1817. ERNE PACKET. Typhus deaths, Kościuszko, Robbery of the Belfast Mail.

25-12-1817. THE MARQUIS D’ANTONELLE, better known in the revolutionary history of France by the name of Pierre Antoine, died lately at Arles, his native place, aged seventy, he was a Member of the Convention, in which he acted a very distinguished part; was persecuted by Robespierre; pursued by the Directory; and neglected by Bonaparte. His political writings were numerous, and memorable for their ability. He was one of the principal Editors of the famous Journal des Hombres Libres. At the restoration of the Bourbons in 1814, he published a pamphlet, in which he openly embraced their cause.

25-12-1817. ADVANTAGES OF CLEANLINESS.—Tuesday, at a meeting of the Subscribers to the House of Recovery, or Fever Hospital, Waterford, it was stated from the proper Committee, that 1,120 dwellings, which had been whitewashed for the poor people, and provided with fresh straw beds, had since whitewashing, sent but four patients to the House. It would be difficult to conceive a stronger proof of the advantages of cleanliness.— Waterford Mirror.

25-12-1817. AT THE I’ECOLE ROYALE, IN PARIS, lectures are now delivering in the Persian, Arabic, Turkish, Armenian, and Modern Greek languages.

25-12-1817. THE INQUISITION, say the last accounts from Spain, has been very active for some time past, particularly in the Provinces, where several persons have been arrested, the greater part of them charges with Freemasonry.

25-12-1817. ON SUNDAY LAST THE following prayer for deliverance from the prevailing sickness or plague, was offered up in several of the churches in Limerick, “Oh Almighty God, who in thy wrath didst send a plague upon thine own people in the wilderness, for their obstinate rebellion against Moses and Aaron, and also in the time of King David, didst stay with the plague of pestilence three score and ten??

18-12-1817. A BOXING MATCH which took place on Monday near Westport, between two men of the names of Patrick McDonagh and Patrick Browne. The former, either in a fall, or by a blow from his opponent, received what appeared to be a slight wound on the forehead, when the persons present interfered and reconciled the combatants, and conducted McDonagh to his home, where he had scarcely arrived when he expired. He was in appearance a much stronger man than Browne. An inquest was held on the body of the deceased and a verdict of Manslaughter was returned against the survivor.

13-11-1817. KOSCIUSKO. The hero of Poland, the brave, disinterested and virtuous Kosciusko is stated, in an article from Lausanne, to have died at Soleure on the 15th instant. A singular felicity of reputation has even attended this amiable citizen and Warrior. — In the case of genuine liberty he fought against injustice, and shamed both the tyrants and Jacobins of the age. In his days of power, at the head of armies that adored his name, no false glory dazzled him nor corrupt ambition could betray him. He nobly resisted the foreign potentates who had laid waste his country; not because they were Kings and Emperors, but because they were invaders and oppressors. He combated with no rebellious sword—far no ambiguous object. When Poland lost her independence, Kosciusko lost his home; as she sunk he rose; but not upon her ruins. The Court of Russia would have allured this illustrious defender of the people whom he had subjugated, by temptations irresistible to vulgar minds: Bonaparte would have made him the flattered instrument of a spurious and hollow liberality to his countrymen: but Kosciusko saw that their lot was irretrievable; and his own he refused to change.— as a soldier and a patriot, in public life and in retirement, his principles were untainted, and his name unsullied: the Monarchs whom he opposed respected him: the factions who failed to seduce, forebore to slander him; and he would have been the Washington, had he not been the Wallace, of Poland.

(From the Internet) Andrzej Tadeusz Bonawentura Kościuszko (Andrew Thaddeus Bonaventure Kościuszko; February 4 or 12, 1746 – October 15, 1817 was a Polish–Lithuanian military engineer and a military leader who became a national hero in Poland, Lithuania, Belarus, and the United States. He fought in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth’s struggles against Russia and Prussia, and on the American side in the American Revolutionary War. As Supreme Commander of the Polish National Armed Forces, he led the 1794 Kościuszko Uprising. Kościuszko was born in February 1746 in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, in a village that is now in Belarus; his exact birthdate is unknown. At age 20, he graduated from the Corps of Cadets in Warsaw, Poland, but after the outbreak of a civil war involving the Bar Confederation in 1768, Kościuszko moved to France in 1769 to pursue further studies. He returned to Poland in 1774, two years after its First Partition, and took a position as tutor in Józef Sylwester Sosnowski’s household. After Kościuszko attempted to elope with his employer’s daughter and was severely beaten by the father’s retainers, he returned to France. In 1776, Kościuszko moved to North America, where he took part in the American Revolutionary War as a colonel in the Continental Army. An accomplished military architect, he designed and oversaw the construction of state-of-the-art fortifications, including those at West Point, New York. In 1783, in recognition of his services, the Continental Congress promoted him to brigadier general.

Returning to Poland in 1784, Kościuszko was commissioned a major general in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth Army in 1789. After the Polish–Russian War of 1792 had resulted in the Second Partition of Poland, he organized an uprising against Russia in March 1794, serving as its Naczelnik (commander-in-chief). Russian forces captured him at the Battle of Maciejowice in October 1794. The defeat of the Kościuszko Uprising that November led to Poland’s Third Partition in 1795, which ended the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth’s independent existence for 123 years. In 1796, following the death of Tsaritsa Catherine the Great, Kościuszko was pardoned by her successor, Tsar Paul I, and he emigrated to the United States. A close friend of Thomas Jefferson, with whom he shared ideals of human rights, Kościuszko wrote a will in 1798 dedicating his American assets to the education and freedom of U.S. slaves. He eventually returned to Europe and lived in Switzerland until his death in 1817. The execution of his will later proved difficult and the funds were never used for the purpose he had intended.

13-11-1817. MARRIED, In St. Mark’s Church, by the Rev. Joseph Druitt, James Johnson, of Drum, County of Monaghan, Esq. to Miss E. Reeves, daughter of the late D. H. Reeves, Esq. and niece to Colonel Reeves of the 27th Regiment.

13-11-1817. On the 21st inst. at Eyrecourt, Walter Lambert, Esq. eldest son of Walter Lambert, Esq. of Castle Lambert, county Galway, to the amiable and accomplished Anne, eldest daughter of Giles Eyre, Esq. of Eyrecourt-Castle, and Lieut. Col. of the Galway Militia.

13-11-1817. DIED. On Saturday last, in the prime of life, of Typhus fever, the Rev. James McKenna, Parish Priest of Tempo. — A young man of the most amiable character and exemplary conduct, and deeply lamented by his acquaintances, and congregation.

On the same day, of Typhus fever, Mrs, McDonald, wife of Mr. Edward McDonald of this town. Baker.

On Monday morning, of Typhus fever, at Mount-Irvine, near Clogher, in the prime of life, Surgeon George Irvine, R, N., son of Mr. Acheson Irvine, of Derrygore, near this town.

At Strabane, on the 20th ult. of  Typhus fever, John Glasse, Esq. Attorney.

On the same day, of Typhus fever, Mr. Spence, Saddler.

At same place, on the 2nd inst., of Typhus fever, Mrs. Perry, wife of Mr. John Perry.

At same place, on the 31st ult. after a few days illness, of Typhus fever, Mr. Adam Burrell.

On the 31st ult., Mrs. Saunders, wife of Mr. Saunders, of Foyle College, Derry.

In Bishop Street, Derry, Mr. Billington.

In Ferry-quay-street, Derry, Mrs. Kelly, in the prime of life.

On the 1st. inst., near Sligo, deeply regretted by all who knew him, Charles Dawson, Esq. A. M., late first assistant in Sligo School.—Amongst his numerous attainments, he had acquired some knowledge of medicine, which he applied in his leisure hours towards the relief of the sick poor—and in his visits of mercy he caught the fever, which in a few days hurried him, in the prime of life, to another World, where, we trust, he “now rests from his Labours, and his Works have followed him.”

At Swords, on the 5th inst., of Typhus fever, caught in the execution of his clerical duties, the Rev. James Wallace a Gentleman regretted by all who knew him.

On the 30th, of Typhus fever, Anna, only surviving child of John Fetherston H., Esq. of Grangemore, County of Westmeath.

(From the Internet.) Typhus is any of several similar diseases caused by Rickettsia bacteria.[1] The name comes from the Greek typhus (τύφος) meaning smoky or hazy, describing the state of mind of those affected with typhus. The causative organism Rickettsia is an obligate intracellular parasitic bacterium that cannot survive for long outside living cells. It is transmitted to humans via external parasites such as lice, fleas, and ticks. While “typhoid” means “typhus-like”, typhus and typhoid fever are distinct diseases caused by different genera of bacteria. The following signs/symptoms refer to epidemic typhus as it is the most important of the typhus group of diseases. Signs and symptoms begin with sudden onset of fever, chills, headache, and other flu-like symptoms about 1 to 2 weeks after being infected. Five to nine days after the symptoms have started; a rash typically begins on the trunk and spreads to the extremities. This rash eventually spreads over most of the body, sparing the face, palms, and soles. Signs of meningoencephalitis begin with the rash and continue into the second or third weeks. Other signs of meningoencephalitis include sensitivity to light (photophobia), altered mental status (delirium), or coma. Untreated cases are often fatal.

In historical times “Gaol Fever”,  was common in English prisons, and is believed by modern authorities to have been Typhus. It often occurred when prisoners were crowded together into dark, filthy rooms where lice spread easily. Thus “Imprisonment until the next term of court” was often equivalent to a death sentence. Prisoners brought before the court sometimes infected members of the court itself. Following the assizes held at Oxford in 1577, later deemed the Black Assize, over 300 died from gaol fever, including Sir Robert Bell, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer. The Black Assize of Exeter 1586 was another notable outbreak. During the Lent assizes court held at Taunton in 1730, gaol fever caused the death of the Lord Chief Baron, as well as the High Sheriff, the sergeant, and hundreds of others. During a time when persons were executed for capital offenses, more prisoners died from ‘gaol fever’ than were put to death by all the public executioners in the British realm. In 1759, an English authority estimated that each year a quarter of the prisoners had died from gaol fever. In London, gaol fever frequently broke out among the ill-kept prisoners of Newgate Prison and then moved into the general city population. In May 1750, the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Samuel Pennant, and a large number of court personnel were fatally infected in the courtroom of the Old Bailey, which adjoined Newgate Prison.

13-11-1817. ROBBERY OF THE BELFAST MAIL COACH. Friday evening, about ten minutes after six o’clock, as the Belfast Day Mail Coach, on its way to Dublin, arrived at Lissen-hall, a short distance beyond Swords, the Coachman found his way obstructed by two carts being placed across the road. Soon afterwards, a body of armed men, ten or twelve in number, appeared; the front horses were seized, and, about the same time, the banditti fired three shots, one of which passed through the hat of one of the guards, Luke Rocheford and unfortunately took effect in the back part of his head, but, we trust, without any serious result. The passengers, eleven in number — seven outside and four inside—many of them females, were then rifled in the most brutal manner, of the valuable effects and property about them; which was a small gold watch, maker’s name, Arnold and Sons, London, and supposed to be Number 217; a gold seal, and the initials marked upon it, W. S., in Irish characters; also, a gold watch, maker’s name, Thomas Moss, Ludgate-street, London; a great variety of bank notes, among which was one of the Bank of Ireland, for five pounds, dated 4th December, 1816. We give this hasty description of those articles, in the hope of their leading to a detection. Two artillery men passed by at the time, but took no notice of the proceedings, more than enquiring, “what was the matter,” and being informed, they went forward quietly- Those men can easily be ascertained to give evidence, if necessary. A carman was also  stopped, but no molestation offered to him.— While the robbers were engaged in plundering the passengers, a post coach came up, in which were the Marquis of Donegal, his son, (Lord Belfast,) and another gentleman, all well armed. An attempt was made to stop the post coach, but, by the exertions of the coachman, in whipping the horses over a large trunk, they most fortunately escaped. They had not proceeded far, when they met a party of horse patrole, who immediately went in quest of the robbers: a foot patrole had also been sent in that direction, in consequence of a robbery having been committed the night previous, at the house of Mr. Harckney. We have the pleasure to state that none of the passengers in the Belfast coach have suffered any personal injury, and also that the entire of the mail-bags have been preserved. We have little doubt that some of the delinquents will be apprehended. The Post Office will, of course, do its duty; and we hope that the poor wounded guard, who preserved the mail bags, will not go without attention and reward. Mr. Farrell requested the attendance of the respective passengers at the Head Police office, this morning when a further investigation will go forward before the Magistrates; and we cannot omit noticing the urbanity and politeness of Lord Belfast, in disclosing and furnishing us with such particulars of this transaction, as came within his immediate knowledge or observation. Carrick’s Morning Post. Five persons have been apprehended for the above Robbery, and after a long examination on Monday last, at the Head Police Office, Dublin, three of them were fully committed for trial.

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November 14th 1908.

14-11-1908. ECHO OF THE ARCHDALL DIVORCE CASE. SEPARATION DEED ARRANGED. APPLICATION AS TO COSTS. On Monday, in the Probate Court, Dublin, before Mr. Justice Andrews, an application in reference to costs was made in the case of Archdall v. Archdall. The petitioner was Mr. Edward Hugh Archdall, of Drumcoo, Co. Fermanagh, and the respondent was his wife, Mrs. Dorothea Frederica M. Archdall. The trial, which had attracted considerable attention, had resulted in a disagreement of the jury. Mr. Patchell, K.C. (instructed by Mr. B. L. Winslow), on behalf of the respondent, stated that the matter had been before the Court on several occasions. The original application was for an order directing that the wife’s costs should be paid when taxed. Some months ago that application was made, but it was adjourned on the ground that it might be premature. The suit had now, however, been determined, and a separator deed arranged by which the parties agreed to live separately and to enter into an arrangement of a pecuniary character for the support of the wife and the custody of the children. There was, however, in the deed, nothing in reference to costs. Mr. Justice Andrews and counsel discussed the question whether any order for costs should include those of the separation deed. Mr. Pringle who (instructed by Messrs. Falls & Pringle appeared for the petitioner, said he was not instructed as to the costs of the separation proceedings. Mr. Justice Andrews, allowed the motion to stand for a week.

14-11-1908. WHAT OTHER NATIONS ARE DOING. With reference to the methods adopted by different countries to improve the breed of horses, in Germany the Government army estimates provide £100,000 for the encouragement of horse-breeding, Austria-Hungry, £300,000, France, £100,000, England nil. In America the Government also looks well after the important matter of horse breeding.

DONEGAL ISLANDERS CLAIM FOR SALVAGE. In the Court of Admiralty, before Mr Justice Johnston. Mr Thomas Patton (instructed by Mr. J. E. O’Doherty) applied on behalf of the plaintiffs, Michael O’Donnell, Edward O’Donnell, and Michael F. O’Donnell, all residing on Arranmore Island, Burtonport, County Donegal for an order giving them leave to issue and serve a writ out of the jurisdiction on the defendants ,’the Fleetwood Steam Shipping Co.,’ Ltd. The action is for £80 claim for salvage services alleged “to have been rendered to the defendant company’s steamer Ixion while in distress off Rutland Island, County Donegal, on 9th and 10th August last. Mr. Justice Johnston granted the application, the writ to be served on the secretary of the company.

14-11-1908. CATTLE DRIVING IN CO. DERRY. On Sunday five Head of cattle were discovered to be missing from the field of Mr. Robert Simpson, having strayed or been stolen. The occurrence has been reported to the police of the entire district around. A month ago two head of cattle were stolen from Bridgend. This looks to be even worse than cattle driving, about which the Unionist organs prate so much. In the South and West the cattle are never injured nor driven away after being taken off the lands. Perhaps some of the “Carrion Crow” M.P.’s would table a question in the House.

14-11-1908. SCENE AT THE RAILWAY STATION. The majority of those who attended the hiring fair in Enniskillen on Tuesday last had to seek refuge in the various places of refreshment from the drenching downpour which prevailed during the day. The result was rather disastrous. In the evening a considerable number emerged from the public-houses fortified by the strong drinks, for which Enniskillen is said to be famous, and added to the gaiety of the town by rolling in the mud, of which there was an abundance and engaging in the usual drunken brawls. The police were kept busy during the day in quelling rows, and in the evening the two police barracks were pretty full. While awaiting the arrival of the 6.30 p.m. train from Dublin a melee occurred at the railway station between some parties from the Kesh district, and a large window at the entrance to the station was broken.

14-11-1908. LARGE AMERICAN FACTORY FOR ENGLAND. The Stolz Electrophone Co, of Chicago with London Offices at 82, Fleet Street, manufacturers of a patent pocket telephone for the deaf, have decided to move the foreign department of their Works to London in order to meet the requirements of the new patent law. The company will employ about 600 hands. In America the Stolz Electrophone has become as necessary as spectacles. The principal agent used in the Electro-phone is electricity, which enables people hard of hearing to hear clearly at any distance. The instrument is portable and a powerful sound intensifier. The whole of the European trade off this concern will be fed by the London Works.

14-11-1908. LISNASKEA HIRING FAIR. The half-yearly hiring fair was held in Lisnaskea on Saturday. Very little hiring is now done in these fairs. All the youths and maidens in the neighbourhood on pleasure bent were present, on Saturday. There was also an exceptionally large crowd of the itinerant class.

14-11-1908. ENNISKILLEN MAN’S BODY FOUND NEAR CASTLE CALDWELL. On Tuesday the body of a young man named Charles Nethercote, a boat builder, aged about 30 years, who resided in Strand St., Enniskillen, was found floating in Lough Erne. It appears deceased left his home on Monday week last in company with his brother, and proceeded by boat to Castlecaldwell for a cargo of sand. When about to return a few days later the deceased left the boat, and getting into a small punt proceeded homewards in. the direction of Enniskillen followed by his brother. Nothing was heard of him up till Tuesday last, when, as stated, his dead body was found.

14-11-1908. TO DETERMINE OLD AGE PENSIONS INCOMES. As a result of consultation with practical farmers about Magherafelt district the following figures have been adopted for determining the income of a person engaged in agriculture:— He allowed £8 per acre on potatoes, £5 on corn, £2 on black hay, £6 on white hay, a horse £6, a cow £4, heifer. £2, a calf £1, from 10s to £1 on each peck of flax sown. He allowed 25 per cent, for working expenses and the keep of animals, and also made an allowance for rent. Mr. Ward said the Treasury gave no instructions as to the values to be placed on crops and stock. It was left to the discretion of the pension officers. Of course the figures varied according to the quality of the crop.