrong, 17 High St., Enniskillen, shop manager.

A settlement was announced under which £650 and costs would be paid by the defendant Fryer, and the claim against Armstrong was dismissed. The £650 will be divided as follows:—£375 to the widow, £175 to the daughter, and £30 to the son, with £20 for funeral expenses. Mr. Justice Megaw made the settlement a rule of court.

BELLEEK GIRL’S INJURIES. Mary Catherine Timoney, a worker in the Belleek Pottery, of Garvery,. Leggs P.O., sued Richard G. Roe, Lake View House, Letter, P.O., for damages sustained by reason of defendant’s negligence in the control of a motor car at Ballymagaghran Cross (Belleek-Kesh road) on the 18th August. Plaintiff stated she was cycling from her home in the afternoon and emerging on the main road at Ballymagaghran Cross she was proceeding over to her proper side when the car suddenly appeared and bore down on top of her. She remembered nothing further.

Dr. Daly, Ballyshannon, stated plaintiff suffered serious injuries, including a fractured skull. Defendant stated he was coming out of Belleek fair with three passengers when, approaching the cross, plaintiff came out about ten yards in front. He braked and swerved to avoid her. The car was almost stationary when plaintiff ran into it. The three passengers also having given evidence, Mr. Justice Megaw said he had every sympathy for the plaintiff, but unfortunately he had to decide the case on law and not on sympathy. He was satisfied there had been contributory negligence and that the defendant had no opportunity of avoiding the collision.

CYCLING ACCIDENT NEAR BLACKLION. SEQUEL AT DOWRA COURT. Two Women Knocked Down. YOUNG LADY FINED. At Dowra District Court, before Mr. M. J. C. Keane, D.J., Supt. Jackson prosecuted Lizzie McManus, Mullaghboy, Blacklion, for cycling on 31st August last in a dangerous manner at Killyglasson, Blacklion. Miss Annie Mason said she was going to Mass at Killinagh. At Killyglasson Cross She met Mrs. Dolan and they walked together. She had only stepped on to the road, and was on her right side. She heard no bell, and the next thing was that they were knocked down by a bicycle which was ridden by Miss McManus. She fell off the bicycle, and when she got up she cycled off. Witness was in a Dublin hospital for three months as a result of the accident. Mrs. M. Dolan,  who was with the last witness on the occasion, said Miss Mason came out to the road from the stile when witness met her. Miss Mason was on the right-hand side of the road and witness was on the left. She was knocked on the road, and Dr. Horkins advised her to go to hospital, and she did not.

Guard Mahaffy said the road was 17ft., wide at the point of the accident, and the person going towards the church would have a view of 70 yards.

Guard Hegarty said he interviewed Miss McManus who made a statement. She said she sounded the bell, and she was passing between the two women. She cycled off after the accident as she was too frightened.

John Sheerin said he was walking to Mass on the occasion on his correct side of the road. He saw Miss Mason coming on the road. He saw the accident. Mrs. Dolan was on the left-hand side and Miss Mason came over and shook hands with her. Mrs. Dolan went to move to the left, and Miss McManus tried to pass between them, and the next thing was that they all fell.

To Mr. Keane—Only for Mrs. Dolan moving Miss McManus could have passed on her correct or left-hand side of the road.

To Supt. Jackson—I cannot say I heard a bell sounded.

Miss Maguire deposed that she was with last witness and Mr. Dolan on the occasion going to Mass. Mrs. Dolan was on the wrong side of the road and went to cross, and when she heard the bell she turned around. Witness heard the bell sounded. If Mrs. Dolan had kept her own side of the road there would have been no accident. Mrs. Dolan was responsible for the accident. Miss McManus tried to pass between the two women.

Miss L. McManus, defendant, stated she was 16 years :of age. She passed John Sheeran, and before doing so rang the bell, and did the same passing Mrs. Dolan and Miss Mason. She rang the bell for them to keep their own place. Only for Mrs. Dolan crossing the road there would be no accident. Her bicycle was broken.

To Supt. Jackson—I went away after the accident, and my sister stayed with the two women.

To Mr. Keane—I live with my parents, and no compensation was paid the two ladies. I am cycling a few years, and am still cycling. I did not report the

JAIL FOR NEXT OFFENCE R.M.’s WARNING IN R.A.F. BLANKETS LARCENY CHARGE. “ I would like it to be known that, the next person I find taking Air Force or Army property from airmen or soldiers will be sent to prison for a lengthy term, and I shall send them to prison without the slightest hesitation.” This stern warning was issued at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday by Major Dickie, R.M., when dealing with a case in which Mrs. Mary Dolan, 27 Market Street, Enniskillen, was charged with receiving six blankets, one sheet and one roller towel, property of the Air Ministry, and value £4 14s 10d, knowing same to have been stolen; her husband; Francis Dolan, was charged with receiving a pair of Air Force trousers, value 15/6, knowing them to have been stolen and Bartholomew McKeown, a lodger with, the Dolans, was charged with aiding and abetting Mrs. Dolan in receiving one Air Ministry blanket, value 12/6, by carrying it from a place of concealment to Dolan’s, knowing it to have been stolen.

Head Constable Thornton said on information received he obtained a warrant on the 9th March and went to Dolan’s house, accompanied by Sergeant Lockhart and Corporal Clarke, of the R.A.F. security police. He met Mary Dolan, wife of Francis, and told her he was going to search the house for Air Force property, and asked her had she any, and she said no. Then she said: “I will tell you the truth, I have; come on and I will show them to you.” She took them upstairs, and from, a number of lodgers’ beds she took blankets, sometimes one, sometimes two, totalling seven in all. Mrs. Dolan kept a lodging-house. They went into the room occupied by the Dolans, and from a chest of drawers she produced a sheet and roller towel. The corporal pointed out, hanging on the bedroom wall, a pair of Air Force trousers. All these were taken. Later, at an identification parade, Mrs. Dolan identified Quinn as the man who sold her the blankets and her husband the trousers. Her husband also identified Quinn. The R.A.F. man who had sold the first blanket had since been transferred to another station.

In a statement, Mrs. Dolan said she bought one blanket from an airman named Walsh. The remaining six blankets and one sheet and towel were bought from Airman Quinn, who Charged 18/- each for the first two, 15/- each for the second pair, and 8/- for the sheet, with the towel thrown in. She knew they were Air Ministry property, but did not know that there .was any harm in taking them, as Quinn, said they had been given to him. The husband, Francis Dolan, said Mr. Quinn, an Air Force man, who lived in Enniskillen about four or five weeks ago sold him a pair of trousers for 8/-. The head constable added that Quinn was a native of Enniskillen. In a statement, Keown said he was a lodger in Dolan’s, and two months ago he brought a parcel into Mrs. Dolan from a house in the country. He did not know what was in the parcel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Flanagan, the head constable said the price paid for the blankets by Mrs. Dolan would probably be£69s 0d in all. The value of the blankets would appear to be £4 14s 0d so she paid a bigger price than the actual value Yes, bigger than

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