1942.

28-3-42. PETTIGO FARMER’S DEATH. During the latter end of February 1942 in a stately home situated on a farm in the townland at Springtown, Pettigo, there passed to his eternal reward that  hard-working and prosperous farmer, Mr. Thomas McCrea, widely known and greatly respected, throughout the county, who although advanced in age continued to work on his farm in a manner and with such skill as to put many of the present and much younger farm hands to shame, and practically up to the time of his death; yes, he had undoubtedly splendid attributes in the family sphere and what an inspiration to those of us who had the good fortune to watch his zeal and activities in order to maintain the reputation he inherited from his ancestors. He was my greatest friend of a lifetime; he who for so long served as the last link to a chain of equally good farmers and friends within, the five adjoining townlands, all of whom have preceded him in death, and how when I last paid a visit to his home some three years ago we talked around the fireside of the many little episodes occurring in our earlier days when during the long dreary and wintry days we made our nocturnal visits to the neighbouring farm houses to engage in a game of cards or some other form of entertainments and journeying home along the lonely roads and paths with an atmosphere of silence save the barking of a dog away at some isolated farmhouse. His home of which he always felt so proud was not always regarded as a home, rather would I say an institution, because I well remember the days’ when, that stately home was filled to overflow with patrons who had paid their pence and in some cases a shilling for what was then generally known as a “tea meeting” or “soiree” to provide funds for the lone widow, the aged or infirm, who dreaded the sight of a poor law institution. Yes, this was the home of big hearts, filled with kindness and sympathy; most charitable and indeed hospitable in the fullest measure. The deceased was the son of a great sporting family. Indeed there are many, people, like the writer, who can recall the annual races held at Ederney, and the great event which was won by a horse called “Wire In,” bred by father, William. This was heralded as a great victory for Pettigo and was celebrated too. Indeed almost every hillside had its bonfire or tar barrel illuminations, but those were the good old days and enjoyed by the grand old men of that time. His wife and family together with numerous and widespread friends are left to mourn a happy ending to a life full of sacrifice, love and admiration for his family circles. The writer has suffered an irreparable loss by one of the most outstanding and staunchest friends he had the good fortune to associate with and little did I imagine that on my last visit some 3 or 4 years ago when I received a most cordial reception followed by his ever increasing hospitality that such a stately and. cheerful home should be overshadowed with death.— (R.I.P.). P. McC.

4-4-1942. PETTIGO NEWS. On Monday of last week an Inspector from the Department of Supplies visited Pettigo village and met and interviewed members of the Parish Council with regard to the shortage of flour in that area. At the suggestion of the official it was decided to ask all householders to hand in the names of all residents in these households to their grocers so as to arrange that all may receive a fair quantity of flour per week.

On Thursday night a very enjoyable concert was held in Pettigo Hall. The entire programme was produced by, local artistes. The sketches which were humorous created much mirth. Songs were rendered by Mr. J. Elliott and Mm. F. M‘Crea, the accompanists being Miss Dorothy Mulhern and Miss Patsy Galligan.

POLICEMAN SHOT DEAD IN BELFAST. SHOTS EXCHANGED IN STREET. Assailant Wounded. SIX MEN CAPTURED. On Sunday afternoon in an exchange of shots in a Belfast street, a policeman was shot dead and one of his assailants wounded.

An official report issued from Stormont Castle, Belfast, stated: “About 3.15 this afternoon (Sunday) a police car containing four members of the R.U.C., was passing along Kashmir Rd., when it was fired at from behind an air-raid shelter. The car was hit, and the driver promptly pulled up. The policemen got out and pursued the armed men, who took refuge in No. 63 Cawnpore St. The police were fired at again, and the fire was returned. Constable Patrick Murphy (3090), attached to Springfield Rd. barracks, was shot dead after wounding one of his assailants. Having entered the house, the six men ran up to the top floor, where they were captured. One of them, who had been wounded, was taken to hospital. Two women were also, detained.”

The wounded man’s name was given as Robert Williams, aged 19, Cawnpore St., Belfast. Intense police activity followed and several houses were searched. There was a large attendance at the funeral of the deceased constable which took place on Tuesday from St. Paul’s Church to Milltown Cemetery. Deceased leaves a widow and nine children.

MURDER CHARGE. FIVE YOUTHS AND TWO GIRLS REMANDED.

Charged with the wilful murder of Constable Patrick Murphy on Easter Sunday, following a gun-battle between the police, and civilians, five youths and two girls appeared at the Belfast Police Court on Tuesday before Mr. J. H. Campbell, K.C., R.M. A sixth man, Thomas J. Williams, Bombay St., is under arrest in the Royal Victoria Hospital, suffering from gunshot wounds. Joseph Cahill (21), of 60 Divis Street, one of the accused, had his head heavily swathed in bandages. Margaret Nolan, of 32 Bombay St., was aged 16 years.

The other accused were Henry Gardner, 35 Malcolmson Street, 19 years, fitter; William James Perry (21), 264 Cupar St., labourer; John Terence Oliver (21), 167 Springfield Road; Patrick Simpson (18), 86 Cawnpore Street, sheet metal worker; Margaret Burns, 39 Cupar St., an 18-year- old waitress. The accused were remanded for three weeks in custody.

Mr. John Deeny, who appeared for the accused reserved has defence.

GIFTED FERMANAGH MAN’S DEATH – MR. PHIL MARTIN. Something of a sensation was caused throughout County Fermanagh on Wednesday by the news of the death, at a comparatively early age, of Mr. Phil Martin, Kilturk, Lisnaskea, the gifted Uileann piper, Radio. Eireann artiste and

£650 SETTLEMEHT. Enniskillen Bootmaker’s Death Recalled. At Fermanagh Assizes a suit was mentioned in which Mrs. Mary McDonald, 5, Down St., Enniskillen, on behalf of herself and children, Bernard and Mary, sought damages for the death of her husband Patrick, who died following an accident on 20th May, at the Hollow, opposite Dickie’s shop. The defendants were Lieut. Robin F. Fryer, then stationed near Enniskillen, who was motor-, cycling and. was seriously injured, and John A. Armstrong, 17 High St., Enniskillen, shop manager.

A settlement was announced under which £650 and costs would be paid by the defendant Fryer, and the claim against Armstrong was dismissed. The £650 will be divided as follows:—£375 to the widow, £175 to the daughter, and £30 to the son, with £20 for funeral expenses. Mr. Justice Megaw made the settlement a rule of court.

BELLEEK GIRL’S INJURIES. Mary Catherine Timoney, a worker in the Belleek Pottery, of Garvery,. Leggs P.O., sued Richard G. Roe, Lake View House, Letter, P.O., for damages sustained by reason of defendant’s negligence in the control of a motor car at Ballymagaghran Cross (Belleek-Kesh road) on the 18th August. Plaintiff stated she was cycling from her home in the afternoon and emerging on the main road at Ballymagaghran Cross she was proceeding over to her proper side when the car suddenly appeared and bore down on top of her. She remembered nothing further.

Dr. Daly, Ballyshannon, stated plaintiff suffered serious injuries, including a fractured skull. Defendant stated he was coming out of Belleek fair with three passengers when, approaching the cross, plaintiff came out about ten yards in front. He braked and swerved to avoid her. The car was almost stationary when plaintiff ran into it. The three passengers also having given evidence, Mr. Justice Megaw said he had every sympathy for the plaintiff, but unfortunately he had to decide the case on law and not on sympathy. He was satisfied there had been contributory negligence and that the defendant had no opportunity of avoiding the collision.

CYCLING ACCIDENT NEAR BLACKLION. SEQUEL AT DOWRA COURT. Two Women Knocked Down. YOUNG LADY FINED. At Dowra District Court, before Mr. M. J. C. Keane, D.J., Supt. Jackson prosecuted Lizzie McManus, Mullaghboy, Blacklion, for cycling on 31st August last in a dangerous manner at Killyglasson, Blacklion. Miss Annie Mason said she was going to Mass at Killinagh. At Killyglasson Cross She met Mrs. Dolan and they walked together. She had only stepped on to the road, and was on her right side. She heard no bell, and the next thing was that they were knocked down by a bicycle which was ridden by Miss McManus. She fell off the bicycle, and when she got up she cycled off. Witness was in a Dublin hospital for three months as a result of the accident. Mrs. M. Dolan,  who was with the last witness on the occasion, said Miss Mason came out to the road from the stile when witness met her. Miss Mason was on the right-hand side of the road and witness was on the left. She was knocked on the road, and Dr. Horkins advised her to go to hospital, and she did not.

Guard Mahaffy said the road was 17ft., wide at the point of the accident, and the person going towards the church would have a view of 70 yards.

Guard Hegarty said he interviewed Miss McManus who made a statement. She said she sounded the bell, and she was passing between the two women. She cycled off after the accident as she was too frightened.

John Sheerin said he was walking to Mass on the occasion on his correct side of the road. He saw Miss Mason coming on the road. He saw the accident. Mrs. Dolan was on the left-hand side and Miss Mason came over and shook hands with her. Mrs. Dolan went to move to the left, and Miss McManus tried to pass between them, and the next thing was that they all fell.

To Mr. Keane—Only for Mrs. Dolan moving Miss McManus could have passed on her correct or left-hand side of the road.

To Supt. Jackson—I cannot say I heard a bell sounded.

Miss Maguire deposed that she was with last witness and Mr. Dolan on the occasion going to Mass. Mrs. Dolan was on the wrong side of the road and went to cross, and when she heard the bell she turned around. Witness heard the bell sounded. If Mrs. Dolan had kept her own side of the road there would have been no accident. Mrs. Dolan was responsible for the accident. Miss McManus tried to pass between the two women.

Miss L. McManus, defendant, stated she was 16 years :of age. She passed John Sheeran, and before doing so rang the bell, and did the same passing Mrs. Dolan and Miss Mason. She rang the bell for them to keep their own place. Only for Mrs. Dolan crossing the road there would be no accident. Her bicycle was broken.

To Supt. Jackson—I went away after the accident, and my sister stayed with the two women.

To Mr. Keane—I live with my parents, and no compensation was paid the two ladies. I am cycling a few years, and am still cycling. I did not report the

JAIL FOR NEXT OFFENCE R.M.’s WARNING IN R.A.F. BLANKETS LARCENY CHARGE. “ I would like it to be known that, the next person I find taking Air Force or Army property from airmen or soldiers will be sent to prison for a lengthy term, and I shall send them to prison without the slightest hesitation.” This stern warning was issued at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday by Major Dickie, R.M., when dealing with a case in which Mrs. Mary Dolan, 27 Market Street, Enniskillen, was charged with receiving six blankets, one sheet and one roller towel, property of the Air Ministry, and value £4 14s 10d, knowing same to have been stolen; her husband; Francis Dolan, was charged with receiving a pair of Air Force trousers, value 15/6, knowing them to have been stolen and Bartholomew McKeown, a lodger with, the Dolans, was charged with aiding and abetting Mrs. Dolan in receiving one Air Ministry blanket, value 12/6, by carrying it from a place of concealment to Dolan’s, knowing it to have been stolen.

Head Constable Thornton said on information received he obtained a warrant on the 9th March and went to Dolan’s house, accompanied by Sergeant Lockhart and Corporal Clarke, of the R.A.F. security police. He met Mary Dolan, wife of Francis, and told her he was going to search the house for Air Force property, and asked her had she any, and she said no. Then she said: “I will tell you the truth, I have; come on and I will show them to you.” She took them upstairs, and from, a number of lodgers’ beds she took blankets, sometimes one, sometimes two, totalling seven in all. Mrs. Dolan kept a lodging-house. They went into the room occupied by the Dolans, and from a chest of drawers she produced a sheet and roller towel. The corporal pointed out, hanging on the bedroom wall, a pair of Air Force trousers. All these were taken. Later, at an identification parade, Mrs. Dolan identified Quinn as the man who sold her the blankets and her husband the trousers. Her husband also identified Quinn. The R.A.F. man who had sold the first blanket had since been transferred to another station.

In a statement, Mrs. Dolan said she bought one blanket from an airman named Walsh. The remaining six blankets and one sheet and towel were bought from Airman Quinn, who Charged 18/- each for the first two, 15/- each for the second pair, and 8/- for the sheet, with the towel thrown in. She knew they were Air Ministry property, but did not know that there .was any harm in taking them, as Quinn, said they had been given to him. The husband, Francis Dolan, said Mr. Quinn, an Air Force man, who lived in Enniskillen about four or five weeks ago sold him a pair of trousers for 8/-. The head constable added that Quinn was a native of Enniskillen. In a statement, Keown said he was a lodger in Dolan’s, and two months ago he brought a parcel into Mrs. Dolan from a house in the country. He did not know what was in the parcel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Flanagan, the head constable said the price paid for the blankets by Mrs. Dolan would probably be£69s 0d in all. The value of the blankets would appear to be £4 14s 0d so she paid a bigger price than the actual value Yes, bigger than

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1942 Edward Anderson’s Fermanagh Folklore.

Eddie Anderson  1897-1960. Christened Edward Andrew he was the eldest son of Kinawley schoolmaster Andrew Anderson and his wife Mary McHugh. He lived at Corragun, Kinawley and in the 1940s as Éamann Mac Aindréis he contributed a weekly column on the history and folklore of South Fermanagh the Anglo-Celt. The Fermanagh Herald also began to serialise his award-winning collection of folklore on 1 November 1941. Another series began FH 29 October 1949. His youngest brother John Peter, a clerical student died January 1927 and his other brother Francis and sister Mary Kate also died young of TB. Master Andrew Anderson who died on Good Friday 1928 lived at Drumlish and had Donegal author Seumas Mac Manus as a young teacher in his school. Mac Manus regularly sent him copies of his latest publications and mentions the Andersons in his autobiography The Rocky Road to Dublin.   Eddie Anderson married Bridget Gilleece from Gorgesh and they had six children. In the Shadow of Benaughlin, a selection of his writings was edited and published by his grand-daughter Iona McGoldrick in 2013. 82 pages, softback, printed by The Print Factory, Enniskillen. I wrote the introduction and helped to launch a collection of his writings a few years ago. The Fermanagh Herald ran a competition for collections of folklore; there were three winners, Anderson, Jim McVeigh and Paddy Tunney. Jim McVeigh’s collection was published in book form by Fr. Joe some years ago. Seamas

Fermanagh Herald 21-2-1942. Folk Tales of Fermanagh. By EAMON ANDERSON

In the closing paragraphs of last week’s article I hinted a little at the kind of times we had in most parts of Fermanagh not only during the whole of the last century, but even through the first decade of the present one. And mind you, Fermanagh was one of the better-off counties, things were far worse in many other parts of Ireland and especially in the western counties from Donegal to Cork. Some of the younger generation who have been reared in comparatively prosperous, times (although we farmers cannot by any means boast of our wealth, even yet)— may say “Oh the times could not have been as bad as all that, and if they were, what was wrong anyway ?” Well, there were several things wrong. There were bad wet seasons—off and on, such as we have got even so lately as 1924 and 1931, with consequent failure of crops and deaths of cattle. Let us hope and pray that the bad seasons will not come back while this war lasts, else we may have to face something like the horrors of another “Black “47” Then there was bad prices for farm produce in those days so that often everything that the farm produced, except a few wretched potatoes, had to be sold, to pay the rack-rent that was on it. An old farmer of Kinawley who died some ten years ago aged 96, told me that in his young days he sold 6 yearling calves for a five pound note. Not five pound apiece, mind you, but five pounds for the whole lot. And many people, still alive, remember all the bull calves of the country side being sold for veal at a half-crown each as it would not pay to rear them. Pork was sold at from 23 to 25 shillings per cut, and eggs at the noble price of 2d to 3d a dozen! There were very few pigs or hens kept in the old days, and no wonder. And eggs could not be sold at all in this part of the country—they had to be carried to Dublin or such places. A woman named Gilbride used to buy eggs here. When she would have a small creel full, she used to make arm ropes for the creel and get it on her back and carry it the whole way to Dublin to make a few shillings. If she got an odd lift, on a cart, for charity, well and good, but often most of the journey had to be done on foot. You may stare at this, but it’s true notwithstanding. And even more astounding things happened as you shall see. Fermanagh was always a great grass county, but often, when the larger farmers went down in stock and had not many cattle, they could not get their hay sold. So they often carted it the whole way to Dublin City. One of my old Shanachies, the late Mr. John Maguire, of Drumbinnis, told me that his grandfather often saw about 20 carts of hay from near Enniskillen going up the old coach road through Kinawley and Derrylin. Their route would be on through Belturbet and Cavan, on through Kells and Navan and on to the Capital, 100 miles in all, changing horses every 20 miles as the old stage coaches did. The wheels of the carts were blocks of wood, all in one piece, shod with iron, somewhat like the ‘‘trindle” of a turf barrow. Most of the gentry of Ireland lived in Dublin in those days and it was full of horses. The 20 carts or so of hay would be all in a row with the loads built in such a way that there was place for the next horse’s head left in the back of each head so that he could not see to left or right. I never could find out what price the hay used to go. It must have been as far back as 1810 or earlier.

But the main cause of the chronic poverty of the farmers was the curse of landlordism, the exactions of the rack-renting landlords, and of their satellites, the agents and bailiffs. For it was not enough to pay the landlord far more than the yearly value of the land, but another rent and often, two rents had to be spent in bribing and tipping the agents and bailiffs to keep them in good humour.

And the agents often kept back the receipt and closed on the rent so that the unfortunate tenant had to pay it again, or else be thrown out on the roadside. Any of us who remember the first decade of this century can recall the closing days of landlordism. Things were not as bad,

of course, as in earlier times, but they were bad enough. First the bailiff would go around from house to house warning for the rent. In a few weeks after the “pross-sarver” would be out, visiting and delivering, blue papers with the unfortunates who were not able to pay in time. And the said unfortunates often even made jokes about it. It is largely our Irish sense of humour, even under the worst circumstances that has kept us from despair, down the long centuries of oppression. One old fellow in our neighbourhood would “on his ceilidh” to a neighbour’s house, when the “pross-sarver” would be going his rounds. “Did yiz get the blue paper yet’’ he would say, “I got mine the day”. The lawyers, I believe, call them civil bills, but in troth. I would call them the most uncivil documents that ever came to a man’s house. Another old humourist had met with a few bad seasons—his crops failed, and his stock had to be sold one by one to buy a bit to eat ‘for herself an’ the childhre.” Then the “presses” began to come in, shop-keeper’s, bills, rent and everything. One day the “pross-sarver” handed him still another “pross.” on the “street,” so he opened the door and shouted in— “Here Nelly, lave that wan in on top of the rest of the prosses.”

Here is another story of the bad old days—-from Teemore—which is not without its humorous side. A small farmer by dint of tremendous labour had reclaimed a field of bogland. Owing to the wet, heavy nature of the uplands in this part of Fermanagh, a field of moss is highly valued, as it is the only chance for a crop in a wet, bad season. The bailiff, a man named Robinson, was an autocrat with unlimited power in the district, and he had his favourites among the tenants, his greatest favourites being those who gave him the biggest bribes. One of these favourites coveted the poor man’s field of moss and as a preliminary to grabbing it; brought the bailiff a present of a pig. He then made his request and the bailiff told him to go and work and crop the field of moss, that it was his from that day forward. When the other man saw his field being taken from him he went almost crazy and asked the advice of a “dacint neighbour man” called Banker Magee. (I will tell you later why he was called ‘‘Banker”). j “Have’nt you a heifer there,” says Banker. “I have,” said the man. “Well, drive your heifer up and make a present of her to the bailiff and request him to give your field back to you,” said Banker. He did so, and the bailiff was very thankful and told him to go home and order the other man off his field and take and work it himself. He did that too, and the other man went in an awful rage to the bailiff; “Didn’t you give me that field’ he said. “I did, but the other man gave me a heifer to get it back again” said the bailiff. Well give me back me pig.” How can I give you back your pig, when the other man’s heifer is after stickin it’ The man dare not press the thing so the bailiff had both pig and heifer.

Banker Magee above mentioned was so called because he was the only man I have ever heard of, except one, who succeeded in digging up one of the numerous crocks of gold that are buried here and there over the countryside. He dreamed for three nights running that the gold was hidden beneath a thorn tree. He dug out the thorn tree by the roots and found the full of a large basin of gold coins. He lent money, in his time, over the whole country, and so he was called ‘Banker’. There is no one belonging to him now—more’s the pity.

Another man—nearer my own place, was awakened one night in old times by a noise in his kitchen. He seized his gun and went down and found three men digging up his hearth-stone.  They fled for their lives and he concluded that they had dreamt of gold there, so he took the spade and dug away till he found it. He got so much gold that his family and descendants have been rich from that day to this. I have often wished I could dream of a crock of gold but no such luck for you or I! A tenant on the Kinawley estate lost an acre of moss in those days and never got it back. He had a crop of oats sown in it. A man living in the neighbourhood had procured a second farm and wanted a field of moss to it so he coveted the field and bribed the agent to give it to him. It was approaching the harvest and some of the owner’s hens were going into the field of corn as it was near the house. So the grabber went into the house and told the woman of the house to keep the fowl out of the corn. The woman—not knowing of the base transaction, said ‘‘Sure the hens are our own and if they eat a little of it  it’s no odds. They have to be fed anyway.” “O” said the man the corn and field both belong to me now. You may have sown it but it will be me cutting it.” So he had the field ever after. There were dozens of instances like that on the Kinawley estate, and of course on every other estate in the country. Even tenants, who did not want favours, had to be always bribing and tipping the agents and bailiff. A bailiff on an estate nearer Enniskillen expected a tip of £1 every time he visited a any tenants house. He was such a grand fellow of course that the tip could not be handed into his hand, but he used to leave his hat on the table and woe to the poor tenant if the bailiff did not find a pound note under the hat when leaving. It did not matter if the poor tenant’s family went to bed supperless that night and many a night after.

The landlord of the Kinawley estate lived in Dublin. He was a counsellor in the years around ‘Black 47’. He never came near the estate and left the management of it to the agent. In many cases the agent  used to refuse the rent from the tenants, as he wanted an excuse to put them out and give the land to favourites. In these cases the tenants had to walk the 100 miles to Dublin, where the landlord was always decent enough to take the rent from them and give them a receipt for it. Dozens of the tenants here had to walk to Dublin like this, including my two grandfathers, on both father and mothers’ side of the family. A woman named Maguire—a widow with a family of small children, had a small farm of 3 cow’s place. The agent refused the rent and the poor woman had to start and walk to Dublin in the depth of winter without either shoe or stocking, barefoot and barelegged.

She wore a homemade coarse linen skirt and on the journey the coarse cloth cut her legs in a hundred places. While waiting on the landlord’s doorstep in the city the blood flowed from her feet and legs till it lay in pools on the street. At last the landlord came to the door took the rent from her, gave her a receipt and gave her a shilling for charity sake and then she had to walk the 100 miles home again. On this same estate the men of four townlands had reclaimed a bog of about 20 acres and each had a field of it for crop ground. The agent decided to talk it all from them and gave it all to a group of favourites. The agent lived near Enniskillen and was to come out on a certain day to take the land from them. A young man who had a gun volunteered to shoot the agent in the bog when he would come out. He said to the men “Collect my passage money for America and leave a new suit of clothes for me in a certain spot over there on Clonturkle Rock so that I can escape when I do the job. But although he lay hid the whole day in the bog with his gun, the agent never came as he got the whisper that there was a bullet waiting for him. He never came near that place for years after and the people concerned have their moss plots there ever since. The place is known is Carrameen Moss.

The bad wet season of l879 is still remembered by many of the old people in this part of the country. All the low-lying lands of Fermanagh were lying under water the whole Summer and Autumn as the “back water” from Lough Erne came up in places two or three miles from the lough. At two places on the road from Enniskillen to Derrylin a large ferry boats had to be used the whole Summer and Autumn to take people and vehicles across the water which lay 6 ft. deep on the road. All crops in the country were a complete failure and the greater part of the hay rotted as it never was got cut so that the cattle died. Not a single clod of turf got dried for the fire that year. Only for Charles Stewart Parnell, leader of the Irish people at the time the plight of many of the country people would have been as bad as ‘Black 47.’ Somehow or other, he wrung relief from the British Government and meal was given out to destitute people and bread given to the children in schools. In Kinawley parish alone 300 300 families had to get relief. 1882 was very little better, rain and floods all the summer; blight and failure of crops. In most cases no rents could be paid in bad years and the arrears were added up by the landlords till they rose to gigantic figures, which the poor tenants could no more pay than they could pay the National Debt.  I know of one farm in my own part of the country where the arrears of rent amounted to £140 and of course the result was an eviction. And evictions were the order of the day during the 80’s. Those were the days of the Land League fight, and later I will devote an article or two to the Land League in Fermanagh and give ballads describing it.

It took the country people 30 years to recover from the effects of the two bad seasons I have mentioned in Fermanagh.

Be Yourself.

6 November 2016 Sunday Independent. A PHOTOGRAPHIC exhibition which encourages people to embrace their imperfections goes on show in Dublin this week. The one-off exhibition by Italian artist Alex Sapienza, entitled Be Yourself, Everyone Else Is Already Taken, goes on display at 37 Dawson Street on Friday from 6.30pm to 10pm. The photographs will feature a number of high-profile names, including Bob Geldof and Rozanna Purcell, and were taken on a 19th century camera, meaning the images could not be altered. Sapienza told the Sunday Independent: “I want to remind people that life is not perfect and to embrace themselves and the way they look and be proud of every wrinkle and freckle. The photographs are not posed. Each person looks straight into the lens. “I wanted to see their personality and their soul. They are all unique.”

1942 Fermanagh Herald – Local News.

21st February 1942. OBITUARY. MRS. THOMPSON, IRVINESTOWN. Amongst her numerous friends in Fermanagh and Tyrone the news of the death- of Mrs. Mary Thompson, Main Street, Irvinestown, has caused deep regret. Deceased was widow of Mr. Wm. Thompson, who predeceased her 23 years ago. Typical of genuine Irish womanhood—a good wife and mother and a kind and helpful neighbour—her admirable traits of character won for herself the highest esteem amongst all classes of the community. The sad end came on Tuesday, the 10th inst., after a short illness, during which she had the best medical attendance and tender nursing. Mrs. Thompson was deeply devout in the practice of her religious obligations and gave a shining example in this respect. During her illness she was frequently visited by the Rev. J. Trainor, P.P., and Rev. B. Lappin, C.C., and in her last moments Father Trainor was at her bedside. Fortified by the consoling rites of the Church, her death was a holy and a happy one. May her soul rest in peace.

There was a large and representative attendance at the funeral on Thursday the 12th inst., those present including the professional and commercial classes of a wide area. Requiem Mass was celebrated in the Sacred Heart Church, Irvinestown, by the Rev. B. Lappin, after which Father Trainor, P.P. in the course of a touching panegyric, referred to the exemplary Christian qualities, of the deceased. Her whole life, he said, was in accord with Divine precept; for very many years she was a daily Communicant, and as well as attending daily Mass, paid visits to the Blessed Sacrament in the Church every evening. She was foremost in every local work connected with religious associations, and was a devout member of the Sacred Heart Sodality for years. By her death, the parish had lost a member of the Catholic flock which by word and deed had given an edifying example to all. On behalf of priests and people he sympathised with the members of deceased’s family, and exhorted the faithful of the parish to be mindful of her in their prayers.

Father Trainor, assisted by Father Lappin, officiated at the graveside.

The chief mourners were William and James (sons), Mrs. G. Thompson, Dromore (daughter-in-law}Joseph and James Eves, Edemey (brothers) ; Mrs. McElrone, Clonelly; Mrs. McCartney, Philadelphia (sisters); James McElrone, Clonelly (brother-in-law.); Mrs. O’Kane, Pettigo; Mrs. Jas. Eves, Irvinestown; Mrs. Jos. Eves, Edemey; Mrs. Patrick Thompson, Portstewart (sisters-in-law). Clergy present, were:—Very Rev. J. Trainor, P.P.; Rev. John Eves, Ederney; Rev. B. Lappin, C.C., Whitehill; Rev. H. O’Hanlon, C.C., Newtownbutler, Rev. E. Flanagan, C.C., Ederney; Rev. C. McCormack, C.C., Pettigo.

21st February 1942. PETTIGO NEWS. A popular wedding took place in St. Patrick’s Church, Aghyaran, the contracting parties being Mr. Bernard McGrath, Carn, Pettigo, and Miss Nan McHugh, Cloghore. Mr, W. M. McKenna, Slavin, a cousin of the bride, was best man, and Miss Maggie McHugh, Magheramena, Belleek, also a cousin of the bride, was bridesmaid. The ceremony with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev. C. Byrne, P.P.

The death took place at her residence “Gortnaree” Pettigo of Miss Isabella Brandon. Deceased was one of the most respected ladies in the district

A very successful whist drive was held in Pettigo Courthouse, on Sunday night week which was organised by Pettigo branch of the Legion of Mary. The prize winners were:—Mrs. J. P. Griffin. Pettigo, 1: Mrs. P. J. Toomey, Pettigo, 2; Miss Maisie Britton, ‘Fincashel’ 3; Mrs. B. Breslin, Pettigo, 4; Gents prize, Mr. Charles Friel, Customs officer. After distributing of the prizes, Rev. P. McCormack, C.C., spiritual director, thanked all who attended.

The marriage took place in St. Brigid’s (sic) St. Joseph’s) Church, Belleek, of Mr. Michael Monaghan, Tamar, Pettigo, and Miss Annie Donnelly, Belalt, Pettigo. Mr. Peter Monaghan, brother of the bridegroom, was best man, and Miss Lizzie Monaghan, sister of the bridegroom, was bridesmaid. The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev. Father MacCloskey, C.C., Belleek.

Pettigo customs officials recently seized a quantity of butter, sugar and other articles from persons who were attempting to export them to the six-counties.

 

The death took place in Donegal Hospital, after a lingering illness, of Mr, Hugh McGee. Deceased who was only 25 years of age, leaves a sorrowing father and brothers.

A very-enjoyable dance was held in Letter Hall on Wednesday night of last week. The proceeds wore in aid of the local Band. The music was supplied by the Kentucky Trio Dance Band. Mr. Wm. H. Marshall, Skea, was M.C.

 

A pretty wedding took place in St. Mary’s Parish Church., Pettigo, the contracting parties being Mr. Frank Monaghan. Brookhill, Pettigo, and Miss Evylin McGrath, Carntressy, Pettigo. Mr. Michael. McGrath, brother of the bride, was best man, and Miss Tessie McGrath was bridesmaid. The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev P. McCormick, C.C., Pettigo.

21st February 1942. KINLOUGH MAN’S EXPERIENCE. A DAY IN BUNDORAN. At Ballyshannon District Court, Brian McGowan, Kinlough, was charged with being drunk on 27th December and with unlawfully damaging a car. Supt. T. Noonan, prosecuted and Mr. E. P. Condon defended.

Evidence was given that a man from Tullaghan left his motor van on the street in Bundoran. As he was not capable of driving the van that night, the Sergeant took away the ignition key and the man stayed in Bundoran. The van was left on the street all night. On that day Brian McGowan came into Bundoran with a load of potatoes in a donkey cart. He sold the potatoes, and some hours later converted the donkey and cart into cash. He got “gloriously’’ drunk and fell asleep somewhere in the vicinity of the East End. Some boys playing a prank took off his boots and put him in the van. When McGowan awoke he thought he was imprisoned in the van, and not knowing anything of the mechanism of a car—never being in a car in his life—he did not know how to get out. He lifted the starting handle ‘ of the car and smashed the windows. Then he found he could open the van at the back and succeeded in getting out that way. He could not find one of his boots and went home in his bare feet. The defendant, it was stated, paid £2 19s 6d compensation to the owner of the car. Justice O‘Hanrahan remarking that the defendant had paid dearly for his day applied the Probation, Act.

 

21st February 1942. BLACKLION DISTRICT NEWS. The death has occurred in England of Miss Kathleen Murray, formerly of Roo, Blacklion.

There was an equipment inspection on Wednesday and Thursday, nights at meetings of the local Security Force in Barran and Blacklion.

Mrs. Chas. Dolan presided at a meeting of the local Red Cross Branch in Blacklion on Friday evening. Arrangements were in progress for first-aid lectures.

The death of Miss Rose Quinn, which took place at her residence, Dernaseer, Blacklion, at an advanced age, has caused deep regret. Deceased belonged to an old and esteemed family. . The funeral was largely attended. Rev. Francis Shiels officiated in the church and at the graveside.

New concrete streets are replacing the old pavements in Blacklion. The work is a relief scheme in charge of the County Council.

 

21st February 1942. MR. DE VALERA IN CAVAN. PROFITEERING CONDEMNED. Speaking at a Fianna Fail Convention in Cavan on Sunday, Mr. de Valera said —The Fianna Fail Organisation being responsible for the election of the present Government had a special duty to be in the forefront of every national endeavour —in building up the defence forces, and in the production of food and fuel. He recalled that it had been founded as a national organisation, and said he thought it would be admitted that their main political objective had been achieved as far as the 26 Counties were concerned.

“We are a completely sovereign State, but, unfortunately, a portion of our country has been cut off, and until it is reunited to the rest no Nationalist can say that the national objective has been achieved. I think the whole nation is united in that, because the other major party and the Labour Party also agreed.’’ There were those who said that this, that and the other thing would happen when war came, but nothing took place which would not have happened to a completely sovereign State.

In making an appeal for good citizenship in the matter of reporting profiteering to the authorities, Mr. de Valera said he knew that people did not like to report their neighbours, but they must make up their minds to report profiteering. If your neighbour is a decent fellow you should act decently by him, but if your neighbour is profiteering on the community he is not a decent fellow and he does not deserve decent treatment.

One of the things we want most is the assistance of each individual in the community. We can’t have a policeman in every house or an inspector on every doorstep. Already there are far more inspectors than we would like to have. If we want to diminish the number of police or inspectors the quickest and best way is for each individual citizen to be an inspector for the community.

We should see that if there are people who are not decent in the neighbourhood they will not get away with making wealth at the expense of the poor, for that is what it often is.

“NO LEADER BUT DE VALERA.” Rev. T. Maguire, P. P., Newtownbutler, Co. Fermanagh, said, that they across the Border placed their full trust and confidence in the Government in Dublin for their deliverance. They had no leader but Mr. de Valera. The resolutions passed included one asking the Government to use all necessary compulsion short of conscription to ensure that all available young men would be brought into the Defence Forces.

21st February 1942. EXPORTING CHARGE. TWO LEITRIM MEN FINED AT BELLEEK. At Belleek Petty Sessions before Major Dickie, R. M., Bernard Brady and Francis Ferguson, both of Townalick, Rossinver, Co. Leitrim, were charged on remand with being knowingly concerned in the illegal, exportation of 90 21b. loaves, 1 cwt carbide, 61bs. cocoa and l lb. tea at Garrison on January 3 and were each fined £10 and £2 2s costs.

 

21st February 1942. £40 FINE TO REMAIN. NEWTOWNBUTLER MAN S APPEAL. COAL INTENDED FOR EXPORT. A farmer whose house is said to be situated on the very border, appealed at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions against a fine of £40 imposed on him at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions for having, as alleged, harboured 16½ tons of coal which was intended for export to the 26-Counties. In addition to the fine the Resident Magistrate had ordered the confiscation of the coal.

The appellant was William Coffey, Clonmacken, Newtownbutler, and he was represented by Mr. J. B. Murphy, solicitor. After a re-hearing of the evidence (already published in this newspaper) Deputy Judge Ellison, K. C., said that taking appellant’s circumstances into consideration (it had been stated his farm was 26 acres in extent) and the close proximity of his place to the border, he was constrained to take the view that appellant had the coal for an improper purpose. Accordingly he (the Judge), affirmed (the lower court ruling.

Mr. Murphy asked his Honour to consider the amount of the penalty. The forfeiture of the coal was in itself a loss of £64 and this with the £40 fine made the total penalty £104. Did his Honour not consider that justice could be met by the imposition of a smaller penalty. When the fine was imposed, said Mr. Murphy, he R.M. had in his mind decided that the penalty must be such as would deter other people from attempting to export coal. The loss of 16½ tons of coal alone would be a tremendous and sufficient deterrent in a case of the sort, he submitted. He suggested that, a £104 penalty on a 20-acre farmer was really too large in a case of the sort even though, the R.M. wanted, and very properly so, to make an example of him. The loss of 16½ tons of coal to appellant was appalling.

Mr .J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, who represented the Customs Authorities, “very strongly” opposed the application for a reduced fine. He suggested that the coal never at any time belonged to appellant but to a Clones resident. People who did this sort of thing took the risk with their eyes open. At the present time, he understood tea was being sold for 16s a pound in Eire and coal was a very high price there too. His Honour had another case in which the appellant had been fined £40. People who got away with fines were prepared to carry on the racket owing to the high profits realised. It was nothing to some of them to lose now and again.

Mr. Murphy said he was able to inform Mr. Cooper that if he went through the town of Clones he would not find a single ton of British coal. In the other case referred to the appellant had a farm of nearly one hundred acres, he did not lose the coal, and he was fined £20. He (Mr. Murphy) thought it no harm, to tell his Honour that in Co. Tyrone, the Judge was rather more lenient and he (the solicitor) thought all the penalties should of a certain sameness.

Mr. Cooper—He could have been fined £500 under -the Act.

His Honour said he could not think that a 26-acre farmer was doing this transaction on his own. It seemed as if he was a catspaw for somebody else and he (the Judge) supposed that somebody else would pay for it. Consequently he could not see his way to grant the reduction asked for.

 

28th February 1942. AMERICAN TOOLS STOLEN. TWO TYRONE MEN RECEIVE JAIL SENTENCE. Magistrate’s Strong Comments at Kesh.

Kesh Courthouse on Tuesday resembled a hardware shop, when a large number of tools were exhibited in a larceny case. The defendants were James E. Maguire, Fivemiletown, and Michael McGinn, Ballynagowan, Clogher, charged with, the larceny of tools from a camp where they were employed on work of national importance. Mr. Smith, for the defendants, entered a plea of guilty. District Inspector Walshe referred in strong terms to the extensive larceny of tools at the camp. The tools had been brought from overseas for use on work of national importance. Sailors’ lives had been risked in bringing them over—and in some cases lives had been lost. He referred to the difficulty of getting replacements, and said that defendants had been employed at good wages and took advantage of their position to steal the tools given them to work with. It amounted to sabotage. Mr. Smith said that as he had entered a plea of guilty he thought it was unnecessary for the District Inspector to go into details,. He said Maguire was a married man with two, children aged 10 and 8½ years. He made a strong appeal for leniency in these cases.

Major Dickie, R. M. said he had been issuing stern warnings in these cases and he had his mind made up. It was .shocking treatment for these people coming to help them. His Worship sentenced each defendant to three months’ imprisonment and to one of the camp officers commented: “I am sorry to apologise for the conduct of my fellow-countrymen.”

 

28th February 1942. PETTIGO NOTES.  The death took .place in Enniskillen Hospital on Friday of Mrs. J. McClelland, Glenagarn, Pettigo. Deceased who was in the prime of life, leaves a husband and four children. The funeral to Tubrid cemetery was one of the largest ever seen in the district. The chief mourners were J. McClelland (husband); John, Edward, James and Robert McClelland (sons). The Rev. J. G. Sandford (rector),  officiated  at the graveside.

On Monday night an enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Hall, Lettercran proceeds being, in aid of repairs. The music was supplied by Mr. Wm. Baird and Mr. James McGrath, Mr. B. Cunningham being M.C.

Pettigo monthly fair on Friday was one of the briskest held in the village for three years. Prices for good quality animals were enticing. Springing cows and heifers, £20 10s 0d to £35 each; three year old heifers £19 to £21 each; two year olds, £14 to £15 10s 0d; small calves from £4 to £7 10s 0d; young pigs 35/- each.

28th February 1942. NOVELTY FOR FERMANAGH. As will be seen in our advertisement columns a silage mowing film is to be shown in Brookeborough Courthouse on Tuesday night of next week. This film has been made in the Six Counties and includes County Fermanagh farmers making silage. This should be interesting to all farmers as in addition to being the first appearance of this film in the county, silage making is the all-important operation on the farm, in a county with abundance of grass, wet climate and where, milk provides the largest proportion of the farmer’s income, .

 

BLACKLION DISTRICT NEWS. At a bull show for premiums at Brockagh, only two animals were exhibited.

There was a large attendance at a concert on Sunday night under the auspices of the Blacklion G.F.C. A report will appear in our next issue.

Most of the officers and committee were present at a Red Cross branch meeting in Blacklion on Friday evening. A number of members were enrolled.

Despite the difficulty of procuring building material, two new houses have been erected in the district, one for Mr. John McGinley, Belcoo, and the other for Mr. J. Armstrong, Blacklion.

During, the week Messrs. O’Connor and O’Keeffe attended at four centres in the district and distributed tons of seed oats and potatoes to farmers. The prices are 14/- per cwt. for oats, and 4/- per cwt. for potatoes.

There is at present a great demand for horses in the district. Some prices paid by buyers range from £30 to £45, and one animal, the property of Mr. J. McGovern, Loughan, was purchased at £66.

There was a large supply of cattle at Blacklion fair on Monday. Prices were in excess of the quotations of the previous fair, and many sales were effected.

The death of Mr. Patk, McGoldrick, merchant, which took place at his residence, Bealbally, Glangevlin, has caused deep regret over a wide area. Deceased, a prosperous young business man, was very popular in the district. He was a son of the late Mr. Patk. McGoldrick, who was a member of the old District Council and a member of the old Enniskillen Board of Guardians for many years. Deep sympathy is extended to deceased’s young wife, family, brother and sisters, The funeral to St. Patrick’s, Glangevlin, on Wednesday, was the largest seen in the district for many years. Rev. J. McCabe, P.P., who celebrated Requiem Mass, officiated at the graveside.

 

28th February 1942. ROOSTER FOR THE AIR FORCE. IRVINESTOWN MAN IN KESH CASE. Thomas Curley, Irvinestown, was charged at Kesh Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., that being a collector of eggs he obtained eggs from a person other than a producer registered with him for that purpose. He was also charged with obtaining the eggs at a price other than that permitted.

District Inspector Walshe, said that defendant was a licensed collector of eggs and had done wrong to purchase eggs from persons residing in the 26-Counties.

Defendant said that he had obtained the eggs for members of .the King’s forces who were going to England to see their wives.

His Worship — You must not do it.

Defendant—I would not have done it had I known it was any offence. I had them for the troops. 1 came to a very big loss at the same time.

The District Inspector said that defendant had 112 eggs, 8 lbs creamery butter, 11 lbs sugar, 55 hens, three geese, one duck, one rooster, and lost the whole lot.

Defendant said he thought he was doing a good turn purchasing the eggs at a cheaper rate than in the Six Counties.

His Worship—What would an air force man be wanting with a rooster? (laughter).

A fine of 20s was imposed on each summons.

 

DANCING CLASS IN COLLEGIATE SCHOOL. At the January meeting of the County Fermanagh Regional Education Committee Mr. C. McKeown complained of the admission of unauthorised persons to a dancing class held in the Enniskillen Collegiate School. By way of explanation the following letter was received from the Headmistress (Mrs. M. C. Smith M.A.) at the Committee’s monthly meeting on Friday. “In reply to your letter Miss Dobbin did carry on a dancing class at the School under the following circumstances. She was running a class for adults, chiefly former pupils of the School in the Minor Town Hall, but it was so much occupied that she found herself without a room and so asked me if she could carry on here. I have absolute confidence in Miss Dobbin and know that she would not abuse the privilege. It is naturally, important that her classes should pay as travelling from Dublin is expensive. It is to our School’s interest that they should pay otherwise we should lose Miss Dobbin’s services. The class, which was never advertised is not now functioning nor has it done so this term. The class was attended during last term by one or two people from Portora and one or two officers who came for a few lessons. I hope no objection can be taken to this under present circumstances. Miss Catt (proprietor) made herself responsible for the lighting and I have not sent in the bill for this and I shall have to find out the cost.” The explanation was accepted.

 

1942 Fermanagh Herald.

.JANUARY 14, 1942. LARCENY CHARGE AT CASTLEDERG. ‘BOUGHT CYCLE FROM FERMANAGH MAN” Before Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., at Castlederg Court, two youths, James Hegarty and William John Hegarty, Cormacoll, Drumquin, brothers, pleaded not guilty to the larceny of a cycle, value £4. They were not professionally represented. Thomas Lynch gave evidence that on Sunday, 7th Sept. he left his bicycle outside Castlederg Chapel and when he came out it was gone. On 28th Sept. he observed a cycle outside a house in Scraghey and on examination. identified it as his although the handle grips and oil bath had been removed. James Hegarty claimed the cycle and said he had bought it from his brother William John. Witness reported the matter to the police. Sergt. Blackstock said James Hegarty came to the barracks and said he bought the cycle from his brother for £2.15s.  William John said he bought the bicycle from a Fermanagh man for £3. He described the Fermanagh man but the police could not trace him. Mr. Long at this stage dismissed the case against James. William John Hegarty gave evidence that he met the Fermanagh man on the road and he offered to sell the cycle, but witness had no money at the time, and they arranged to meet at Castlederg later on. He did so and paid 30s and got possession of the cycle; he met him later by appointment and paid a further £2, getting 7s 6d as a lucks penny on condition that witness would give back the oil bath and witness agreed. The Fermanagh man appeared to have plenty of money. Cross-examined by the District-Inspector, witness said the Fermanagh man would turn his back to people who were passing them when they were negotiating the sale. He had not seen the man since he bought the cycle. Mr. Long said there was a doubt in the case and he would dismiss it, but he made an order that the cycle be returned to Thomas Lynch.

JANUARY 14, 1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER FIRE. BUSINESS PREMISES SERIOUSLY DAMAGED. Serious damage was caused by a fire which broke out during the blackout hours in the grocery and drapery premises of Mr. John J. O’Donnell, Main Street, Newtownbutler. The outbreak occurred on Saturday morning. The alarm was given by the proprietor, Mr. O’Donnell, who was awakened by the crackling of burning timber. He ran to his sister’s bedroom and carried her through the flames to the Main Street. R.U.C. and military assisted civilians to fight the outbreak but by the time they arrived the fire had a strong hold and the flames were extending to the adjoining shop. Water was carried by civilians from the two town pumps in buckets, tubs and creamery cans. When it was seen that it was impossible to try and confine it. Mr. Joseph McNamee and his four sons climbed to the roof of an adjoining shop and broke down the roof, portion of which fell on Mr. McNamee, who was rescued by his son, Marcus. The Enniskillen fire brigade was  summoned but when it arrived on the scene the local residents had the fire under control. Mr. O’Donnell’s premises included a private house as well as a large store, all of which were burned to the ground.

JANUARY 14, 1942. G.N.R. OFFICIAL DEAD. NATIVE OF MAGUIRESBRIDGE. The death has taken place at a Belfast nursing home of Mr. W. A. F. Graham, aged 46, deputy traffic manager of the Great Northern Railway Co. He was a native of Maguiresbridge, Co. Fermanagh, and was educated at Enniskillen Model School, and entered the railway service 29 years ago. He is survived by his wife and. one child.

January 7th 1942. A FERMANAGH DONKEY. AMUSING COURT EVIDENCE. An unusual claim in respect of alleged breach of warranty in the sale of a donkey came before Deputy Judge Ellison, K. C at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions in Enniskillen. Plaintiff was John Cassidy, of Cullintagh, and he claimed £4 10s damages for the alleged breach from Morton. Greaves, of Knockdooris, Derrylin, who sold him the animal for £2 10s on the 16th September, 1941.Mr. Cooper, solicitor for plaintiff, said the case was an unusual one. The animal was warranted sound and able to pull a 15 cwts. load. The animal was big but not too well looking. On being brought home the animal’s condition became worse and it died. Plaintiff in evidence said defendant asked him to buy the ass in the fair of Ballyconnell, but he did not like to buy it as it was imported. However, the deal was made and the animal was left for him at Blake’s of Derrylin. Defendant said the animal could draw 15 cwts anywhere, and was the best ass in County Fermanagh. (Laughter). He also told plaintiff that when trotting along the road the feet of the ass made a noise like a pony (laughter), and that it had mowed with a pony. The beast was brought home by plaintiff  but it died on 15th October. On the way home it was dragging its feet. Mr. Cooper – It looked like a lady doing one of these new dances. (Laughter). Plaintiff added that the ass had lumps on its backbone, and was, “jinked.” It also walked sideways. (Laughter). Mr. Ferguson (for defendant) —What did you think you were buying, a horse or a donkey?—-A donkey. I am not that far gone yet that I would not know a donkey. (Laughter). Did you ever see a donkey ploughing? –No, but he told me this one ploughed. Don’t you deal in donkeys?—No, but when I get an order I buy one. Didn’t you inspect this donkey? —No, I did not. I was in a hurry for the bus. (Laughter) Didn’t you run it up and down the fair green in Ballyconnell?—No, I took his word for it. You would think it was a thousand-pound horse he was selling. I could not keep him from warranting it. (Laughter). He told me it was the best in the world and was worth £20. This was .a stallion donkey ?—Yes. Did you find it on its back in a drain? —No. Have you got a girl in your house?— She’s not a girl3 she’s a woman. (Laughter) I will not differ with you about the age, but you have a. girl?—I have a housekeeper, if you want to know my business. (Laughter). I don’t want to know your business any more than necessary, but did it take you, the girl and your nephew to pull it out of the drain? There is not a word about it. Fred Hart, M.R.C.V.S. said he examined the carcass of the animal on 15th October and found that it had suffered ailments of the liver, heart and spine. The animal was about 10 years of age and the ailment of the spine was of five or six months standing. To Mr., Ferguson witness said the spinal trouble would be apparent to any one buying the animal. Mr. Cooper–What did it die of?— Witness— it was dead when I saw it. Laughter.). Apparently it lay down as a result of this spinal trouble and ‘konked out.’ (Laughter). To the Judge witness said his opinion was that the animal could not have pulled a load of 15 cwts.

In the witness box, defendant said he had the donkey in his possession for nine months, and the bargain was made with plaintiff in Ballyconnell fair in September. Plaintiff ‘vetted’ the animal in the fair and defendant told him it could pull a good load. No warranty was given, and the bargain was made by a man called Fitch. The first complaint he got about the animal was in the form of a note given to him in Derrylin fair in October, the note demanding defendant to take it back. Cross-examined by Mr. Cooper, defendant said the animal brought a load of 14 or 15 cwts. For him at times. There was no talk of mowing. Mr. Cooper I notice this ass was smuggled twice as a matter of fact. (Laughter). Defendant. Yes. Mr. Cooper. Well we are not going to say anything about that. (Laughter). You bought another ass? Yes. What age was it? It was a wee foal. Mr. Cooper. To plaintiff – What age was it? Plaintiff. It was an oul ass. (Laughter). What did he pay for him? – 18 shillings. Mr. Cooper. What do you intend to sell him for? Defendant – I don’t intend to sell him. (To the Judge)—-I didn’t notice anything wrong in the way the ass walked to Ballyconnell fair. Foster Greaves, son of the defendant, said the ass in question was a strong one, and had always been kept in the house or tied when let out while in defendants possession.

Thomas Fitch gave evidence of the making of the bargain and said plaintiff had been inspecting the donkey all morning. Mr. McEntee of Clones, “the biggest horse-dealer in the world” (Laughter)—was giving £20 for him not so long ago. Witness did not see anything wrong with the donkey when it was running up and down. It was represented that it could draw a load of 15 cwt., but no warranty was given. Mr. Ferguson questioned witness as to whether the offer of £20 was of recent date or not. Witness—Not so long ago, it was wartime. Mr. Cooper — During this war? I think it was the last one. (Laughter). But we have been told it was ten years old? —bout ten or twelve years. How could it have lived in the last war? I suppose it was the last. (Laughter). .It must have been this war?—No. You said it was not so long ago?—Mr. McEntee could have been here if he had been summoned. If it was not so long ago  when was it. I could not tell; I have not a good memory. Was it a year ago? It was more than a year. Was it more than two years?—It may be four or five. The man who owned him said he did not want him any more for the children. Mr. McEntee wanted him as a sire. It was represented he could pull 15 cwts.?— He could run like mad. He could leap over me or Cassidy either. (Laughter). His Honour held there was a breach, of warranty and allowed a decree for £3 with 15/- costs and expenses.

BALLYGAWLEY—Country butter Is 3d to Is 6d per lb.; potatoes 8d – to l0d per stone; fowl; chickens; 5s to 6s, hens 3s to 3s 6d, ducks 3s 9d to 4s 3d—each; slip pigs 75s to-85s, suckers 50 to- 60s— .each.

February 14th 1942. PETTICO COURT CASES. At Pettigo District Court on Tuesday of last week, before Mr. Justice O’Hanrahan, Guard Gallivan summoned Gerald McMenamin, Minchifin for using an unlighted cycle. Fined 5s.

Supt. Noonan charged Michael McGee, Carntressy, with cutting and carrying away eighteen young trees from a cut away plantation at Carntressy on the lands of William Monaghan. Guard James Ryan proved tracing the trees to McGee’s residence. Mr. Monaghan, the owner, refused to prosecute and pleaded for leniency for defendant. A fine of 10s was imposed.

Guard, Gallivan summoned Adam Eves, Gortnessy, for using an unlighted cycle. Fined 6s.

Guard Treanor summoned J. Fitzpatrick, tractor driver, for driving without licence and no rear light. The Justice fined defendant 10s.

February 14th 1942. BROOKEBORO’ COURT CASES. At Brookeboro’ Petty Sessions, before Major Dickie, R.M., Thos. Clarke, Little Mount, was charged with slaughtering a pig without a licence on 2nd January. D.I. Smith prosecuted, and Mr. Stewart, the Ministry’s Inspector gave evidence of visiting Clark’s house, and Clarke admitted having slaughtered the pig, and at that time there were only l0 lbs. of pork left in the house. Clarke pleaded that he killed the animal in November last, as he had a large number of men working, and wanted the pork to feed them.

His Worship, remarking that it was the worst case he had known, fined defendant 40/-.

CYCLISTS’ DIFFICULTIES. His Worship, when dealing with, a number of cases where cyclists, charged with no rear lights, gave the excuse that they could not get batteries, and he would like to make it known that cyclists should have a clear patch of white paint as a background to a reflector when they could not get batteries.

 

February 14th 1942. FERMANAGH CLAIM FAILS. ACTION AGAINST BELCOO TEACHER. BOY WHO LOST EYE. A denial that he had dictated a story to the pupils as to what they should say when asked about an accident was made by the principal teacher, the defendant in an action for damages, the hearing of which was resumed in the Belfast King’s Bench Division on Wednesday of last week before the Lord Chief Justice. Mr. James Ferguson, P.E.T., of Belcoo, was alleged to have been negligent by not exercising proper supervision over the pupils on March, 25, 1959, when one of the boys, Patrick Anthony Leonard, aged 13 years, of Creenahoe, Belcoo, lost his right eve. The plaintiff’s case was that while playing on the road during the luncheon interval he was struck by a stone and he sought damages against the master for negligence. Mr: C. L. Sheil (instructed by Messrs. Cooper and Cooper) was for plaintiff, Mr. J. D. Chambers, K.C., and Mr. J. Agnew (instructed by Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented the defendant. The defendant said it was customary for the boys to play on the road on which they had played in his predecessor’s time. Answering his Lordship, the witness agreed that he had no personal knowledge of that. Mr. Ferguson added that he had instructed the boys not to play on the road on Blacklion or Belcoo fair days and the days, immediately following. He had warned the children not to go on the road on the day of the accident as the previous day was Blacklion fair day. He said he was quite unaware that there were pupils playing on the road. In order to get a clear story of what happened he had asked the boys to write a letter stating what had occurred, but there was nothing in the nature of dictation.

In reply to Mr. Sheil, the defendant agreed that the road was the best, playground they had, as there was an open sewer in the yard. There had been a dancing class in the school during the lunch hour. Mr; Sheil commented that a girl pupil who had not been on the road had written in her exercise, book— “No one knows whether it was a ball or a stone that hit him,”

“Did that child imagine that story,” asked Counsel, to which the defendant replied that the girl heard the inquiry going on, and could think for herself and form her own conclusions. It was a description of what the girl had heard from other children. That pupil was only writing an essay. The witness mentioned that he had never seen children in Belcoo School throwing stones.         He agreed with Mr. Sheil that the Ministry of Education were apprehensive about children playing on the road, and that in a circular he had produced it was shown that between January and December, 1939, some 569 accidents to children at school had happened in Northern Ireland, and of that number 575 were due to the presence of the children on roads. He reiterated that he had taken all the care possible. Mrs. Annie McCabe, the first assistant in the school, and a number of pupils also gave evidence. The lord Chief Justice held that the supervision exercised was not unreasonable, saying that the accident was caused by a fellow-pupil who was acting playfully. Having detailed his findings as to fact, his Lordship entered judgment for the defendant, with costs.

February 14th 1942. £15 FINE AFFIRMED. KESH FARMER’S FAILURE TO PLOUGH

John. Spence, Bannaghbeg, Clonelly, Kesh, appealed to Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Friday against a fine of £15 and costs imposed on him at Kesh Betty Sessions for having, as alleged, failed to obey a direction of the Ministry of Agriculture to plough five acres. Mr. Aiden Herbert, solicitor, represented the appellant and Mr. J. Cooper was for the Ministry.

Opening the case Mr. Cooper said it was a somewhat peculiar case. The farm in question was almost twenty-five acres in extent. Appellant was visited by a couple of inspectors from the Ministry to whom he spoke of the difficulty of getting tractors to do the ploughing. To another inspector he said the land was not fit for ploughing. That official took him over the lands and, using a spade, pointed out to him that the soil was suitable for cultivation. He should have ploughed five acres but only cultivated a plot for potatoes and at the Petty Sessions a fine of £15 was imposed. At that Court appellant denied ownership of the farm and told the R.M. it was the property of his sister who lived in Co. Donegal for whom he acted as manager. Under the regulations, an occupier meant a person rated or liable to be rated to the poor rate in respect of the holding or who would be so rated or liable to be rated for the provisions of the Local Government (Rating and Finance) Act (N.I.), 1929, that was the Derating Act and included in relation to any holding, the occupier of which was absent from Northern Ireland, any agent or other person entrusted with the management of the land on his behalf. On appellant’s own statement that he managed the farm for his sister and that he was the herd he was convicted. Since then he (Mr. Cooper] had made a search and found that appellant was the person actually rated for the land (certificate produced). Mr. Herbert intimated that the defence was that the land was not arable.

Samuel Jordan, Ministry’s Inspector, said fifteen acres of the farm were arable. When defendant said the land was not arable witness got a spade, and showed him in the field he said was most suitable that there were four or five inches of soil.

Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness agreed that generally Clonelly was not an ideal district for tillage. He did not test the area he said was arable as there was no question raised by appellant at the time. Furrows in the fields showed that cultivation had been carried out previously.

  1. S. Flack, area officer, swore he visited the farm on 7th March and 26th May. Appellant complained of the difficulty of getting tractors to do work. There were about fifteen acres arable. He agreed that in general Fermanagh farmers were not very fond of ploughing. Appellant had taken out a crop of flax in 1940. In the witness box appellant swore that he was reared on this farm, owned by his sister, and never at any time had there been more than six or seven acres cultivated. In 1940 he got Samuel Mills to work the tractor plough on his land but owing to the rocky nature of the field he was unable to do the work. The soil was only two to four inches deep whereas one needed seven inches of soil to do successful work with the tractor. Appellant also got a man with horses and plough but his ploughman was no more successful than Mills. Mr. Cooper—I suggest you are what is known as a lazy farmer?

Appellant—I have had to work hard all my life.

Samuel Mills gave evidence of his unsuccessful effort to work the tractor plough on appellant’s land. On an adjoining farm he broke eight socks in the ploughing of three acres.

To Mr. Cooper—I believe with a different type of tractor yon could plough this land.

James Allen said he started to plough with a chill plough and gave it up as there was a danger of getting killed. He refused to do any more work on the farm. His Honour affirmed the lower court conviction and fine.

FEBRUARY 14, 1942. £120 REWARD FOR DOMESTIC SERVANT. SEVERE BURNS SUSTAINED. A domestic servant who received severe burns while working at eggs in the kitchen of her employer’s house; her clothing catching fire. and causing severe burns to face, right arm, shoulder and body, appeared before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions last week in connection with the recording of an agreement whereby the applicant .had agreed to accept £50 compensation, together with the sum of £10 costs, and £3 11s 0d medical expenses.

The applicant was Margaret Muldoon, Drumcullion, Dernacrieve, Co. Cavan, and the respondent Patrick Rooney, Sessiagh East, Inishmore, Lisbellaw. The matter had been referred to his Honour to see if the compensation was adequate or not. Mr. J; P. Black (for applicant) told his Honour that applicant was employed by respondent as domestic servant, and on the 10th March, 1941, at her employer’s residence she received serious burns.

Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B. (for respondent)—Not arising out of her work, according, to my instructions.

Proceeding, Mr. Black said that applicant was detained in Fermanagh County Hospital for a period of about, 4 weeks, and subsequently the agreement was arrived at as set out in the opening paragraph. Applicant gave evidence in the witness box. She said that respondent was in comfortable circumstances. Applicant had been living with a married sister since the accident had occurred, and had no means in the world at all.

Mr. Herbert—I am afraid it is more than a question of means. The doctor, he added, said that the only limitation she had was limitation of her arm on account of skin grafting. Her beauty might be injured, but beauty was not the subject of the Workmen’s Compensation Act.

Mr. Horace T. Fleming, surgeon in Fermanagh County Hospital, described the extent of applicant’s burns when she was admitted to hospital. He had again examined her that day and she was totally incapacitated for work.

In reply to Mr. Herbert, witness said that he did not think applicant could do the ordinary work of a house servant.

Mr. Herbert made an offer of £75 in settlement.        . .

Mr. Black said that applicant had agreed to accept £100. He thought she was meeting respondent very fairly in accepting £100.

His Honour—I am not inclined to sanction a settlement of £75.

His Honour made an award of £120, with £10 costs and £3 3s 0d medical expenses.

 

February 14th 1942. EVIDENCE AT INQUEST. The tragic death of a Kinawley school boy was investigated by Mr. James Mulligan, coroner; and a jury, at an inquest on 6th inst., on William John Thompson (7), Derryvran, Thompson’s Bridge, Kinawley, who was killed instantaneously the previous day by a motor lorry.

Head-Constable Thornton represented the police authorities, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B. (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) the driver of the lorry. James Molloy, a conductor on the bus, said the boy was travelling from Stragowna School to his home and got off at Thompson’s Bridge Post Office. Witness was helping other children off the bus; he heard the lorry go past and after a few momenta looked up to see that the accident had occurred. Bernard McGovern, Gortgesh, said he was standing on the roadside and saw the boy go forward from the bus and cross the load end collide with the lorry. He had seen the lorry pass the bus and it swerved as it met the boy, who, however, hit against the left front off side and fell, the wheel going over him. Dr. S. McQuaid, Derrylin, said the boy suffered from multiple injuries to the head and neck. Sergt. Devine gave evidence of measurements.

The lorry driver, Patrick Corrigan, Clonatrig, said he was driving from Derrylin—in the same direction as the bus was headed and the boy was walking— and saw the bus by the roadside at the Post Office. He was driving slowly and passed the bus. He saw no traffic on the road. When he had the engine of the lorry past the front of the bus he suddenly saw the boy a few feet in front of him, crossing the road. He applied his brakes and tried to avoid the boy, but after he got the front of the lorry past him he heard a noise and knew the boy was hit. He stopped and got out and found the rear wheel had passed over the boy’s head. There was four or five tons of sand on the lorry. A verdict was returned that death was caused by injuries received when the boy was knocked down and crushed by the lorry, loaded with sand, and that the accident was unavoidable. The funeral to the Protestant Cemetery, Derrylin, on Saturday, was very large and representative of all creeds and classes.

February 14th 1942. EDERNEY FARMER’S APPEAL CATTLE SEIZURE ECHO.

The seizure of seven cattle belonging to a young Ederney farmer and dealer, and the subsequent forfeiture of five of the animals, had a sequel at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Thursday, when David Jones, Crimlin, Ederney, from whom the animals were seized, appealed against their forfeiture of the five animals. Mr. G. Murnaghan appeared for the appellant and Mr. J. Cooper for the respondent authorities. Head Constable Conlin, Kesh, said the cattle were seized on 1st Sept. last on suspicion of being smuggled. Jones’ statement was that two black polly heifers were bought from John Kane, Kilgarry, and three from William Lunny, same place, on 35th June, 1940. Subsequently, Lunny and Kane stated the cattle were sold a year previously. Mr. Murnaghan said the whole thing was the result of a slip in regard to the date of the sale on the part of Lunny, who said 1939 instead of 1940. Kane, when questioned, said he could not remember the date but it was the same date as Lunny’s sale.

Five, witnesses having given evidence for the appellants, and Head-Constable Conlin (recalled) and Mr. J. McMenamy, veterinary surgeon, of the Ministry of Agriculture, for the respondents, Deputy Judge Ellison, G.C., dismissed the appeal.

1942 Fermanagh Herald.

January 17th 1942. PAIR OF TOUGHS AND BULLIES. £10 ON EACH OF TWO DEFENDANTS Ballinamallard Assault on Policemen. “ From your behaviour in Court I regard you as . toughs and bullies declared Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., when, at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, he addressed two men convicted of assaulting two policemen in Ballinamallard. One of the men, Arthur Smiley, of Coa, was summoned for assaulting “ B ” Special Graham, while in the execution of his duty, and the second man, Edward Wilson, also of Coa, was summoned for assaulting Const. James Glassey, R.U.C. D. I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr. Aidan Herbert, solicitor, defended.

Constable Glassey swore that when on duty in Ballinamallard on 13th December he saw and heard a number of strangers shouting and singing as they left a public-house. They appeared to be rowdy, and witness stopped them, and demanded their identity cards. As witness was taking out his notebook and pencil, one of the men, Wilson, struck him a violent blow in the face, knocking him down. Defendant jumped on top of him and, putting his two hands round witness’s head, tried to batter it off the kerbstone. Special Const. Graham came to his assistance and, while attempting to release him, Smiley caught him (Graham.) by the two legs and “threw him up the street.” D, I. — A rugby tackle. (Laughter). Witness — Yes, and he kicked him at the same time. A large crowd gathered and the two men cleared off.

Cross-examined, witness agreed the night was dark—it was about 9-20 p.m. He did not see another row on the street. “Isn’t Ballinamallard street only twenty or thirty yards long?” suggested Mr. Herbert. D.I.—It is more than that. R.M.—It is a quarter of a mile at least.  Continuing, witness said he saw Wilson later, struck in a hedge outside the town. ”When he was pulled out and asked what he was doing there,- defendant replied: “ I hit nobody. ”

Special Const, Graham gave corroborative evidence as to the alleged attack by Wilson on Const. Glassey. He .went to the latter’s assistance, and while trying to separate them Smiley tossed him on his back and kicked him as well. Witness identified the men with the aid of a torch. Witness did not see any other row on the street that night. Sergt. J. V. Lewis gave evidence that following a report of the incident he went out the road and found Smiley’s car. A person standing beside it was asked where the’ other gentlemen were, and he replied that he did not know. Witness then heard a “fissling” in the hedge, and on going over found Wilson pulling himself out of the thorns; his face was covered with blood, and his clothes were torn. The first words defendant said were: “I hit nobody, skipper.” (Laughter).

RECOGNISANCES ESTREATED AT ENNISKILLEN. At the second December Court in Enniskillen, four .men were fined for coming into the Six Counties without proper documents of identity. Only two of the men surrendered to their bail. The two who returned to their homes in the Twenty-Six Counties did not appear before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M. They were fined 40/- each, and. the two fines were paid by Francis Macken, publican, Belmore Street, who had bailed the men. At Enniskillen Petty. Sessions on Monday, Mr. Macken appeared on an application by the police to estreat the recognisances entered into. Head Constable Thornton made the application, and Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., said bailing a man was a most serious matter, and he granted the application, estreating the recognisances in the  sum of 20/- in each of the two cases.

RAILWAYS AND ARIGNA COAL. Arigna coal, mixed; with Welsh, steam coal, is being used by Great Southern Railways Co. on a large section of the Western circuit, with the measure of success anticipated, states an Irish Independent representative. An expert explained that Arigna coal did not really suit railway engines because it was too dirty. It left a big residue of ash, and also burned the fire bars quickly and the fire box as well and abnormal renewals would be called for. It produced a fire which was really too hot for engines, but in existing circumstances, the railways would be glad to get it. The company was prepared to take increasing quantities of the coal.

“MY WIFE IS A CATHOLIC” ENGLISHMAN WHO WAS REFUSED TOWN CLERKSHIP OF BELFAST. ALLEGATIONS IN AN INTERVIEW. “I WAS ASKED MY RELIGION” Mr. W. L. Allen, town Clerk, Barrow- on-Furness, was appointed by the “Big Six’ of the corporation as Town Clerk of Belfast. He was selected as the most, competent amongst a large batch of applicants. Mr. Dawson Bates, Minister for Home Affairs, refused to sanction the appointment. Now it is alleged that the Minister’s refusal was prompted by questions of religion. This was stated by Mr. Allen in an interview with pressmen on Saturday last. I would like to make it perfectly clear,” said Mr. Allen, “that it seems to me amazing that such an issue could be seriously raised either as a recommendation or an objection to the appointment to such an important position as town clerk of a city of the importance of Belfast.

Sir Dawson Bates, Minister of Home Affairs on Saturday informed the “Big Six” Committee of Belfast Corporation that, .as requested by the Corporation, he had interviewed Mr, Allen and that nothing had emerged from the interview to alter his decision not to endorse Mr. Alley’s appointment. The “Big Six,” it is stated, have decided not to press further for the appointment, and Mr. John F. McKinstry, Acting Town Clerk who is due to retire next May, will again be asked to continue in office for an indefinite period.

Mr. ALLEN’S INTERVIEW. Mr. Allen, in an interview, said “I came over here at the direct, request of the Minister of Home Affairs. I had an interview with him, lasting 40 minutes, and it would have been a simple matter for him to have told me his decision. The first time I was over here, the first intimation I had of the appointment being refused was through the Press. This time the same thing has occurred. ‘’Since arriving on the second visit I have reason to believe that the religious question has been raised, and raised as a very serious issue. “It is incredible to me that such an issue could be raised as either, an objection or recommendation to an appointment such as Town Clark of a city as important as Belfast. One wonders what are the views of the thousands of Irishmen who fight for freedom.

“The position is that I and my family and ancestors for 250 years have been Church of England Protestants. The girl, who became my wife two years ago, after I had been widowed six years, is an English girl of Irish descent and a Catholic.

January 17th 1942. GREAT DERRYGONNELLY CEILIDHE. FR. McCAFFREY’S POWERFUL APPEAL FOR GAELIC CAUSE.A stirring appeal for support of the native games, dances and language and all things Gaelic, was made by Rev. D. McCaffrey, C.C., when on Sunday night he presented the Junior Football League Cup to the victors in the 1941 competition, Derrygonnelly Harps G.F.C., at a ceilidhe mhor organised by the club in St, Patrick’s Hall, Derrygonnelly. There was an attendance of over 400 at the ceilidhe, which was the first organised in the district for many years. The extraordinary success of the event ensures that for the future ceilidhthe will be a prominent feature of Derrygonnelly social events. Enniskillen and Cavanacross between them, alone sent nearly a hundred patrons, while travelling accommodation prevented nearly fifty more from attending also.

It was a great Irish night. Mr. Jim Sheridan, popular M.C., from Cavanacross, had a comparatively easy task in dealing with a fine programme and an orderly and happy crowd. The St. Molaise Ceilidhe Band, Enniskillen, added further lustre to its name by providing splendid music under the direction of Rev. Bro. Bede, its conductor. An excellent supper was supplied by a hard-working ladies’ committee, and contributors to a most enjoyable selection of songs, dances, etc., were: Misses Maisie Lunny, P.E.T., Eileen Early, Kathleen and May Burns, Margaret McGlone and  — Duffy, Monea; Messrs. Sean O’Boyle, J. Sheridan and J. Quinn.

Although Irish dancing has not been done in the district for some years, the performance of the dances was excellent, the Enniskillen and Cavanacross Gaels leading their Derrygonnelly friends through the various movements. Happy faces were everywhere, and as the popular chairman of the club (Mr. J. J. Maguire) remarked aptly: “at no other event could there be seen so many happy Irish faces.” Those present in addition to others mentioned were Father Duffy, Derrygonnelly; Misses Vera Tummon, P.E.T.; May, McCaffrey, teaching staff, . Convent of Mercy, Messrs. Seamus O’Ceallaigh, Secretary, Co. Board; G. McGee, M.P. S.I.  Parties were present from Belleek and Irvinestown, as well as other places mentioned.

Mr. Maguire, presiding, expressed regret at the unavoidable absence of Very Rev. T. Maguire, P.P., who was to have presented the cup. Father Maguire was the best Gael in Fermanagh, and they were sorry not to have him with them, especially as he was a native of the parish. They had a good substitute in their own beloved curate, Father McCaffrey. (Applause). He thanked all the patrons, and said it was a revelation to them in Derrygonnelly to see the pulling power of a ceilidhe. It was a lesson they were not likely to forget for the future. (Applause). He hoped 1942 would be an even more successful year for their club than 1941, and that they would retain the cup they had and add further trophies to their collection He hoped, too, that ceilidhthe would form their social entertainments for the future. (Applause). The only game they had lost during the year was to Derrylin in the Junior Championship final. Victory in that would have meant that they had won the two junior cups, but they very heartily congratulated Derrylin on their victory and wished them all success in the future. He thanked, everyone connected with the success of the night: the ladies, for their catering and the excellent band from Enniskillen.

FERMANAGH TEACHER SUED. PUPIL LOST EYE AT PLAY. CLAIM FOR DAMAGES. HEARING IN HIGH COURT. A claim brought by a 13 year-old pupil against the principal teacher of a Border school came before the Lord Chief Justice in the Belfast King’s Bench Division last week. The plaintiff, Patrick Anthony Leonard, a minor by his father, John Patrick Leonard, of Creenagho, Belcoo, claimed damages far ,the loss of his right eye alleging negligence on the part of James Ferguson, a public elementary teacher, of Belcoo, in not exercising proper supervision. The boy when playing on the road during the midday break was struck by a stone.

Mr. C. L. Sheil (instructed by Mr. Jas. Cooper) was for the plaintiff; Mr. J. D. Chambers, K.C., and Mr, J. Agnew (instructed by Messrs. Maguire & Herbert) being for the defendant.

Mr. Sheil said the accident took place during the lunch hour on March 23, 1939. The school was the last building on the border dividing Fermanagh from Cavan. The school was staffed by the defendant and two women teachers. On the day in question there were about 70 pupils at the school. Those who lived in Belcoo village or nearby got home for their lunch and about 30 children brought their lunch with them.

Mont of the playground or field had been used for instruction in horticulture by the master, and as part of it not tilled was wet the children played on the public road to the knowledge of the principal teacher.

Counsel added that one of the complaints was that the children were so allowed to play on the public road without any person being in charge of them. The children were playing football, and it is alleged that one of them lifted a handful of road material and threw it at the plaintiff,; who was struck on the right eye. The boy was attended by Dr. Hamilton and sent to Hospital. He was later taken to Belfast where the eye was removed. He submitted that the defendant should have foreseen the danger of letting the boys play on the road because of the traffic and the presence of loose road material. Under the Education Act there was cast on the defendant the statutory duty of exercising care over the children and supervision during the luncheon hour. Defendant, counsel asserted, had interviewed some of the boys, dictated to the children, and they wrote down statements. One boy would say that he was sent for by the master, who asked him to say that he (the defendant) was in fact on the road at the time of the accident.  Plaintiff gave evidence, and in reply to Mr Chambers agreed that he sometimes played on the roads at his home but not with the sanction of his parents. Sometimes the master told them not to go on the roads. Answering his Lordship, the plaintiff , said the master had told them not to be out on the road on certain days.

James McGurl, aged 16 years, said the boys used to play on the road. They were forbidden to be on the road on fair days but not on other days. The following day the master spoke to him and …………….

“IMPARTIALITY ” SERIOUSLY QUERIED. To the Editor Fermanagh Herald. ”Sir, Some of your readers who are unacquainted with the Impartial Reporters peculiar principles of impartiality, may have been misled by one of its “impartial” statements, published last week; will you, therefore allow me a few words on the subject. An article in that journal commenting on Regional Education Committee matters, concluded thus “Strange, when Mr. Hanna was appointed Principal, Captain Wray voted against him, favouring a candidate in the same line but with qualifications inferior to those of Mr. Hanna. Under the sharp pangs of remorse for having failed to favour the “Impartial Reporter’s” “highly qualified. candidate, I can just barely recall, as feeble consolation that my iniquity  on that occasion was shared by several other Corrupt nit-wits of the Committee, a few citizens with rank and title to their names – spiritual and temporal. The “Impartial Reporters” ‘‘highly qualified” candidate was, of course, championed by our well- known stalwarts of public rectitude.

The poor mutt, with the ‘‘inferior qualifications” for whom I voted had only a lot of silly stuff as certificates, one of which was from a comic naval dockyard named Chatham and, incidentally, he was only the son of a common British Naval Officer —’how ridiculously absurd to associate our Technical School, or sully its academic air, with such unqualified and inferior persons and places. Needless to add, that fellow with the “inferior qualifications” was not a Presbyterian, he was only just a Protestant, the poor devil could hardly have been more unqualified, I suppose, according to the “Impartial Reporter” unless he were a b…….. Papist.

I am Sir etc. J. P. Wray 27-1-1942.

January 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

Pettigo News. Fermanagh Herald. 17th January 1942. The death has occurred after a short illness, at her residence, Tievemore, Pettigo, of Miss Elizabeth Reid. There was a large attendance at the funeral.

On Saturday R.U.C. from Tullyhommon, Pettigo, made a search of a number of farm houses in the Cloghore and Camplagh districts along the Lettercran border, and seized a quantity of flour and bread. They also seized a quantity of sugar in bags, which had been smuggled from Donegal.

Blacklion District news. 17th January 1942. The wedding took place at Killinagh Protestant Church of Sergeant Alfred Brady R. I. F. Dungannon, a native of Florencecourt, and Miss Elizabeth Sheridan, Gola, Blacklion. Mr. George Sheridan, cousin of the bride, was best man, Miss Annie Sheridan, sister of the bride, was bridesmaid. Rev. Mr. Coleman, B. A. performed the ceremony.

There was a 90% attendance at meetings of the L.D.F. at Blacklion, Glenfarne, Barran and Glangevlin Groups during the week. At a meeting of the Locality Security Force arrangements for extending night patrols were made.

During the week 160 men started to work under the minor relief scheme in the different parts of the area.

When returning from milking cows at Drumcow, Mrs Leonard, Belcoo, fell from a foot style and had her leg broken. She was removed to Enniskillen Hospital.

FINTONA. Butter jumps 1s 7d per lb.; pork 23 carcasses; young pigs 85s to 95s each, potatoes 6s to 7s 4d per cwt.

CASTLEDERG. Pork, 40 carcases; young pigs 65s to 80s each; chickens 4s 6d to 6s 6d, hens 3s 6d to 5s 6d, ducks 3s to3s 6d each; potatoes 7s to 8s per cwt retail.

24th January 1942. CAR ON CONCESSION ROADS. QUESTION OF LIGHTS NOT “ BLACKED-OUT ” A point affecting thousands of motorists who use the Clones-Gavan Concession Road, was raised at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions, before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., when Patrick McEntee, Clonfad, Newtownbutler, was summoned on three counts for not having the lights on his motor car properly blacked-out.

Mr. J. B. Murphy, solicitor, who appeared for defendant, said the case raised the point of black-out on the Concession- Road, on which defendant resided. The road was in and out of Monaghan and Fermanagh at points. Cars in Monaghan could use undimmed lights while the Six-County cars must be blacked-out. District Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, said defendant’s car was found in the Six Counties. Mr. Murphy — Any person using that road could be stopped in the Six Counties. Major Dickie—I am afraid they could. The real trouble is that Six-County “cars meeting headlights are helpless. Major Dickie said he thought it was a very proper case to be brought, to- see what would be done. Constable W. H. Walker—I brought it for that purpose. Mr. Murphy —‘What is Mr. McEntee to do in future? ‘ Major Dickie – That is the trouble with, all of us. I would suggest he should have a dipping headlight and drive with one headlamp dipped. I think if the defendant and all other Free State drivers used that form of light on the Concession Road there would be no objection by the police. Mr. Murphy asked to have the Probation of Offenders Act applied with costs, and said they in Monaghan would dip their lights. The Probation Act was applied.

24th January 1942. POPULAR ENNISKILLEN WEDDING. MAGUIRE — SMYTH. A pretty and popular wedding was solemnised in St. Michael’s, Church, Enniskillen, on Wednesday morning of last week, the contacting parties being Mr. Peter M. Maguire, the well-known Gael and secretary of Enniskillen Gaels G.A.A. club for the past 15 years and Miss Margaret (Gretta) Smyth, Wellington,, secretary of the Fermanagh County Camogie Board. The best man was Mr. James Donnelly, and the bride was attended by her sister, Miss Mary T. (‘Dot’) Smyth, P.E.T.

The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by Rev. E. Rhatigan, C.C., Terenure, Dublin, cousin of the groom, assisted by Ven. Archdeacon Gannon, P.P., Enniskillen. The reception in the Railway Hotel, Enniskillen, was attended by a large number of relatives and friends of the happy couple. Father Rhatigan presided, and those present included Rev. Father Vincent, C. P., the Graan. The honeymoon is being spent in the South and West of Ireland.

24th January 1942. CALL FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION ON WIDER BASIS. Mr. J. J. Coalter, J.P., urged Fermanagh Regional Education Committee to appeal to the Government to place secondary education on the same basis as primary education so that all might be able to obtain the higher standard of education without extra cost. Mr. Coalter said the time had arisen when they should press upon the Government the absolute necessity of providing the same facilities for secondary as for primary education. Secondary education was not available to all pupils. It was lack of a proper secondary education that had caused the dearth of properly trained young men that were now wanted by the country in time of war. It was impossible for the ordinary man, after providing the necessities of life for children, such as food and clothing, to provide a proper secondary education.

24th January 1942. LEITRIM LADY’S DEATH IN WICKLOW. Mrs. Alice Clancy, proprietress, Grand Hotel, Wicklow, who died, was a native of Manorhamilton and was widow of Mr. Patrick Clancy, Kiltyclogher, Co. Leitrim. Formerly of the Bellevue Hotel, Dun Laoghaire, she took over the Grand Hotel, Wicklow, in 1918. She was sister of Sister Mary Therese, O.P., and Sister Mary Patrick, Holy Faith Order, both in South Africa, and mother of Mr. Joseph Clancy, who has been managing the Grand Hotel for some years; Rev. R. Clancy, C.C., Donabate, and of the late Rev. Berchmans Clancy, O Cist., Mount Melleray.

24th January 1942. DROVE WITHOUT LICENCE. John P. Brannigan, 6, Henry Street, Enniskillen, was fined 20s at Enniskillen Petty Sessions for driving a motor lorry without a licence.

January 10th 1942. RAILWAY LINE CLOSED. LAST RUN IN THE CLOGHER VALLEY. The close of the old year coincides with the passing of the Clogher Valley Railway, which has served the district for 65 years and was closed down on Wednesday of last week in accordance with an Order of the Ministry of Home Affairs. To mark the occasion members of the office and locomotive staffs with a number of local folk took a joy ride on the last train from Aughnacloy to Fivemiletown and back, the arrival home at Aughnacloy being signalled by the hooting of the engine whistle. Competition was keen as to who would have the honour of punching the last ticket issued and this distinction was credited to Dr. Gillespie of Tynan.

Some 70 employees are affected by the closing of the line, but most of them, will receive compensation on a varying scale. Although: no trains are now running the head office staff at Aughnacloy carry on as usual and will continue to do so for the present as a lot of clearing up work has to be attended to before the liquidator proceeds with the dispersal of the property.

The Ministry’s cattle grading centers at Aughnacloy, Clogher, and Fivemiletown will be carried on at the railway premises as usual, the Clogher Rural Council having made arrangements for the use of the railway weighbridges for the purpose.

It is interesting to note that the first ticket issued on the railway is retained by Mr. W. D. Graham, solicitor, Fivemiletown, having been purchased by his father, the late Mr. D. Graham, on the first run 56 years ago.

January 10th 1942. MANOR HAMILTON NEWS. Roses in Bloom. — Roses in bloom are to be seen in Mr. M. O’Donnell’s garden at Boleyhill.

L.D.F. District Command Dance. — The L.D.F. District Command Dance held on Sunday night was well patronised.

January 10th 1942. ROSLEA POTEEN CHARGE. BARREL OF WASH FOUND. JAIL SENTENCE. At Roslea Petty Sessions on Friday before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., Thomas Beagan, farmer, Tonnaghaboy, Roslea, was sentenced to two months’ imprisonment without hard labour when he pleaded guilty to having 20 gallons of wash in his possession, on Dec. 6th. A further charge of having a bottle in his possession containing a few drops of poteen was dismissed without prejudice. Defendant was not professionally represented. In reply to District-Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, Sergt. Ryder, R.U.C., Fivemiletown, stated that while accompanied by Sergt. C. E. Williams, Roslea, he assisted in searching the house of defendant. In the sitting-room he found two empty 141b. tins which had contained syrup. He then went to a hayshed and with the assistance of a graip he found a barrel in the hay which contained 20 gallons of ‘wash’. The wash had matured and was ready for running. Witness heard Beagan saying it was his wash. Defendant then informed the court he admitted having the wash.

Sergt. Williams deposed to finding a large bottle which smelled strongly of poteen. When questioned about the bottle defendant stated it had been left there by a girl called Lena Murphy. In fairness to defendant he would like to say he tested that statement and found there had been a bottle left there some days previously. When questioned about the wash defendant said it was his. When asked to account for the syrup defendant’s wife said it was used for making cakes. Later after the barrel was found defendant admitted the syrup was used for making the wash. Witness destroyed the wash and kept a sample. Defendant (told the court he admitted the wash but not the poteen. In reply to his Worship, the District Inspector said there were no previous convictions. In imposing the sentence stated Major Dickie said he would not impose hard Labour, although actually he believed it made no difference. Defendant was then removed in custody.

BLACKLION NEWS. In accordance with custom, groups of ‘Wren Boys’ travelled the district in the days prior to New Year’s Day.

The annual Xmas Tree was given in the Blacklion School by Mrs and the Rev. Mr Coleman on Wednesday night. A big number of children were entertained.

A dance in aid of funds for the new band was held in the MacNean Hall, Belcoo, on New Year’s Night. The spacious Hall was packed. The music was by the Sunny Melody Band.

A special meeting of the Group Staff of the Local Security Force was held in Blacklion on Friday night. Group Leader Wynn presided. Sergt Rock and D. S. O. Maguire, N. T. were in attendance. A letter from the Minister for Justice was read, thanking the group for their services for the past year. The question of the formation of a branch of the Red Cross was discussed and it was decided to assist in forming a branch as soon as possible. The appointment of Mr. John Jas. Grane as Section Leader was sanctioned. Mr Michael Foley was appointed Asst. Section Leader. An Intelligence Officer was also appointed.

PETTIGO NEWS. The poor in Pettigo village were provided with food, clothing and fuel by a number of charitable gentlemen and ladies in the vicinity during the Christmas season. The donors include: – Guard J. Treanor and Mrs Treanor, Mr. James Gallagher, Postmaster, Mr Michael Fullerton, Customs and Excise, Mr and Mrs Thos. Bradley, Sic-Co., Customs and Mrs Dora Wrenn, C.M.B.

On Tuesday night of last week Lettercran B. Group of the L. S. F. under Squad Leader T. Haughey assembled at the local hall and underwent instruction in squad drill.

On Thursday night of last week a very enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Parochial Hall, Agheyarron, (sic) the proceeds being in aid of Parochial Funds. The music was supplied by Messrs Eddie McHugh, Corgary, and Edward Lynch, Mullinabreen. Mr. James Neill McNally was M. C.

On Wednesday night of last week a dance was held in Letter Hall, Pettigo, the proceeds being in aid of charity. The music was provided by the Trio Dance Band. Mr. William H. Marshall, Skea, was M. C.