1817. ERNE PACKET. Typhus deaths, Kościuszko, Robbery of the Belfast Mail.

25-12-1817. THE MARQUIS D’ANTONELLE, better known in the revolutionary history of France by the name of Pierre Antoine, died lately at Arles, his native place, aged seventy, he was a Member of the Convention, in which he acted a very distinguished part; was persecuted by Robespierre; pursued by the Directory; and neglected by Bonaparte. His political writings were numerous, and memorable for their ability. He was one of the principal Editors of the famous Journal des Hombres Libres. At the restoration of the Bourbons in 1814, he published a pamphlet, in which he openly embraced their cause.

25-12-1817. ADVANTAGES OF CLEANLINESS.—Tuesday, at a meeting of the Subscribers to the House of Recovery, or Fever Hospital, Waterford, it was stated from the proper Committee, that 1,120 dwellings, which had been whitewashed for the poor people, and provided with fresh straw beds, had since whitewashing, sent but four patients to the House. It would be difficult to conceive a stronger proof of the advantages of cleanliness.— Waterford Mirror.

25-12-1817. AT THE I’ECOLE ROYALE, IN PARIS, lectures are now delivering in the Persian, Arabic, Turkish, Armenian, and Modern Greek languages.

25-12-1817. THE INQUISITION, say the last accounts from Spain, has been very active for some time past, particularly in the Provinces, where several persons have been arrested, the greater part of them charges with Freemasonry.

25-12-1817. ON SUNDAY LAST THE following prayer for deliverance from the prevailing sickness or plague, was offered up in several of the churches in Limerick, “Oh Almighty God, who in thy wrath didst send a plague upon thine own people in the wilderness, for their obstinate rebellion against Moses and Aaron, and also in the time of King David, didst stay with the plague of pestilence three score and ten??

18-12-1817. A BOXING MATCH which took place on Monday near Westport, between two men of the names of Patrick McDonagh and Patrick Browne. The former, either in a fall, or by a blow from his opponent, received what appeared to be a slight wound on the forehead, when the persons present interfered and reconciled the combatants, and conducted McDonagh to his home, where he had scarcely arrived when he expired. He was in appearance a much stronger man than Browne. An inquest was held on the body of the deceased and a verdict of Manslaughter was returned against the survivor.

13-11-1817. KOSCIUSKO. The hero of Poland, the brave, disinterested and virtuous Kosciusko is stated, in an article from Lausanne, to have died at Soleure on the 15th instant. A singular felicity of reputation has even attended this amiable citizen and Warrior. — In the case of genuine liberty he fought against injustice, and shamed both the tyrants and Jacobins of the age. In his days of power, at the head of armies that adored his name, no false glory dazzled him nor corrupt ambition could betray him. He nobly resisted the foreign potentates who had laid waste his country; not because they were Kings and Emperors, but because they were invaders and oppressors. He combated with no rebellious sword—far no ambiguous object. When Poland lost her independence, Kosciusko lost his home; as she sunk he rose; but not upon her ruins. The Court of Russia would have allured this illustrious defender of the people whom he had subjugated, by temptations irresistible to vulgar minds: Bonaparte would have made him the flattered instrument of a spurious and hollow liberality to his countrymen: but Kosciusko saw that their lot was irretrievable; and his own he refused to change.— as a soldier and a patriot, in public life and in retirement, his principles were untainted, and his name unsullied: the Monarchs whom he opposed respected him: the factions who failed to seduce, forebore to slander him; and he would have been the Washington, had he not been the Wallace, of Poland.

(From the Internet) Andrzej Tadeusz Bonawentura Kościuszko (Andrew Thaddeus Bonaventure Kościuszko; February 4 or 12, 1746 – October 15, 1817 was a Polish–Lithuanian military engineer and a military leader who became a national hero in Poland, Lithuania, Belarus, and the United States. He fought in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth’s struggles against Russia and Prussia, and on the American side in the American Revolutionary War. As Supreme Commander of the Polish National Armed Forces, he led the 1794 Kościuszko Uprising. Kościuszko was born in February 1746 in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, in a village that is now in Belarus; his exact birthdate is unknown. At age 20, he graduated from the Corps of Cadets in Warsaw, Poland, but after the outbreak of a civil war involving the Bar Confederation in 1768, Kościuszko moved to France in 1769 to pursue further studies. He returned to Poland in 1774, two years after its First Partition, and took a position as tutor in Józef Sylwester Sosnowski’s household. After Kościuszko attempted to elope with his employer’s daughter and was severely beaten by the father’s retainers, he returned to France. In 1776, Kościuszko moved to North America, where he took part in the American Revolutionary War as a colonel in the Continental Army. An accomplished military architect, he designed and oversaw the construction of state-of-the-art fortifications, including those at West Point, New York. In 1783, in recognition of his services, the Continental Congress promoted him to brigadier general.

Returning to Poland in 1784, Kościuszko was commissioned a major general in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth Army in 1789. After the Polish–Russian War of 1792 had resulted in the Second Partition of Poland, he organized an uprising against Russia in March 1794, serving as its Naczelnik (commander-in-chief). Russian forces captured him at the Battle of Maciejowice in October 1794. The defeat of the Kościuszko Uprising that November led to Poland’s Third Partition in 1795, which ended the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth’s independent existence for 123 years. In 1796, following the death of Tsaritsa Catherine the Great, Kościuszko was pardoned by her successor, Tsar Paul I, and he emigrated to the United States. A close friend of Thomas Jefferson, with whom he shared ideals of human rights, Kościuszko wrote a will in 1798 dedicating his American assets to the education and freedom of U.S. slaves. He eventually returned to Europe and lived in Switzerland until his death in 1817. The execution of his will later proved difficult and the funds were never used for the purpose he had intended.

13-11-1817. MARRIED, In St. Mark’s Church, by the Rev. Joseph Druitt, James Johnson, of Drum, County of Monaghan, Esq. to Miss E. Reeves, daughter of the late D. H. Reeves, Esq. and niece to Colonel Reeves of the 27th Regiment.

13-11-1817. On the 21st inst. at Eyrecourt, Walter Lambert, Esq. eldest son of Walter Lambert, Esq. of Castle Lambert, county Galway, to the amiable and accomplished Anne, eldest daughter of Giles Eyre, Esq. of Eyrecourt-Castle, and Lieut. Col. of the Galway Militia.

13-11-1817. DIED. On Saturday last, in the prime of life, of Typhus fever, the Rev. James McKenna, Parish Priest of Tempo. — A young man of the most amiable character and exemplary conduct, and deeply lamented by his acquaintances, and congregation.

On the same day, of Typhus fever, Mrs, McDonald, wife of Mr. Edward McDonald of this town. Baker.

On Monday morning, of Typhus fever, at Mount-Irvine, near Clogher, in the prime of life, Surgeon George Irvine, R, N., son of Mr. Acheson Irvine, of Derrygore, near this town.

At Strabane, on the 20th ult. of  Typhus fever, John Glasse, Esq. Attorney.

On the same day, of Typhus fever, Mr. Spence, Saddler.

At same place, on the 2nd inst., of Typhus fever, Mrs. Perry, wife of Mr. John Perry.

At same place, on the 31st ult. after a few days illness, of Typhus fever, Mr. Adam Burrell.

On the 31st ult., Mrs. Saunders, wife of Mr. Saunders, of Foyle College, Derry.

In Bishop Street, Derry, Mr. Billington.

In Ferry-quay-street, Derry, Mrs. Kelly, in the prime of life.

On the 1st. inst., near Sligo, deeply regretted by all who knew him, Charles Dawson, Esq. A. M., late first assistant in Sligo School.—Amongst his numerous attainments, he had acquired some knowledge of medicine, which he applied in his leisure hours towards the relief of the sick poor—and in his visits of mercy he caught the fever, which in a few days hurried him, in the prime of life, to another World, where, we trust, he “now rests from his Labours, and his Works have followed him.”

At Swords, on the 5th inst., of Typhus fever, caught in the execution of his clerical duties, the Rev. James Wallace a Gentleman regretted by all who knew him.

On the 30th, of Typhus fever, Anna, only surviving child of John Fetherston H., Esq. of Grangemore, County of Westmeath.

(From the Internet.) Typhus is any of several similar diseases caused by Rickettsia bacteria.[1] The name comes from the Greek typhus (τύφος) meaning smoky or hazy, describing the state of mind of those affected with typhus. The causative organism Rickettsia is an obligate intracellular parasitic bacterium that cannot survive for long outside living cells. It is transmitted to humans via external parasites such as lice, fleas, and ticks. While “typhoid” means “typhus-like”, typhus and typhoid fever are distinct diseases caused by different genera of bacteria. The following signs/symptoms refer to epidemic typhus as it is the most important of the typhus group of diseases. Signs and symptoms begin with sudden onset of fever, chills, headache, and other flu-like symptoms about 1 to 2 weeks after being infected. Five to nine days after the symptoms have started; a rash typically begins on the trunk and spreads to the extremities. This rash eventually spreads over most of the body, sparing the face, palms, and soles. Signs of meningoencephalitis begin with the rash and continue into the second or third weeks. Other signs of meningoencephalitis include sensitivity to light (photophobia), altered mental status (delirium), or coma. Untreated cases are often fatal.

In historical times “Gaol Fever”,  was common in English prisons, and is believed by modern authorities to have been Typhus. It often occurred when prisoners were crowded together into dark, filthy rooms where lice spread easily. Thus “Imprisonment until the next term of court” was often equivalent to a death sentence. Prisoners brought before the court sometimes infected members of the court itself. Following the assizes held at Oxford in 1577, later deemed the Black Assize, over 300 died from gaol fever, including Sir Robert Bell, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer. The Black Assize of Exeter 1586 was another notable outbreak. During the Lent assizes court held at Taunton in 1730, gaol fever caused the death of the Lord Chief Baron, as well as the High Sheriff, the sergeant, and hundreds of others. During a time when persons were executed for capital offenses, more prisoners died from ‘gaol fever’ than were put to death by all the public executioners in the British realm. In 1759, an English authority estimated that each year a quarter of the prisoners had died from gaol fever. In London, gaol fever frequently broke out among the ill-kept prisoners of Newgate Prison and then moved into the general city population. In May 1750, the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Samuel Pennant, and a large number of court personnel were fatally infected in the courtroom of the Old Bailey, which adjoined Newgate Prison.

13-11-1817. ROBBERY OF THE BELFAST MAIL COACH. Friday evening, about ten minutes after six o’clock, as the Belfast Day Mail Coach, on its way to Dublin, arrived at Lissen-hall, a short distance beyond Swords, the Coachman found his way obstructed by two carts being placed across the road. Soon afterwards, a body of armed men, ten or twelve in number, appeared; the front horses were seized, and, about the same time, the banditti fired three shots, one of which passed through the hat of one of the guards, Luke Rocheford and unfortunately took effect in the back part of his head, but, we trust, without any serious result. The passengers, eleven in number — seven outside and four inside—many of them females, were then rifled in the most brutal manner, of the valuable effects and property about them; which was a small gold watch, maker’s name, Arnold and Sons, London, and supposed to be Number 217; a gold seal, and the initials marked upon it, W. S., in Irish characters; also, a gold watch, maker’s name, Thomas Moss, Ludgate-street, London; a great variety of bank notes, among which was one of the Bank of Ireland, for five pounds, dated 4th December, 1816. We give this hasty description of those articles, in the hope of their leading to a detection. Two artillery men passed by at the time, but took no notice of the proceedings, more than enquiring, “what was the matter,” and being informed, they went forward quietly- Those men can easily be ascertained to give evidence, if necessary. A carman was also  stopped, but no molestation offered to him.— While the robbers were engaged in plundering the passengers, a post coach came up, in which were the Marquis of Donegal, his son, (Lord Belfast,) and another gentleman, all well armed. An attempt was made to stop the post coach, but, by the exertions of the coachman, in whipping the horses over a large trunk, they most fortunately escaped. They had not proceeded far, when they met a party of horse patrole, who immediately went in quest of the robbers: a foot patrole had also been sent in that direction, in consequence of a robbery having been committed the night previous, at the house of Mr. Harckney. We have the pleasure to state that none of the passengers in the Belfast coach have suffered any personal injury, and also that the entire of the mail-bags have been preserved. We have little doubt that some of the delinquents will be apprehended. The Post Office will, of course, do its duty; and we hope that the poor wounded guard, who preserved the mail bags, will not go without attention and reward. Mr. Farrell requested the attendance of the respective passengers at the Head Police office, this morning when a further investigation will go forward before the Magistrates; and we cannot omit noticing the urbanity and politeness of Lord Belfast, in disclosing and furnishing us with such particulars of this transaction, as came within his immediate knowledge or observation. Carrick’s Morning Post. Five persons have been apprehended for the above Robbery, and after a long examination on Monday last, at the Head Police Office, Dublin, three of them were fully committed for trial.

1942 Fermanagh.

2-5-1942 ENNISKILLEN GROCER’S SUCCESSFUL APPEAL. Ernest Colvin, grocer, High St., Enniskillen, appealed at Enniskillen Quarter. Sessions on Thursday against a penalty of £50 imposed at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on a charge of knowingly harbouring seven sacks of coffee beans with intent to evade the prohibition of export thereon. Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, said that after Colvin had been convicted they succeeded in arresting a man from the Free State named Keenan, .for whom, this coffee was, and he was fined £50. When the case same on against Keenan they had interviewed Mr. Colvin and his assistant, and got them to come and give evidence against Keenan. In view of this fact the Customs Authorities would agree to this penalty, being reduced to £25. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, D. L. (for Colvin) agreed to this course, and accordingly his Honour affirmed the conviction, but reduced the penalty to £25.

2-5-1942 WHISKEY SEIZURE BY FLORENCECOURT POLICE. Sergeant Ryan and Constable Redpath, Florencecourt, on Saturday evening stopped a car at Drumcarn, Belnaleck, Co. Fermanagh, and on searching it found 6 five naggin bottles of whiskey, four similar bottles of wine and two large bottles of gin, as well as a dozen egg cups, a quantity of tobacco and cigarettes, a showerproof coat and quantity of sweepstake tickets, all of which were seized, together with the car. The driver was taken into custody,, and on. Sunday afternoon was allowed out on £20 bail to appear at next Enniskillen Petty Sessions. Major Dickie, R.M., attended at the Barracks, on Sunday afternoon, and the car driver was ,present with his solicitor, but no court was held, the reason being that the magistrate could not discharge any judicial function on a Sunday, though he can sit as a magistrate. The case could only have been .proceeded with had the man sufficient money to pay any fine which, if he had been convicted, might have been imposed. Had the case been heard and a fine inflicted, the order would have been unenforceable, as the Court was held on Sunday.

2-5-1942 FIRE AT CASTLECOOLE. BUILDINGS DESTROYED. An outbreak of fire occurred on Saturday afternoon in outhouses at Castlecoole, Enniskillen, the residence of the Earl of Belmore. The Enniskillen Town Brigade and the Auxiliary Fire Service, both under Mr. James Donnelly, town surveyor, receiving notification at ten minutes to one, were on the spot before one clock a quick turn-out which probably saved extensive buildings because the fire had gained a firm hold on the solid buildings and was burning fiercely. The efforts of the Brigades were chiefly directed towards confining the outbreak. Until. 2.30 p. m, the battle with the flames continued, ending only when about forty yards of the buildings had been destroyed roof and floors being burned out. The A.F.S. Brigade was under the immediate command of Mr. Freddy Bleakley with Mr. J. Lusted, A.F.S. chief in attendance.

2-5-1942 PARTY VOTE ECHO. FARTAGH COTTAGE TENANCY. An echo of a recent Enniskillen Rural Council party vote on a cottage tenancy was heard at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions, on Friday, when the Council was granted a decree for possession of a cottage at Fartagh, against Miss Mary Millar. Miss Millar’s father was the tenant until his death a few months ago. Miss Millar applied for the cottage, but it was granted to a Unionist by a party vote of the Rural Council. Miss Millar is a Catholic.

2-5-1942 SEIZED BICYCLE AT BELLEEK BARRIER. JUDGE RECOMMENDS RETURN ON PAYMENT OF DUTY. Are bicycles liable to purchase tax? Although, according to Mr, George Dixon, Surveyor of customs and Excise for County Fermanagh the tax is collected throughout Great Britain and the Six Counties on bicycles, Mr. R. A. Herbert, L.B. (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert, Enniskillen contended during the course of an appeal at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Monday, before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., that the wording of the Section of the Act governing the matter makes bicycles not liable.

The appeal was one brought by Terence McGowan, of Ross, Tullyrossmearn, Co. Fermanagh, against an order of Major Dickie, R. M., forfeiting a bicycle under the Customs Acts. When cross-examining Mr. Dixon, the Customs Surveyor, Mr. Herbert referred the witness to the Finance Act No. 2, 1940, which created the Purchase-Tax, and stated that the schedule set out goods that were chargeable with purchase-tax. In the first column (that setting out goods charged at the basic rate of one third were the words: Road Vehicles and Cycles (whether mechanically propelled or not) being vehicles and cycles constructed or adapted solely or mainly for the carriage of passengers.” Mr. Dixon said that was the Section, which gave authority to charge purchase tax on bicycles. Mr. Herbert — Who would be the passenger on a bicycle?—He is his own. passenger. It is being definitely charged and paid all over the United Kingdom. It is time it was questioned. Mr. Herbert said a passenger was already interpreted in law. This boy cycling on this bicycle could not be said to be a passenger. Judge Ellison said he did not think the language in the Section was very neat for the purpose.

Mr. Herbert — It is very far from neat. He further argued that a machine constructed for one person to ride did not make the machine one “constructed for the carriage of passengers.” His Honour held against Mr. Herbert who raised the paint because one of the taxes the appellant was stated to have failed to pay was his purchase tax. Giving evidence for the respondent,  Customs Officer George Forrest, Belleek, stated McGowan was cycling past the barrier there, not stopping, when witness called on him to stop, seeing that he was riding a new bicycle. McGowan in answer to witness’s questions said he belonged to Kiltyclogher, but produced a national registration, card with his address at Ross, Tullyrossmearn. He asked him to account for the fact that he had stated he was from Leitrim, while he was from Ross, and McGowan said he lived at both places off and on, and that he had been, living in the Six Counties for ten years. He said he had borrowed the bicycle from his brother in Kiltyclogher as his own had been stolen. He then offered to pay whatever was necessary. Witness seized the bicycle and an order for forfeiture was granted at the Petty Sessions. “There has not been one single instance,” said witness, “of where a bicycle has been smuggled and has been confirmed as having been smuggled into the Six Counties where the bicycle has not been stated to have been a borrowed bicycle although the bicycle has actually been new at the moment. In cross-examination by Mr. Herbert, witness said cyclists should stop, and go into the Customs hut if necessary.

Do you stop all cyclists? —I do if I am on the road. We all pass these huts and see what occurs?—Sometimes it is after five o’clock (when the Customs hut closes). George Dixon, Customs Surveyor at Enniskillen, stated a Customs duty of 30 per cent, ad valorem was chargeable on Eire-built machines unless satisfactory evidence was produced (a certificate of origin from the manufacturer) that the machine was Empire-made and that the cost of materials and labour involved reached a certain percentage. Mr. Herbert—Could it have been of anything but Empire origin in these days? –Witness stated he admitted the present circumstances, but still the certificate was necessary. Mr, Herbert—Playing with the law like a child, isn’t it?—No, it isn’t. Would you swear this is a foreign article?— I cannot swear it, but it is for the importer to displace the prima facie charge by providing evidence. Were these things drawn to the attention of’ the importer? —It is the importer’s duty, if he wishes to claim preference, to make a declaration that he claims preference.

Don’t you think it would only be fair before putting Customs duty into force that the attention of the importer should be drawn to the provisions? —Undoubtedly, if the citizen had come into the hut and stated he had imported it. Mr. Herbert—A sort of Please, sir, can I pass? Mr, Herbert said McGowan came from Kiltyclogher but had been staying with friends in Ross for some years off and on. This was the smallest thing he had ever come across in the Customs line The same sort of point was raised before where a solicitor in Donegal drove his, car up to the barrier and the Customs seized it as having been imported, but the car was subsequently returned. This boy came along a proper route at a proper time and his bicycle was seized. He had gone a hundred yards or two into Six- County territory. It was straining the law very far to say a certificate of origin was required. Why didn’t they tell him to go back? When he found out the position the boy offered to pay. Mr. Cooper said this was not the only case brought up at the same place. The snuggling of bicycles into the Six Counties was a wholesale business. Mr. Herbert—There is no evidence of that.

Judge Ellison said he should be inclined to confirm the order and say he thought this boy should be let off if he paid what he should pay. Mr. Cooper—-We will forward it to the Customs, and they will obey your Honour’s recommendation. Mr. Herbert said Major Dickie had stated that if the brother had appeared to say the bicycle belonged to him he would have given it back. Unfortunately the brother could not appear as he was engaged in munitions work in England. His Honour—I think Major Dickie’s view of that was the right one.

25-4-1942. BELNALECK YOUTH’S LAPSE. A Belnaleck youth’s lapse led to his appearance at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on .Monday, before Major Dickie, R.M., charged with, larceny. The defendant was John Patrick Boyle, Toneyteague, and the articles concerned were a coat value £4, a silver watch value £4, a gold watch valued about £5, and the sum of 5/-. District Inspector Peacocke, who prosecuted, said that the silver watch, coat, and the sum of 5/- had been recovered. Constable Ewart gave evidence of a statement made by defendant, and, in reply to Mr. P. J. Flanagan, LL.B. (defending), said that defendant made a clean breast of the whole thing. Mr. Flanagan said that this had come as a complete surprise to defendant’s parents and everybody else, as heretofore defendant had borne an unblemished character. “He says he simply did not know what came over him,” said Mr. Flanagan, who added that defendant was prepared to make restitution for the gold watch that had not been recovered. His Worship bound over defendant for two years in his own bail of £10 and one surety of £10. He also ordered him to pay within three months the sum of £5 to Mrs. Cathcart, Belnaleck, the owner of the gold watch, and 31/6 costs of the prosecution.

25-4-1942. £2 FINES FOR BAD LORRY BRAKES. ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. At Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday Thomas Coogan, Gortnacallon, Newtownbutler, was summoned, as owner, for permitting a motor lorry to be used with inefficient brakes.  James P. Connolly, Cloniston, Clones, was summoned as driver. Sergt. Sherrard said as a result of an accident he examined the motor lorry owned by Coogan and driven by Connolly. At 20 miles per hour Connolly was unable to stop the vehicle with the band brake before travelling 25 yards. The vehicle travelled a similar distance before being stopped by the footbrake. Constable Wilson, inspector of vehicles, said both brakes were defective on all wheels except the offside front. That was not due to the effects of the accident. Connolly did not appear. Coogan, in evidence, said the driver had full charge of the vehicle, and witness did not know that the brakes were defective. They had been adjusted a fortnight before. District-Inspector Peacocke—Can you say why Connolly is not here to-day?—I cannot; he was to be here. A fine of 40s was imposed on each summons. Sergt. Codd said both defendants were from the Twenty-Six Counties, and had temporary Six-County addresses.

25-4-1942. FRUITLESS SEARCH. TWO HOUR INCIDENT AT BELLEEK. A party of about thirty-six young men from the Enniskillen, district attended the great ceilidhe in O’Carroll’s Palais de Danse, Bundoran on Wednesday night of last week, to which parties came from the Six Counties. When the Enniskillen bus reached Belleek, just across the Border, in the Six Counties, on the return journey at about 4 a.m. they were met by a party of Enniskillen police under Head-Constable Thornton. The bus driver was ordered to proceed to the barracks. On arrival there, the dance patrons were taken into the barracks in groups of two and three at a time and were closely searched. Every particle of paper and article in the possession of each was taken out, placed on a table and examined thoroughly. The men had to take off their coats and these were gone through; several of the youths were made take off their boots and socks, which were minutely scrutinised. Three rooms at the barracks were engaged by the police party for the purpose and while the search proceeded three constables did duty with the young men in the bus whose turn had to come. In all the search took almost two hours and the bus did not .reach Enniskillen until after 8 a.m. An American who was on the bus, was not interfered with. The bus conveying the party from Belleek to the ceilidhe was also searched.

25-4-1942. A. O. H. DEVENISH DIVISION. The quarterly meeting, of the above Division was held in the A.O.H. Hall, Brollagh, on Sunday, 12th inst., the President occupying the chair. A vote of sympathy was passed to the relatives of the late Terence Keown, Larrigan, also to the relatives of the late James Reilly, Corrakeel. The motion was passed in silence.

 

Land League 1942 by Eamon Anderson.

25-4-1942. FOLK TALES OF FERMANAGH. BY EAMON ANDERSON. It is truly said that the history of Ireland is written in ballads. Before the days of writing, two thousand or more years ago, the old Gaelic bards of Ireland composed all historical happenings in verse which were committed to memory and handed down for countless generations. Irish historical poetry begun with Amergin, the son of Milesius, about fifteen centuries before Christ, and continued ever since, generation after generation, down to our own day. Some of the early Gaelic historical poems, such as the Táin Bó Cúailnge (Great Cattle Spoil of Cooley), amounted to hundreds of thousands of lines. No wonder that in the Gaelic Ireland of the past it took twenty years’ hard study for the Bardic Order. Not only had a man to be naturally a poet himself, but had also to commit to memory all the Gaelic poetry up to his own time. If we add to that all the ballads and songs that have been composed in English during the last century or so in every parish and corner of this island of ours, and got it all printed in books, it would fill the Fermanagh Co. Library.

So that is the reason that we know so much about the Ireland of the past from the earliest times down to our own day.

For some weeks past I have been writing about the Land League days which many, of our readers can remember. It would be interesting to know how many are alive to-day of the countless thousands who attended the great Land League meeting in Enniskillen on 2nd, of October, 1887. That meeting would have been almost forgotten to-day but for the ballad which Frank Maguire composed to commemorate it. I am going to publish that ballad here this week, and you will find that it describes the meeting far better than any dry prose history could do.’

I have mentioned Frank Maguire in these articles before. He was a fanner and lived his lifetime in the townland of Ruscaw, a mile north of Kinawley village, the next townland to Drumlish, where I was born myself. I never remember him, as he passed away before my time, but his songs and ballads are living still in this part of the country. When I was a child I thought that the few townlands around us were the most wonderful place’s in the world, and I have the same opinion yet! Ruscaw produced two of our parish bards, Frank Maguire and the old school master, Michael Maguire, In Teravally, a short half-mile away, lived Charley Farmer, another of our parish bards. In Drumbinnis lived two of our noted shanachies whom I have often quoted here, John Maguire and Owen Jones. Once I said to Mr. Cahir Healy, who, alas; is far from us to-day, “I think our parish of Kinawley is the best in Fermanagh for folklore and traditions, and bards and ballads.” “I agree with you,’’ said he. “and anyway, that is the right spirit for a person to have—to regard his own townland or parish as the hub and centre of the universe. If every townland would preserve its own traditions we would then be able to preserve those of all Ireland.”

So now here is Frank Maguire’s ballad on the Enniskillen Land League Meeting. The Dean mentioned chairman was the Very Rev. Dean Bermingham, then parish priest of Enniskillen.

“Bold Redmond” was Willie Redmond, then M.P. for North Fermanagh, who was then a fiery young patriot, even fiery enough at that time to please that most ardent Irish Nationalist, Seumas MacManus, the famous Irish writer, who was in Enniskillen at the time. To those of us who remember 1914 and later times and how the old Irish Parliamentary Party lost much of their early Nationalist enthusiasm, this will seem rather strange. But in later days they apparently forgot Parnell’s oft-repeated warnings. Parnell had only a limited belief in the efficiency of Parliamentary agitation. He was of the opinion that without a well-organised public opinion in Ireland his power in Parliament would be slight. He publicly stated that long association with the House of Commons would destroy the integrity of any Irish Party, and publicly advised the Irish people to keep a keen watch  on the conduct of their representatives in the British House of  Commons at all times. As I say, the Irish Party, and many of its people must have forgotten these warnings in later times, else they would never have agreed, even temporarily, to the so-called Home Rule Act of 1914, which merely empowered the Irish people to play at a “Parliament” in Dublin, whose enactments could be vetoed by either the British Lord Lieutenant or the British Parliament, or ruled illegal by the High Court of Justice, and, alas, providing that Ireland’s finances would remain chiefly in England’s hands, and also for the first time in history, agreeing to the partition of Ireland. We get an idea of how the Irish people advanced in the seven years after, when we consider that although Griffith and Collins “Treaty,’’ and “Free State” gave control over tariffs and finance, and many other great powers of all kinds, yet a civil war was fought against it. The Constitution of Eire, of recent times goes a long step further again and gives far-reaching powers, and yet the partition question cannot yet be solved.

So here now for the Land League Song.

 

ENNISKLILEN MONSTER             DEMONSTRATION.

 

Rejoice, ye sons of Erin, for old Ireland shall be free,

The bard’s inclined to tell his mind for all that he did see.

On the 2nd of October, right well I mind the date,

When our Members they came over, their minds for to relate.

 

That morning, as the bell did ring, to chapel we did go,

And fervently we all did Pray against the daring foe,

Returning from the altar, with a mark upon our brow,

Saying freedom for our country, where is coercion now.

 

With horse and foot we took the road,

each shepherd led his flock,

We arrived in Enniskillen at the hour of two o’clock

From Portora gates to Belmore Street was crowded with the throng,

No man to yield, but for the field in thousands we marched on.

 

For to make up their number, I might go through the count,

There is no rule in learning could tell the full amount.           ,

I saw the hand of Shane O’Neill on the green flag from Tyrone,

And the royal band of Fintona, they played us “Garryowen.”

 

At the Jail Square I rested there to take another view,

When Lowry, off the Monument, he asked me “Is that you?’

And are these the Derry Prentice Boys, or when did yous leave home?

I took you for another man, I thought you were Maglone.”

 

“We’re not the Derry Prentice Boys, nor yet from Sandy Row,

For our Parliament is landed in old Ireland once more.

We have the men of Ulster here, our cause for to maintain,

Our member is bold Redmond, and our chairman, is the Dean.”

 

North and South Fermanagh, they made a grand display.

With Kinawley and Kilskeery, and the boys from Lisnaskea.

From Maguiresbridge to Monaghan, and Tempo in the glen,

With Montiagh lads and Macken men, who fought their way and won.

 

We had Belleek and Bellashanny, and the men from sweet Roslea,

With Mullaghdun and Arney like an army in array,

And noble Enniskillen, with good order and command,

Their cry was “No coercion, but freedom for our land.”

 

And now a few words about the song to explain certain points in it. “Maglone” was “Barney Maglone,” a beloved Enniskillen poet of those days who used to write in the Fermanagh vernacular. His real name was Wilson, and I don’t think he was entirely nationalist in politics, in fact he did not express any opinion on politics. At any rate, when making verses he used to go and stand and ‘chat’ with the statute of Sir Lowry Cole on the top of the monument on the Forthill to gain inspiration. So, according to Frank’s imagination in this ballad Sir Lowry mistook Frank for “Barney Maglone,” and the immense procession for the “Derry Prentice Boys” who were paying a visit to the town of Enniskillen. And a very ghostly visit it would be for, like Sir .Lowry himself, the Prentice Boys had departed this life. They closed the gates of “Derry against King James’s Army in 1685, which is generally considered one of the brave deeds of Irish history, but, unfortunately, on the wrong side! Not that Irish Nationalists ever thought much of King James, and always considered him an old coward anyway, who ran away from the Boyne,, and from Ireland. It was really for Ireland, and not for King James, that the Irish were fighting in that war, and it’s the gallant Patrick Sarsfield was the real hero of it, a man who was admired for his bravery even by those who were fighting against him. Probably Sir Lowry, or his statue, or his ghost, as in life he belonged to the unnational and aristocratic party, would much rather see the Derry ’Prentice Boys marching the town in ghostly array, than a great demonstration of people standing for what he would consider the “preposterous” idea of a free Ireland, and the still more “preposterous” idea of “The Land for the People,” and not for the landlords!”

Belashanny is spelt the old way here, as in the ballad, instead of Ballyshannon, which is a modern corruption. “Bela-shanny” is the phonetic pronunciation of the old Gaelic name of the place (Beal atha na Seannach). Bands and banners from all over the place mentioned, and a lot more attended the meeting.

Up till recent years we had the old Land League banner preserved in Kinawley inscribed “Kinawley to the Front. Away with Landlordism.” We carried it in all processions up to 1917, when we changed it for the Tricolour. But the same three colours were also on the old banner, only fixed in a different way— a white cross on a green background, yellow shamrocks and a white fringe. Also a life-size picture of Charles Stewart Parnell.  As1 said before, there must be many people still in Fermanagh and neighbouring counties who attended the great Enniskillen demonstration of 1887. Seumas MacManus admired this ballad so much that he has included it in his latest book, “The Rocky Road to Dublin,’’ which is the author’s own life story.

But there are a great many other local ballads of the Land League days which never have yet been in print which I must publish in these columns so that they will live in future ages.

And now a word about Frank Maguire, the composer. Like many of the old generation, he got little or no schooling, and only “met the scholars,” as they used to say. He only got into the second standard at a hedge school. But my uncle Joe used to write down all his verses, and also the verses of old Master Michael Maguire. So Seumas MacManus christened him “Secretary Joe” in the poem which he made commemorating old Master Maguire—

“His songs shall be recorded By Secretary Joe.”

Frank Maguire was a great humourist. At that time there was a family in this district called the “Quaker Crawfords.” Whether some of the family in times gone by belonged to the religious persuasion called Quakers I know not, but at any rate they were never called anything only the Quakers. Frank used to “kailey” in it, and was very “great” in it. They had a big farm of land, and often sold a lot of meadows. They were not satisfied with how auctions were going one summer, so Frank said to them, “If yiz give me the sale of your meadows I will get you the best price in the country.” “But sure you are no auctioneer. ” “No matter.” says Frank, “I can be an auctioneer for wan day anyhow, and I’ll bring Joe Anderson to write down the bids.” So the auction was advertised by word of mouth from mountain to lough, and the whole country gathered in hundreds to see the fun of the thing. Frank started to auction the plots with hammer and all, like a real auctioneer, and Joe with notebook and pencil took down the ‘bids.’ Any advance on thirty bob for this plot. Any advance. Come on now, and don’t be like beggar men. Give the landlord’s rent of it itself.” And so on. Carried away by the fun, many men bought meadows that day and gave a good price for them, that did not want hay at all. The end of it was that the meadows fetched far more than any auctioneer could get, and that auction is talked of to this day. There was a man in the country at that time nicknamed “Pat the Moat,” and he was very fond of taking near-cuts, even tramping across fields of crop and vegetables. Going daily to work one summer he had made a regular “pad-road” across the middle of Frank’s field of corn so Frank met him one day on the road and gave him this warning in verse—

O Clatty Moat, you’re nothing loath, your habits to maintain,

Marchin’ o’er me cornfield, and comin’ back again.

But if you do not stop it, and from it don’t refrain,

I’ll meet you on some evenin’ and tramp you in a drain.

Frank had many original sayings. There was a woman in the countryside who had a lot of style and polish, but very little real good breeding, Frank’s comment on her was: “In spite of Art, Nature will appear.”

He once took the contract of opening a drain, in the village which served the barrack and other houses. He had to carry the drain along the edge of a field, and the owner of the field came like a lion and objected to the right-of-way of the water that way. The row rose higher and higher, and at last a villager named Paddy Flynn came on the scene. Frank saluted him in this way:—

“Paddy Flynn yon are welcome in,

In dignity and glory

To join our force, yon are not loath,

to drive away this Tory!’’

Paddy Flynn, by the way, was father of the late Mr. John Flynn, of Enniskillen. In this country the words “wit” and ‘sense’ are often used as to mean the same thing. Frank, however, used to distinguish between them by saying, “The want of wit is as bad as the want of sense!” By “sense” he correctly meant one of the five senses, i.e., hearing, sight, etc. What he meant to convey was that the want of wit. i.e. foolishness, was as bad a failure as to be blind, or deaf, or dumb, There are many more articles to be written about our parish bards, and many songs of their’s which will be published at a future date.

Fermanagh Herald 1942.

24-10-1942. BAD ENNISKILLEN “BLACK-OUT” COURT CASES. “I had a letter from the A.R.P. authorities, saying the black-out in Enniskillen is no use, and we will have to take  sterner measures,” said Head Constable Poots at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, when a number .of householders were summoned for blackout offences. Major Dickie, R.M., inquired what the A.R.P. authorities exactly meant. Head Constable Poots said the A.R.P. authorities complained of lights from buildings, and particularly lights from the rear of buildings. The black-out at the rear of buildings was very bad. That had necessitated him putting extra men on duty at night to inspect the rear of premises to locate the lights. It was a very difficult job sometimes. The result of this tightening-up of the regulations would result in there being far more of these prosecutions for the next Court. In the cases before the Court the following decisions were announced: — Mary Heslin, The Brook, .Probation of Offenders Act; Mary McCaffrey, 2 Militia Barracks; 10/6 and costs; Margaret Dooris, 11 Eden St., 10/- and costs; Alfred Dickson, 6 Abbey St., 5/- and costs; Michael Byrne, Old Bonded Stores, 5/- and costs; George P. Haggins; 25 Strand St., 5/- and costs. Constables W. R. Allen and W. H. Walker were the complainants, and Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solicitor, represented two of the defendants.

24-10-1942. NO INTEREST. COMPLAINT AGAINST SCHOOL ATTENDANCE COMMITTEES. Mr. C. McKeown complained at Fermanagh Regional Education Committee on Friday that some school attendance committees were taking no interest in the attendance of the children at school. He asked when did the Roslea attendance committee meet? The secretary (Mr. Maguire); said he could not say. It was some time since he had a report. He knew of a number of cases in which sub-committees did not seem to take an interest in the school attendance in their districts. He had from time to time received reports that it had been practically impossible to obtain a quorum therefore there was no means of dealing with school attendance. Mr. McKeown said the Act was practically 50 years in existence, making attendance compulsory, yet they had districts in Fermanagh that were taking practically no interest in it. There should be some remedy. It was very discreditable in these days. Lord Belmore—We appoint these committees. We should put off those that do not attend.

24-10-1942. CHEAP MILK FOR ALL SCHOOL CHILDREN. MINISTRY’S CIRCULAR TO FERMANAGH COMMITTEE. A circular letter from the Ministry of Education informed Fermanagh Regional Committee on Friday that schools—primary, secondary, junior commercial, junior and technical—can obtain milk for children at the .rate of one-third of a pint per day, the child to bear half of the cost. Milk would .be supplied to the schools by any local supplier at Is per .gallon and the remainder of the cost would be paid for by the Ministry of Agriculture.

24-10-1942. BAZAAR GOODS SEIZED. SEQUEL AT LISNASKEA COURT. At Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Nellie McGovern, Derrynanny, was summoned for having, on 14th April, knowingly harboured 13 men’s shirts, 20 pairs of assorted ladies’ dress material, six pieces of artificial silk, five children’s frocks, one child’s blouse, one pair of silk stockings, and one lady’s nightdress, imported from the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted and Mr. Baldwin Murphy, solicitor, defended.

Sergt. Kirkpatrick told of the finding of the goods in a tin trunk at defendant’s house, which, he searched following information received. In a statement to him, defendant said she was President of the Women’s Committee in connection with the Catholic bazaar in Newtownbutler, and following the bazaar on 17th March, she brought the goods in question to her house as they had not been sold. These goods had been given as gifts to raise funds for the new church. Cross-examined, witness said that at first defendant told him she had no goods of the kind he was inquiring about in the house, but later said she had stuff belonging to the bazaar. She told him the committee meetings in Drumlone School had not been very well attended. Reginald Allen said the shirts were of Japanese manufacture, the importation of which had been, prohibited in the Six Counties since Japan’s entry into the war. Mrs. McGovern, in evidence, said she was President of the Catholic Bazaar Committee, and the goods in question had been gathered into the trunk at different times. Before the box came to her it had been in Drumlone School, where the committee meetings had not been well attended. His Honour said he was prepared to grant defendant a dismiss on the harbouring summons, but he must make the order for forfeiture.

24-10-1942. WALLPAPER AND WOOL. Edward Whelan and his wife, Mary Whelan, Lisnaskea, were summoned for knowingly, harbouring 13 rolls of wallpaper and 32 ozs. of wool imported from, the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. A. Herbert, solicitor, defended. Sergt. Kirkpatrick gave evidence of the seizure at defendants’ house, and said Mr. Whelan denied all responsibility. In all he found 121 ozs. of wool, but only seized 32 ozs. Mrs. Whelan said she got the wool from various drapers in Lisnaskea and Enniskillen. Mrs. Whelan said she brought the wallpaper in a suitcase from the Twenty-Six Counties about a year ago and was not examined by the Customs’ official on the train. It only cost 13/-. The wool, had been obtained in Six-County shops. His Worship said the Customs must prove the intent to evade payment of Customs duty as mentioned in the summons. Mr. Cooper said these prohibited goods had been bought in the Twenty-Six Counties and brought across the Border. His Worship – But if she was not aware they were dutiable? Mr. Cooper cited the case of a London cabby who was held liable for a man he had taken in his cab at London docks. His Worship said that since Mr. Cooper had introduced his cab he must convict as regards the wallpaper. He imposed a fine of £3 saying she might have been fined £100,

24-10-1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER COURT CASES. TURF-STEALING CHARGE. MOTORIST SAYS FINE “1S A BIT SEVERE.” At Newtownbutler Court, before Major Dickie, R.M., Thomas McCarney, labourer, Clonagun, Newtownbutler, was charged with the larceny of a quantity of turf, the property of Thomas Storey, Clontivern. Thos. Storey, in evidence, stated he had bog at Clonagun and discovered some of his turf being stolen. On the night of Sept. 27th he went to his bog and put a private mark on some of the turf which he had in clamps. On Sept. 28th he found some of the turf missing. He reported the matter to the police at Newtownbutler, and later accompanied Const. Ferguson to Carney’s house, where they found half a bag of turf in the kitchen. He picked out some of the turf (produced) which had his mark on them. Const. Ferguson corroborated. Defendant, in evidence, stated he was going to work and there was no turf in the house. If he had not taken the turf his wife and children would have no fire until he came back. District Inspector Smyth said there was an epidemic of turf-stealing in the district. This man had five horse loads stolen. Major Dickie—I will have to start sending people to prison, for these offences. He imposed a fine of 40/s and said if I there had been anything against defendant before he would have put on a much heavier penalty.

DRUNK IN CHARGE. John McCarroll, hackney owner, Lisnaskea, was charged with being drunk in charge of a motor car on October 1.1th. Defendant admitted the offence. Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, gave evidence, and Dr. James Dolan, Newtownbutler, stated he examined defendant, who was so far under the influence of drink as to be incapable of driving a car. Defendant told the Court he had been driving some soldiers and had some drink, but did not think he was incapable of driving. Major Dickie said there was a minimum penalty in these cases. He imposed a fine of £5, with £2 12s 6d, costs, and suspended defendant’s licence for 12 months. He fixed sureties in the event of an appeal. Defendant—I will appeal the case. Major Dickie—But you admit the offence. Defendant—I think that is a bit severe. Major Dickie—But that is the minimum penalty. Defendant—I don’t think I was incapable of driving. Major Dickie—No judge can impose a smaller penalty. If you appeal, I am afraid it would be a waste of time and money. Defendant said he was not in the habit of taking drink, and had driven all over the world. District Inspector Smyth, said it was much too dangerous to have people driving while under the influence of drink. Major Dickie said he would allow defendant to drive until his appeal was heard, but he did not know whether the appeal was wise or not.

24-10-1942. APPELLANT WAS DEAD. NEWTOWNBUTLER CASE UNUSUAL SITUATION. An unusual situation arose at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Wednesday when an appeal case was called in which Hugh Connolly, of Derrysteaton Island, appealed, against a £12 fine for harbouring 10 cwts. of sulphate of ammonia. Mr, V. G. Patterson, solicitor, who had represented Connolly at the Petty Sessions hearing, said the appellant was dead. He had been dead ten days at his island home before being found. Judge Ellison said perhaps the case could be adjourned. Mr. J. Cooper (for the respondent Customs authorities) —I don’t know how you can adjourn the case of a dead man. Judge—There must be some means of correcting an obvious error. Mr. Cooper—Nothing can happen – just strike out the appeal. Judge—If the fine is not paid he cannot be imprisoned which was the alternative. Could the £12 not be levied by distress on his property irrespective of his, death? Mr. Cooper -You cannot levy it on the goods of a dead man. We would not attempt to do it anyhow. Mr. Patterson—If they don’t do that and don’t attempt to follow Mr. Connolly, nothing further will happen. A constable of police from the locality said the dead man had no stock. A brother-in-law was looking after the farm, but nobody was living on it. Mr. Cooper said it would be different if Mr. Patterson said he was going to take out probate and continue the appeal, but he simply came and said he had no instructions. Mr. Patterson—The man was ten days dead before he was found. Judge—Could the Crown not claim it was a creditor? Mr. Patterson said he thought not in this case. The matter was adjourned.

24-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN MARKET, ENNISKILLEN, Tuesday—Pork, 45 carcases; potatoes, 4s 3d per cwt.; straw, 4s per cwt.; hens, 1s to Is 3d per lb.; chickens. Is 4d to Is 6d per lb.; rabbits, 7d to 8d per lb.

24-10-1942. DERRYLIN BURGLARY.“The monotony of their present service got on their nerves and they decided to desert with the intention of joining the Air Force from ‘Eire’ ” said Mr. E. Ferguson at Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday when he was defending two soldiers of the Royal Engineers, Gerard Fitzgerald and Leslie Fuller, who pleaded guilty to having on 11th August, 1942, broken and entered the dwelling house at Cloghan of Dr. S. J. McQuaid, M.O.H., Derrylin, and stolen two gent’s shirts, two pullovers, one gent’s sports jacket, one pair gent’s trousers, one gent’s lounge jacket and two pairs of gent’s socks, the property of Dr. McQuaid.

Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, said there were no convictions of any sort against Fitzgerald, Fuller was convicted on 21st August, 1935, for attempted housebreaking and larceny at Wealdstone Juvenile Court and put under a rule of bail. On 2nd July, 1936, at Middlesex Quarter Sessions he was sent to Borstal for three years. He was later convicted of being an Army deserter. Mr. Ferguson said both accused belonged to the Royal Engineers. Fitzgerald was 21 years of age in July last and before the war was an aircraft worker at Bristol. He joined the Army at 17, although, he was in a reserved service. Fuller was 23 years of age and had been in the Army since the outbreak of war. Although the pair had made repeated applications to get away from the Royal Engineers because of their peacetime occupations, one being an aircraft worker and the other a plumber, they had been refused. They applied to join the commandos but were refused. Wishing to join the Air Force from across the border, they needed civilian, clothes and this caused the offence. They went into the doctor’s house, found no one in and took these clothes. All the clothes had been returned and the only thing broken was one window. Since the offence, the men had been tea weeks in jail and as far as Fitzgerald was concerned he had expiated his crime and it would be a shame if he had to go to jail again. He asked that they should be allowed to go back to the Army where they would be of more use than in jail. Deputy Judge Ellison discharged Fitzgerald under the Probation Act. He bound over Fuller in £10 to keep the peace for two years. Both men were ordered to be detained pending the arrival of a military escort.

24-10-1942. £4 DECREE FOR ASSAULT. IRVINESTOWN MAN’S CLAIM. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, William John Swanson, of Drumbulcan, Irvinestown, sued James Farrell, of same place, for £5 damages for assault. The claim was not defended. Mr. A. Herbert (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented the plaintiff, who said that on 24th July last he was in the townland of Drumbulkin, and had his bicycle with him. He was at the foot of a hill and had dismounted from the machine to walk up the hill. Farrell came out of the house as witness passed and shouted. Witness looked round to see what defendant was talking about and Farrell struck him on the jaw and tumbled him on his back right over the bicycle. As a result, his jaw swelled and he was not able to take his food. Defendant was a forty-acre farmer with fairly good land. A decree for £4 was given with 2s 6d expenses,

24-10-1942. GOOD ATTENDANCE OF JURORS. When out of 102 petty jurors summoned for Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday, it transpired that only one was absent without explanation, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., said the attendance was very good indeed. “I have never heard a jury list before on which so many names were answered,” he added.

REDUCTION IN FINE. NEWTOWNBUTLER MAN’S APPEAL. Hugh P. Maguire, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, appealed at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday against two fines of £50 each imposed at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions in respect of (1) for failing to stop his car at the Border when called upon to do so, and (2) for exporting prohibited, goods. By consent, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., affirmed both convictions, but the fine for failing to stop the car was reduced to £40. Defendant applied for and was given six weeks in which to pay the £90.

24-10-1942. GLANGEVLIN VOCATIONAL SCHOOL. DECISION TO RE-OPEN IT. At the meeting of County Cavan Vocational Education Committee Mr. J. J. Gleeson presided. The Office of Public Works wrote that as Glangevlin School was not in use they were prepared to take it on lease from the committee for a period of ten years. Mr. McGovern proposed, that they reopen the school. Mr. P. Smith said it was a shame to have the school closed. The application was refused it was decided to take steps to have the school reopened.

24-10-1942. BORDER INCIDENT. BELFAST MAN FINED £100 AT CLONES. At Clones District Court before District Justice Lavery, Patrick McIlduff, whose address was given as English St. Belfast, and who was described as a bookmaker, was charged with on May 19, 1941, at Glasslough, Co. Monaghan, exporting prohibited goods consisting of wearing apparel and also rescuing the goods seized by a Customs official. Defendant was fined £100 on the charge of exporting and £1 on the charge of rescuing, and the fines were paid into court immediately. Evidence was given by Customs Officer Lynn of following a motor-car to the Tyrone border. When he arrived he saw defendant standing by the car along with the driver. He examined the car and found two parcels in it. A man came across the Border and seized one of the parcels and took it away with him across the Border. Defendant took up the other parcel and went across the Border with it. He had no doubt it was defendant who took one of the parcels away. Defendant said he knew nothing about the parcels in the car. He had some drink taken.

24-10-1942. CATTLE DEALER’S CLAIM. £12 DECREE AT ENNISKILLEN. In an undefended civil bill at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, John Elliott, 1 Victoria Terrace, Enniskillen,  cattle-dealer, sued Thomas Gallagher, Aghoo, Garrison, for £26, plaintiff alleging that defendant’s warranty in the sale of a heifer was contrary to the facts. Plaintiff said he paid £21 for the heifer on 12th August last, when, defendant said she had cleaned after calving. It transpired, however, he said, that she had not cleaned, and he had to pay £2 for medicine for her. She lost her milk and was now worth only £13. Defendant went to see the animal and promised to take her back. He did not do so, and when plaintiff saw him, again and mentioned the matter he told plaintiff to “make the best of it.” Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., gave plaintiff a decree for £13, plaintiff to retain the animal.

24-10-1942. FOUR MONTHS FOR ASSAULT. At Enniskillen Criminal Sessions Wm. Hynes, Nugent’s Entry, Enniskillen, was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment on a charge to which he pleaded guilty, of assaulting a girl of under thirteen years. He had been found not guilty of a serious charge against the child.

24-10-1942. PETTIGO NOTES. Mr. Patrick Chaucer, Customs officer at Pettigo Customs frontier post, is to be transferred to Clones. Mr. Chaucer since coming to the village has been a very popular young man. He is a keen athlete who took a prominent part in all the local games. He is being replaced in Pettigo by Mr. Denis Bradley.

On Sunday morning while on duty in the vicinity of Termon Creamery, near the Grouselodge border, Constables Mathers and Robinson, R.U.C., seized a quantity of tea, margarine and rice from a young man. The constables removed the goods to Tullyhommon R.U.C. station.

During the week, R.U.C. from Tullyhommon, Pettigo, were successful in tracing and .recovering, a heifer which had been missing from the farm, of Mr. Robt. Brandon, Glenvannon, near Pettigo.

On Sunday, Sergt. Bradley, R.U.C., when on patrol in the townland of Camplagh observed a man carrying a parcel and coming from the Donegal border. The man bolted leaving the parcel behind which contained woollen blankets.

31-10-1942. GIRL ESCAPES JAIL. £50 FINE SUBSTITUTED FOR PRISON SENTENCE. A pretty, well-dressed young woman, Elizabeth Hal, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, escaped a three months’ prison sentence by appealing to Newtownbutler  Quarter Sessions in Enniskillen on Wednesday. She had been sentenced at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions for dealing in prohibited goods, namely, four loaves, a carton of soap and 3½ lbs. flake meal. Mr. A. J. Belford (instructed by Mr. F. J. Patterson, solicitor) represented defendant. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown, Solicitor, for the Customs authorities, said the amount of goods involved was very small, their value being 3/-. On the 18th November, 1941, appellant was fined £3 for dealing in prohibited goods—18 loaves—and also £36 for exporting three tons of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. Cooper was proceeding to tell Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., of the ambushes carried out by, the police on three different days in April, 1942, when Mr. Belford interpolated and said his submission was that that evidence had been wrongly admitted by the magistrate in the Court below, no charge in respect of these allegations having been made. Mr. Cooper said the police had seen people, seventy-five in number, going to and. from the shop, bringing goods into the Free State. Judge – Illegally across the border? Mr. Cooper—Yes. Judge—Why didn’t you prosecute them?

Mr. Belford pointed out that the solicitor for appellant at the Petty Sessions objected to that evidence on the ground that no prosecution had been brought against those people. Mr. Cooper explained that the shop was on the very border and it was practically impossible to catch the offenders. In this particular case the policeman had to run after a woman; he grabbed the bag she was carrying but was unable to get a hold of her. The constable brought the goods back to appellant’s shop and she pleaded guilty. At the Petty Sessions he (Mr, Cooper.) was instructed to press for imprisonment, and his Worship said to her: “I have seen you before’ and sentenced her to three months. Mr. Belford said imprisonment in the case would be rather harsh as appellant was only twenty-five years old. Before the introduction of rationing, three- quarters of her customers were from over the border, and while he frankly admitted there might have been some irregularities, it was true to say she did not realise the enormity of the offences. She had been more or less out of business since her Ministry of Food licence had been withdrawn by the Lisnaskea Food Control Committee. She was now only allowed to sell some hardware and clothes, and she was contemplating giving up the business she had carried on for seven years. That being so, the police would be given no further trouble. Like many other border residents, she did not seem to realise the seriousness of smuggling and she had already been heavily punished by her livelihood being taken away. Mr. Cooper thought the licence was merely suspended pending his Honour’s decision. Mr. Belford said appellant would submit to a fairly substantial penalty in order to avoid the sentence, which would be likely to have unpleasant consequences for her in after life.

31-10-1942. YOUNG BOYS ON LARCENY CHARGES. ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions ion Friday three young boys pleaded guilty before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., to having on 26th July, 1942, broken and entered the shop of William H. Creighton, Church St., Enniskillen, and stolen chocolate and sweets to the value of £1 6s 6d. One of the above-mentioned boys and another boy pleaded guilty to breaking and entering the shop of Thomas Wilson, Garvary, between 11.55 p.m. on 13th Aug. and 3 a.m. on 14th August, and stealing two bicycle free wheels value 11s, pair pliers value Is 6d, 3½ doz. safety razor blades value 7s, two pocket torches value 3s, two fountain pens value 5s, one pair opera glasses value 15s and five bottles lemonade, value 3s 8d.

The boy twice charged, above also pleaded guilty to stealing a bicycle value £5, the property of Harold Cleary, on 20th July. Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented all accused. All the boys were very young and had respectable parents. None had. any previous convictions involving dishonesty. In two of the cases he mentioned that one boy had been earning £3 18s 0d weekly at public works at the age of 15. Another at the same age had been earning almost £5 weekly. This work stopped and the boys were running about with nothing to do. There was no proper control over the boys since the wages terminated until they had settled down again and got used to living with little or no money.

The Judge, sternly warning the boys of what would happen should they ever again be guilty of a similar offence, allowed them off on entering, or their parents’ entering into recognisances in £10 for their good behaviour. An order was made for the return of the stolen property, and £1 found in the possession of the boy who stole the bicycle was ordered to be handed to Cleary to compensate for a coat on the bicycle that was still missing. Mr. Creighton, said Mr. Cooper, was at the loss of the chocolate, which was buried and was rendered unfit. Asked whether he wanted compensation, by Mr. Herbert, who said the parents of the boy involved were very poor. Mr. Creighton said he did not. The Judge highly commended Mr. Creighton for his charitable attitude.

31-10-1942. ARTIFICIAL MANURE ON BORDER ISLAND. APPEAL AGAINST £12 FINE FAILS. At Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday, before Deputy Judge Ellison William Atwell, of Derrysteaton, appealed against a fine of £12 for the harbouring of a quantity of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. V. G. Patterson represented the appellant, and Mr. J. Cooper appeared for the respondent Customs Authorities. Constable Duffy said in an unoccupied house on Gallon Island belonging to defendant, while on boat patrol on Lough Erne, he found eight bags containing 16 cwt. of sulphate of ammonia. The house was approachable in summer time from the shore, but at this time of the year (February) could only be approached by boat. From the point of the island it was only 50 yards across Lough Erne to the 26 counties. In a statement defendant said he bought the ammonia in Newtownbutler for his own, use. It was the only ammonia he had bought that year. Witness discovered on enquiring at the shop where the purchase was made that the latter statement was untrue.

Cross-examined, witness said Mr. Anderson, manager of the Newtownbutler shop which supplied the stuff, said in a statement that on the 5th January defendant ordered a ton of sulphate of ammonia, took half of it that, day, and the remaining half the next day, and paid for it on the second day. Mr. Patterson—You got it in February, he got it in January; if he had wanted to get it across the Border there would have been no difficulty? –No difficulty. Even when taking it to his house he has to go along the shore of the Free State?—Yes. The Ministry actually urged people to get artificial manures early.—Yes.

Mr. Cooper—Atwell’s statement to you was that he had bought 16 cwt.?—Yes. It could be bought for about £12 a ton .here; what was the price in “Eire ?” —The price at the time was as much as £60. So it would be very profitable to get it across these few yards?—Yes. And 4 cwts. of this ammonia was missing?—Yes. George Dixon, Surveyor of Customs and Excise, stated on information from the police as to defendant’s probable requirements for his own cropping, he allowed 6 cwt. to the defendant, and had the remainder seized. Mr. Patterson—Did you know that he was treating for the purchase of another 40-acre farm?—No. And that he would require fertiliser for it?—No. Will you say you knew 6 cwt. was enough for his forty-acre farm, on Derrysteaton, and another 40-acre farm he was going to purchase?—I acted on information from the police. They did not know what he was going to crop?—They knew what he had cropped the previous year. Mf. Cooper—You don’t allocate fertiliser for a farm he has not bought? — No. Mr. Patterson said when he got his potato subsidy from the Government he received a notice stating that the Ministry had arranged for the importation of sufficient supplies of sulphate of ammonia to meet the needs of farmers, but it was most important that farmers should order immediately and where possible take delivery. “It is most important. Act now” stated the notice. Atwell followed that advice. He had 60 acres on Derrysteaton or heavy wet land, and required a quick acting fertilizer.

31-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN’S £200 PRIZE. When Enniskillen Urban Council met on Monday evening to allocate the prize money of £300 won in the recent waste paper salvage competition, a letter was read from Omagh Urban Council, congratulating the Council on winning a £200 prize. ‘The successful collection of waste paper,” stated the letter “requires great effort, organisation and co-operation of the townspeople, and your success shows that you had these three factors.” Mr. T. Algeo thought the County Hospital was the first consideration of the Council, as it catered for all creeds and classes, and he proposed that the Hospital get half of the prize money. Mr. P. Kelly seconded. Mr. T. Devine—I quite agree with Mr. Algeo that our County Hospital has our first claim, but there are a number of other institutions and organisations which 1 think have claims on you also. He proposed that the money be allocated as follows, County Hospital, £60; Enniskillen Nursing Society, £25: Enniskillen Council for Social. Service, £25; Soldiers’, Sailors’ and Airmen’s Association, £25; Inniskillings Comforts Fund, £25; £15 each to the Women’s Section, British Legion and the Earl Haig Fund; and £10 to the Ulster Gift Fund. Mr. W. H. Creighton seconded. Mr- W. J. Monaghan—Have the charities attached to the various churches received any consideration from you in these matters? Chairman, (Senator Whaley)—I don’t think they have been consulted in this matter at all

Mr. Monaghan said they were coming on to winter, and .he thought the various churches should get some little help for their funds, so that they could assist the poor people by either way of coal or other relief that they may be pleased to give to the people. “You have the outlook of a very severe winter; something should be done for these people,” he added. Mr. J. Donnelly (Borough Surveyor) said he had been consulted on the matter when it had been suggested that the St. Vincent De Paul Society should get £20, but this Society was in the most fortunate position that it had ever been in—that they had sufficient money at the present time. They were well able to carry on and meet the demands of the next couple of years or more. Mr. W. J. B. Lee said if they gave all the money to the County Hospital everybody would benefit, and he proposed that it all go to the County Hospital. Mr. Monaghan—It is a State-aided institution.  Mr. Devine—Speaking for the Church I represent, so far as I know they are not in need of any funds. Mr. Monaghan—That satisfies me. Mr. Algeo then altered his proposal and propose that the Hospital get £100 and he asked the Chairman to take a written vote “to see who was for the County Hospital or not.”

Mr. W. E. Johnston—I object to Mr. Algeo’s statement—“to see who is for the County Hospital or not.” Mr. Algeo—I demand a written vote on it. Mr. Johnston–You can have any vote on it you like. Mr. Devine said he would not like it to go out that this was a vote for and against the County Hospital. Mr. J. Logan thought that Mr. Devine’s motion should be passed unanimously. They had always the churches with them and they had always the poor with them, and likely to have them.

31-10-1942. MINOR HALL BOOKINGS DISCUSSED AT ENNISKILLEN URBAN COUNCIL. Enniskillen Urban Council discussed at length, at a special meeting on Monday evening an application from, the Six-County Council for Social Service for the use of the Minor Hall for .at least one night per week as a club for young people, and also for the taking over by them of a small plot of ground, the Council’s property, abutting on the road adjoining Mill Street and the Irvinestown Road us a juvenile recreation centre. The Chairman (Senator Whaley) asked had the Council a room to spare. Town Clerk (Mr. A. W. Ritchie) — For the next two or three months it is booked. Mr. T. Algeo—Haven’t you a resolution on the books that the Minor Hall is closed for three months? Chairman—After present bookings. The Town Clerk said if there was a fixed night each week it would be very difficult. The Minor Hall went usually with the main hall, when the latter was booked for dances.

Mr. Devine— They cannot surely book; up the hall for three months ahead. Mr. J. Logan proposing that Saturday night be granted to the Social Services in the Minor Hall, said all through the week the young people were engaged at their lessons, and it would be a shame to take them away from these to attend a club. The presence of the boys attending in the hall would help to purify the atmosphere. That would be a disappointment to some people. They would miss (the “hop.” The people would also miss the bottles of a Sunday morning. It would do the town a lot of good if they had the young boys in the ball on a Saturday night. There was very seldom a big function in the hall on a Saturday night; therefore, that night would not clash with any other people. He meant this arrangement to start from 1st January. Mr. Algeo seconded. Mr. Devine— We want it before January. Saturday night would not suit. The Town Clerk read a list of bookings of the Minor Hall for some weeks to come which, showed that the same three groups of people have the hall on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, respectively, of each week for some time in advance. Mr. Devine—Shilling “hops.” The Town Clerk said Saturday night was “Football.” Mr. McKeown— What football; there are several football clubs. Town Clerk—I cannot tell you the name of it. Mr. Devine—Corinthian Football Club. Everyone knows it. There is no secret about it. Town Clerk— It is difficult to get a night. Mr. Devine asked Mr. Logan, not to press his motion, because he did not think Saturday night would suit the Social Services. Mr. Logan—Saturday night is the best. The pictures have the main hall, so that there would only be the two parties here. It is all the same to me. Boys always strolled about the streets for an hour or two on that night, he said. Mr. Johnston—Country boys go home. Mr. Logan-The shops are closed earlier

7-11-1942. TRAGIC DEATH OF JAS. A. JONES, ROYAL HOTEL. POISONED BY GAS FUMES IN BEDROOM. Enniskillen got a profound shock on Tuesday with the news of the death that morning of Mr. James A. Jones, popular proprietor of the Royal Hotel, Enniskillen and one of the best-known auctioneers in the North-West. Only the previous evening Mr. Jones had been seen in the best of health and spirits, on his daily walk, and it was tragic to think that within little more than twelve hours he was dead. The tragic event was caused by an accident. A gas tap which had served a disused stove in Mr, Jones’ bedroom had been at some time or other inadvertently turned on. Mr. Jones was resting in bed after his morning cup of tea when the meter serving that pipe and tap was again turned on by the Gas Company’s fitter after having been off for some time. The fitter was unaware of the pipe leading to the bedroom. The turning on of the gas filled Mr. Jones’ room with gas. The window was closed and when the alarm was raised and the doctor arrived, he found Mr. Jones unconscious. He died after a short time. .

An Enniskillen man, Mr. Jones was a member of a popular and much-esteemed family. His brother Frank, a former Superintendent of the Garda Siochana, died less than two years ago in Dublin, where he was the proprietor of the Beresford Hotel. Another, sister, now deceased was a member of the Convent .of Mercy community Newry. The only surviving member of the family is Miss Josephine Jones, who lived at the Hotel with the deceased, gentleman. It was she who first raised the alarm. To her, in her sorrow, the sincere sympathy of the whole community goes out.

The late Mr. Jones, who was aged 59 years, started life as a clerk in the office of the late Mr. Robert W. Wilson, auctioneer, in the present premises of the Royal Hotel. . He became an auctioneer himself in Mr. Wilson’s employment, and on Mr. Wilson’s death succeeded him. He built up for himself one of the most extensive auctioneering practices in the North. He later became the proprietor of the Royal Hotel, and in both capacities he was as popular as he was-well-known. He entertained some of the leading personalities of Ireland in every sphere.

Mr. Jones was a good-living Catholic gentleman, who attended regularly to his religious duties. Although unmarried, he had a wonderful regard and love for children, a love for little ones shared by every member of his family. In life he had borne many crosses, several members of his family dying within a comparatively short time of one another, but he bore his sorrows bravely, even cheerfully, and was always in high spirits outwardly, whatever sorrows his inner soul might feel. He will be much missed by every creed and class in the town.

THE INQUEST. The sad circumstances of his death were investigated by Mr. G. E. Warren, Coroner, at an inquest in the Hotel on Tuesday. Head Constable Conlin represented the police; Mr. R. A. Herbert, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert), the next of kin, and Mr. Gerald Grant, BL., appeared for the Enniskillen Gas Company.

DOCTOR’S EVIDENCE. Dr. Philip Brady said in response to a telephone massage received at 11 a.m., he went to the Royal Hotel, where he arrived in a few minutes and smelled coal gas. He went, to a bedroom on the first floor and found a strong smell of coal gas in the bedroom. In the bed he found deceased in an unconscious condition but alive. He died a few minutes afterward. He was clad in pyjamas. Death was caused by asphyxia due to coal gas poisoning. Mr. Jones was a patient of witness’s and was suffering from myocarditis in a mild degree; otherwise he was in good health.

WAITER’S STORY. Wm. Brady, waiter, said that morning at 10-30 he was tidying up in the dining room when Miss Jones, sister of the deceased, told him to go up to deceased’s room because she had smelled gas escaping there. When he went into the room he found it full of gas and the gas pipe turned on. He turned off the tap and opened the window. The pipe from which the gas was escaping was not connected to the gas stove in the room and had not been for some time. The gas fire in the room was never used and the tap was on the portion of the pipe leading to the main. He saw deceased in the bed and asked him was he all right, but he made no answer. He felt deceased’s hands and face, and, as he appeared to witness to be unconscious, witness went for Dr. Brady. There was a fitter from the hotel working at the oven in the kitchen that morning. To Mr. Grant, witness said this pipe had been disconnected from the fire for some time, but he did not know who disconnected it.

Mr. Grant-How long had it been in that condition?—I don’t know. Had it ever been reported?—I don’t know, unless Mr. Jones did it. Witness said he did not know when he first noticed that it was cut. He was very seldom in Mr. Jones’s room, except to go occasionally for Mr. Jones’ coat. Mr. Herbert -Is it cut or disconnected? Head Constable—There seems to be six inches of pipe cut away altogether. Witness said, he had not seen the gas stove lit this ages. It was not lit last winter. Patrick Cunningham, boots, said between 9.45 and 10 a.m. that morning he was called by Miss Jones to the Hotel office; In this office were two gas metres, and he was asked by Miss Jones to turn on the gas. She opened the press where the meter was and, as witness knew nothing about them, he refused to turn on the gas. There was a gas man there and he got a wrench and went towards the meter. Witness did not know what he did. There was a gas radiator in the hall of the Hotel, and witness was seven months in the hotel and had never seen it lighted. He heard no conversation between Miss Jones and the fitter. Mr. Grant—Had you ever seen the stove lit in Mr. Jones’ bedroom?—I didn’t even know there was a stove in the bedroom.

IN USUAL GOOD SPIRITS. Michael Rooney, boots, said that about 9-15 a.m. that morning he went to Mr. Jones’ bedroom with his tea. Mr. Jones was in bed and seemed to be in good form. Witness gave him the tea and pulled down the black-out blind. The window was closed. Witness did not go near the gas fire in the room as he did not know it was working. It was usual for Mr. Jones to remain in bed in the morning and have his tea there. Witness never saw the gas fire in the room used. He was in the Hotel since August and never saw the radiator in the hall used. Head, Const. Conlin—Was there any smell of gas when you were in the room? —No. Mr. Jones seemed in his usual health, and spoke to him the same as usual. He made no complaint of any kind. To Mr. Herbert, witness said Mr. Jones took his tea. Coroner—You don’t know whether he got out of bed at all or not?—No, I don’t.

Henry Fox, employed as fitter by the Enniskillen Gas Company, said on this morning about 9 a.m. he was sent by Mr. Lusted, manager of the Gasworks, to the Royal Hotel to have a look at the gas radiator. He arrived at the Hotel at 8-50 a.m. and saw Miss Jones, who pointed out the gas radiator in the hall. She said in reply to witness that that was all in the place. Witness turned on the tap of the radiator, but no gas came. Miss Jones called the Boots to turn on the gas in this meter. As there were two meters in the office the boots was not sure what to do so witness turned on the main cock of the meter serving this radiator. The other meter served the cooking stoves in the kitchen and was fully turned on. Witness was not aware that this meter which he turned on served anything but the hall radiator, so he took the word of Miss Jones for this. He had since made a test of this meter which served the hall radiator and found it also, served the pipe which led to the gas stove in Mr. Jones’ room. He lit the gas in the hall radiator and Miss Jones told him to leave it on as it was cold. He was then brought to the kitchen to look at the cooker. He was not up in Mr. Jones’ bedroom on this visit. Head Constable—If the tap in the pipe in Mr. Jones’ room which was cut had been turned off, could any gas escape? — No, certainly not. It would have been perfectly safe. The pipe was not cut it was disconnected. To Mr. Herbert, witness said he asked Miss Jones were there any others in the place to be seen to, and she said that was all that was in the place. The gas in the hall radiator was still on when he left about twenty minutes past ten a.m.

SISTER’S EVIDENCE. Miss Josephine Jones, who, when the inquest was held at five o’clock, was still confined to bed from the results of the shock, gave her evidence in bed. She said her brother arranged with the Gas Company to attend to the gas in the morning. About ten minutes to ten a man from the Gas Company arrived. Before going to the radiator, the gas man asked her were there any other radiators and she said no. To make sure, she asked the waiter, and he also said ho. She did not remember about the stove in Mr, Jones’ room. It never entered her mind. She called Patrick Cunningham to turn on the meter in the office for the gas man, but he was not able, and the gas man did it himself. After the radiator had been fired, she brought the gas man down to the kitchen to look at the stove there. About 10-30 she smelt gas and went upstairs. She found on entering deceased’s room that it was full of gas. She noticed that her brother did not move as usual, felt his hand and found it cold. She then raised the alarm.

To Mr. Grant, witness said she could not definitely remember whether it was the radiator or gas fittings the gas man said when he asked her were there any others in the house. The tap which was turned on in her brother’s room was on the floor underneath the wash-hand basin, and it could easily have been turned on by someone brushing out the room, or hitting it with their foot when at the basin. Mr. Grant said on behalf of Mr. Lusted and the Gas Company, he extended very sincere sympathy in the terrible tragedy that had happened. The Head Constable and Coroner associated themselves with this expression, of sympathy, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL. B., also joined in the expression of sorrow at Mr. Jones’ tragic passing. He had been a personal friend of Mr. Jones and he was sure the relatives felt the blow very much. The Coroner returned a verdict of death from asphyxia caused by coal-gas poisoning, the result of an accident.

7-11-1942. MILITARY LORRY LIGHTS IN ENNISKILLEN. MAGISTRATE’S COMPLAINT. Complaints concerning glaring headlights of motor vehicles belonging to the military were voiced by Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. His Worship said that recently the whole street of Enniskillen was lit up by army vehicle headlights from end to end, and this was far worse than some of the cases which he had to deal with in Court. Those motor lights could certainly be seen for ten or twelve miles away from the air. He also spoke of the glare from torches. Sergt. John. Codd, R.U.C., said a special report had been made by the police on the subject of lights on army vehicles, but no reply had yet been received. His Worship pointed out that except a light could be seen from an altitude of six hundred feet he would not impose a fine.

One of the cases which fell within this category was brought against an air-raid warden in Enniskillen, and no penalty was inflicted. In another case Head Constable Conlon, prosecuting, said the defendant was aged ninety-three. She kept a boarding-house in Forthill Street and according to the constable she had forgotten to put up the black-out blind. His Worship said it was hard to put a penalty on a law-breaker when she reached the age of ninety three, but he had to do it. A. fine of 5/- and costs was ordered. Similar fines were imposed in a number of other summonses.

7-11-1942. PRISONERS ESCAPE FROM MOUNTJOY GAOL. The following statement was issued by the “Eire” Government Information Bureau on Tuesday; “Six prisoners serving sentences imposed by the Special Military Court escaped from Mountjoy Prison on the evening of November 1.”

 

 

First Garda in 1922.

I WONDER how many men are left in Donegal who joined the Garda in 1922, when the force was founded? And of the few there may be, how many did all their service in Donegal? I met one the other day who could answer affirmatively on both counts.

Patrick McInerney, now in retirement and living in Letterkenny, where he spent part of his service, belongs to O’Callaghan’s Bridge in Co. Clare. He joined the Garda at the formation of the force — he still recalls the day, 22nd May, 1922. His first station was Ballyshannon; a short sit, as it turned out. He moved in on 14th October and was on the transfer list by December 12th. Then it was a brief stint in Pettigo (where my picture was taken) and shortly it was on to Carrick, in 1923. He remained there until 1927 when he moved to Ballintra. Some years there, and the next posting was Letterkenny. Promotion came on transfer to Castlefin and Sergt. McInerney spent spells in Burnfoot and Quigley’s Point before going for his longest service, to Moville. Retiring in 1961, he continued to live on there for some years before coming back to Letterkenny, the home town of his wife, a member of the well-known McClay family of Oldtown, formerly a nurse in the then District Hospital.

Pat, a man with a vivid memory for places and people, could fill a book with reminiscences of his years as a policeman in Donegal, a county he came to love and where he was held in high regard wherever duty took him. He holds two medals of which he is very proud. First, his old I.R.A. medal then the plaque and medal presented at the jubilee celebrations in Dublin to mark the fiftieth year of the existence of the force. This was awarded only to those who had served from the first year. There are few others in Donegal who hold these two much cherished mementos. In retirement, time does not hang heavily on him; when the opportunity is right and the weather inviting he does his daily spot of gardening.

There are seven in the family; a son, Father Matthew McInerney, is parish priest of St. Mary’s Church in Brighton, in the south of England. A keen angler, he manages a run home twice a year. At present he is busy with an extension to the church and a new presbytery is being built, a £100,000 project which entails a succession of fund-raising schemes. Another son is an Assistant County Engineer with the Co. Council.

Having seen service in so many places in Donegal, Pat knows it even better than his native Banner county and still recalls his days in the different stations and the firm friendships formed. He had no ambition to spend his retirement anywhere else.

 

1942. October. Fermanagh Herald.

17-10-1942.LICENSING PROSECUTION FAILS. IRVINESTOWN CASE. All five summonses issued in a licensing case heard at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday were dismissed by Major Dickie, R.M. The licensee Mrs. Elizabeth M. Shutt, was summoned on the usual five counts and her husband for aiding and abetting. Three men found on the premises were also defendants. D.I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL. B., defended. Constable Wright gave evidence that at 12.15 a.m. on 30th Sept. they heard noises in the kitchen of the licensed premises and at 12.20 were admitted by the licensee’s husband who said he invited the men in for a chat to await the return of the licensee who was at a dance. Two of the men had drink in front of them. Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness said the bar was closed and everything was in order. Constable Bradley corroborated. Giving evidence, the licensee’s husband said this wife was out at a dance and while awaiting her return, at one o’clock he invited three friends of his for a chat. The drink they had had been left out early in the .night for himself, and no money was paid for it. The bar had not even been opened to get it. After further evidence, the R.M. said he did not think there was any evidence and the explanation given was reasonable. He dismissed all the cases.

17-10-1942. TEN YEARS’ IMPRISONMENT. AMERICAN SOLDIERS’ SENTENCED. There was a dramatic conclusion to the General Court-Martial in Co. Down on Pte. Herbert G. Jacobs, aged 23, Kentucky, and Pte. Embra H. Farley, aged 27, of Arkansas, who were accused of the murder of Edward Clenaghan, of Soldierstown, Aghalee, who died in Lurgan hospital on September 23, shortly after being found with, head injuries, on the roadside near his mother’s public-house in Soldierstown, when at the end of the case for the prosecution, the defending officer stated that he would call no evidence for the defence. Following short statements by the officer for the prosecution and for the defence, the Court was closed. Within a few moments it reassembled to hear evidence of the character and military career of each of the accused, following which each of the accused was found guilty of manslaughter, and sentenced to 10 years’ imprisonment. The court consisted of four colonels and four lieutenant-colonels.

17-10-1942. CAVAN HALL BURNED. Killadoon Hall, situated in the Loughduff area of Mullahoran (County Cavan) Parish and erected by free labour in 1924, has been destroyed by fire. It was constructed of iron and timber with boarded floor seats and stage, and used as a meeting place by the local football club, L.D.F., Red Cross, etc.

17-10-1942.STORY OF ENNISKILLEN TRAGEDY BABY FOUND WITH THROAT CUT. MISSING MOTHER RESPONSIBLE WHILE INSANE. That five months old Claire Henderson died front shock and haemorrhage as the result of a wound inflicted on the throat with a carving knife by her mother while the latter was apparently, temporarily insane, was the verdict of a jury on Friday at the resumed inquest on the baby which had been found at 5.45 p.m. on the 24th Sept. lying dead on the settee in the sitting room of its parents temporary home 3, Erne View, Enniskillen, by its father Major Edward Henderson. Head-Constable Poots represented the police. Mr. B. L. Winslow appeared for Major Henderson and Mr. G. E. Warren, coroner, conducted the proceedings. Mr. W. F. Dewane was jury foreman.

FATHER S GHASTLY FIND. Major Henderson deposed that his wife and child resided with him at 3, Erne View Terrace, where they had rooms taken. On the 24th Sept. at 5.45 he returned from his office and went upstairs to the sitting room of their temporary home. He saw the baby lying on her back on the settee, with her throat cut and .a carving knife beside her on the settee. There was no one else in the room and he immediately went downstairs to the hallway and there saw Dr. McBrien and Miss Ellen Hands. He told them what he had seen, saying, as far as he could recollect ‘‘The baby’s throat is cut.”

Since the birth of the baby on 27th April last his wife had enjoyed good health. During a week or two prior to the tragedy, however, she appeared to be overstrung and suffered from sleeplessness. They had been on holidays at Bundoran from the 14th to the 21st Sept., and during that time his wife worried about the baby’s health. As a result of his wife’s condition and some remarks she made he called with Dr. McBrien on the morning of 24th September and asked him to visit his wife, who had said she thought herself and the baby were both ill. She also said she let witness down and would not go to heaven and that she was becoming mentally deranged. At 2 p.m. on the 24th Sept. he last saw his wife, when they were both coming out of the sitting room. Shortly before he left his wife went to procure a bottle for the baby. He had been at lunch between one and two o’clock and his wife appeared to be worrying unduly. He spent some time in cheering her up and comforting her. She appeared to cheer up while he was there. He had not since seen her and did not know where she was. The carving knife, which he identified (and which was produced bearing bloodstains) had been bought by him some time ago.

LAST TO SEE MRS. HENDERSON. Miss Rebecca Hands, who said she resided with her sifter at Erne View, deposed that the Henderson’s lived in rooms with them. Mrs. Henderson after the return from Bundoran complained that the baby was ill and looked worried. She complained several times that the baby was wasting away and had a cough. On the 24th Sept. she met Mrs Henderson on the stairs on her way to the sitting room. When out on a message later in the afternoon she met Mrs. Henderson in Belmore Street.

“I HAVE DISKED THINGS.’ Miss Eleanor Hands said she did not see Mrs. Henderson leaving the house. She described what took place when Major Henderson ran down the stairs. About: 4 p.m. witness was in Mrs. Henderson’s sitting room and saw Mrs. Henderson and the baby. Mrs. Henderson was sitting on the settee with the baby on her knee, and she seemed quite happy. She had not been too well and was a bit worried. Did she pass any remarks?—she said I have dished things. Witness did not know what she meant by the remark which was passed as witness was leaving the room and she attached no significance to it.

MAID’S STORY. Miss Joan Power, 9, New Row, Enniskillen, said she had been employed as a domestic servant by Mrs. Henderson between July 1942, and 24th Sept., 1942. On the latter date she left the Henderson house at 3.55 p.m. when she had her work finished, and went to her home. When she was going out Mrs. Henderson said her work was finished and told witness to come in at the usual time next morning. That was in the sitting room. Mrs. Henderson was sitting on a chair near the window and was feeding the baby. She appeared to be all right, and did not look worried. She complained to witness about her health shortly after she came back from Bundoran. She had not since seen Mrs. Henderson. The first she knew of the tragedy was at 8.45 the following morning.

DOCTOR’S EVIDENCE. Dr. M. E. McBrien said on the 24th Sept. Major Henderson called with him and asked him to visit his wife. He found the house occupied by Major Henderson about 5.45, that evening. The Major came down the stairs saying “She is gone and she has cut the baby’s throat.” Witness went upstairs to the sitting room and found the baby lying on her back on the settee. Her throat was cut across with the windpipe opened into and the principal vessels cut. The front of the child’s clothing was heavily stained with blood and a bloodstained curving knife was lying on the baby’s left side between the body, and the back of the settee. Life was extinct. Death was due to shock and haemorrhage resulting from the injuries described. Head-Constable Poots said a widespread search had been made for Mrs. Henderson since the tragedy but she had not been found. Sympathy with Major Henderson was expressed by Head-Constable Poots, the jury, foreman and the Coroner Mr. Winslow.

17-10-1942. CRIMELESS COUNTY LEITRIM. When Judge Sheehy was presented with white gloves at Carrick-on-Shannon he said he was glad to hear from Supt. McNamara that conditions in the county were very satisfactory.

17-10-1942. MOTHER S BODY FOUND IN LOUGH ERNE. SUICIDE VERDICT. The body of the dead child’s mother, Mrs. Mary Henderson (aged 26), was found in Lough Erne at the Weirs  Bridge, near Enniskillen, on Sunday afternoon, attired as she had been when last seen by Miss Rebecca Hands, in Belmore .Street, on 24th Sept. At an inquest held at the Workhouse, Enniskillen, on Monday morning by Mr. G. E. Warren, coroner, Capt. J. N. Hughes gave evidence of identification, and said deceased’s home address was Cheviot View, Ponteland, Newcastle-on-Tyne. Sergt. S. J. Sherrard said about 4.30 p.m. on Sunday an object was pointed out to him at the Weirs Bridge. On closer examination he found it to be the body of a woman fully clothed. He sent for assistance and had the body taken to the Workhouse mortuary. The body was found among the rushes near the bathing boxes at the swimming pond. Dr. M. E. McBrien said on examination he found the body in an advanced state of decomposition consistent with having been in the water about 17 days. There were no marks of violence and death was due to drowning. A verdict was returned of suicide by drowning while temporarily insane.

17-10-1942. OBITUARY MISS ANNIE McMANUS, ENNISKILLEN. Deep regret has been occasioned by the death of Annie McManus, Wellington Place, Enniskillen, which on Wednesday last following a short illness. Deceased gained the respect and esteem of everyone with whom she was acquainted. Of a quiet nature, she was deeply sincere in her friendships, and her unfailing good humour and kindness endeared her to a large circle of friends. During her illness she had the happiness of being frequently visited by the local clergy, and she made an edifying preparation for death. All along she retained her wonted cheerfulness, never uttering a word of complaint, .but patiently resigning herself to the Divine Will. The funeral took place on Friday following Requiem Mass in St. Michael’s Church, Enniskillen. Rev. C. O’Daly, C.C., who was celebrant, delivered a touching panegyric in the. course of which he referred to the deceased young lady as a model Catholic and one whose popularity in life was evidenced by the wide sympathy created by her demise. He expressed sympathy with, her relatives who had sustained a severe loss by her passing. The funeral cortege was large and paid eloquent testimony to the widespread regret caused by her death. Rev T. J. Meegan, C.C., officiated at the obsequies in the Catholic Cemetery, where the interment took place. The chief mourners were —Annie McManus (mother), Mary and Nellie (sisters), John and Patrick (brothers).

17-10-1942. HAD UNCUSTOMED CIGARETTES PENALTY AT DERRY COURT. A fine of £10 was imposed at Derry Petty Sessions on Charles McIntyre, 50 Creggan Road, who was prosecuted by the Customs authorities for aiding and abetting some person, unknown in the unlicensed sale of cigarettes. Constable Hinds said in a drawer in defendant’s room he found 1,450 American cigarettes, and the defendant, who was employed by the American technicians, said he bought the cigarettes from American sailors for his own use. No duty had been paid. Defendant, in reply to the R.M., said he was earning £5 13s a week, and had to pay 18s 4d a week income-tax. Captain Bell, R.M.—The more the Revenue is defrauded the more income-tax we will have to pay. Defendant—I was not defrauding the revenue. Captain Bell—Of course, you are. Captain Bell said he was determined to do his best to help the revenue and tobacconists, who had to make their living. A similar penalty was imposed on George Page, 7 Strand Road, who was summoned for being knowingly concerned in selling uncustomed goods, 3 3/16 lbs. cigarettes and 26 boxes of face powder. Police evidence was given that when defendant’s .premises were searched they found. 1,540 American cigarettes in a trunk marked “Eire’’ under a mattress. Defendant said he did not know who put the cigarettes in the trunk which was in a passage. The face powder was lying on a chest of drawers. There was no necessity to him to smuggle face powder when he could buy it in Derry at 6d a box.

17-10-1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER NEWS. During the absence of the family at church the dwelling house and shop of Mrs. E, Williamson, Clonagun, Newtownbutler, situated a few yards from the border, was broken into and raided. Following investigations by the R.U.C. in charge of Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, a man named John J. Connolly, Clonkeelan, Clones, was arrested. Later at a special court in Newtownbutler, before Mr. E. Reilly, J.P., Connolly was charged with breaking and entering the premises and stealing a gold watch and a quantity of cigarettes and tobacco. He was remanded on bail to Newtownbutler Petty Sessions. At the week-end Newtownbutler police in charge of Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, visited a house on the Cavan-Fermanagh border at Cleenagh and seized quantities of flour, candles, boots, horseshoes, thread, rice, loaves, and other articles suspected of being for export across the border. Constables H. Lowry and R. J. Freeman, Newtownbutler, seized a motor-car containing a quantity of rice at Summerhill. The car and contents were taken to Newtownbutler. On Sunday night, Sergt. Blevins, Newtownbutler, intercepted a motor-car coming from Co. Cavan direction at Parson’s Green and seized a quantity of whiskey from one of the occupants which was believed to have been imported.

17-10-1942. PETTIGO NOTES. A pretty wedding took place in St. Mary’s Parish Church, Pettigo, the contracting parties being Mr. William Baird, Dromore, eldest son of David and Mary Baird, Dromore, and Miss Teresa McGrath, youngest daughter of Michael and the late Mrs, M. McGrath, Belault, Pettigo. Miss Sadie McGrath, sister of the bride was bridesmaid, and Mr. John Baird, brother of the bridegroom, was bestman. The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by the Rev. P. McCormack, C.C., Pettigo.

On Friday night a very enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Hall, Lettercran, the proceeds of which were in aid of repairs to the church.

A sad burning-accident resulting in the death of Baby Marshall, the four-year-old daughter of James Marshall, Drumhorick, Pettigo, occurred on Monday. The child during her mother’s absence was in the vicinity of the fire when its frock became ignited; she ran on to the street to the mother who immediately extinguished the flames, but the child had received such severe burns as necessitated removal to hospital where she died a few hours later.

17-10-1942. BLACKLION DISTRICT NEWS. There was a full attendance of the committee at a meeting of the Red Cross branch in Blacklion on Thursday night. Mrs. Chas. Dolan presided. Mrs, Maguire, N.T., read correspondence and financial matters were arranged. A vote of sympathy was passed to. Miss Margt. McGovern, Loughan House, on the death of her father.

There was a large muster of the L.D.F. at Loughan on Sunday, when target practice took place. The highest three marks were recorded by Messrs. Fred Murray, Frank Maguire, Patk. Fitzpatrick, and Capt. Kelly. D.S.O. Magovern and Group Leader Farmer were in charge.

The Harvest Thanksgiving Service took place in Killinagh Protestant Church on Friday night. The special preacher was Rev. Canon Pratt.

D.S.O. Maguire, N.T., Sergt, Rock, and the local officers, were present at a meeting of the L.D.F. in Blacklion on Thursday night. Sergeant Rock read special communications and Group Leader of the L.D.F. was appointed to give lectures.

The wedding took place, with Nuptial Mass, at Drumshambo Church, of Francis, youngest son of the late John and Mrs. McGovern, Barran, Blacklion, and Margaret Teresa, third daughter of the late Mr. Peter Dolan and Mrs. Dolan, Crotty, Drumshambo. Rev. Father Cummins, C.C., performed the ceremony. Mr. Michael McGovern (brother of the groom) was best man, and Miss Dolan, (sister of the bride), was bridesmaid.

There was a large attendance at the funeral in Doobally of Mrs. Patk. McLoughlin, Tullinamoal. Rev. J. J. Murtagh, C.C., officiated in the church and at the graveside. .

17-10-1942. MANORHAMILTON NEWS. Forestry Officials—Mr. Curran who has been Forestry Inspector at Manorhamilton during the past two years has been transferred to Co, Cork, and is replaced by Mr. Madden who comes from Tipperary.

Teacher’s Appointment—Miss Dillon, assistant in the girls’ school, has been appointed assistant in Drumlease N.S., Dromahair. She possesses a lady-like charm, all her own and her departure from Manorhamilton is very much regretted.

Legion Of Mary—To mark the first anniversary of the formation of a branch of the Legion of Mary at Manorhamilton a very enjoyable function was held in the Technical School on Thursday evening (1st inst.). Tea was provided by the Legionaries and vocal, items were contributed, Bro. Ferdinand being the principal contributor. The guests at the evening were Rev. Fr. Brady, C.C.; Rev. Father McGrail, C.C.; Rev, Fr. Gilbride, and Bros. Ferdinand and Leonard. Rev. Fr. Brady congratulated the Legionaries on the good work they had performed during the year.

17-10-1942. SENIOR FOOTBALL FINAL. NEXT SUNDAYS GAME AT THE GAELIC PARK. At the Gaelic Park, Enniskillen on Sunday next Fermanagh’s two star teams— Lisnaskea Emmets and Newtownbutler St. Comgalls—clash once more in quest of county honours when they meet in the county final of the Fermanagh Senior Football Championship. So keen is the rivalry between these teams and so well are they .matched that this contest for premier honours should prove one of the best games seen in Fermanagh for a long time. The championship title has always been the most coveted in G.A. A. competitions and many memorable clashes have occurred in recent years between these teams for the blue riband of Fermanagh football.

Few teams can boast such an array of inter-county talent as the Emmets and St. Comgalls, for between them they comprise two-thirds of the Fermanagh county team. Lisnaskea have the services of such well-known players as T. Durnian, F. Johnston, A. Smith, F. O’Dowd, Duffy and Collins, whilst Newtownbutler have inter-county stars in E. McQuillan, B. Allen, M. McDermott and Murray. Two splendid additions to the .Newtown team lately have been the Smith brothers—M. Smith in particular being a, promising youth of inter-county status.

Only a month or so ago Lisnaskea triumphed over Newtown in the League final by a very narrow margin when the latter seemed favourites for the title. Newtown were short some of their regular team on that occasion however. The St. Comgalls’ victory over Clones-one of Monaghan’s best senior teams—in the Border League a fortnight ago greatly enhances their chances against the. Fermanagh Champions, but the Emmets have always proved they are a difficult combination to beat in championship struggles. Contests between Lisnaskea and Newtownbutler are invariably sparkling exhibitions of fast and clever football which have always attracted bumper crowds, and Sunday’s game should certainly draw a record crowd to the Gaelic Park. The throw-in will be at 4 p.m. and Rev. B. Mahon, Irvinestown, whose competency as a referee is widely recognised, will have charge of the game. Spectators are asked to note carefully that owing to the difficulty in stewarding the pitch at recent matches nobody except players and officials will be allowed inside the paling fences.

17-10-1942. ‘WIN BY STRATEGY BEST FOR ALL OF US” AN AMERICAN VIEW. “In the light of what you are doing in India, how do expect us to talk about principles and look our soldiers in the eye.”? This question is asked in an “Open Letter to the People of England” in the current issue of the magazine “Life.” The document demands one thing from Britain: “Quit fighting the war to hold the Empire together, and join with Russia and your allies to fight the war to win by whatever strategy is best for all of us. “After victory has been won, then the British .people can decide-what to do about .the Empire—for you may be sure we don’t want it. “But if you cling to the Empire at the expense of the United Nations’ victory you will lose the war … because you will lose us.” Briefly, there are two wars,’ the letter goes on “one we are actually. fighting and the other we must fight in order, to win. The war we are actually fighting is a war to save America. Nothing else. “Everyone here is prepared to fight this war to any extremes just as everybody in England will go to any extreme to save England. “But this kind of war of each trying to save himself is just the set-up for Hitler. If we are really going to overwhelm the Axis we must envision and fight for something bigger than either England or the United States. “We Americans are a strange people, maybe you think of us as rather practical. But you cannot understand us at all unless you realise what principles mean to us.” We fought you on principles in the first place. Once in our history we killed 600,000 of our own sons to establish the principle of freedom for the black man.” “Life ” suggests that the British may object that Americans have not defined these principles very well yet—“and that’s a fair objection.” “One reason we have not defined them is that we are not convinced yon would fight for them even if they were defined.” ‘’For instance, we realise that you have difficult problems in India, but we don’t see your “solution” to date provides any evidence of principles of any kind.’

17-10-1942. DISREGARD FOR TRUTH AMD HONESTY. PROTESTANT ARCHBISHOP PERTURBED. Speaking on Tuesday at the Joint Synod of Dublin, Kildare and Glendalough diocese, the Most Rev. Dr Barton, Protestant Archbishop of Dublin, referred to “the growing disregard for the sacredness of truth and honesty,’’ and said he had been, seriously perturbed of late by evidence of that disregard. Could a society be in a healthy state he asked in which a man would boast openly and without shame of how he had treated the Customs, or his neighbours, or in which there was graft and wire-pulling. He was convinced that a nation’s taxes could at once be reduced by 50 per cent, at the very least if its citizens could be trusted to tell the truth and to deal as conscientiously with Government departments as a man was expected to deal with his neighbours.

17-10-1942. NORTH LEITRIM FARMERS’ UNION. MEETING IN MANORHAMILTON. A special meeting of the above was held in McGloin’s Hall, Manorhamilton, on Oct. 7th. Mr. James Kerrigan, president, who presided, said that the appointment of a new Agricultural Commission which was composed almost entirely of professors boded ill for the poor farmers of Connaught. Such a Commission to be effective should be composed of practical farmers, and the Congested Districts should have representation as well as the plains of Boyle. Mr. Kerrigan said that North Leitrim was in a serious position owing to the bad harvest and the destruction of hay and crops by flooding and the drainage scheme which was turned down twelve, years ago should be revived. Mr. John McGarraghy, said that .much damage had been done in Mullies by flooding of the Bonet, and several farmers had lost large quantities of hay. Referring to the increased rates Mr. McGarraghy said the new County Council would be expected to work hard for a reduction in the rates.

Mr. P. J. O’Rourke, secretary, said that after working for four years in trying to establish a. Farmers’ Union  in North Leitrim, and after encountering many difficulties and disappointments he was glad to be able to state that his work and teaching had not been in vain because farmers all over the area were beginning to take a lively interest in the Union. Old prejudices, went on the speaker, are dying fast, and the workers on the land have come to realise the importance of their task in producing the food supply of the Nation. They have also learned after long years of disillusionment that the promise of politicians are made to be broken. I don’t mean to say that all politicians are selfish or dishonest, but I am not overstepping the mark when I say that men who are highly educated and claim to be intensely  patriotic have time and again made promises which they must have known could not possibly be fulfilled. I have it from usually well informed sources that a General Election will take place inside of a few months, and farmers will need to be on the alert if they are not to be fooled all the time. Thousands upon thousands of pounds have been spent for the past few years in building new houses in the cities tod towns, and in providing water schemes for the smallest villages, but when the farmers of North Leitrim apply for a grant to have a corn mill erected no money can be spared to facilitate them. When farmers who have lands which do not require drainage petition the Minister fop Agriculture to give grants for reclamation plots on the old system their appeal is turned down. They must make drains no matter what about the potatoes. The matter boiled down to one important point—that the farmer was disregarded because he generally supported politicians who knew nothing about farming. The farmers were dictated to by officials who had only a theoretical knowledge of farming. The Labour Party were now coming forward asking the people to return them to power at the next Election and hinting that they had a brand new plan for putting the agricultural community on their feet. Judging by letters which had appeared in the daily papers recently from men who are prominent in the Labour movement, the Labour Party expects farmers to produce food below the cost of production. I believe a Labour Government would fix the price of milk going to creameries at about 4d per gallon.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT. The relatives and friends of the Late Monsignor Soden, Manorhamilton, wrote expressing gratitude for the Co. Council’s vote of sympathy, and hoped the note would be accepted in acknowledgment.

NO OBJECTION. A letter was received from the Department stating that the Minister in pursuance of the Local Authorities (Financial Provisions) Act, 1921, had consented to the Leitrim County Council borrowing by way of temporary overdraft for the purpose of providing temporarily for current expenses, a sum not exceeding £15,000.

PARISH COUNCIL’S VIEWS. Mr. J. P, Eames, Secretary, Ballaghameehan Parish Council, wrote that at a meeting of that body on the 13th Sept., the following resolution was proposed by Mr. Joe Fox and seconded by Mr. Jas. Connolly—“That the Parish Council view with alarm the increase in rates, and they consider the time has come to reduce the rates,. and give an opportunity to the ratepayers to pay.” The communication was noted.

17-10-1942. RUBBER SHORTAGE “MAY STOP ROAD TRANSPORT” Major Eastwood, Yorkshire Road Traffic Commissioner, told road transport operators at Halifax on Saturday that if the country continues to use rubber at the present rate road transport will be brought to a complete standstill. Passenger services would have to be cut to the bone, and all road services in Yorkshire might have to be stopped after 9 p.m.

17-10-1942. PERMITS FOR SIX COUNTIES. BRITISH GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCEMENT. DRASTIC. REGULATIONS. STATEMENTS IN WESTMINSTER AND STORMONT. An important announcement regarding the control of emigrants into Northern Ireland from “Eire” and the reinstatement in employment after the war of demobilised soldiers was made in the British House of Commons on Thursday by Mr. Herbert, Morrison, Home Secretary. Mr.. Morrison said: ‘During the past two years there has been a considerable influx into Northern Ireland of persons normally resident elsewhere, and this influx is continuing to a considerable extent. “It has been decided to take power by a Defence Regulation to institute a system of control over persons who come to Northern Ireland from ‘Eire,’ Great Britain, or elsewhere, and to require such persons to furnish particulars as to their address and occupation.” “Subject to exceptions for children and persons in the service of the Crown, all British subjects who were not ordinarily resident in Northern Ireland on January 1, 1940, will be required if they desire to take up. residence there or to continue to reside there for longer than six weeks to obtain permits which will be issued on my behalf by the Ministry of Home Affairs in Northern Ireland. Unless there are security objections in individual cases, permits will be granted for so long as their services, are needed to applicants who are already in occupations and to those who in future come into Northern Ireland to take up work. “They will also be granted to those who ought to be allowed to remain there on compassionate or other special grounds.

“Each permit will bear a photograph of the holder, and will in all cases be issued for a period of six mouths or for the duration of the employment specified in the permit, whichever is the less. “These will be renewable on the same conditions as govern their issue. “Permit-holders will be required to notify the authorities of any change of address. The immediate objective of the schema is to deal with war conditions, but it is also contemplated that the scheme will be of value on the termination of hostilities for the purpose of facilitating the reinstatement in employment of demobilised men from Northern Ireland who join the Forces as volunteers. “At such a time it will be right to give to the demobilised volunteers, preference in the labour market of Northern Ireland over these newcomers, and for this purpose to have power to terminate the permits granted to persons who are in employment.

“It is, accordingly contemplated, that the scheme will be kept in existence for a reasonable time after the war and if the Defence Regulations should expire before the demobilised men have had reasonable opportunity of being absorbed into employment, it will, in the view of the Government, be right that the necessary legislation should be introduced in the United Kingdom Parliament for a temporary prolongation of the system.” Sir Hugh O’Neill-Can you say whether these Regulations will give power to deport people who have come in since Jan., 1940, and in respect of whom it is not thought desirable to give permits? Mr. Morrison.—Yes, there is no obligation on the Northern Ireland Minister of Home Affairs, acting for me, to grant a permit, and it can be withdrawn at any time. I am assured that the Minister for Home Affairs in Northern Ireland will be reasonable in the exercise of this power.

STORMONT ANNOUNCEMENT. A statement on similar lines was made by the Prime Minister, Rt. Hon. J. M. Andrews, in Stormont on Thursday afternoon, and was received with cheers. Mr. J. W. Nixon asked if the Prime Minister would continue the good work by restraining his Cabinet colleagues and other members from going to ‘Eire,’ sometimes in doubtful company?” The Prime Minister—I would remind the House that that was a statement made by the Secretary of State in the British Parliament and as a matter of courtesy I have read it to this House. I have nothing further to add.

24-10-1942. LISNASKEA POTEEN CASE. 23 GALLONS WASH SEIZED. FARMER TO SERVE THREE MONTHS. A farmer, who lives on a small mountain holding and has a wife and seven children, was granted a month at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, in order to get in his crop before serving a three months’ hard labour sentence imposed in connection with a poteen case. The defendant was James Wallace, of Carrowmaculla, Lisnaskea, who was charged by District-Inspector Smyth with having in his possession on 7th October at Carrowmaculla, twenty-three gallons of wash.

Sergeant Kirkpatrick, R.U.C., gave evidence that at 6.10 p.m. on 7th inst., in company with other police, he went to the dwelling house of the defendant to search for illicit spirits. In a bedroom off the kitchen, witness found a barrel containing twenty-three gallons of wash, the barrel being heavily covered with bags. Defendant was not present and witness went to where, he was working a mile away. On being told what the police had found and being asked for an explanation defendant, witness alleged, replied “It is mine. I am only a poor man and I suppose it will put me out of the place.” Witness, then brought him to the house and pointed out the illicit spirits be had found. Witness subsequently destroyed all the wash except the sample taken for analysis.

To Mr. Winslow, witness stated he agreed defendant lived in a very small farm up in the mountains and had a wife and seven children. When Mr. Winslow asked his Worship (Major T. W. Dickie, R.M.) to deal as leniently with the defendant as possible, District-Inspector Smyth said defendant had .been convicted and sentenced to four months’ imprisonment at Lisnaskea, on 10th December. 1927, for having in his possession a still and illicit spirits. Mr. Winslow—This unfortunate man lives on a very poor mountain farm. He had made the poteen and as a result he was now before the Court. He was married and had a lot of small children. In addition he had not got his crop saved. District-Inspector Smyth—It is all right, but he is not quite so innocent as he is made out to be. Our information is that he is making quite a lot out of illicit, spirits at the present time and that some of our visitors to this country have found out his dwelling house and are regular attenders.

His Worship said that having been convicted before defendant must have known perfectly well the risk he was running. In the circumstances he ordered a sentence of three months’ hard labour. On the application of Mr. Winslow, District-Inspector Smyth said he would not execute the order for defendant’s arrest for a month so that he could get his crop saved. Later, Mr. Winslow enquired if his Worship would substitute a monetary penalty which would be paid by some friends. His Warship refused the request stating that in these cases his iron rule was jail and so far as he was concerned he would not depart from that rule even if the defendant was ready to pay a £500 fine. It was the only way to stop it. He was sorry he could not accede to the request.

24-10-1942. SESSIONS ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. Several appeals before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C.,  at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Tuesday resolved themselves into pleas for leniency and a reduction of the penalty. £60 FINE SUBSTITUTED. Mark Prunty, Drumany, Lisnaskea, appealed against sentence of three mouths’ imprisonment for harbouring 6cwt. of white flour for the purpose of unlawfully exporting it. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, said after the conviction the defendant pleaded guilty. He stated that he knew the flour was there, and he had nothing to do with it and that he would not tell who put it there. Judge—He pleaded guilty, and that is an end of it as far as I am concerned. Mr. Cooper—Since then it came to my knowledge through another source—in fact, a party called on me and informed me that they were the real smugglers, and asked me if I would get a penalty of £60 put on this man. They said they would pay the money. I believe the money is in Court. I told Mr. Murphy was prepared to do that. Mr. J. Murphy (for appellant)—I had to advise my client that, there was no case to come before the Court. He was charged with harbouring and admitted he saw the flour put in an outhouse and raised no objection. The Judge withdrew the order for imprisonment and. substituted a penalty of £60. A man immediately walked forward and paid the amount of the fine in notes.

24-10-1942. PRISON SENTENCE TO STAND. Philip Swift, Lisnashillinda, Newtownbutler, for whom Mr. Black appeared, appealed against sentence of four months’ imprisonment without hard labour for harbouring 14cwts. of sulphate of ammonia and 12 stones of flour for the purpose of exporting it. Mr. J. Cooper said that after keeping Swift under observation and seeing three military tracks moving in certain directions Sergeant Green went to Swift’s house and in a byre found two lots in which were the sulphate of ammonia and flour. Soldiers pointed this out as the stuff they had brought there. They were promised £2 for their work. Both soldiers were reduced in rank. It was a bad day for them. The R.M. gave Swift- 6 months’ imprisonment. Mr. Black appealed to him and he reduced it to five months, and he appealed again, and it was reduced to four months.

Mr. Black—There is a further appeal to-day. I advised my client to plead guilty, and I appeal on this boy’s behalf for the substitution of a monetary penalty in lieu of imprisonment. He is 25 years of age, was married about year ago and has one little baby. He lives with his mother and looks after the farm. His mother has 25 acres under tillage, and this boy is responsible for the saving and harvesting of the crops. There will be nobody to work unless he is made available. This is the first time he has been charged with any offence of this nature. Mr. Cooper—He has been fined for making illicit spirits. Mr. Black said the young man was in delicate health, and he handed in a certificate from Dr. Dolan showing that for two years he had been treating him for gastritis and complications. The co-defendant (another man charged in connection with the same offence) had only been fined.

October 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

10-10-1942. SIX-COUNTY DAIRY INDUSTRY. FARMERS’ RESENT MINISTRY’S ACTION. CLOSING OF CREAMERIES. “CHANGES HAD CREATED INDIGNATION ”

The Ministry would get far better and more successful results by acknowledging the education which the farmer had gained by experience, and consult him and secure his co-operation in their new schemes before touching them, said Mr. J. Johnston, secretary of the U.A.O.S., at the annual meeting of Creamery shareholders. Mr. Thos. McCaughey referred to the changes the Ministry was making in the dairying industry, not only in closing such a large number of creameries, but in upsetting the existing transport arrangements for milk suppliers. Milk will now have to be transported by lorry whereas previously 70 to 80 per cent of all the milk in Northern, Ireland was delivered by horse and cart.

Several suppliers present said they had notice from the Ministry to leave their milk at collection points over two miles from their house and away from the creamery, although, their house was only three-quarters of a mile from the creamery. It was unanimously agreed to leave, their milk at the point where they had always left it. Mr. J. Johnston, secretary, U.A.O.S., said the changes that were now being introduced into the industry by the Ministry had created a wave of indignation from farmers throughout the country. Inexperienced officials with little local knowledge of the country had marked out on a map the collection points where suppliers were to leave their milk and they had just heard some of the results. The same thing had happened all over the country.

It had been stated that farmers approved of the scheme because there had not been any protest, but the farmer has learned that if he dared to protest his milk would not be paid for. In his opinion the new transport arrangements to be carried out under the Ministry’s control would require a very large increase in the amount of petrol used, and would ultimately cost a great deal more. The petrol increase was a matter for the Petroleum Board, but the increased cost would have to be paid by the farmer.

With regard to the closing down of 60 creameries in Northern Ireland at 1st October, Mr. Johnston said, it had always been the view of the practical dairyman that the earlier in the morning the milk could be collected at the farm, and the nearer to the depot or creamery at which the milk was to be treated, the better the quality of the milk to be delivered to the consumer. They were told the whole scheme was intended to process the milk at present going to the creameries to make it suitable for the liquid milk market. By closing two-thirds of the creameries the distance to the creameries retained for treatment was greatly extended. The larger quantity to be treated took much more time, and the new system meant that milk would be collected from some points up to 3 o’clock and later.

10-10-1942. NO LICENCE FOR DANCE HALL. “EXCUSE ME ” DANCES A MENACE. Objections were made to the renewal of the licence for dances at Jamestown Hall by Sergeant John McGrath, Drumana, at Carrick-on-Shannon; District Court when the adjourned application of

Mr. John Gaffney, one of the trustees, came before the fortnightly (District Court) for the renewal of the licence.  Last year they got 12 dances and the hours were from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m. and the rows did not start until 1-30 or 2 a.m., and accordingly this year they wished to curtail the hours to 1 o’clock. Continuing the applicant said that the committee, tried to settle the row and keep the opposing parties separated but the crowd was so big it was impossible to handle them. There were dances held in August and September and there were no rows at them. He asked for 12 dances 8 p.m. to l a.m.

Sergeant John McGrath, Drumana, said that unless the Guards were present the parties in attendance came to blows, the committee took no action to prevent disorderly scenes and law abiding citizens had to pay for admission while the disorderly crowd were sent out free tickets. Witness said that he saw the free tickets himself being sent out to the disorderly crowd. Sergeant Gallagher said arguments developed in the hall and caused people to crowd around the hall. He had warned the committee not to have “excuse me” dances, as they cause trouble, and there was not a dance, on the occasion of the row, but was an “excuse me.” Mr Keane said that on the evidence of the Sergeant he had no hesitation in refusing the application. Had the hall been governed by a proper committee he would grant the application.

17-10-1942. “BRAINWAVE” SCHEME RETURNS TO AID RED CROSS. It was reported at the meeting of County Fermanagh Committee of Agriculture on Saturday that the amount of money raised in the .Six Counties for the month of August on behalf of the Red Cross. Agricultural Fund in the scheme initiated by Fermanagh of 1d in the £ on cattle passing through the grading centre was £1,111 8s 11d and for the month of July the total raised from the milk deductions (also suggested by Fermanagh) was £188 18s 0d.

Mr. H. A. Porter said he had meant the scheme to include pigs. Major W. O. Nixon (chairman) said the scheme had been satisfactory so far, but if they took the percentage of people that really subscribed to the fund it was very disappointing. Mr. J. N. Carson—It is not brought to their notice. If it is brought to their notice they pay at once.The Chairman said it was printed on the cards. Fermanagh had the highest percentage of any county in the North. Although the fund was doing well, it could do better. Mr. J. E. Fawcett, J.P., thought if it were printed in red ink on the cards it would emphasise it better. Chairman—I think the scheme was a brain-wave of the people on this Committee who suggested it.

17-10-1942. BISHOP MAGEEAN BLESSES NEW CHURCH. The Catholics of the pariah of Aghagallon, three miles from Lurgan, went to Mass in their new £20,000 church for the: first time on Sunday. On Thursday last the Bishop of the Diocese, Most Rev. Dr. Mageean, had solemnly blessed .and dedicated the building, but on Sunday he formally opened the new edifice! It was a day of celebration in the parish, and everywhere there were manifestations of joy, practically every Catholic house in the district displaying Papal flags. The front of the new building was decorated with streamers of Papal colours. Right Rev. Mgr. Dean O’Hagan, P.P., V.G., celebrated High Mass, and Rev. A. Ryan, D.Ph., D.D., preached. Very Rev. J. Connelly, P.P., thanked the subscribers

17-10-1942. KINAWLEY ROAD NEEDS REPAIRS. At Enniskillen Rural Council meeting Mr. J. R. Crawford moved that the Council repair the old road in Drumbinnis and Corracrawford between Kinawley and Florencecourt. Ten or eleven ratepayers he said had their farms alongside this road which was in a very bad condition. Mr. W, Kelly said he had been informed that it was impossible to use this road. One man had two carts broken on it within two months. The county surveyor (Capt. Charlton) said the road was not in as bad a condition as stated. However, financial provision had been made for it in the estimates. After further discussion it was decided to leave the matter in the hands of the County Surveyor.

17-10-1942. “TYRANNY OPERATING AGAINST MINORITIES’’ BRITISH M.P.s AND STORMONT. Two M.P. in the British House of Commons on Tuesday said that tyranny was operating against minorities in the Six Counties and that there was ’disgraceful discrimination” against Catholics. Mr. McGovern (I.L.P.), when the Prorogation of Parliament Bill was considered in Committee, moved the rejection of a clause dealing with the duration of the Northern Ireland House of Commons, and, urging an election there, said there was overwhelming opposition to the Northern Government taking dictatorial powers over Belfast City Council. Unionists have told me that the Government should be purged of certain elements and undergo a drastic change. “Three or four hundred people are interned there—some without charge or trial for over five years—-and many believe that they are prisoners because of malicious and political intolerance. Tyranny is operating against minorities I there.’’

Mr. Stokes (Lab.) said: “There is disgraceful discrimination against Catholics in Northern Ireland. When six young men were charged with shooting a Belfast policeman, the Government refused to have a single Catholic on the jury. That Government is not fit to carry on.” The amendment was rejected by 220 votes to 6, and after ,a further amendment by Sir Richard Ackland (Ind.) to prolong Parliament for six months instead of 12 had been rejected, the Bill was read a third time.

17-10-1942. LADY SEARCHER AT BALLYSHANNON. Customs searches on the Belleek border have been intensified. Train and bus passengers are all searched—a practice hitherto unknown in that area. A lady searcher has been appointed in Ballyshannon and she was on duty for the first time last week at all the trains. On Saturday evening she carried out a search of all the lady passengers on the last bus leaving Ballyshannon. On both sides there is much greater Customs activity at all posts but the number of seizures from ordinary travellers are comparatively few.

17-10-1942. CLONES COUNCIL FINANCES.  At a special meeting of Clones Urban Council held on Friday night for the  purpose of considering the council’s finances it was unanimously decided to raise a loan of £2.000 by temporary borrowing by way of overdraft accommodation for the months of October-November to enable the payment of arrears of loans to the Commissioners of Public Works and to their treasurers.

17-10-1942.TO LET OR SELL. Farm OF 100 ACRES, good 2 story slated Dwelling-house (with hot and cold water) (Calor Gas}; splendid Office houses, all in good repair, about 1 mile from Irvinestown. The above place can be let for a number of years, with 70.acres if required.—F. SCALLON, Moynaghan, Irvinestown.

17-10-1942.70 PER CENT. OF OAT CROP HARVESTED. FERMANAGH FARMERS’ GOOD WORK. Despite severe harvesting conditions experienced this year, seventy per cent, of the 1942 oat crop has been cut and stacked in County Fermanagh, while ninety per cent. has already been cut stated Mr. W. T. McClintock, B. Agr., War Executive Officer, at a meeting of the County Fermanagh Agricultural Committee in Enniskillen on Saturday afternoon. He said the farmers had, in spite of adverse conditions, done a remarkable job and .their work had been heroic. One man had cut twelve acres of oats with hooks.

At the present time, he said, there were in operation in the county 150 tractors and ploughs, 72 disc harrows, 88 binders, 46 mobile threshing mills, and, in addition, hundreds of horses. Labour, which had been one of their chief problems in the past, would not now be such a problem owing to machinery which had been set up by the Government to direct men to the land and remain on it. Voluntary labour, which had been so successful in other counties, had not been a success in Fermanagh, and in this respect there would remain, a stain on the county which, it was hoped, would be wiped out by an improvement in the matter next year.

The new Tillage Order had been issued, and .farmers had been asked for an increased effort. Subsidy would be paid on four crops in the coming season, i.e., wheat, rye, potatoes and flax. Mr. John Graham complained of the price allowed for potatoes, contending that after the £10 per acre subsidy and the £3 15s 0d per ton fixed price were added together the return did not compare favourably with that received by the “Eire” farmers.

Mr. F. Doherty thought that the reason was to be found in that the price was the same as that fixed, for the English crop. Mr. Graham said farmers in Northern Ireland were not getting a fair deal in this respect. He added that in “Eire’’ the price given for potatoes was £8 per ton. They were not worth digging at the price now fixed in Northern Ireland. Mr. J. O. Rhynehart, of the Ministry of Agriculture, who was pressed for an explanation as to the discrepancy in prices stated he was not in a position to state what the prices were in another part of the country, but pointed out that in ‘Eire’ the scarcity of manures would possibly result in a poorer crop, so that in the end the return per acre in Northern Ireland might be higher. Mr. Graham – I think that is not an answer. Mr. Doherty said that in country places potatoes were not worth moving at £3 15a per ton.

Mr. A. Wilson—Better do away with the potato crop. Mr. McClintock objected to the question as to the price paid in “Eire” stating they were not concerned with it. Mr. J. N. Carson, J.P.—Indeed we are concerned with it. Mr Graham (to the Secretary) — Yes, so, I am not going to let you away with that. We are concerned if a better price is paid across the Border in the Free State. Mr. Graham then spoke of the number of fat cows, which were going across into “Eire,’’ where a better price was being paid than at home. Major W. G. Nixon, D.L., chairman, said he was sure Mr. Rhynehart would bring their views on these two questions before the price fixing authorities.

Mr. J. E. J. Fawcett, J.P., voiced the appreciation of the farming community at the efforts of Mr. McClintock and his staff in promoting the tillage drive in the county. It had been a difficult period but the farmers had come through fairly well on the whole, and the position was much more satisfactory than anyone could have imagined earlier in the season. Mr. J. R. Hamilton, J.P., stated Mr. McClintock did a wonderful job of work, and the farmers had scored a wonderful achievement. Supporting, Mr. Graham said he was still of the opinion, that the Ministry had given the farmers an unfair deal as regards the potato crop. He requested Mr. Rhynehart to convey to the Ministry the Committee’s expression of thanks to their officials. Mr. Rhynehart said he would be delighted to do so. In reply, Mr. McClintock said the farmers of Fermanagh had responded promptly to the appeal for more tillage, and it was only in a very odd instance that the officials encountered any difficulty.

17-10-1942. MINUTES AMENDMENTS. WAR BONUS FOR RELIEVING OFFICER. Mr. James Murphy objected to the signing of the minutes of Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday on the ground that they stated that an increase in war bonus be granted to Mr. P. MacManus, reliving officer, to bring the grant under this heading up to 5s a week. Mr. Murphy said his proposal on the last Board day was to increase Mr. MacManus’s war bonus by 5s a week which would bring the grant up to 6s 6d a week.  Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., chairman, stated he had the entry in his book which corresponded to what Mr, Murphy now said. Mr. J. Brown, cleric, said he understood Mr. MacManus was being treated in the same way as Mr. Fee, another relieving officer had been dealt with—i.e., an increase of 3s per week, half payable by the Board and half by the Rural Council.

Mr. Murphy said that what really happened was Mr. Beatty proposed 10s a week, and he seconded. Mr. Thornton proposed. 3s and that was why he (Mr. Murphy) had proposed 5s a week. Mr. J. Beatty, J.P.—I understood the 5s proposal was passed. Mr; James Burns said his recollection of what happened was that the bonus be made up to 5s a week as the Clerk had stated in the minutes. Mr. C- McKeown—Didn’t the Ministry sanction 10s a week for a nurse? Didn’t the ferryman get 10s? I do not see why the Ministry should object to it. Clerk—It is not a question of that at all—it is a case of the minutes being correct. That now makes the bonus a total of 6s 6d per week? Mr. Murphy—Yes. Mr. Beatty—I would like to know why he was only allowed 6s 6d. Clerk—That was the Board’s decision. Mr. Beatty — That was nothing to allow any man. Mr. McKeown—It would buy matches. The minutes were amended as Mr. Murphy suggested.

17-10-1942. GAVE CAR ON LOAN—LICENCE SUSPENDED FOR YEAR. Fines of 40s and costs with suspension of licence for twelve months were imposed on Patrick McGovern Grayport, Belcoo, user of the vehicle, and John McGale, Tattysallagh, Clanabogan, Omagh, owner, when at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday is was proved that McGovern was found using the car which was covered with owner driven insurance only. Constable McKimm was the police witness. McGale said McGovern asked him for the loan of the car and witness acceded to the request. Mr, R. A. Herbert, LL.B., for McGovern, said the latter had walked into a trap. Major Dickie, R.M. (to McGale)—What right have you to give your car and petrol to anyone to drive round the country? He told me he would put the petrol in to do the job. I was always allowed petrol to go to my work.

£10 FINE ON IRVINESTOWN MAN. FALSE REPRESENTATION CHARGE. At Irvinestown Petty Sessions, on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., James Keys, of Glenall, Irvinestown, was charged with having on 22nd December, 1941, for the purpose of obtaining a supplementary pension for himself under the Unemployment Assistance Act, made a false representation that, during the seven days up to and including the 18th Dec., 1941, he had not earned more than 5s, whereas during this period he was employed by Messrs. Courtney, Ltd., I, Shipquay Place, Derry, at an average daily wage of 6/11d. The case had been brought at the last Irvinestown, Court but was dismissed without prejudice. Alan McCullagh, an official of the Assistance Board, gave evidence that he received an application from defendant for a supplemental pension on 31st Dec., 1940. He stated that he was in receipt of 10s old age pension and had stock of about one dozen hens. Later defendant wrote to him asking him if he could do something about placing him in employment and witness referred him to the Ministry of Labour.

William Henry Howe, another official, said that on the 26th May he told defendant that information had come into the possession of the Board that he had been employed with Messrs. Courtney and witness gave defendant the dates. Defendant made the following statement: “I was never employed by Messrs. Courtney and have done no work since ceasing to be employed by Mr. Hermon of Necarne Castle, Irvinestown. I am not living on a holding and get no privileges from the owner of the house where I now live. My son Irvine does no work of any kind.’’ Witness identified defendant’s signature on a document produced. John Charles Burkey, of the firm of Messrs. Courtney, said defendant was employed as a labourer by his firm from the 2nd December 1941, till 20th December, 1942. For the week ending 18th Dec., 1941, defendant was paid £2 7s 6d. The week prior to that, he was paid £2 9s 7d and the week before that £1 7s 4d. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, M.P. (defending)’ —Did you pay the defendant?—I paid a “J. Keys.” When Desmond Mahon was called as a witness and did not appear, Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, who prosecuted, said he would ask for a warrant for his arrest if necessary.

Mr. Ferguson submitted that he was entitled to a direction on the grounds that the prosecution had not identified defendant as the man, but his Worship ruled against him on this point. Defendant swore that he got a supplementary pension first about the end of 1940 and drew it from then until the 31st October, 1941, when his book was taken away and kept till 18th December. During that time he had to go and look for some work. He worked for a week and left on the 11th December. Before he went into employment he actually wrote to the authorities and told them he was going to apply for a job. After he had worked for almost three weeks he had to give up. From December, 1941 he had been in receipt of a supplementary pension. He was not working for the week ending 18th December and did not earn more than 5s during that week. There were any amount of Keys in that country besides defendant. Mr. Cooper—You don’t mind telling a little falsehood now and again, do you? No, never to my knowing. Defendant added that he signed his name that he never worked with Messrs. Courtney while he was getting the pension. Mr. Ferguson said he did not see any particularly hidden fraud in the case. Defendant had written to the Labour Exchange and called three times. His Worship said that during the week for which defendant had been prosecuted he thought it had been proved beyond any reasonable doubt that he had actually earned the sum of £2 7s 6d. He imposed a fine of £10 and £2 2s costs, and allowed defendant-two months to pay.

17-10-1942.CARDINAL MacRORY AND THE WAR. PLEA FOR NEGOTIATED PEACE. ADDRESS AT MAYNOOTH. His Eminence Cardinal MacRory, speaking at the annual distribution of prizes in Maynooth College on Tuesday, pleaded for a negotiated peace. He said: – On various occasions I have expressed my hope for a negotiated peace, because I believed that only in this way is there any hope of peace with justice. I am convinced of that more than ever, seeing that cruel feelings are arising on both sides and prisoners are being put in chains. “If the war is fought to a finish,’’ said his Eminence, “there may possibly be a stalemate owing to utter exhaustion on both sides, but if either side win there will be a peace, not of justice, but of vengeance which will but sow the seeds sf future wars.” The Cardinal, continuing, said:—”I am not so foolish as to imagine that anything I can say will have any effect. However, I feel it a duty to say something.

17-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN BOARD AND QUESTION OF REPAIRS. When an account from a local garage proprietor for repairs to the ambulance came before Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday for payment, Mr. J. Brown, Clerk, said Mr. J. Cathcart, the ambulance driver, was not prepared to certify some of the items. Mr. Cathcart said some of the items were not in his book in which he kept a record of all repairs to the ambulance. The explanation was this: On 15th, January last Mr. Barton’s man was employed to bring a patient into the Hospital in this ambulance, he (Mr. Cathcart) being out at the time in the other ambulance. An accident happened to the ambulance in charge of Mr. Barton’s (the garage proprietor) driver. On one occasion since it would not start. He thought himself these repairs were made necessary by the accident. The ambulance never had been in order since. It would not charge until it was driven at 35 miles per hour—a speed too high for a vehicle of the kind, it should start charging at at least 20 m.p.h. The repairs were, therefore, in his opinion chargeable to the insurance company. He had some of the items of the account in his book.

Mr, Murphy—Do you keep an account as well as Mr. Barton? Mr. Cathcart—Everything I get is kept in my book. Mr. Murphy—Mr. Barton’s account does not correspond with yours? Mr. Cathcart — No sir. Mr. Murphy—Very well, I would not pay him. Mr. Beatty-Was it sent back to Mr. Barton? Mr. Cathcart—No; it is here for payment. Mr. Beatty—Can’t you send it back? Mr. Cathcart—No; it is a matter for the Board. Mr. Kelly—Mr. Brown will ask Mr. Barton, about it and get the thing squared up. Mr. Murphy—Did the insurance company pay for the accident? . Clerk—We have not got any bill for it anyway.

Mr. Murphy—The ambulance should be put right and the insurance company should be informed accordingly. Mr. Beatty—Mr. Barton’s attention should have been drawn to it. Mr. Murphy—That ambulance is giving far too much trouble here and there is something wrong somewhere. There has always been trouble with it since it came here. Mr. Beatty—When you found it not right, why didn’t you draw his attention to it? Mr. Cathcart—I am tired drawing his attention to it. The Chairman, (Hon. C. L. Corry) was proceeding to the next business when Mr. Murphy said: We are here as representatives of the ratepayers; the ratepayers’ money is being paid away and we are entitled to know what it is being paid for. I am not at all satisfied. Write to the insurance company and tell them the ambulance is not giving satisfaction. Mr. Beatty — Draw Mr. Barton’s attention to it. Chairman — The Clerk is going to do that. Mr. Murphy—The insurance company is the body.

17-10-1942.ILLEGAL USE OF COUPONS. STATEMENTS IN BELLEEK CASES. CHARGES AGAINST MERCHANTS. Eight summonses alleging the illegal use of coupons were heard by Major Dickie, R.M., at Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday. John Stephens, draper, Main Street, Belleek, and who also has a business in Ballyshannon, was summoned (1) for having, at Belleek between 7th and 16th March, 1942, without the authority of a licence granted by the Board of Trade and for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods, made use of rationed documents or coupons other than those issued to him or those surrendered to him; (2) had in, his possession, with intent to obtain goods, rationed documents or coupons issued to another person; and (3) using for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods, rationed documents, or coupons which did not bear the name, address and National Registration number of the person or persons to whom they were issued. Michael McGrath, Main, Street, Belleek, was charged with aiding and abetting in the commission of these offences. Thomas Daly, grocer, Main St., Belleek, was charged with transferring rationed documents or coupons, and Michael McGrath was summoned for aiding and abetting. Mr. R. A. Herbert, LLb., defended.

Mr. J. P. Getty, solicitor for the Board of Trade, who brought the prosecutions, said his instructions were that Daly had quite a number of customers who left their ration books with him. His Worship would remember that certain ration books which were issued in the first instance with regard to food had 26 margarine coupons in them. Those coupons were not valid and were not used. At the 1st June, 1941, when clothing was rationed for the first time, these: margarine coupons were then to be used for the purpose of acquiring clothing. Their case was that Daly, having got all these margarine coupons from his customers he transferred them to Stephens or McGrath (who managed Stephens’ shop in Belleek), or both. If he did so it was an offence.

He (Mr. Getty) was going to call a number of witnesses to prove that they left these margarine coupons with Daly and gave him no instructions or authority to transfer them to Stephens or anybody else and they did not use them themselves. A quantity of these coupons was sent to Stephens’ wholesaler in Belfast, Messrs. Moffitt and Co., whose agent would tell the Court that 500 coupons were delivered by Stephens to him in return for goods to be supplied. Having got those coupons, the practice was for Messrs. Moffitt to send them to the Post Office and they in turn sent them to the Board of Trade, When they got to the Board of Trade these margarine coupons were found in the bundle, and this started the inquiries. Miss Rosalie Aiken, chief assistant in the Food Office, Irvinestown, gave evidence that ration books containing margarine coupons were issued to a number of people, whom she named.

Sadie Agnes Keown said that Daly was her grocer, and she received .ration books for herself, and three daughters which she gave to her grocer. She did not use the margarine coupons, but her husband used some and bought clothes in Stephens’ using the margarine coupons for the purpose. William Dolan said he never purchased clothing with the margarine coupons and did not authorise his grocer to hand them on. Ernest W. Hall, area manager, of the Board of Trade, Belfast, said the coupons came to him from the Post Office and included margarine coupons. Statements made to Sergt. J. D. Cochrane by Stephens, McGrath and Daly having been read,

McGrath gave evidence and said he could not say when the coupons came into his establishment. He was not given the particulars of the coupons before the prosecution came on, and consequently he was unable to make any inquiries. Sadie Keown’s, husband left in margarine coupons in exchange for clothes, and whatever he handed in would be sent to Moffitt. Dolan’s father and also Daly bought clothes from him. He had some difficulty in getting any regulations and ultimately got part of the regulations from a traveller. He had written five times previously to the Board of Trade and never got an answer from them. So far as he could, he carried out all these relevant regulations. John James Dolan said he did the buying for all of his family, and used his son’s coupons too.

His Worship dismissed the charge against Daly and also the charge against McGrath for aiding and abetting him. Regarding the other case, he said he found it fully proved. He fined Stephens 20/- and 10/- costs on each of the charges of making use of rationed documents other than those issued to him and using  them for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods. McGrath was fined £10 and £3 3s 0d costs for aiding and abetting in the commission of the first offence, and 120/- and three guineas costs for aiding, and abetting in the second offence. The other summonses against Stephens and McGrath were dismissed without prejudice.

17-10-1942. £5 FINE AT BELLEEK. HAD FIVE STONES OF TWENTY SIX COUNTY SUGAR. £5 FINE AT BELLEEK. James Johnston, Aghamuldoney, County Fermanagh, was charged at Belleek Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., with having on 28th May knowingly harboured five stones of sugar imported from the 26-Counties into the Six Counties with intent to evade the payment of Customs duty thereon. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, told the court that in the defendant’s house the police found five stones of sugar, which was of 26-County origin. Mr. P. T. Flanagan, LL.B., who pleaded guilty, in mitigation of the sentence said that if it were possible for defendant to pay duty on the sugar he would very willingly have done so. In certain seasons of the year defendant had special work to do on his farm. He could not get any labour in the Six Counties, and had to get a man from the Free State, This man had no ration card and during the time his application was in for one, by arrangement between him and the defendant they brought over this sugar, for which they paid 5/3d a stone in the Free State, whereas it was obtainable in the .Six Counties for 3/6d per stone. It was really a matter of trying to get over a personal inconvenience. Saying that he did not think it was a bad case, his Worship imposed a fine of £5.

£15 FINE FOR SMUGGLING SPIRITS. John Farry, Monendogue, was charged of knowingly harbouring ten bottles of Irish whiskey, one bottle of Sherry, and one bottle of port wine imported from the 26 Counties into the Six-Counties! Mr. R. A. Herbert, L.L.B., (defending) said that defendant lived with his father and brother on a small farm on the mountain side. His father was an invalid, over 80 years of age; and they were constantly afraid of him dropping off when they would not have any stimulants to give him. Defendant said he hold the police it was for his brother in Belfast. That was not true. None of the local people would sell him (defendant) a bottle of whiskey. Some of the whiskey had been in the house since Christmas- He collected it from time to time and brought it over with him. Mr. Cooper-—-Were you going over the Border on different days and bringing it back—accumulating it?—-No. His Worship—There’s no proof he was dealing in it on a very large scale. I think £15 would meet it.

LORRY DRIVER FINED AT IRVINESTOWN. “The lorry came round Flack’s corner 40 at m.p.h. without slackening speed.” “My lorry is governed down to 25 m.p.h.” These two conflicting statements of evidence, the first one by a constable and the second by the driver of the lorry were given at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday when District Inspector P. Walshe summoned Charles McQuaid, of Drogan, for driving a motor lorry in Irvinestown on 7th Sept. without due care and attention and without reasonable consideration for other users of the highway. Constable McKimm proved the summons and was corroborated by Constable Bradley, neither of whom heard a horn sounded. Defendant said he sounded the horn and only accelerated when he got round the corner. His lorry was governed down to 25 m.p.h. Major Dickie, R.M., said the two constable were definite that defendant came round without due care and he imposed a fine of 10s and costs.

TWICE TORPEDOED MERCHANT NAVY MAN FINED £5. A wireless operator in the Merchant Navy, who, according to his solicitor, had been twice torpedoed and had also been in a tussle with the ‘Deutschland’ appeared at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., on a charge of being concerned in a fraudulent attempt at evasion of payment of Customs’ duty on two bottles of spirits, at Kesh, on 28th July, imported from “Eire” into Northern Ireland.

Defendant was Vincent Mahon, of Mill St., Irvinestown, and Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, said a Customs officer found defendant sitting reading a book in a third class carriage of the train. He asked defendant if he had any articles to declare and he did not reply. He then asked defendant, what he had in his pockets: and defendant produced. two camera films and said that was all he had got.

The Customs officer, proceeded Mr, Cooper, was very suspicious of defendant as this pockets seemed bulky and ordered him to stand up till he searched him, and found a bottle of whiskey in each of his trousers pockets. When asked why he did not declare the spirits defendant told the officer to “go to hell you and the spirits;” When asked to furnish proof he admitted he had not paid any duty and absolutely decline to recognise the Customs authorities in any way.  His Worship—In what way? Mr. Cooper-He said he did not recognise them. His Worship — A very unfortunate position, with two bottles of whiskey in his pockets.

Mr. E. C. Ferguson, LL.B., M.P., defending, said they admitted having the two bottles of whiskey. The circumstances were these Defendant was a wireless operator employed by the Marconi Company with the Merchant Navy. Since the outbreak of war he had been torpedoed twice and on one occasion had been in a tussle with the ‘Deutschland.’ As a result of these sea activities he had been invalided home at the end of July by the Company. He (Mr. Ferguson) was instructed by defendant that he had wanted these two bottles of whiskey to send to a friend of his. Defendant was a decent fellow who was now fit and ready to return to duty and was awaiting a call to his ship. Mr. Cooper said if defendant .had adopted a different attitude he would have been fined there and then. The duty on the spirits was £l 15s 5d. Mr. Ferguson said in the circumstances perhaps it was excusable. “I am asked,” he said, “to apologise for anything, that he did wrong. His Worship said defendant knew quite well he should not have done this. However, in view of his record he imposed a fine of £5.

SUNDAY CARTING DISAPPROVED. A meeting, under the auspices of the Six-Co. Farmers’ Union was held in the Townhall, Enniskillen on Saturday afternoon, when representatives from all over County Fermanagh attended. Addresses on the policy of the Union were given by Mr. H. Jamison, General Secretary ; Mr, J. H. Barbour, Organiser; Mr. Hughes. Farmers’ Union Insurance Company, and Rev. R. J. M‘Ilmoyle, Dervock. Resolutions were passed, viewing with apprehension the milk marketing scheme so far as payments were concerned and a unanimous expression of opinion was voiced against the carting of milk on Sundays. The main purpose of the meeting was the formation of new branches and progress in this direction was made.

FELLOW INTERNEE’S TRIBUTE TO CAHIR HEALY, M.P. By Frederick Bowman, Internee, Brixton Prison, London and 5, Bradley Place, Eastbank St., Southport; Lancashire, England.

TILL IRELAND UNITE IN PEACE

The years, untried, in prison passed,

Have made impressions sure to last,

Many are grim, but, I’ve a few

For which my gratitude are due.

One patriot I’m proud I’ve met

While tangled in the prison net,

Is CAHIR HEALY—always kind,

Whose noble heart and cultured mind

Inspires respect and strengthen all

Whose courage might incline to fall.

His fine example—smiles of cheer

Make prison walls less gloomy here

His shrewd remarks and sound advice:

Confer a boon beyond all price

On those whose prison .life he shades,

Smoothing their madness, easing cares.

His land and loved ones far away,

Are in his gentle thoughts all day.

But helping others makes him try

To keep suppressing any sigh.

A man of wit and worth and charm.

Sincere and steadfast, firm and calm;

To death for Ireland he would go—

This man whom I’m so proud to know.

Peace for the world is what I claim

And Healy’s object is the same.

His work for Ireland will not cease.

Till Ireland can unite in peace.

SIX-COUNTY VACANT SEATS. STORMONT REJECTS LABOUR MOTION. A motion by Mr. H. Midgley (Labour, Willowfield) at Stormont on Tuesday which asked that writs for vacant Parliamentary seats be issued not later than three months from date of vacancy was defeated by 24 votes to one. The  motion was described by the Minister of Agriculture as the most reactionary that had ever been brought.