Land League 1942 by Eamon Anderson.

25-4-1942. FOLK TALES OF FERMANAGH. BY EAMON ANDERSON. It is truly said that the history of Ireland is written in ballads. Before the days of writing, two thousand or more years ago, the old Gaelic bards of Ireland composed all historical happenings in verse which were committed to memory and handed down for countless generations. Irish historical poetry begun with Amergin, the son of Milesius, about fifteen centuries before Christ, and continued ever since, generation after generation, down to our own day. Some of the early Gaelic historical poems, such as the Táin Bó Cúailnge (Great Cattle Spoil of Cooley), amounted to hundreds of thousands of lines. No wonder that in the Gaelic Ireland of the past it took twenty years’ hard study for the Bardic Order. Not only had a man to be naturally a poet himself, but had also to commit to memory all the Gaelic poetry up to his own time. If we add to that all the ballads and songs that have been composed in English during the last century or so in every parish and corner of this island of ours, and got it all printed in books, it would fill the Fermanagh Co. Library.

So that is the reason that we know so much about the Ireland of the past from the earliest times down to our own day.

For some weeks past I have been writing about the Land League days which many, of our readers can remember. It would be interesting to know how many are alive to-day of the countless thousands who attended the great Land League meeting in Enniskillen on 2nd, of October, 1887. That meeting would have been almost forgotten to-day but for the ballad which Frank Maguire composed to commemorate it. I am going to publish that ballad here this week, and you will find that it describes the meeting far better than any dry prose history could do.’

I have mentioned Frank Maguire in these articles before. He was a fanner and lived his lifetime in the townland of Ruscaw, a mile north of Kinawley village, the next townland to Drumlish, where I was born myself. I never remember him, as he passed away before my time, but his songs and ballads are living still in this part of the country. When I was a child I thought that the few townlands around us were the most wonderful place’s in the world, and I have the same opinion yet! Ruscaw produced two of our parish bards, Frank Maguire and the old school master, Michael Maguire, In Teravally, a short half-mile away, lived Charley Farmer, another of our parish bards. In Drumbinnis lived two of our noted shanachies whom I have often quoted here, John Maguire and Owen Jones. Once I said to Mr. Cahir Healy, who, alas; is far from us to-day, “I think our parish of Kinawley is the best in Fermanagh for folklore and traditions, and bards and ballads.” “I agree with you,’’ said he. “and anyway, that is the right spirit for a person to have—to regard his own townland or parish as the hub and centre of the universe. If every townland would preserve its own traditions we would then be able to preserve those of all Ireland.”

So now here is Frank Maguire’s ballad on the Enniskillen Land League Meeting. The Dean mentioned chairman was the Very Rev. Dean Bermingham, then parish priest of Enniskillen.

“Bold Redmond” was Willie Redmond, then M.P. for North Fermanagh, who was then a fiery young patriot, even fiery enough at that time to please that most ardent Irish Nationalist, Seumas MacManus, the famous Irish writer, who was in Enniskillen at the time. To those of us who remember 1914 and later times and how the old Irish Parliamentary Party lost much of their early Nationalist enthusiasm, this will seem rather strange. But in later days they apparently forgot Parnell’s oft-repeated warnings. Parnell had only a limited belief in the efficiency of Parliamentary agitation. He was of the opinion that without a well-organised public opinion in Ireland his power in Parliament would be slight. He publicly stated that long association with the House of Commons would destroy the integrity of any Irish Party, and publicly advised the Irish people to keep a keen watch  on the conduct of their representatives in the British House of  Commons at all times. As I say, the Irish Party, and many of its people must have forgotten these warnings in later times, else they would never have agreed, even temporarily, to the so-called Home Rule Act of 1914, which merely empowered the Irish people to play at a “Parliament” in Dublin, whose enactments could be vetoed by either the British Lord Lieutenant or the British Parliament, or ruled illegal by the High Court of Justice, and, alas, providing that Ireland’s finances would remain chiefly in England’s hands, and also for the first time in history, agreeing to the partition of Ireland. We get an idea of how the Irish people advanced in the seven years after, when we consider that although Griffith and Collins “Treaty,’’ and “Free State” gave control over tariffs and finance, and many other great powers of all kinds, yet a civil war was fought against it. The Constitution of Eire, of recent times goes a long step further again and gives far-reaching powers, and yet the partition question cannot yet be solved.

So here now for the Land League Song.

 

ENNISKLILEN MONSTER             DEMONSTRATION.

 

Rejoice, ye sons of Erin, for old Ireland shall be free,

The bard’s inclined to tell his mind for all that he did see.

On the 2nd of October, right well I mind the date,

When our Members they came over, their minds for to relate.

 

That morning, as the bell did ring, to chapel we did go,

And fervently we all did Pray against the daring foe,

Returning from the altar, with a mark upon our brow,

Saying freedom for our country, where is coercion now.

 

With horse and foot we took the road,

each shepherd led his flock,

We arrived in Enniskillen at the hour of two o’clock

From Portora gates to Belmore Street was crowded with the throng,

No man to yield, but for the field in thousands we marched on.

 

For to make up their number, I might go through the count,

There is no rule in learning could tell the full amount.           ,

I saw the hand of Shane O’Neill on the green flag from Tyrone,

And the royal band of Fintona, they played us “Garryowen.”

 

At the Jail Square I rested there to take another view,

When Lowry, off the Monument, he asked me “Is that you?’

And are these the Derry Prentice Boys, or when did yous leave home?

I took you for another man, I thought you were Maglone.”

 

“We’re not the Derry Prentice Boys, nor yet from Sandy Row,

For our Parliament is landed in old Ireland once more.

We have the men of Ulster here, our cause for to maintain,

Our member is bold Redmond, and our chairman, is the Dean.”

 

North and South Fermanagh, they made a grand display.

With Kinawley and Kilskeery, and the boys from Lisnaskea.

From Maguiresbridge to Monaghan, and Tempo in the glen,

With Montiagh lads and Macken men, who fought their way and won.

 

We had Belleek and Bellashanny, and the men from sweet Roslea,

With Mullaghdun and Arney like an army in array,

And noble Enniskillen, with good order and command,

Their cry was “No coercion, but freedom for our land.”

 

And now a few words about the song to explain certain points in it. “Maglone” was “Barney Maglone,” a beloved Enniskillen poet of those days who used to write in the Fermanagh vernacular. His real name was Wilson, and I don’t think he was entirely nationalist in politics, in fact he did not express any opinion on politics. At any rate, when making verses he used to go and stand and ‘chat’ with the statute of Sir Lowry Cole on the top of the monument on the Forthill to gain inspiration. So, according to Frank’s imagination in this ballad Sir Lowry mistook Frank for “Barney Maglone,” and the immense procession for the “Derry Prentice Boys” who were paying a visit to the town of Enniskillen. And a very ghostly visit it would be for, like Sir .Lowry himself, the Prentice Boys had departed this life. They closed the gates of “Derry against King James’s Army in 1685, which is generally considered one of the brave deeds of Irish history, but, unfortunately, on the wrong side! Not that Irish Nationalists ever thought much of King James, and always considered him an old coward anyway, who ran away from the Boyne,, and from Ireland. It was really for Ireland, and not for King James, that the Irish were fighting in that war, and it’s the gallant Patrick Sarsfield was the real hero of it, a man who was admired for his bravery even by those who were fighting against him. Probably Sir Lowry, or his statue, or his ghost, as in life he belonged to the unnational and aristocratic party, would much rather see the Derry ’Prentice Boys marching the town in ghostly array, than a great demonstration of people standing for what he would consider the “preposterous” idea of a free Ireland, and the still more “preposterous” idea of “The Land for the People,” and not for the landlords!”

Belashanny is spelt the old way here, as in the ballad, instead of Ballyshannon, which is a modern corruption. “Bela-shanny” is the phonetic pronunciation of the old Gaelic name of the place (Beal atha na Seannach). Bands and banners from all over the place mentioned, and a lot more attended the meeting.

Up till recent years we had the old Land League banner preserved in Kinawley inscribed “Kinawley to the Front. Away with Landlordism.” We carried it in all processions up to 1917, when we changed it for the Tricolour. But the same three colours were also on the old banner, only fixed in a different way— a white cross on a green background, yellow shamrocks and a white fringe. Also a life-size picture of Charles Stewart Parnell.  As1 said before, there must be many people still in Fermanagh and neighbouring counties who attended the great Enniskillen demonstration of 1887. Seumas MacManus admired this ballad so much that he has included it in his latest book, “The Rocky Road to Dublin,’’ which is the author’s own life story.

But there are a great many other local ballads of the Land League days which never have yet been in print which I must publish in these columns so that they will live in future ages.

And now a word about Frank Maguire, the composer. Like many of the old generation, he got little or no schooling, and only “met the scholars,” as they used to say. He only got into the second standard at a hedge school. But my uncle Joe used to write down all his verses, and also the verses of old Master Michael Maguire. So Seumas MacManus christened him “Secretary Joe” in the poem which he made commemorating old Master Maguire—

“His songs shall be recorded By Secretary Joe.”

Frank Maguire was a great humourist. At that time there was a family in this district called the “Quaker Crawfords.” Whether some of the family in times gone by belonged to the religious persuasion called Quakers I know not, but at any rate they were never called anything only the Quakers. Frank used to “kailey” in it, and was very “great” in it. They had a big farm of land, and often sold a lot of meadows. They were not satisfied with how auctions were going one summer, so Frank said to them, “If yiz give me the sale of your meadows I will get you the best price in the country.” “But sure you are no auctioneer. ” “No matter.” says Frank, “I can be an auctioneer for wan day anyhow, and I’ll bring Joe Anderson to write down the bids.” So the auction was advertised by word of mouth from mountain to lough, and the whole country gathered in hundreds to see the fun of the thing. Frank started to auction the plots with hammer and all, like a real auctioneer, and Joe with notebook and pencil took down the ‘bids.’ Any advance on thirty bob for this plot. Any advance. Come on now, and don’t be like beggar men. Give the landlord’s rent of it itself.” And so on. Carried away by the fun, many men bought meadows that day and gave a good price for them, that did not want hay at all. The end of it was that the meadows fetched far more than any auctioneer could get, and that auction is talked of to this day. There was a man in the country at that time nicknamed “Pat the Moat,” and he was very fond of taking near-cuts, even tramping across fields of crop and vegetables. Going daily to work one summer he had made a regular “pad-road” across the middle of Frank’s field of corn so Frank met him one day on the road and gave him this warning in verse—

O Clatty Moat, you’re nothing loath, your habits to maintain,

Marchin’ o’er me cornfield, and comin’ back again.

But if you do not stop it, and from it don’t refrain,

I’ll meet you on some evenin’ and tramp you in a drain.

Frank had many original sayings. There was a woman in the countryside who had a lot of style and polish, but very little real good breeding, Frank’s comment on her was: “In spite of Art, Nature will appear.”

He once took the contract of opening a drain, in the village which served the barrack and other houses. He had to carry the drain along the edge of a field, and the owner of the field came like a lion and objected to the right-of-way of the water that way. The row rose higher and higher, and at last a villager named Paddy Flynn came on the scene. Frank saluted him in this way:—

“Paddy Flynn yon are welcome in,

In dignity and glory

To join our force, yon are not loath,

to drive away this Tory!’’

Paddy Flynn, by the way, was father of the late Mr. John Flynn, of Enniskillen. In this country the words “wit” and ‘sense’ are often used as to mean the same thing. Frank, however, used to distinguish between them by saying, “The want of wit is as bad as the want of sense!” By “sense” he correctly meant one of the five senses, i.e., hearing, sight, etc. What he meant to convey was that the want of wit. i.e. foolishness, was as bad a failure as to be blind, or deaf, or dumb, There are many more articles to be written about our parish bards, and many songs of their’s which will be published at a future date.

Fermanagh Herald 1942.

24-10-1942. BAD ENNISKILLEN “BLACK-OUT” COURT CASES. “I had a letter from the A.R.P. authorities, saying the black-out in Enniskillen is no use, and we will have to take  sterner measures,” said Head Constable Poots at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, when a number .of householders were summoned for blackout offences. Major Dickie, R.M., inquired what the A.R.P. authorities exactly meant. Head Constable Poots said the A.R.P. authorities complained of lights from buildings, and particularly lights from the rear of buildings. The black-out at the rear of buildings was very bad. That had necessitated him putting extra men on duty at night to inspect the rear of premises to locate the lights. It was a very difficult job sometimes. The result of this tightening-up of the regulations would result in there being far more of these prosecutions for the next Court. In the cases before the Court the following decisions were announced: — Mary Heslin, The Brook, .Probation of Offenders Act; Mary McCaffrey, 2 Militia Barracks; 10/6 and costs; Margaret Dooris, 11 Eden St., 10/- and costs; Alfred Dickson, 6 Abbey St., 5/- and costs; Michael Byrne, Old Bonded Stores, 5/- and costs; George P. Haggins; 25 Strand St., 5/- and costs. Constables W. R. Allen and W. H. Walker were the complainants, and Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solicitor, represented two of the defendants.

24-10-1942. NO INTEREST. COMPLAINT AGAINST SCHOOL ATTENDANCE COMMITTEES. Mr. C. McKeown complained at Fermanagh Regional Education Committee on Friday that some school attendance committees were taking no interest in the attendance of the children at school. He asked when did the Roslea attendance committee meet? The secretary (Mr. Maguire); said he could not say. It was some time since he had a report. He knew of a number of cases in which sub-committees did not seem to take an interest in the school attendance in their districts. He had from time to time received reports that it had been practically impossible to obtain a quorum therefore there was no means of dealing with school attendance. Mr. McKeown said the Act was practically 50 years in existence, making attendance compulsory, yet they had districts in Fermanagh that were taking practically no interest in it. There should be some remedy. It was very discreditable in these days. Lord Belmore—We appoint these committees. We should put off those that do not attend.

24-10-1942. CHEAP MILK FOR ALL SCHOOL CHILDREN. MINISTRY’S CIRCULAR TO FERMANAGH COMMITTEE. A circular letter from the Ministry of Education informed Fermanagh Regional Committee on Friday that schools—primary, secondary, junior commercial, junior and technical—can obtain milk for children at the .rate of one-third of a pint per day, the child to bear half of the cost. Milk would .be supplied to the schools by any local supplier at Is per .gallon and the remainder of the cost would be paid for by the Ministry of Agriculture.

24-10-1942. BAZAAR GOODS SEIZED. SEQUEL AT LISNASKEA COURT. At Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Nellie McGovern, Derrynanny, was summoned for having, on 14th April, knowingly harboured 13 men’s shirts, 20 pairs of assorted ladies’ dress material, six pieces of artificial silk, five children’s frocks, one child’s blouse, one pair of silk stockings, and one lady’s nightdress, imported from the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted and Mr. Baldwin Murphy, solicitor, defended.

Sergt. Kirkpatrick told of the finding of the goods in a tin trunk at defendant’s house, which, he searched following information received. In a statement to him, defendant said she was President of the Women’s Committee in connection with the Catholic bazaar in Newtownbutler, and following the bazaar on 17th March, she brought the goods in question to her house as they had not been sold. These goods had been given as gifts to raise funds for the new church. Cross-examined, witness said that at first defendant told him she had no goods of the kind he was inquiring about in the house, but later said she had stuff belonging to the bazaar. She told him the committee meetings in Drumlone School had not been very well attended. Reginald Allen said the shirts were of Japanese manufacture, the importation of which had been, prohibited in the Six Counties since Japan’s entry into the war. Mrs. McGovern, in evidence, said she was President of the Catholic Bazaar Committee, and the goods in question had been gathered into the trunk at different times. Before the box came to her it had been in Drumlone School, where the committee meetings had not been well attended. His Honour said he was prepared to grant defendant a dismiss on the harbouring summons, but he must make the order for forfeiture.

24-10-1942. WALLPAPER AND WOOL. Edward Whelan and his wife, Mary Whelan, Lisnaskea, were summoned for knowingly, harbouring 13 rolls of wallpaper and 32 ozs. of wool imported from, the Twenty-Six Counties into the Six Counties. Mr. A. Herbert, solicitor, defended. Sergt. Kirkpatrick gave evidence of the seizure at defendants’ house, and said Mr. Whelan denied all responsibility. In all he found 121 ozs. of wool, but only seized 32 ozs. Mrs. Whelan said she got the wool from various drapers in Lisnaskea and Enniskillen. Mrs. Whelan said she brought the wallpaper in a suitcase from the Twenty-Six Counties about a year ago and was not examined by the Customs’ official on the train. It only cost 13/-. The wool, had been obtained in Six-County shops. His Worship said the Customs must prove the intent to evade payment of Customs duty as mentioned in the summons. Mr. Cooper said these prohibited goods had been bought in the Twenty-Six Counties and brought across the Border. His Worship – But if she was not aware they were dutiable? Mr. Cooper cited the case of a London cabby who was held liable for a man he had taken in his cab at London docks. His Worship said that since Mr. Cooper had introduced his cab he must convict as regards the wallpaper. He imposed a fine of £3 saying she might have been fined £100,

24-10-1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER COURT CASES. TURF-STEALING CHARGE. MOTORIST SAYS FINE “1S A BIT SEVERE.” At Newtownbutler Court, before Major Dickie, R.M., Thomas McCarney, labourer, Clonagun, Newtownbutler, was charged with the larceny of a quantity of turf, the property of Thomas Storey, Clontivern. Thos. Storey, in evidence, stated he had bog at Clonagun and discovered some of his turf being stolen. On the night of Sept. 27th he went to his bog and put a private mark on some of the turf which he had in clamps. On Sept. 28th he found some of the turf missing. He reported the matter to the police at Newtownbutler, and later accompanied Const. Ferguson to Carney’s house, where they found half a bag of turf in the kitchen. He picked out some of the turf (produced) which had his mark on them. Const. Ferguson corroborated. Defendant, in evidence, stated he was going to work and there was no turf in the house. If he had not taken the turf his wife and children would have no fire until he came back. District Inspector Smyth said there was an epidemic of turf-stealing in the district. This man had five horse loads stolen. Major Dickie—I will have to start sending people to prison, for these offences. He imposed a fine of 40/s and said if I there had been anything against defendant before he would have put on a much heavier penalty.

DRUNK IN CHARGE. John McCarroll, hackney owner, Lisnaskea, was charged with being drunk in charge of a motor car on October 1.1th. Defendant admitted the offence. Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, gave evidence, and Dr. James Dolan, Newtownbutler, stated he examined defendant, who was so far under the influence of drink as to be incapable of driving a car. Defendant told the Court he had been driving some soldiers and had some drink, but did not think he was incapable of driving. Major Dickie said there was a minimum penalty in these cases. He imposed a fine of £5, with £2 12s 6d, costs, and suspended defendant’s licence for 12 months. He fixed sureties in the event of an appeal. Defendant—I will appeal the case. Major Dickie—But you admit the offence. Defendant—I think that is a bit severe. Major Dickie—But that is the minimum penalty. Defendant—I don’t think I was incapable of driving. Major Dickie—No judge can impose a smaller penalty. If you appeal, I am afraid it would be a waste of time and money. Defendant said he was not in the habit of taking drink, and had driven all over the world. District Inspector Smyth, said it was much too dangerous to have people driving while under the influence of drink. Major Dickie said he would allow defendant to drive until his appeal was heard, but he did not know whether the appeal was wise or not.

24-10-1942. APPELLANT WAS DEAD. NEWTOWNBUTLER CASE UNUSUAL SITUATION. An unusual situation arose at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Wednesday when an appeal case was called in which Hugh Connolly, of Derrysteaton Island, appealed, against a £12 fine for harbouring 10 cwts. of sulphate of ammonia. Mr, V. G. Patterson, solicitor, who had represented Connolly at the Petty Sessions hearing, said the appellant was dead. He had been dead ten days at his island home before being found. Judge Ellison said perhaps the case could be adjourned. Mr. J. Cooper (for the respondent Customs authorities) —I don’t know how you can adjourn the case of a dead man. Judge—There must be some means of correcting an obvious error. Mr. Cooper—Nothing can happen – just strike out the appeal. Judge—If the fine is not paid he cannot be imprisoned which was the alternative. Could the £12 not be levied by distress on his property irrespective of his, death? Mr. Cooper -You cannot levy it on the goods of a dead man. We would not attempt to do it anyhow. Mr. Patterson—If they don’t do that and don’t attempt to follow Mr. Connolly, nothing further will happen. A constable of police from the locality said the dead man had no stock. A brother-in-law was looking after the farm, but nobody was living on it. Mr. Cooper said it would be different if Mr. Patterson said he was going to take out probate and continue the appeal, but he simply came and said he had no instructions. Mr. Patterson—The man was ten days dead before he was found. Judge—Could the Crown not claim it was a creditor? Mr. Patterson said he thought not in this case. The matter was adjourned.

24-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN MARKET, ENNISKILLEN, Tuesday—Pork, 45 carcases; potatoes, 4s 3d per cwt.; straw, 4s per cwt.; hens, 1s to Is 3d per lb.; chickens. Is 4d to Is 6d per lb.; rabbits, 7d to 8d per lb.

24-10-1942. DERRYLIN BURGLARY.“The monotony of their present service got on their nerves and they decided to desert with the intention of joining the Air Force from ‘Eire’ ” said Mr. E. Ferguson at Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday when he was defending two soldiers of the Royal Engineers, Gerard Fitzgerald and Leslie Fuller, who pleaded guilty to having on 11th August, 1942, broken and entered the dwelling house at Cloghan of Dr. S. J. McQuaid, M.O.H., Derrylin, and stolen two gent’s shirts, two pullovers, one gent’s sports jacket, one pair gent’s trousers, one gent’s lounge jacket and two pairs of gent’s socks, the property of Dr. McQuaid.

Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, said there were no convictions of any sort against Fitzgerald, Fuller was convicted on 21st August, 1935, for attempted housebreaking and larceny at Wealdstone Juvenile Court and put under a rule of bail. On 2nd July, 1936, at Middlesex Quarter Sessions he was sent to Borstal for three years. He was later convicted of being an Army deserter. Mr. Ferguson said both accused belonged to the Royal Engineers. Fitzgerald was 21 years of age in July last and before the war was an aircraft worker at Bristol. He joined the Army at 17, although, he was in a reserved service. Fuller was 23 years of age and had been in the Army since the outbreak of war. Although the pair had made repeated applications to get away from the Royal Engineers because of their peacetime occupations, one being an aircraft worker and the other a plumber, they had been refused. They applied to join the commandos but were refused. Wishing to join the Air Force from across the border, they needed civilian, clothes and this caused the offence. They went into the doctor’s house, found no one in and took these clothes. All the clothes had been returned and the only thing broken was one window. Since the offence, the men had been tea weeks in jail and as far as Fitzgerald was concerned he had expiated his crime and it would be a shame if he had to go to jail again. He asked that they should be allowed to go back to the Army where they would be of more use than in jail. Deputy Judge Ellison discharged Fitzgerald under the Probation Act. He bound over Fuller in £10 to keep the peace for two years. Both men were ordered to be detained pending the arrival of a military escort.

24-10-1942. £4 DECREE FOR ASSAULT. IRVINESTOWN MAN’S CLAIM. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, William John Swanson, of Drumbulcan, Irvinestown, sued James Farrell, of same place, for £5 damages for assault. The claim was not defended. Mr. A. Herbert (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented the plaintiff, who said that on 24th July last he was in the townland of Drumbulkin, and had his bicycle with him. He was at the foot of a hill and had dismounted from the machine to walk up the hill. Farrell came out of the house as witness passed and shouted. Witness looked round to see what defendant was talking about and Farrell struck him on the jaw and tumbled him on his back right over the bicycle. As a result, his jaw swelled and he was not able to take his food. Defendant was a forty-acre farmer with fairly good land. A decree for £4 was given with 2s 6d expenses,

24-10-1942. GOOD ATTENDANCE OF JURORS. When out of 102 petty jurors summoned for Enniskillen Criminal Sessions on Friday, it transpired that only one was absent without explanation, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., said the attendance was very good indeed. “I have never heard a jury list before on which so many names were answered,” he added.

REDUCTION IN FINE. NEWTOWNBUTLER MAN’S APPEAL. Hugh P. Maguire, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, appealed at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday against two fines of £50 each imposed at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions in respect of (1) for failing to stop his car at the Border when called upon to do so, and (2) for exporting prohibited, goods. By consent, Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., affirmed both convictions, but the fine for failing to stop the car was reduced to £40. Defendant applied for and was given six weeks in which to pay the £90.

24-10-1942. GLANGEVLIN VOCATIONAL SCHOOL. DECISION TO RE-OPEN IT. At the meeting of County Cavan Vocational Education Committee Mr. J. J. Gleeson presided. The Office of Public Works wrote that as Glangevlin School was not in use they were prepared to take it on lease from the committee for a period of ten years. Mr. McGovern proposed, that they reopen the school. Mr. P. Smith said it was a shame to have the school closed. The application was refused it was decided to take steps to have the school reopened.

24-10-1942. BORDER INCIDENT. BELFAST MAN FINED £100 AT CLONES. At Clones District Court before District Justice Lavery, Patrick McIlduff, whose address was given as English St. Belfast, and who was described as a bookmaker, was charged with on May 19, 1941, at Glasslough, Co. Monaghan, exporting prohibited goods consisting of wearing apparel and also rescuing the goods seized by a Customs official. Defendant was fined £100 on the charge of exporting and £1 on the charge of rescuing, and the fines were paid into court immediately. Evidence was given by Customs Officer Lynn of following a motor-car to the Tyrone border. When he arrived he saw defendant standing by the car along with the driver. He examined the car and found two parcels in it. A man came across the Border and seized one of the parcels and took it away with him across the Border. Defendant took up the other parcel and went across the Border with it. He had no doubt it was defendant who took one of the parcels away. Defendant said he knew nothing about the parcels in the car. He had some drink taken.

24-10-1942. CATTLE DEALER’S CLAIM. £12 DECREE AT ENNISKILLEN. In an undefended civil bill at Enniskillen Quarter Sessions on Saturday, John Elliott, 1 Victoria Terrace, Enniskillen,  cattle-dealer, sued Thomas Gallagher, Aghoo, Garrison, for £26, plaintiff alleging that defendant’s warranty in the sale of a heifer was contrary to the facts. Plaintiff said he paid £21 for the heifer on 12th August last, when, defendant said she had cleaned after calving. It transpired, however, he said, that she had not cleaned, and he had to pay £2 for medicine for her. She lost her milk and was now worth only £13. Defendant went to see the animal and promised to take her back. He did not do so, and when plaintiff saw him, again and mentioned the matter he told plaintiff to “make the best of it.” Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., gave plaintiff a decree for £13, plaintiff to retain the animal.

24-10-1942. FOUR MONTHS FOR ASSAULT. At Enniskillen Criminal Sessions Wm. Hynes, Nugent’s Entry, Enniskillen, was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment on a charge to which he pleaded guilty, of assaulting a girl of under thirteen years. He had been found not guilty of a serious charge against the child.

24-10-1942. PETTIGO NOTES. Mr. Patrick Chaucer, Customs officer at Pettigo Customs frontier post, is to be transferred to Clones. Mr. Chaucer since coming to the village has been a very popular young man. He is a keen athlete who took a prominent part in all the local games. He is being replaced in Pettigo by Mr. Denis Bradley.

On Sunday morning while on duty in the vicinity of Termon Creamery, near the Grouselodge border, Constables Mathers and Robinson, R.U.C., seized a quantity of tea, margarine and rice from a young man. The constables removed the goods to Tullyhommon R.U.C. station.

During the week, R.U.C. from Tullyhommon, Pettigo, were successful in tracing and .recovering, a heifer which had been missing from the farm, of Mr. Robt. Brandon, Glenvannon, near Pettigo.

On Sunday, Sergt. Bradley, R.U.C., when on patrol in the townland of Camplagh observed a man carrying a parcel and coming from the Donegal border. The man bolted leaving the parcel behind which contained woollen blankets.

31-10-1942. GIRL ESCAPES JAIL. £50 FINE SUBSTITUTED FOR PRISON SENTENCE. A pretty, well-dressed young woman, Elizabeth Hal, of Clonfard, Newtownbutler, escaped a three months’ prison sentence by appealing to Newtownbutler  Quarter Sessions in Enniskillen on Wednesday. She had been sentenced at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions for dealing in prohibited goods, namely, four loaves, a carton of soap and 3½ lbs. flake meal. Mr. A. J. Belford (instructed by Mr. F. J. Patterson, solicitor) represented defendant. Mr. Jas. Cooper, Crown, Solicitor, for the Customs authorities, said the amount of goods involved was very small, their value being 3/-. On the 18th November, 1941, appellant was fined £3 for dealing in prohibited goods—18 loaves—and also £36 for exporting three tons of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. Cooper was proceeding to tell Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., of the ambushes carried out by, the police on three different days in April, 1942, when Mr. Belford interpolated and said his submission was that that evidence had been wrongly admitted by the magistrate in the Court below, no charge in respect of these allegations having been made. Mr. Cooper said the police had seen people, seventy-five in number, going to and. from the shop, bringing goods into the Free State. Judge – Illegally across the border? Mr. Cooper—Yes. Judge—Why didn’t you prosecute them?

Mr. Belford pointed out that the solicitor for appellant at the Petty Sessions objected to that evidence on the ground that no prosecution had been brought against those people. Mr. Cooper explained that the shop was on the very border and it was practically impossible to catch the offenders. In this particular case the policeman had to run after a woman; he grabbed the bag she was carrying but was unable to get a hold of her. The constable brought the goods back to appellant’s shop and she pleaded guilty. At the Petty Sessions he (Mr, Cooper.) was instructed to press for imprisonment, and his Worship said to her: “I have seen you before’ and sentenced her to three months. Mr. Belford said imprisonment in the case would be rather harsh as appellant was only twenty-five years old. Before the introduction of rationing, three- quarters of her customers were from over the border, and while he frankly admitted there might have been some irregularities, it was true to say she did not realise the enormity of the offences. She had been more or less out of business since her Ministry of Food licence had been withdrawn by the Lisnaskea Food Control Committee. She was now only allowed to sell some hardware and clothes, and she was contemplating giving up the business she had carried on for seven years. That being so, the police would be given no further trouble. Like many other border residents, she did not seem to realise the seriousness of smuggling and she had already been heavily punished by her livelihood being taken away. Mr. Cooper thought the licence was merely suspended pending his Honour’s decision. Mr. Belford said appellant would submit to a fairly substantial penalty in order to avoid the sentence, which would be likely to have unpleasant consequences for her in after life.

31-10-1942. YOUNG BOYS ON LARCENY CHARGES. ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. At Enniskillen Quarter Sessions ion Friday three young boys pleaded guilty before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C., to having on 26th July, 1942, broken and entered the shop of William H. Creighton, Church St., Enniskillen, and stolen chocolate and sweets to the value of £1 6s 6d. One of the above-mentioned boys and another boy pleaded guilty to breaking and entering the shop of Thomas Wilson, Garvary, between 11.55 p.m. on 13th Aug. and 3 a.m. on 14th August, and stealing two bicycle free wheels value 11s, pair pliers value Is 6d, 3½ doz. safety razor blades value 7s, two pocket torches value 3s, two fountain pens value 5s, one pair opera glasses value 15s and five bottles lemonade, value 3s 8d.

The boy twice charged, above also pleaded guilty to stealing a bicycle value £5, the property of Harold Cleary, on 20th July. Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL.B (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert) represented all accused. All the boys were very young and had respectable parents. None had. any previous convictions involving dishonesty. In two of the cases he mentioned that one boy had been earning £3 18s 0d weekly at public works at the age of 15. Another at the same age had been earning almost £5 weekly. This work stopped and the boys were running about with nothing to do. There was no proper control over the boys since the wages terminated until they had settled down again and got used to living with little or no money.

The Judge, sternly warning the boys of what would happen should they ever again be guilty of a similar offence, allowed them off on entering, or their parents’ entering into recognisances in £10 for their good behaviour. An order was made for the return of the stolen property, and £1 found in the possession of the boy who stole the bicycle was ordered to be handed to Cleary to compensate for a coat on the bicycle that was still missing. Mr. Creighton, said Mr. Cooper, was at the loss of the chocolate, which was buried and was rendered unfit. Asked whether he wanted compensation, by Mr. Herbert, who said the parents of the boy involved were very poor. Mr. Creighton said he did not. The Judge highly commended Mr. Creighton for his charitable attitude.

31-10-1942. ARTIFICIAL MANURE ON BORDER ISLAND. APPEAL AGAINST £12 FINE FAILS. At Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Wednesday, before Deputy Judge Ellison William Atwell, of Derrysteaton, appealed against a fine of £12 for the harbouring of a quantity of sulphate of ammonia. Mr. V. G. Patterson represented the appellant, and Mr. J. Cooper appeared for the respondent Customs Authorities. Constable Duffy said in an unoccupied house on Gallon Island belonging to defendant, while on boat patrol on Lough Erne, he found eight bags containing 16 cwt. of sulphate of ammonia. The house was approachable in summer time from the shore, but at this time of the year (February) could only be approached by boat. From the point of the island it was only 50 yards across Lough Erne to the 26 counties. In a statement defendant said he bought the ammonia in Newtownbutler for his own, use. It was the only ammonia he had bought that year. Witness discovered on enquiring at the shop where the purchase was made that the latter statement was untrue.

Cross-examined, witness said Mr. Anderson, manager of the Newtownbutler shop which supplied the stuff, said in a statement that on the 5th January defendant ordered a ton of sulphate of ammonia, took half of it that, day, and the remaining half the next day, and paid for it on the second day. Mr. Patterson—You got it in February, he got it in January; if he had wanted to get it across the Border there would have been no difficulty? –No difficulty. Even when taking it to his house he has to go along the shore of the Free State?—Yes. The Ministry actually urged people to get artificial manures early.—Yes.

Mr. Cooper—Atwell’s statement to you was that he had bought 16 cwt.?—Yes. It could be bought for about £12 a ton .here; what was the price in “Eire ?” —The price at the time was as much as £60. So it would be very profitable to get it across these few yards?—Yes. And 4 cwts. of this ammonia was missing?—Yes. George Dixon, Surveyor of Customs and Excise, stated on information from the police as to defendant’s probable requirements for his own cropping, he allowed 6 cwt. to the defendant, and had the remainder seized. Mr. Patterson—Did you know that he was treating for the purchase of another 40-acre farm?—No. And that he would require fertiliser for it?—No. Will you say you knew 6 cwt. was enough for his forty-acre farm, on Derrysteaton, and another 40-acre farm he was going to purchase?—I acted on information from the police. They did not know what he was going to crop?—They knew what he had cropped the previous year. Mf. Cooper—You don’t allocate fertiliser for a farm he has not bought? — No. Mr. Patterson said when he got his potato subsidy from the Government he received a notice stating that the Ministry had arranged for the importation of sufficient supplies of sulphate of ammonia to meet the needs of farmers, but it was most important that farmers should order immediately and where possible take delivery. “It is most important. Act now” stated the notice. Atwell followed that advice. He had 60 acres on Derrysteaton or heavy wet land, and required a quick acting fertilizer.

31-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN’S £200 PRIZE. When Enniskillen Urban Council met on Monday evening to allocate the prize money of £300 won in the recent waste paper salvage competition, a letter was read from Omagh Urban Council, congratulating the Council on winning a £200 prize. ‘The successful collection of waste paper,” stated the letter “requires great effort, organisation and co-operation of the townspeople, and your success shows that you had these three factors.” Mr. T. Algeo thought the County Hospital was the first consideration of the Council, as it catered for all creeds and classes, and he proposed that the Hospital get half of the prize money. Mr. P. Kelly seconded. Mr. T. Devine—I quite agree with Mr. Algeo that our County Hospital has our first claim, but there are a number of other institutions and organisations which 1 think have claims on you also. He proposed that the money be allocated as follows, County Hospital, £60; Enniskillen Nursing Society, £25: Enniskillen Council for Social. Service, £25; Soldiers’, Sailors’ and Airmen’s Association, £25; Inniskillings Comforts Fund, £25; £15 each to the Women’s Section, British Legion and the Earl Haig Fund; and £10 to the Ulster Gift Fund. Mr. W. H. Creighton seconded. Mr- W. J. Monaghan—Have the charities attached to the various churches received any consideration from you in these matters? Chairman, (Senator Whaley)—I don’t think they have been consulted in this matter at all

Mr. Monaghan said they were coming on to winter, and .he thought the various churches should get some little help for their funds, so that they could assist the poor people by either way of coal or other relief that they may be pleased to give to the people. “You have the outlook of a very severe winter; something should be done for these people,” he added. Mr. J. Donnelly (Borough Surveyor) said he had been consulted on the matter when it had been suggested that the St. Vincent De Paul Society should get £20, but this Society was in the most fortunate position that it had ever been in—that they had sufficient money at the present time. They were well able to carry on and meet the demands of the next couple of years or more. Mr. W. J. B. Lee said if they gave all the money to the County Hospital everybody would benefit, and he proposed that it all go to the County Hospital. Mr. Monaghan—It is a State-aided institution.  Mr. Devine—Speaking for the Church I represent, so far as I know they are not in need of any funds. Mr. Monaghan—That satisfies me. Mr. Algeo then altered his proposal and propose that the Hospital get £100 and he asked the Chairman to take a written vote “to see who was for the County Hospital or not.”

Mr. W. E. Johnston—I object to Mr. Algeo’s statement—“to see who is for the County Hospital or not.” Mr. Algeo—I demand a written vote on it. Mr. Johnston–You can have any vote on it you like. Mr. Devine said he would not like it to go out that this was a vote for and against the County Hospital. Mr. J. Logan thought that Mr. Devine’s motion should be passed unanimously. They had always the churches with them and they had always the poor with them, and likely to have them.

31-10-1942. MINOR HALL BOOKINGS DISCUSSED AT ENNISKILLEN URBAN COUNCIL. Enniskillen Urban Council discussed at length, at a special meeting on Monday evening an application from, the Six-County Council for Social Service for the use of the Minor Hall for .at least one night per week as a club for young people, and also for the taking over by them of a small plot of ground, the Council’s property, abutting on the road adjoining Mill Street and the Irvinestown Road us a juvenile recreation centre. The Chairman (Senator Whaley) asked had the Council a room to spare. Town Clerk (Mr. A. W. Ritchie) — For the next two or three months it is booked. Mr. T. Algeo—Haven’t you a resolution on the books that the Minor Hall is closed for three months? Chairman—After present bookings. The Town Clerk said if there was a fixed night each week it would be very difficult. The Minor Hall went usually with the main hall, when the latter was booked for dances.

Mr. Devine— They cannot surely book; up the hall for three months ahead. Mr. J. Logan proposing that Saturday night be granted to the Social Services in the Minor Hall, said all through the week the young people were engaged at their lessons, and it would be a shame to take them away from these to attend a club. The presence of the boys attending in the hall would help to purify the atmosphere. That would be a disappointment to some people. They would miss (the “hop.” The people would also miss the bottles of a Sunday morning. It would do the town a lot of good if they had the young boys in the ball on a Saturday night. There was very seldom a big function in the hall on a Saturday night; therefore, that night would not clash with any other people. He meant this arrangement to start from 1st January. Mr. Algeo seconded. Mr. Devine— We want it before January. Saturday night would not suit. The Town Clerk read a list of bookings of the Minor Hall for some weeks to come which, showed that the same three groups of people have the hall on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, respectively, of each week for some time in advance. Mr. Devine—Shilling “hops.” The Town Clerk said Saturday night was “Football.” Mr. McKeown— What football; there are several football clubs. Town Clerk—I cannot tell you the name of it. Mr. Devine—Corinthian Football Club. Everyone knows it. There is no secret about it. Town Clerk— It is difficult to get a night. Mr. Devine asked Mr. Logan, not to press his motion, because he did not think Saturday night would suit the Social Services. Mr. Logan—Saturday night is the best. The pictures have the main hall, so that there would only be the two parties here. It is all the same to me. Boys always strolled about the streets for an hour or two on that night, he said. Mr. Johnston—Country boys go home. Mr. Logan-The shops are closed earlier

7-11-1942. TRAGIC DEATH OF JAS. A. JONES, ROYAL HOTEL. POISONED BY GAS FUMES IN BEDROOM. Enniskillen got a profound shock on Tuesday with the news of the death that morning of Mr. James A. Jones, popular proprietor of the Royal Hotel, Enniskillen and one of the best-known auctioneers in the North-West. Only the previous evening Mr. Jones had been seen in the best of health and spirits, on his daily walk, and it was tragic to think that within little more than twelve hours he was dead. The tragic event was caused by an accident. A gas tap which had served a disused stove in Mr, Jones’ bedroom had been at some time or other inadvertently turned on. Mr. Jones was resting in bed after his morning cup of tea when the meter serving that pipe and tap was again turned on by the Gas Company’s fitter after having been off for some time. The fitter was unaware of the pipe leading to the bedroom. The turning on of the gas filled Mr. Jones’ room with gas. The window was closed and when the alarm was raised and the doctor arrived, he found Mr. Jones unconscious. He died after a short time. .

An Enniskillen man, Mr. Jones was a member of a popular and much-esteemed family. His brother Frank, a former Superintendent of the Garda Siochana, died less than two years ago in Dublin, where he was the proprietor of the Beresford Hotel. Another, sister, now deceased was a member of the Convent .of Mercy community Newry. The only surviving member of the family is Miss Josephine Jones, who lived at the Hotel with the deceased, gentleman. It was she who first raised the alarm. To her, in her sorrow, the sincere sympathy of the whole community goes out.

The late Mr. Jones, who was aged 59 years, started life as a clerk in the office of the late Mr. Robert W. Wilson, auctioneer, in the present premises of the Royal Hotel. . He became an auctioneer himself in Mr. Wilson’s employment, and on Mr. Wilson’s death succeeded him. He built up for himself one of the most extensive auctioneering practices in the North. He later became the proprietor of the Royal Hotel, and in both capacities he was as popular as he was-well-known. He entertained some of the leading personalities of Ireland in every sphere.

Mr. Jones was a good-living Catholic gentleman, who attended regularly to his religious duties. Although unmarried, he had a wonderful regard and love for children, a love for little ones shared by every member of his family. In life he had borne many crosses, several members of his family dying within a comparatively short time of one another, but he bore his sorrows bravely, even cheerfully, and was always in high spirits outwardly, whatever sorrows his inner soul might feel. He will be much missed by every creed and class in the town.

THE INQUEST. The sad circumstances of his death were investigated by Mr. G. E. Warren, Coroner, at an inquest in the Hotel on Tuesday. Head Constable Conlin represented the police; Mr. R. A. Herbert, (Messrs. Maguire and Herbert), the next of kin, and Mr. Gerald Grant, BL., appeared for the Enniskillen Gas Company.

DOCTOR’S EVIDENCE. Dr. Philip Brady said in response to a telephone massage received at 11 a.m., he went to the Royal Hotel, where he arrived in a few minutes and smelled coal gas. He went, to a bedroom on the first floor and found a strong smell of coal gas in the bedroom. In the bed he found deceased in an unconscious condition but alive. He died a few minutes afterward. He was clad in pyjamas. Death was caused by asphyxia due to coal gas poisoning. Mr. Jones was a patient of witness’s and was suffering from myocarditis in a mild degree; otherwise he was in good health.

WAITER’S STORY. Wm. Brady, waiter, said that morning at 10-30 he was tidying up in the dining room when Miss Jones, sister of the deceased, told him to go up to deceased’s room because she had smelled gas escaping there. When he went into the room he found it full of gas and the gas pipe turned on. He turned off the tap and opened the window. The pipe from which the gas was escaping was not connected to the gas stove in the room and had not been for some time. The gas fire in the room was never used and the tap was on the portion of the pipe leading to the main. He saw deceased in the bed and asked him was he all right, but he made no answer. He felt deceased’s hands and face, and, as he appeared to witness to be unconscious, witness went for Dr. Brady. There was a fitter from the hotel working at the oven in the kitchen that morning. To Mr. Grant, witness said this pipe had been disconnected from the fire for some time, but he did not know who disconnected it.

Mr. Grant-How long had it been in that condition?—I don’t know. Had it ever been reported?—I don’t know, unless Mr. Jones did it. Witness said he did not know when he first noticed that it was cut. He was very seldom in Mr. Jones’s room, except to go occasionally for Mr. Jones’ coat. Mr. Herbert -Is it cut or disconnected? Head Constable—There seems to be six inches of pipe cut away altogether. Witness said, he had not seen the gas stove lit this ages. It was not lit last winter. Patrick Cunningham, boots, said between 9.45 and 10 a.m. that morning he was called by Miss Jones to the Hotel office; In this office were two gas metres, and he was asked by Miss Jones to turn on the gas. She opened the press where the meter was and, as witness knew nothing about them, he refused to turn on the gas. There was a gas man there and he got a wrench and went towards the meter. Witness did not know what he did. There was a gas radiator in the hall of the Hotel, and witness was seven months in the hotel and had never seen it lighted. He heard no conversation between Miss Jones and the fitter. Mr. Grant—Had you ever seen the stove lit in Mr. Jones’ bedroom?—I didn’t even know there was a stove in the bedroom.

IN USUAL GOOD SPIRITS. Michael Rooney, boots, said that about 9-15 a.m. that morning he went to Mr. Jones’ bedroom with his tea. Mr. Jones was in bed and seemed to be in good form. Witness gave him the tea and pulled down the black-out blind. The window was closed. Witness did not go near the gas fire in the room as he did not know it was working. It was usual for Mr. Jones to remain in bed in the morning and have his tea there. Witness never saw the gas fire in the room used. He was in the Hotel since August and never saw the radiator in the hall used. Head, Const. Conlin—Was there any smell of gas when you were in the room? —No. Mr. Jones seemed in his usual health, and spoke to him the same as usual. He made no complaint of any kind. To Mr. Herbert, witness said Mr. Jones took his tea. Coroner—You don’t know whether he got out of bed at all or not?—No, I don’t.

Henry Fox, employed as fitter by the Enniskillen Gas Company, said on this morning about 9 a.m. he was sent by Mr. Lusted, manager of the Gasworks, to the Royal Hotel to have a look at the gas radiator. He arrived at the Hotel at 8-50 a.m. and saw Miss Jones, who pointed out the gas radiator in the hall. She said in reply to witness that that was all in the place. Witness turned on the tap of the radiator, but no gas came. Miss Jones called the Boots to turn on the gas in this meter. As there were two meters in the office the boots was not sure what to do so witness turned on the main cock of the meter serving this radiator. The other meter served the cooking stoves in the kitchen and was fully turned on. Witness was not aware that this meter which he turned on served anything but the hall radiator, so he took the word of Miss Jones for this. He had since made a test of this meter which served the hall radiator and found it also, served the pipe which led to the gas stove in Mr. Jones’ room. He lit the gas in the hall radiator and Miss Jones told him to leave it on as it was cold. He was then brought to the kitchen to look at the cooker. He was not up in Mr. Jones’ bedroom on this visit. Head Constable—If the tap in the pipe in Mr. Jones’ room which was cut had been turned off, could any gas escape? — No, certainly not. It would have been perfectly safe. The pipe was not cut it was disconnected. To Mr. Herbert, witness said he asked Miss Jones were there any others in the place to be seen to, and she said that was all that was in the place. The gas in the hall radiator was still on when he left about twenty minutes past ten a.m.

SISTER’S EVIDENCE. Miss Josephine Jones, who, when the inquest was held at five o’clock, was still confined to bed from the results of the shock, gave her evidence in bed. She said her brother arranged with the Gas Company to attend to the gas in the morning. About ten minutes to ten a man from the Gas Company arrived. Before going to the radiator, the gas man asked her were there any other radiators and she said no. To make sure, she asked the waiter, and he also said ho. She did not remember about the stove in Mr, Jones’ room. It never entered her mind. She called Patrick Cunningham to turn on the meter in the office for the gas man, but he was not able, and the gas man did it himself. After the radiator had been fired, she brought the gas man down to the kitchen to look at the stove there. About 10-30 she smelt gas and went upstairs. She found on entering deceased’s room that it was full of gas. She noticed that her brother did not move as usual, felt his hand and found it cold. She then raised the alarm.

To Mr. Grant, witness said she could not definitely remember whether it was the radiator or gas fittings the gas man said when he asked her were there any others in the house. The tap which was turned on in her brother’s room was on the floor underneath the wash-hand basin, and it could easily have been turned on by someone brushing out the room, or hitting it with their foot when at the basin. Mr. Grant said on behalf of Mr. Lusted and the Gas Company, he extended very sincere sympathy in the terrible tragedy that had happened. The Head Constable and Coroner associated themselves with this expression, of sympathy, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL. B., also joined in the expression of sorrow at Mr. Jones’ tragic passing. He had been a personal friend of Mr. Jones and he was sure the relatives felt the blow very much. The Coroner returned a verdict of death from asphyxia caused by coal-gas poisoning, the result of an accident.

7-11-1942. MILITARY LORRY LIGHTS IN ENNISKILLEN. MAGISTRATE’S COMPLAINT. Complaints concerning glaring headlights of motor vehicles belonging to the military were voiced by Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. His Worship said that recently the whole street of Enniskillen was lit up by army vehicle headlights from end to end, and this was far worse than some of the cases which he had to deal with in Court. Those motor lights could certainly be seen for ten or twelve miles away from the air. He also spoke of the glare from torches. Sergt. John. Codd, R.U.C., said a special report had been made by the police on the subject of lights on army vehicles, but no reply had yet been received. His Worship pointed out that except a light could be seen from an altitude of six hundred feet he would not impose a fine.

One of the cases which fell within this category was brought against an air-raid warden in Enniskillen, and no penalty was inflicted. In another case Head Constable Conlon, prosecuting, said the defendant was aged ninety-three. She kept a boarding-house in Forthill Street and according to the constable she had forgotten to put up the black-out blind. His Worship said it was hard to put a penalty on a law-breaker when she reached the age of ninety three, but he had to do it. A. fine of 5/- and costs was ordered. Similar fines were imposed in a number of other summonses.

7-11-1942. PRISONERS ESCAPE FROM MOUNTJOY GAOL. The following statement was issued by the “Eire” Government Information Bureau on Tuesday; “Six prisoners serving sentences imposed by the Special Military Court escaped from Mountjoy Prison on the evening of November 1.”

 

 

First Garda in 1922.

I WONDER how many men are left in Donegal who joined the Garda in 1922, when the force was founded? And of the few there may be, how many did all their service in Donegal? I met one the other day who could answer affirmatively on both counts.

Patrick McInerney, now in retirement and living in Letterkenny, where he spent part of his service, belongs to O’Callaghan’s Bridge in Co. Clare. He joined the Garda at the formation of the force — he still recalls the day, 22nd May, 1922. His first station was Ballyshannon; a short sit, as it turned out. He moved in on 14th October and was on the transfer list by December 12th. Then it was a brief stint in Pettigo (where my picture was taken) and shortly it was on to Carrick, in 1923. He remained there until 1927 when he moved to Ballintra. Some years there, and the next posting was Letterkenny. Promotion came on transfer to Castlefin and Sergt. McInerney spent spells in Burnfoot and Quigley’s Point before going for his longest service, to Moville. Retiring in 1961, he continued to live on there for some years before coming back to Letterkenny, the home town of his wife, a member of the well-known McClay family of Oldtown, formerly a nurse in the then District Hospital.

Pat, a man with a vivid memory for places and people, could fill a book with reminiscences of his years as a policeman in Donegal, a county he came to love and where he was held in high regard wherever duty took him. He holds two medals of which he is very proud. First, his old I.R.A. medal then the plaque and medal presented at the jubilee celebrations in Dublin to mark the fiftieth year of the existence of the force. This was awarded only to those who had served from the first year. There are few others in Donegal who hold these two much cherished mementos. In retirement, time does not hang heavily on him; when the opportunity is right and the weather inviting he does his daily spot of gardening.

There are seven in the family; a son, Father Matthew McInerney, is parish priest of St. Mary’s Church in Brighton, in the south of England. A keen angler, he manages a run home twice a year. At present he is busy with an extension to the church and a new presbytery is being built, a £100,000 project which entails a succession of fund-raising schemes. Another son is an Assistant County Engineer with the Co. Council.

Having seen service in so many places in Donegal, Pat knows it even better than his native Banner county and still recalls his days in the different stations and the firm friendships formed. He had no ambition to spend his retirement anywhere else.

 

1942. October. Fermanagh Herald.

17-10-1942.LICENSING PROSECUTION FAILS. IRVINESTOWN CASE. All five summonses issued in a licensing case heard at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday were dismissed by Major Dickie, R.M. The licensee Mrs. Elizabeth M. Shutt, was summoned on the usual five counts and her husband for aiding and abetting. Three men found on the premises were also defendants. D.I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr. R. A. Herbert, LL. B., defended. Constable Wright gave evidence that at 12.15 a.m. on 30th Sept. they heard noises in the kitchen of the licensed premises and at 12.20 were admitted by the licensee’s husband who said he invited the men in for a chat to await the return of the licensee who was at a dance. Two of the men had drink in front of them. Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness said the bar was closed and everything was in order. Constable Bradley corroborated. Giving evidence, the licensee’s husband said this wife was out at a dance and while awaiting her return, at one o’clock he invited three friends of his for a chat. The drink they had had been left out early in the .night for himself, and no money was paid for it. The bar had not even been opened to get it. After further evidence, the R.M. said he did not think there was any evidence and the explanation given was reasonable. He dismissed all the cases.

17-10-1942. TEN YEARS’ IMPRISONMENT. AMERICAN SOLDIERS’ SENTENCED. There was a dramatic conclusion to the General Court-Martial in Co. Down on Pte. Herbert G. Jacobs, aged 23, Kentucky, and Pte. Embra H. Farley, aged 27, of Arkansas, who were accused of the murder of Edward Clenaghan, of Soldierstown, Aghalee, who died in Lurgan hospital on September 23, shortly after being found with, head injuries, on the roadside near his mother’s public-house in Soldierstown, when at the end of the case for the prosecution, the defending officer stated that he would call no evidence for the defence. Following short statements by the officer for the prosecution and for the defence, the Court was closed. Within a few moments it reassembled to hear evidence of the character and military career of each of the accused, following which each of the accused was found guilty of manslaughter, and sentenced to 10 years’ imprisonment. The court consisted of four colonels and four lieutenant-colonels.

17-10-1942. CAVAN HALL BURNED. Killadoon Hall, situated in the Loughduff area of Mullahoran (County Cavan) Parish and erected by free labour in 1924, has been destroyed by fire. It was constructed of iron and timber with boarded floor seats and stage, and used as a meeting place by the local football club, L.D.F., Red Cross, etc.

17-10-1942.STORY OF ENNISKILLEN TRAGEDY BABY FOUND WITH THROAT CUT. MISSING MOTHER RESPONSIBLE WHILE INSANE. That five months old Claire Henderson died front shock and haemorrhage as the result of a wound inflicted on the throat with a carving knife by her mother while the latter was apparently, temporarily insane, was the verdict of a jury on Friday at the resumed inquest on the baby which had been found at 5.45 p.m. on the 24th Sept. lying dead on the settee in the sitting room of its parents temporary home 3, Erne View, Enniskillen, by its father Major Edward Henderson. Head-Constable Poots represented the police. Mr. B. L. Winslow appeared for Major Henderson and Mr. G. E. Warren, coroner, conducted the proceedings. Mr. W. F. Dewane was jury foreman.

FATHER S GHASTLY FIND. Major Henderson deposed that his wife and child resided with him at 3, Erne View Terrace, where they had rooms taken. On the 24th Sept. at 5.45 he returned from his office and went upstairs to the sitting room of their temporary home. He saw the baby lying on her back on the settee, with her throat cut and .a carving knife beside her on the settee. There was no one else in the room and he immediately went downstairs to the hallway and there saw Dr. McBrien and Miss Ellen Hands. He told them what he had seen, saying, as far as he could recollect ‘‘The baby’s throat is cut.”

Since the birth of the baby on 27th April last his wife had enjoyed good health. During a week or two prior to the tragedy, however, she appeared to be overstrung and suffered from sleeplessness. They had been on holidays at Bundoran from the 14th to the 21st Sept., and during that time his wife worried about the baby’s health. As a result of his wife’s condition and some remarks she made he called with Dr. McBrien on the morning of 24th September and asked him to visit his wife, who had said she thought herself and the baby were both ill. She also said she let witness down and would not go to heaven and that she was becoming mentally deranged. At 2 p.m. on the 24th Sept. he last saw his wife, when they were both coming out of the sitting room. Shortly before he left his wife went to procure a bottle for the baby. He had been at lunch between one and two o’clock and his wife appeared to be worrying unduly. He spent some time in cheering her up and comforting her. She appeared to cheer up while he was there. He had not since seen her and did not know where she was. The carving knife, which he identified (and which was produced bearing bloodstains) had been bought by him some time ago.

LAST TO SEE MRS. HENDERSON. Miss Rebecca Hands, who said she resided with her sifter at Erne View, deposed that the Henderson’s lived in rooms with them. Mrs. Henderson after the return from Bundoran complained that the baby was ill and looked worried. She complained several times that the baby was wasting away and had a cough. On the 24th Sept. she met Mrs Henderson on the stairs on her way to the sitting room. When out on a message later in the afternoon she met Mrs. Henderson in Belmore Street.

“I HAVE DISKED THINGS.’ Miss Eleanor Hands said she did not see Mrs. Henderson leaving the house. She described what took place when Major Henderson ran down the stairs. About: 4 p.m. witness was in Mrs. Henderson’s sitting room and saw Mrs. Henderson and the baby. Mrs. Henderson was sitting on the settee with the baby on her knee, and she seemed quite happy. She had not been too well and was a bit worried. Did she pass any remarks?—she said I have dished things. Witness did not know what she meant by the remark which was passed as witness was leaving the room and she attached no significance to it.

MAID’S STORY. Miss Joan Power, 9, New Row, Enniskillen, said she had been employed as a domestic servant by Mrs. Henderson between July 1942, and 24th Sept., 1942. On the latter date she left the Henderson house at 3.55 p.m. when she had her work finished, and went to her home. When she was going out Mrs. Henderson said her work was finished and told witness to come in at the usual time next morning. That was in the sitting room. Mrs. Henderson was sitting on a chair near the window and was feeding the baby. She appeared to be all right, and did not look worried. She complained to witness about her health shortly after she came back from Bundoran. She had not since seen Mrs. Henderson. The first she knew of the tragedy was at 8.45 the following morning.

DOCTOR’S EVIDENCE. Dr. M. E. McBrien said on the 24th Sept. Major Henderson called with him and asked him to visit his wife. He found the house occupied by Major Henderson about 5.45, that evening. The Major came down the stairs saying “She is gone and she has cut the baby’s throat.” Witness went upstairs to the sitting room and found the baby lying on her back on the settee. Her throat was cut across with the windpipe opened into and the principal vessels cut. The front of the child’s clothing was heavily stained with blood and a bloodstained curving knife was lying on the baby’s left side between the body, and the back of the settee. Life was extinct. Death was due to shock and haemorrhage resulting from the injuries described. Head-Constable Poots said a widespread search had been made for Mrs. Henderson since the tragedy but she had not been found. Sympathy with Major Henderson was expressed by Head-Constable Poots, the jury, foreman and the Coroner Mr. Winslow.

17-10-1942. CRIMELESS COUNTY LEITRIM. When Judge Sheehy was presented with white gloves at Carrick-on-Shannon he said he was glad to hear from Supt. McNamara that conditions in the county were very satisfactory.

17-10-1942. MOTHER S BODY FOUND IN LOUGH ERNE. SUICIDE VERDICT. The body of the dead child’s mother, Mrs. Mary Henderson (aged 26), was found in Lough Erne at the Weirs  Bridge, near Enniskillen, on Sunday afternoon, attired as she had been when last seen by Miss Rebecca Hands, in Belmore .Street, on 24th Sept. At an inquest held at the Workhouse, Enniskillen, on Monday morning by Mr. G. E. Warren, coroner, Capt. J. N. Hughes gave evidence of identification, and said deceased’s home address was Cheviot View, Ponteland, Newcastle-on-Tyne. Sergt. S. J. Sherrard said about 4.30 p.m. on Sunday an object was pointed out to him at the Weirs Bridge. On closer examination he found it to be the body of a woman fully clothed. He sent for assistance and had the body taken to the Workhouse mortuary. The body was found among the rushes near the bathing boxes at the swimming pond. Dr. M. E. McBrien said on examination he found the body in an advanced state of decomposition consistent with having been in the water about 17 days. There were no marks of violence and death was due to drowning. A verdict was returned of suicide by drowning while temporarily insane.

17-10-1942. OBITUARY MISS ANNIE McMANUS, ENNISKILLEN. Deep regret has been occasioned by the death of Annie McManus, Wellington Place, Enniskillen, which on Wednesday last following a short illness. Deceased gained the respect and esteem of everyone with whom she was acquainted. Of a quiet nature, she was deeply sincere in her friendships, and her unfailing good humour and kindness endeared her to a large circle of friends. During her illness she had the happiness of being frequently visited by the local clergy, and she made an edifying preparation for death. All along she retained her wonted cheerfulness, never uttering a word of complaint, .but patiently resigning herself to the Divine Will. The funeral took place on Friday following Requiem Mass in St. Michael’s Church, Enniskillen. Rev. C. O’Daly, C.C., who was celebrant, delivered a touching panegyric in the. course of which he referred to the deceased young lady as a model Catholic and one whose popularity in life was evidenced by the wide sympathy created by her demise. He expressed sympathy with, her relatives who had sustained a severe loss by her passing. The funeral cortege was large and paid eloquent testimony to the widespread regret caused by her death. Rev T. J. Meegan, C.C., officiated at the obsequies in the Catholic Cemetery, where the interment took place. The chief mourners were —Annie McManus (mother), Mary and Nellie (sisters), John and Patrick (brothers).

17-10-1942. HAD UNCUSTOMED CIGARETTES PENALTY AT DERRY COURT. A fine of £10 was imposed at Derry Petty Sessions on Charles McIntyre, 50 Creggan Road, who was prosecuted by the Customs authorities for aiding and abetting some person, unknown in the unlicensed sale of cigarettes. Constable Hinds said in a drawer in defendant’s room he found 1,450 American cigarettes, and the defendant, who was employed by the American technicians, said he bought the cigarettes from American sailors for his own use. No duty had been paid. Defendant, in reply to the R.M., said he was earning £5 13s a week, and had to pay 18s 4d a week income-tax. Captain Bell, R.M.—The more the Revenue is defrauded the more income-tax we will have to pay. Defendant—I was not defrauding the revenue. Captain Bell—Of course, you are. Captain Bell said he was determined to do his best to help the revenue and tobacconists, who had to make their living. A similar penalty was imposed on George Page, 7 Strand Road, who was summoned for being knowingly concerned in selling uncustomed goods, 3 3/16 lbs. cigarettes and 26 boxes of face powder. Police evidence was given that when defendant’s .premises were searched they found. 1,540 American cigarettes in a trunk marked “Eire’’ under a mattress. Defendant said he did not know who put the cigarettes in the trunk which was in a passage. The face powder was lying on a chest of drawers. There was no necessity to him to smuggle face powder when he could buy it in Derry at 6d a box.

17-10-1942. NEWTOWNBUTLER NEWS. During the absence of the family at church the dwelling house and shop of Mrs. E, Williamson, Clonagun, Newtownbutler, situated a few yards from the border, was broken into and raided. Following investigations by the R.U.C. in charge of Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, a man named John J. Connolly, Clonkeelan, Clones, was arrested. Later at a special court in Newtownbutler, before Mr. E. Reilly, J.P., Connolly was charged with breaking and entering the premises and stealing a gold watch and a quantity of cigarettes and tobacco. He was remanded on bail to Newtownbutler Petty Sessions. At the week-end Newtownbutler police in charge of Sergt. A. Blevins, Newtownbutler, visited a house on the Cavan-Fermanagh border at Cleenagh and seized quantities of flour, candles, boots, horseshoes, thread, rice, loaves, and other articles suspected of being for export across the border. Constables H. Lowry and R. J. Freeman, Newtownbutler, seized a motor-car containing a quantity of rice at Summerhill. The car and contents were taken to Newtownbutler. On Sunday night, Sergt. Blevins, Newtownbutler, intercepted a motor-car coming from Co. Cavan direction at Parson’s Green and seized a quantity of whiskey from one of the occupants which was believed to have been imported.

17-10-1942. PETTIGO NOTES. A pretty wedding took place in St. Mary’s Parish Church, Pettigo, the contracting parties being Mr. William Baird, Dromore, eldest son of David and Mary Baird, Dromore, and Miss Teresa McGrath, youngest daughter of Michael and the late Mrs, M. McGrath, Belault, Pettigo. Miss Sadie McGrath, sister of the bride was bridesmaid, and Mr. John Baird, brother of the bridegroom, was bestman. The ceremony, with Nuptial Mass, was performed by the Rev. P. McCormack, C.C., Pettigo.

On Friday night a very enjoyable dance was held in St. Patrick’s Hall, Lettercran, the proceeds of which were in aid of repairs to the church.

A sad burning-accident resulting in the death of Baby Marshall, the four-year-old daughter of James Marshall, Drumhorick, Pettigo, occurred on Monday. The child during her mother’s absence was in the vicinity of the fire when its frock became ignited; she ran on to the street to the mother who immediately extinguished the flames, but the child had received such severe burns as necessitated removal to hospital where she died a few hours later.

17-10-1942. BLACKLION DISTRICT NEWS. There was a full attendance of the committee at a meeting of the Red Cross branch in Blacklion on Thursday night. Mrs. Chas. Dolan presided. Mrs, Maguire, N.T., read correspondence and financial matters were arranged. A vote of sympathy was passed to. Miss Margt. McGovern, Loughan House, on the death of her father.

There was a large muster of the L.D.F. at Loughan on Sunday, when target practice took place. The highest three marks were recorded by Messrs. Fred Murray, Frank Maguire, Patk. Fitzpatrick, and Capt. Kelly. D.S.O. Magovern and Group Leader Farmer were in charge.

The Harvest Thanksgiving Service took place in Killinagh Protestant Church on Friday night. The special preacher was Rev. Canon Pratt.

D.S.O. Maguire, N.T., Sergt, Rock, and the local officers, were present at a meeting of the L.D.F. in Blacklion on Thursday night. Sergeant Rock read special communications and Group Leader of the L.D.F. was appointed to give lectures.

The wedding took place, with Nuptial Mass, at Drumshambo Church, of Francis, youngest son of the late John and Mrs. McGovern, Barran, Blacklion, and Margaret Teresa, third daughter of the late Mr. Peter Dolan and Mrs. Dolan, Crotty, Drumshambo. Rev. Father Cummins, C.C., performed the ceremony. Mr. Michael McGovern (brother of the groom) was best man, and Miss Dolan, (sister of the bride), was bridesmaid.

There was a large attendance at the funeral in Doobally of Mrs. Patk. McLoughlin, Tullinamoal. Rev. J. J. Murtagh, C.C., officiated in the church and at the graveside. .

17-10-1942. MANORHAMILTON NEWS. Forestry Officials—Mr. Curran who has been Forestry Inspector at Manorhamilton during the past two years has been transferred to Co, Cork, and is replaced by Mr. Madden who comes from Tipperary.

Teacher’s Appointment—Miss Dillon, assistant in the girls’ school, has been appointed assistant in Drumlease N.S., Dromahair. She possesses a lady-like charm, all her own and her departure from Manorhamilton is very much regretted.

Legion Of Mary—To mark the first anniversary of the formation of a branch of the Legion of Mary at Manorhamilton a very enjoyable function was held in the Technical School on Thursday evening (1st inst.). Tea was provided by the Legionaries and vocal, items were contributed, Bro. Ferdinand being the principal contributor. The guests at the evening were Rev. Fr. Brady, C.C.; Rev. Father McGrail, C.C.; Rev, Fr. Gilbride, and Bros. Ferdinand and Leonard. Rev. Fr. Brady congratulated the Legionaries on the good work they had performed during the year.

17-10-1942. SENIOR FOOTBALL FINAL. NEXT SUNDAYS GAME AT THE GAELIC PARK. At the Gaelic Park, Enniskillen on Sunday next Fermanagh’s two star teams— Lisnaskea Emmets and Newtownbutler St. Comgalls—clash once more in quest of county honours when they meet in the county final of the Fermanagh Senior Football Championship. So keen is the rivalry between these teams and so well are they .matched that this contest for premier honours should prove one of the best games seen in Fermanagh for a long time. The championship title has always been the most coveted in G.A. A. competitions and many memorable clashes have occurred in recent years between these teams for the blue riband of Fermanagh football.

Few teams can boast such an array of inter-county talent as the Emmets and St. Comgalls, for between them they comprise two-thirds of the Fermanagh county team. Lisnaskea have the services of such well-known players as T. Durnian, F. Johnston, A. Smith, F. O’Dowd, Duffy and Collins, whilst Newtownbutler have inter-county stars in E. McQuillan, B. Allen, M. McDermott and Murray. Two splendid additions to the .Newtown team lately have been the Smith brothers—M. Smith in particular being a, promising youth of inter-county status.

Only a month or so ago Lisnaskea triumphed over Newtown in the League final by a very narrow margin when the latter seemed favourites for the title. Newtown were short some of their regular team on that occasion however. The St. Comgalls’ victory over Clones-one of Monaghan’s best senior teams—in the Border League a fortnight ago greatly enhances their chances against the. Fermanagh Champions, but the Emmets have always proved they are a difficult combination to beat in championship struggles. Contests between Lisnaskea and Newtownbutler are invariably sparkling exhibitions of fast and clever football which have always attracted bumper crowds, and Sunday’s game should certainly draw a record crowd to the Gaelic Park. The throw-in will be at 4 p.m. and Rev. B. Mahon, Irvinestown, whose competency as a referee is widely recognised, will have charge of the game. Spectators are asked to note carefully that owing to the difficulty in stewarding the pitch at recent matches nobody except players and officials will be allowed inside the paling fences.

17-10-1942. ‘WIN BY STRATEGY BEST FOR ALL OF US” AN AMERICAN VIEW. “In the light of what you are doing in India, how do expect us to talk about principles and look our soldiers in the eye.”? This question is asked in an “Open Letter to the People of England” in the current issue of the magazine “Life.” The document demands one thing from Britain: “Quit fighting the war to hold the Empire together, and join with Russia and your allies to fight the war to win by whatever strategy is best for all of us. “After victory has been won, then the British .people can decide-what to do about .the Empire—for you may be sure we don’t want it. “But if you cling to the Empire at the expense of the United Nations’ victory you will lose the war … because you will lose us.” Briefly, there are two wars,’ the letter goes on “one we are actually. fighting and the other we must fight in order, to win. The war we are actually fighting is a war to save America. Nothing else. “Everyone here is prepared to fight this war to any extremes just as everybody in England will go to any extreme to save England. “But this kind of war of each trying to save himself is just the set-up for Hitler. If we are really going to overwhelm the Axis we must envision and fight for something bigger than either England or the United States. “We Americans are a strange people, maybe you think of us as rather practical. But you cannot understand us at all unless you realise what principles mean to us.” We fought you on principles in the first place. Once in our history we killed 600,000 of our own sons to establish the principle of freedom for the black man.” “Life ” suggests that the British may object that Americans have not defined these principles very well yet—“and that’s a fair objection.” “One reason we have not defined them is that we are not convinced yon would fight for them even if they were defined.” ‘’For instance, we realise that you have difficult problems in India, but we don’t see your “solution” to date provides any evidence of principles of any kind.’

17-10-1942. DISREGARD FOR TRUTH AMD HONESTY. PROTESTANT ARCHBISHOP PERTURBED. Speaking on Tuesday at the Joint Synod of Dublin, Kildare and Glendalough diocese, the Most Rev. Dr Barton, Protestant Archbishop of Dublin, referred to “the growing disregard for the sacredness of truth and honesty,’’ and said he had been, seriously perturbed of late by evidence of that disregard. Could a society be in a healthy state he asked in which a man would boast openly and without shame of how he had treated the Customs, or his neighbours, or in which there was graft and wire-pulling. He was convinced that a nation’s taxes could at once be reduced by 50 per cent, at the very least if its citizens could be trusted to tell the truth and to deal as conscientiously with Government departments as a man was expected to deal with his neighbours.

17-10-1942. NORTH LEITRIM FARMERS’ UNION. MEETING IN MANORHAMILTON. A special meeting of the above was held in McGloin’s Hall, Manorhamilton, on Oct. 7th. Mr. James Kerrigan, president, who presided, said that the appointment of a new Agricultural Commission which was composed almost entirely of professors boded ill for the poor farmers of Connaught. Such a Commission to be effective should be composed of practical farmers, and the Congested Districts should have representation as well as the plains of Boyle. Mr. Kerrigan said that North Leitrim was in a serious position owing to the bad harvest and the destruction of hay and crops by flooding and the drainage scheme which was turned down twelve, years ago should be revived. Mr. John McGarraghy, said that .much damage had been done in Mullies by flooding of the Bonet, and several farmers had lost large quantities of hay. Referring to the increased rates Mr. McGarraghy said the new County Council would be expected to work hard for a reduction in the rates.

Mr. P. J. O’Rourke, secretary, said that after working for four years in trying to establish a. Farmers’ Union  in North Leitrim, and after encountering many difficulties and disappointments he was glad to be able to state that his work and teaching had not been in vain because farmers all over the area were beginning to take a lively interest in the Union. Old prejudices, went on the speaker, are dying fast, and the workers on the land have come to realise the importance of their task in producing the food supply of the Nation. They have also learned after long years of disillusionment that the promise of politicians are made to be broken. I don’t mean to say that all politicians are selfish or dishonest, but I am not overstepping the mark when I say that men who are highly educated and claim to be intensely  patriotic have time and again made promises which they must have known could not possibly be fulfilled. I have it from usually well informed sources that a General Election will take place inside of a few months, and farmers will need to be on the alert if they are not to be fooled all the time. Thousands upon thousands of pounds have been spent for the past few years in building new houses in the cities tod towns, and in providing water schemes for the smallest villages, but when the farmers of North Leitrim apply for a grant to have a corn mill erected no money can be spared to facilitate them. When farmers who have lands which do not require drainage petition the Minister fop Agriculture to give grants for reclamation plots on the old system their appeal is turned down. They must make drains no matter what about the potatoes. The matter boiled down to one important point—that the farmer was disregarded because he generally supported politicians who knew nothing about farming. The farmers were dictated to by officials who had only a theoretical knowledge of farming. The Labour Party were now coming forward asking the people to return them to power at the next Election and hinting that they had a brand new plan for putting the agricultural community on their feet. Judging by letters which had appeared in the daily papers recently from men who are prominent in the Labour movement, the Labour Party expects farmers to produce food below the cost of production. I believe a Labour Government would fix the price of milk going to creameries at about 4d per gallon.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT. The relatives and friends of the Late Monsignor Soden, Manorhamilton, wrote expressing gratitude for the Co. Council’s vote of sympathy, and hoped the note would be accepted in acknowledgment.

NO OBJECTION. A letter was received from the Department stating that the Minister in pursuance of the Local Authorities (Financial Provisions) Act, 1921, had consented to the Leitrim County Council borrowing by way of temporary overdraft for the purpose of providing temporarily for current expenses, a sum not exceeding £15,000.

PARISH COUNCIL’S VIEWS. Mr. J. P, Eames, Secretary, Ballaghameehan Parish Council, wrote that at a meeting of that body on the 13th Sept., the following resolution was proposed by Mr. Joe Fox and seconded by Mr. Jas. Connolly—“That the Parish Council view with alarm the increase in rates, and they consider the time has come to reduce the rates,. and give an opportunity to the ratepayers to pay.” The communication was noted.

17-10-1942. RUBBER SHORTAGE “MAY STOP ROAD TRANSPORT” Major Eastwood, Yorkshire Road Traffic Commissioner, told road transport operators at Halifax on Saturday that if the country continues to use rubber at the present rate road transport will be brought to a complete standstill. Passenger services would have to be cut to the bone, and all road services in Yorkshire might have to be stopped after 9 p.m.

17-10-1942. PERMITS FOR SIX COUNTIES. BRITISH GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCEMENT. DRASTIC. REGULATIONS. STATEMENTS IN WESTMINSTER AND STORMONT. An important announcement regarding the control of emigrants into Northern Ireland from “Eire” and the reinstatement in employment after the war of demobilised soldiers was made in the British House of Commons on Thursday by Mr. Herbert, Morrison, Home Secretary. Mr.. Morrison said: ‘During the past two years there has been a considerable influx into Northern Ireland of persons normally resident elsewhere, and this influx is continuing to a considerable extent. “It has been decided to take power by a Defence Regulation to institute a system of control over persons who come to Northern Ireland from ‘Eire,’ Great Britain, or elsewhere, and to require such persons to furnish particulars as to their address and occupation.” “Subject to exceptions for children and persons in the service of the Crown, all British subjects who were not ordinarily resident in Northern Ireland on January 1, 1940, will be required if they desire to take up. residence there or to continue to reside there for longer than six weeks to obtain permits which will be issued on my behalf by the Ministry of Home Affairs in Northern Ireland. Unless there are security objections in individual cases, permits will be granted for so long as their services, are needed to applicants who are already in occupations and to those who in future come into Northern Ireland to take up work. “They will also be granted to those who ought to be allowed to remain there on compassionate or other special grounds.

“Each permit will bear a photograph of the holder, and will in all cases be issued for a period of six mouths or for the duration of the employment specified in the permit, whichever is the less. “These will be renewable on the same conditions as govern their issue. “Permit-holders will be required to notify the authorities of any change of address. The immediate objective of the schema is to deal with war conditions, but it is also contemplated that the scheme will be of value on the termination of hostilities for the purpose of facilitating the reinstatement in employment of demobilised men from Northern Ireland who join the Forces as volunteers. “At such a time it will be right to give to the demobilised volunteers, preference in the labour market of Northern Ireland over these newcomers, and for this purpose to have power to terminate the permits granted to persons who are in employment.

“It is, accordingly contemplated, that the scheme will be kept in existence for a reasonable time after the war and if the Defence Regulations should expire before the demobilised men have had reasonable opportunity of being absorbed into employment, it will, in the view of the Government, be right that the necessary legislation should be introduced in the United Kingdom Parliament for a temporary prolongation of the system.” Sir Hugh O’Neill-Can you say whether these Regulations will give power to deport people who have come in since Jan., 1940, and in respect of whom it is not thought desirable to give permits? Mr. Morrison.—Yes, there is no obligation on the Northern Ireland Minister of Home Affairs, acting for me, to grant a permit, and it can be withdrawn at any time. I am assured that the Minister for Home Affairs in Northern Ireland will be reasonable in the exercise of this power.

STORMONT ANNOUNCEMENT. A statement on similar lines was made by the Prime Minister, Rt. Hon. J. M. Andrews, in Stormont on Thursday afternoon, and was received with cheers. Mr. J. W. Nixon asked if the Prime Minister would continue the good work by restraining his Cabinet colleagues and other members from going to ‘Eire,’ sometimes in doubtful company?” The Prime Minister—I would remind the House that that was a statement made by the Secretary of State in the British Parliament and as a matter of courtesy I have read it to this House. I have nothing further to add.

24-10-1942. LISNASKEA POTEEN CASE. 23 GALLONS WASH SEIZED. FARMER TO SERVE THREE MONTHS. A farmer, who lives on a small mountain holding and has a wife and seven children, was granted a month at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, in order to get in his crop before serving a three months’ hard labour sentence imposed in connection with a poteen case. The defendant was James Wallace, of Carrowmaculla, Lisnaskea, who was charged by District-Inspector Smyth with having in his possession on 7th October at Carrowmaculla, twenty-three gallons of wash.

Sergeant Kirkpatrick, R.U.C., gave evidence that at 6.10 p.m. on 7th inst., in company with other police, he went to the dwelling house of the defendant to search for illicit spirits. In a bedroom off the kitchen, witness found a barrel containing twenty-three gallons of wash, the barrel being heavily covered with bags. Defendant was not present and witness went to where, he was working a mile away. On being told what the police had found and being asked for an explanation defendant, witness alleged, replied “It is mine. I am only a poor man and I suppose it will put me out of the place.” Witness, then brought him to the house and pointed out the illicit spirits be had found. Witness subsequently destroyed all the wash except the sample taken for analysis.

To Mr. Winslow, witness stated he agreed defendant lived in a very small farm up in the mountains and had a wife and seven children. When Mr. Winslow asked his Worship (Major T. W. Dickie, R.M.) to deal as leniently with the defendant as possible, District-Inspector Smyth said defendant had .been convicted and sentenced to four months’ imprisonment at Lisnaskea, on 10th December. 1927, for having in his possession a still and illicit spirits. Mr. Winslow—This unfortunate man lives on a very poor mountain farm. He had made the poteen and as a result he was now before the Court. He was married and had a lot of small children. In addition he had not got his crop saved. District-Inspector Smyth—It is all right, but he is not quite so innocent as he is made out to be. Our information is that he is making quite a lot out of illicit, spirits at the present time and that some of our visitors to this country have found out his dwelling house and are regular attenders.

His Worship said that having been convicted before defendant must have known perfectly well the risk he was running. In the circumstances he ordered a sentence of three months’ hard labour. On the application of Mr. Winslow, District-Inspector Smyth said he would not execute the order for defendant’s arrest for a month so that he could get his crop saved. Later, Mr. Winslow enquired if his Worship would substitute a monetary penalty which would be paid by some friends. His Warship refused the request stating that in these cases his iron rule was jail and so far as he was concerned he would not depart from that rule even if the defendant was ready to pay a £500 fine. It was the only way to stop it. He was sorry he could not accede to the request.

24-10-1942. SESSIONS ENNISKILLEN COURT CASES. Several appeals before Deputy Judge Ellison, K.C.,  at Newtownbutler Quarter Sessions on Tuesday resolved themselves into pleas for leniency and a reduction of the penalty. £60 FINE SUBSTITUTED. Mark Prunty, Drumany, Lisnaskea, appealed against sentence of three mouths’ imprisonment for harbouring 6cwt. of white flour for the purpose of unlawfully exporting it. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, said after the conviction the defendant pleaded guilty. He stated that he knew the flour was there, and he had nothing to do with it and that he would not tell who put it there. Judge—He pleaded guilty, and that is an end of it as far as I am concerned. Mr. Cooper—Since then it came to my knowledge through another source—in fact, a party called on me and informed me that they were the real smugglers, and asked me if I would get a penalty of £60 put on this man. They said they would pay the money. I believe the money is in Court. I told Mr. Murphy was prepared to do that. Mr. J. Murphy (for appellant)—I had to advise my client that, there was no case to come before the Court. He was charged with harbouring and admitted he saw the flour put in an outhouse and raised no objection. The Judge withdrew the order for imprisonment and. substituted a penalty of £60. A man immediately walked forward and paid the amount of the fine in notes.

24-10-1942. PRISON SENTENCE TO STAND. Philip Swift, Lisnashillinda, Newtownbutler, for whom Mr. Black appeared, appealed against sentence of four months’ imprisonment without hard labour for harbouring 14cwts. of sulphate of ammonia and 12 stones of flour for the purpose of exporting it. Mr. J. Cooper said that after keeping Swift under observation and seeing three military tracks moving in certain directions Sergeant Green went to Swift’s house and in a byre found two lots in which were the sulphate of ammonia and flour. Soldiers pointed this out as the stuff they had brought there. They were promised £2 for their work. Both soldiers were reduced in rank. It was a bad day for them. The R.M. gave Swift- 6 months’ imprisonment. Mr. Black appealed to him and he reduced it to five months, and he appealed again, and it was reduced to four months.

Mr. Black—There is a further appeal to-day. I advised my client to plead guilty, and I appeal on this boy’s behalf for the substitution of a monetary penalty in lieu of imprisonment. He is 25 years of age, was married about year ago and has one little baby. He lives with his mother and looks after the farm. His mother has 25 acres under tillage, and this boy is responsible for the saving and harvesting of the crops. There will be nobody to work unless he is made available. This is the first time he has been charged with any offence of this nature. Mr. Cooper—He has been fined for making illicit spirits. Mr. Black said the young man was in delicate health, and he handed in a certificate from Dr. Dolan showing that for two years he had been treating him for gastritis and complications. The co-defendant (another man charged in connection with the same offence) had only been fined.

October 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

10-10-1942. SIX-COUNTY DAIRY INDUSTRY. FARMERS’ RESENT MINISTRY’S ACTION. CLOSING OF CREAMERIES. “CHANGES HAD CREATED INDIGNATION ”

The Ministry would get far better and more successful results by acknowledging the education which the farmer had gained by experience, and consult him and secure his co-operation in their new schemes before touching them, said Mr. J. Johnston, secretary of the U.A.O.S., at the annual meeting of Creamery shareholders. Mr. Thos. McCaughey referred to the changes the Ministry was making in the dairying industry, not only in closing such a large number of creameries, but in upsetting the existing transport arrangements for milk suppliers. Milk will now have to be transported by lorry whereas previously 70 to 80 per cent of all the milk in Northern, Ireland was delivered by horse and cart.

Several suppliers present said they had notice from the Ministry to leave their milk at collection points over two miles from their house and away from the creamery, although, their house was only three-quarters of a mile from the creamery. It was unanimously agreed to leave, their milk at the point where they had always left it. Mr. J. Johnston, secretary, U.A.O.S., said the changes that were now being introduced into the industry by the Ministry had created a wave of indignation from farmers throughout the country. Inexperienced officials with little local knowledge of the country had marked out on a map the collection points where suppliers were to leave their milk and they had just heard some of the results. The same thing had happened all over the country.

It had been stated that farmers approved of the scheme because there had not been any protest, but the farmer has learned that if he dared to protest his milk would not be paid for. In his opinion the new transport arrangements to be carried out under the Ministry’s control would require a very large increase in the amount of petrol used, and would ultimately cost a great deal more. The petrol increase was a matter for the Petroleum Board, but the increased cost would have to be paid by the farmer.

With regard to the closing down of 60 creameries in Northern Ireland at 1st October, Mr. Johnston said, it had always been the view of the practical dairyman that the earlier in the morning the milk could be collected at the farm, and the nearer to the depot or creamery at which the milk was to be treated, the better the quality of the milk to be delivered to the consumer. They were told the whole scheme was intended to process the milk at present going to the creameries to make it suitable for the liquid milk market. By closing two-thirds of the creameries the distance to the creameries retained for treatment was greatly extended. The larger quantity to be treated took much more time, and the new system meant that milk would be collected from some points up to 3 o’clock and later.

10-10-1942. NO LICENCE FOR DANCE HALL. “EXCUSE ME ” DANCES A MENACE. Objections were made to the renewal of the licence for dances at Jamestown Hall by Sergeant John McGrath, Drumana, at Carrick-on-Shannon; District Court when the adjourned application of

Mr. John Gaffney, one of the trustees, came before the fortnightly (District Court) for the renewal of the licence.  Last year they got 12 dances and the hours were from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m. and the rows did not start until 1-30 or 2 a.m., and accordingly this year they wished to curtail the hours to 1 o’clock. Continuing the applicant said that the committee, tried to settle the row and keep the opposing parties separated but the crowd was so big it was impossible to handle them. There were dances held in August and September and there were no rows at them. He asked for 12 dances 8 p.m. to l a.m.

Sergeant John McGrath, Drumana, said that unless the Guards were present the parties in attendance came to blows, the committee took no action to prevent disorderly scenes and law abiding citizens had to pay for admission while the disorderly crowd were sent out free tickets. Witness said that he saw the free tickets himself being sent out to the disorderly crowd. Sergeant Gallagher said arguments developed in the hall and caused people to crowd around the hall. He had warned the committee not to have “excuse me” dances, as they cause trouble, and there was not a dance, on the occasion of the row, but was an “excuse me.” Mr Keane said that on the evidence of the Sergeant he had no hesitation in refusing the application. Had the hall been governed by a proper committee he would grant the application.

17-10-1942. “BRAINWAVE” SCHEME RETURNS TO AID RED CROSS. It was reported at the meeting of County Fermanagh Committee of Agriculture on Saturday that the amount of money raised in the .Six Counties for the month of August on behalf of the Red Cross. Agricultural Fund in the scheme initiated by Fermanagh of 1d in the £ on cattle passing through the grading centre was £1,111 8s 11d and for the month of July the total raised from the milk deductions (also suggested by Fermanagh) was £188 18s 0d.

Mr. H. A. Porter said he had meant the scheme to include pigs. Major W. O. Nixon (chairman) said the scheme had been satisfactory so far, but if they took the percentage of people that really subscribed to the fund it was very disappointing. Mr. J. N. Carson—It is not brought to their notice. If it is brought to their notice they pay at once.The Chairman said it was printed on the cards. Fermanagh had the highest percentage of any county in the North. Although the fund was doing well, it could do better. Mr. J. E. Fawcett, J.P., thought if it were printed in red ink on the cards it would emphasise it better. Chairman—I think the scheme was a brain-wave of the people on this Committee who suggested it.

17-10-1942. BISHOP MAGEEAN BLESSES NEW CHURCH. The Catholics of the pariah of Aghagallon, three miles from Lurgan, went to Mass in their new £20,000 church for the: first time on Sunday. On Thursday last the Bishop of the Diocese, Most Rev. Dr. Mageean, had solemnly blessed .and dedicated the building, but on Sunday he formally opened the new edifice! It was a day of celebration in the parish, and everywhere there were manifestations of joy, practically every Catholic house in the district displaying Papal flags. The front of the new building was decorated with streamers of Papal colours. Right Rev. Mgr. Dean O’Hagan, P.P., V.G., celebrated High Mass, and Rev. A. Ryan, D.Ph., D.D., preached. Very Rev. J. Connelly, P.P., thanked the subscribers

17-10-1942. KINAWLEY ROAD NEEDS REPAIRS. At Enniskillen Rural Council meeting Mr. J. R. Crawford moved that the Council repair the old road in Drumbinnis and Corracrawford between Kinawley and Florencecourt. Ten or eleven ratepayers he said had their farms alongside this road which was in a very bad condition. Mr. W, Kelly said he had been informed that it was impossible to use this road. One man had two carts broken on it within two months. The county surveyor (Capt. Charlton) said the road was not in as bad a condition as stated. However, financial provision had been made for it in the estimates. After further discussion it was decided to leave the matter in the hands of the County Surveyor.

17-10-1942. “TYRANNY OPERATING AGAINST MINORITIES’’ BRITISH M.P.s AND STORMONT. Two M.P. in the British House of Commons on Tuesday said that tyranny was operating against minorities in the Six Counties and that there was ’disgraceful discrimination” against Catholics. Mr. McGovern (I.L.P.), when the Prorogation of Parliament Bill was considered in Committee, moved the rejection of a clause dealing with the duration of the Northern Ireland House of Commons, and, urging an election there, said there was overwhelming opposition to the Northern Government taking dictatorial powers over Belfast City Council. Unionists have told me that the Government should be purged of certain elements and undergo a drastic change. “Three or four hundred people are interned there—some without charge or trial for over five years—-and many believe that they are prisoners because of malicious and political intolerance. Tyranny is operating against minorities I there.’’

Mr. Stokes (Lab.) said: “There is disgraceful discrimination against Catholics in Northern Ireland. When six young men were charged with shooting a Belfast policeman, the Government refused to have a single Catholic on the jury. That Government is not fit to carry on.” The amendment was rejected by 220 votes to 6, and after ,a further amendment by Sir Richard Ackland (Ind.) to prolong Parliament for six months instead of 12 had been rejected, the Bill was read a third time.

17-10-1942. LADY SEARCHER AT BALLYSHANNON. Customs searches on the Belleek border have been intensified. Train and bus passengers are all searched—a practice hitherto unknown in that area. A lady searcher has been appointed in Ballyshannon and she was on duty for the first time last week at all the trains. On Saturday evening she carried out a search of all the lady passengers on the last bus leaving Ballyshannon. On both sides there is much greater Customs activity at all posts but the number of seizures from ordinary travellers are comparatively few.

17-10-1942. CLONES COUNCIL FINANCES.  At a special meeting of Clones Urban Council held on Friday night for the  purpose of considering the council’s finances it was unanimously decided to raise a loan of £2.000 by temporary borrowing by way of overdraft accommodation for the months of October-November to enable the payment of arrears of loans to the Commissioners of Public Works and to their treasurers.

17-10-1942.TO LET OR SELL. Farm OF 100 ACRES, good 2 story slated Dwelling-house (with hot and cold water) (Calor Gas}; splendid Office houses, all in good repair, about 1 mile from Irvinestown. The above place can be let for a number of years, with 70.acres if required.—F. SCALLON, Moynaghan, Irvinestown.

17-10-1942.70 PER CENT. OF OAT CROP HARVESTED. FERMANAGH FARMERS’ GOOD WORK. Despite severe harvesting conditions experienced this year, seventy per cent, of the 1942 oat crop has been cut and stacked in County Fermanagh, while ninety per cent. has already been cut stated Mr. W. T. McClintock, B. Agr., War Executive Officer, at a meeting of the County Fermanagh Agricultural Committee in Enniskillen on Saturday afternoon. He said the farmers had, in spite of adverse conditions, done a remarkable job and .their work had been heroic. One man had cut twelve acres of oats with hooks.

At the present time, he said, there were in operation in the county 150 tractors and ploughs, 72 disc harrows, 88 binders, 46 mobile threshing mills, and, in addition, hundreds of horses. Labour, which had been one of their chief problems in the past, would not now be such a problem owing to machinery which had been set up by the Government to direct men to the land and remain on it. Voluntary labour, which had been so successful in other counties, had not been a success in Fermanagh, and in this respect there would remain, a stain on the county which, it was hoped, would be wiped out by an improvement in the matter next year.

The new Tillage Order had been issued, and .farmers had been asked for an increased effort. Subsidy would be paid on four crops in the coming season, i.e., wheat, rye, potatoes and flax. Mr. John Graham complained of the price allowed for potatoes, contending that after the £10 per acre subsidy and the £3 15s 0d per ton fixed price were added together the return did not compare favourably with that received by the “Eire” farmers.

Mr. F. Doherty thought that the reason was to be found in that the price was the same as that fixed, for the English crop. Mr. Graham said farmers in Northern Ireland were not getting a fair deal in this respect. He added that in “Eire’’ the price given for potatoes was £8 per ton. They were not worth digging at the price now fixed in Northern Ireland. Mr. J. O. Rhynehart, of the Ministry of Agriculture, who was pressed for an explanation as to the discrepancy in prices stated he was not in a position to state what the prices were in another part of the country, but pointed out that in ‘Eire’ the scarcity of manures would possibly result in a poorer crop, so that in the end the return per acre in Northern Ireland might be higher. Mr. Graham – I think that is not an answer. Mr. Doherty said that in country places potatoes were not worth moving at £3 15a per ton.

Mr. A. Wilson—Better do away with the potato crop. Mr. McClintock objected to the question as to the price paid in “Eire” stating they were not concerned with it. Mr. J. N. Carson, J.P.—Indeed we are concerned with it. Mr Graham (to the Secretary) — Yes, so, I am not going to let you away with that. We are concerned if a better price is paid across the Border in the Free State. Mr. Graham then spoke of the number of fat cows, which were going across into “Eire,’’ where a better price was being paid than at home. Major W. G. Nixon, D.L., chairman, said he was sure Mr. Rhynehart would bring their views on these two questions before the price fixing authorities.

Mr. J. E. J. Fawcett, J.P., voiced the appreciation of the farming community at the efforts of Mr. McClintock and his staff in promoting the tillage drive in the county. It had been a difficult period but the farmers had come through fairly well on the whole, and the position was much more satisfactory than anyone could have imagined earlier in the season. Mr. J. R. Hamilton, J.P., stated Mr. McClintock did a wonderful job of work, and the farmers had scored a wonderful achievement. Supporting, Mr. Graham said he was still of the opinion, that the Ministry had given the farmers an unfair deal as regards the potato crop. He requested Mr. Rhynehart to convey to the Ministry the Committee’s expression of thanks to their officials. Mr. Rhynehart said he would be delighted to do so. In reply, Mr. McClintock said the farmers of Fermanagh had responded promptly to the appeal for more tillage, and it was only in a very odd instance that the officials encountered any difficulty.

17-10-1942. MINUTES AMENDMENTS. WAR BONUS FOR RELIEVING OFFICER. Mr. James Murphy objected to the signing of the minutes of Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday on the ground that they stated that an increase in war bonus be granted to Mr. P. MacManus, reliving officer, to bring the grant under this heading up to 5s a week. Mr. Murphy said his proposal on the last Board day was to increase Mr. MacManus’s war bonus by 5s a week which would bring the grant up to 6s 6d a week.  Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., chairman, stated he had the entry in his book which corresponded to what Mr, Murphy now said. Mr. J. Brown, cleric, said he understood Mr. MacManus was being treated in the same way as Mr. Fee, another relieving officer had been dealt with—i.e., an increase of 3s per week, half payable by the Board and half by the Rural Council.

Mr. Murphy said that what really happened was Mr. Beatty proposed 10s a week, and he seconded. Mr. Thornton proposed. 3s and that was why he (Mr. Murphy) had proposed 5s a week. Mr. J. Beatty, J.P.—I understood the 5s proposal was passed. Mr; James Burns said his recollection of what happened was that the bonus be made up to 5s a week as the Clerk had stated in the minutes. Mr. C- McKeown—Didn’t the Ministry sanction 10s a week for a nurse? Didn’t the ferryman get 10s? I do not see why the Ministry should object to it. Clerk—It is not a question of that at all—it is a case of the minutes being correct. That now makes the bonus a total of 6s 6d per week? Mr. Murphy—Yes. Mr. Beatty—I would like to know why he was only allowed 6s 6d. Clerk—That was the Board’s decision. Mr. Beatty — That was nothing to allow any man. Mr. McKeown—It would buy matches. The minutes were amended as Mr. Murphy suggested.

17-10-1942. GAVE CAR ON LOAN—LICENCE SUSPENDED FOR YEAR. Fines of 40s and costs with suspension of licence for twelve months were imposed on Patrick McGovern Grayport, Belcoo, user of the vehicle, and John McGale, Tattysallagh, Clanabogan, Omagh, owner, when at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday is was proved that McGovern was found using the car which was covered with owner driven insurance only. Constable McKimm was the police witness. McGale said McGovern asked him for the loan of the car and witness acceded to the request. Mr, R. A. Herbert, LL.B., for McGovern, said the latter had walked into a trap. Major Dickie, R.M. (to McGale)—What right have you to give your car and petrol to anyone to drive round the country? He told me he would put the petrol in to do the job. I was always allowed petrol to go to my work.

£10 FINE ON IRVINESTOWN MAN. FALSE REPRESENTATION CHARGE. At Irvinestown Petty Sessions, on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., James Keys, of Glenall, Irvinestown, was charged with having on 22nd December, 1941, for the purpose of obtaining a supplementary pension for himself under the Unemployment Assistance Act, made a false representation that, during the seven days up to and including the 18th Dec., 1941, he had not earned more than 5s, whereas during this period he was employed by Messrs. Courtney, Ltd., I, Shipquay Place, Derry, at an average daily wage of 6/11d. The case had been brought at the last Irvinestown, Court but was dismissed without prejudice. Alan McCullagh, an official of the Assistance Board, gave evidence that he received an application from defendant for a supplemental pension on 31st Dec., 1940. He stated that he was in receipt of 10s old age pension and had stock of about one dozen hens. Later defendant wrote to him asking him if he could do something about placing him in employment and witness referred him to the Ministry of Labour.

William Henry Howe, another official, said that on the 26th May he told defendant that information had come into the possession of the Board that he had been employed with Messrs. Courtney and witness gave defendant the dates. Defendant made the following statement: “I was never employed by Messrs. Courtney and have done no work since ceasing to be employed by Mr. Hermon of Necarne Castle, Irvinestown. I am not living on a holding and get no privileges from the owner of the house where I now live. My son Irvine does no work of any kind.’’ Witness identified defendant’s signature on a document produced. John Charles Burkey, of the firm of Messrs. Courtney, said defendant was employed as a labourer by his firm from the 2nd December 1941, till 20th December, 1942. For the week ending 18th Dec., 1941, defendant was paid £2 7s 6d. The week prior to that, he was paid £2 9s 7d and the week before that £1 7s 4d. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, M.P. (defending)’ —Did you pay the defendant?—I paid a “J. Keys.” When Desmond Mahon was called as a witness and did not appear, Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, who prosecuted, said he would ask for a warrant for his arrest if necessary.

Mr. Ferguson submitted that he was entitled to a direction on the grounds that the prosecution had not identified defendant as the man, but his Worship ruled against him on this point. Defendant swore that he got a supplementary pension first about the end of 1940 and drew it from then until the 31st October, 1941, when his book was taken away and kept till 18th December. During that time he had to go and look for some work. He worked for a week and left on the 11th December. Before he went into employment he actually wrote to the authorities and told them he was going to apply for a job. After he had worked for almost three weeks he had to give up. From December, 1941 he had been in receipt of a supplementary pension. He was not working for the week ending 18th December and did not earn more than 5s during that week. There were any amount of Keys in that country besides defendant. Mr. Cooper—You don’t mind telling a little falsehood now and again, do you? No, never to my knowing. Defendant added that he signed his name that he never worked with Messrs. Courtney while he was getting the pension. Mr. Ferguson said he did not see any particularly hidden fraud in the case. Defendant had written to the Labour Exchange and called three times. His Worship said that during the week for which defendant had been prosecuted he thought it had been proved beyond any reasonable doubt that he had actually earned the sum of £2 7s 6d. He imposed a fine of £10 and £2 2s costs, and allowed defendant-two months to pay.

17-10-1942.CARDINAL MacRORY AND THE WAR. PLEA FOR NEGOTIATED PEACE. ADDRESS AT MAYNOOTH. His Eminence Cardinal MacRory, speaking at the annual distribution of prizes in Maynooth College on Tuesday, pleaded for a negotiated peace. He said: – On various occasions I have expressed my hope for a negotiated peace, because I believed that only in this way is there any hope of peace with justice. I am convinced of that more than ever, seeing that cruel feelings are arising on both sides and prisoners are being put in chains. “If the war is fought to a finish,’’ said his Eminence, “there may possibly be a stalemate owing to utter exhaustion on both sides, but if either side win there will be a peace, not of justice, but of vengeance which will but sow the seeds sf future wars.” The Cardinal, continuing, said:—”I am not so foolish as to imagine that anything I can say will have any effect. However, I feel it a duty to say something.

17-10-1942. ENNISKILLEN BOARD AND QUESTION OF REPAIRS. When an account from a local garage proprietor for repairs to the ambulance came before Enniskillen Board of Guardians on Tuesday for payment, Mr. J. Brown, Clerk, said Mr. J. Cathcart, the ambulance driver, was not prepared to certify some of the items. Mr. Cathcart said some of the items were not in his book in which he kept a record of all repairs to the ambulance. The explanation was this: On 15th, January last Mr. Barton’s man was employed to bring a patient into the Hospital in this ambulance, he (Mr. Cathcart) being out at the time in the other ambulance. An accident happened to the ambulance in charge of Mr. Barton’s (the garage proprietor) driver. On one occasion since it would not start. He thought himself these repairs were made necessary by the accident. The ambulance never had been in order since. It would not charge until it was driven at 35 miles per hour—a speed too high for a vehicle of the kind, it should start charging at at least 20 m.p.h. The repairs were, therefore, in his opinion chargeable to the insurance company. He had some of the items of the account in his book.

Mr, Murphy—Do you keep an account as well as Mr. Barton? Mr. Cathcart—Everything I get is kept in my book. Mr. Murphy—Mr. Barton’s account does not correspond with yours? Mr. Cathcart — No sir. Mr. Murphy—Very well, I would not pay him. Mr. Beatty-Was it sent back to Mr. Barton? Mr. Cathcart—No; it is here for payment. Mr. Beatty—Can’t you send it back? Mr. Cathcart—No; it is a matter for the Board. Mr. Kelly—Mr. Brown will ask Mr. Barton, about it and get the thing squared up. Mr. Murphy—Did the insurance company pay for the accident? . Clerk—We have not got any bill for it anyway.

Mr. Murphy—The ambulance should be put right and the insurance company should be informed accordingly. Mr. Beatty—Mr. Barton’s attention should have been drawn to it. Mr. Murphy—That ambulance is giving far too much trouble here and there is something wrong somewhere. There has always been trouble with it since it came here. Mr. Beatty—When you found it not right, why didn’t you draw his attention to it? Mr. Cathcart—I am tired drawing his attention to it. The Chairman, (Hon. C. L. Corry) was proceeding to the next business when Mr. Murphy said: We are here as representatives of the ratepayers; the ratepayers’ money is being paid away and we are entitled to know what it is being paid for. I am not at all satisfied. Write to the insurance company and tell them the ambulance is not giving satisfaction. Mr. Beatty — Draw Mr. Barton’s attention to it. Chairman — The Clerk is going to do that. Mr. Murphy—The insurance company is the body.

17-10-1942.ILLEGAL USE OF COUPONS. STATEMENTS IN BELLEEK CASES. CHARGES AGAINST MERCHANTS. Eight summonses alleging the illegal use of coupons were heard by Major Dickie, R.M., at Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday. John Stephens, draper, Main Street, Belleek, and who also has a business in Ballyshannon, was summoned (1) for having, at Belleek between 7th and 16th March, 1942, without the authority of a licence granted by the Board of Trade and for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods, made use of rationed documents or coupons other than those issued to him or those surrendered to him; (2) had in, his possession, with intent to obtain goods, rationed documents or coupons issued to another person; and (3) using for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods, rationed documents, or coupons which did not bear the name, address and National Registration number of the person or persons to whom they were issued. Michael McGrath, Main, Street, Belleek, was charged with aiding and abetting in the commission of these offences. Thomas Daly, grocer, Main St., Belleek, was charged with transferring rationed documents or coupons, and Michael McGrath was summoned for aiding and abetting. Mr. R. A. Herbert, LLb., defended.

Mr. J. P. Getty, solicitor for the Board of Trade, who brought the prosecutions, said his instructions were that Daly had quite a number of customers who left their ration books with him. His Worship would remember that certain ration books which were issued in the first instance with regard to food had 26 margarine coupons in them. Those coupons were not valid and were not used. At the 1st June, 1941, when clothing was rationed for the first time, these: margarine coupons were then to be used for the purpose of acquiring clothing. Their case was that Daly, having got all these margarine coupons from his customers he transferred them to Stephens or McGrath (who managed Stephens’ shop in Belleek), or both. If he did so it was an offence.

He (Mr. Getty) was going to call a number of witnesses to prove that they left these margarine coupons with Daly and gave him no instructions or authority to transfer them to Stephens or anybody else and they did not use them themselves. A quantity of these coupons was sent to Stephens’ wholesaler in Belfast, Messrs. Moffitt and Co., whose agent would tell the Court that 500 coupons were delivered by Stephens to him in return for goods to be supplied. Having got those coupons, the practice was for Messrs. Moffitt to send them to the Post Office and they in turn sent them to the Board of Trade, When they got to the Board of Trade these margarine coupons were found in the bundle, and this started the inquiries. Miss Rosalie Aiken, chief assistant in the Food Office, Irvinestown, gave evidence that ration books containing margarine coupons were issued to a number of people, whom she named.

Sadie Agnes Keown said that Daly was her grocer, and she received .ration books for herself, and three daughters which she gave to her grocer. She did not use the margarine coupons, but her husband used some and bought clothes in Stephens’ using the margarine coupons for the purpose. William Dolan said he never purchased clothing with the margarine coupons and did not authorise his grocer to hand them on. Ernest W. Hall, area manager, of the Board of Trade, Belfast, said the coupons came to him from the Post Office and included margarine coupons. Statements made to Sergt. J. D. Cochrane by Stephens, McGrath and Daly having been read,

McGrath gave evidence and said he could not say when the coupons came into his establishment. He was not given the particulars of the coupons before the prosecution came on, and consequently he was unable to make any inquiries. Sadie Keown’s, husband left in margarine coupons in exchange for clothes, and whatever he handed in would be sent to Moffitt. Dolan’s father and also Daly bought clothes from him. He had some difficulty in getting any regulations and ultimately got part of the regulations from a traveller. He had written five times previously to the Board of Trade and never got an answer from them. So far as he could, he carried out all these relevant regulations. John James Dolan said he did the buying for all of his family, and used his son’s coupons too.

His Worship dismissed the charge against Daly and also the charge against McGrath for aiding and abetting him. Regarding the other case, he said he found it fully proved. He fined Stephens 20/- and 10/- costs on each of the charges of making use of rationed documents other than those issued to him and using  them for the purpose of obtaining rationed goods. McGrath was fined £10 and £3 3s 0d costs for aiding and abetting in the commission of the first offence, and 120/- and three guineas costs for aiding, and abetting in the second offence. The other summonses against Stephens and McGrath were dismissed without prejudice.

17-10-1942. £5 FINE AT BELLEEK. HAD FIVE STONES OF TWENTY SIX COUNTY SUGAR. £5 FINE AT BELLEEK. James Johnston, Aghamuldoney, County Fermanagh, was charged at Belleek Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M., with having on 28th May knowingly harboured five stones of sugar imported from the 26-Counties into the Six Counties with intent to evade the payment of Customs duty thereon. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, told the court that in the defendant’s house the police found five stones of sugar, which was of 26-County origin. Mr. P. T. Flanagan, LL.B., who pleaded guilty, in mitigation of the sentence said that if it were possible for defendant to pay duty on the sugar he would very willingly have done so. In certain seasons of the year defendant had special work to do on his farm. He could not get any labour in the Six Counties, and had to get a man from the Free State, This man had no ration card and during the time his application was in for one, by arrangement between him and the defendant they brought over this sugar, for which they paid 5/3d a stone in the Free State, whereas it was obtainable in the .Six Counties for 3/6d per stone. It was really a matter of trying to get over a personal inconvenience. Saying that he did not think it was a bad case, his Worship imposed a fine of £5.

£15 FINE FOR SMUGGLING SPIRITS. John Farry, Monendogue, was charged of knowingly harbouring ten bottles of Irish whiskey, one bottle of Sherry, and one bottle of port wine imported from the 26 Counties into the Six-Counties! Mr. R. A. Herbert, L.L.B., (defending) said that defendant lived with his father and brother on a small farm on the mountain side. His father was an invalid, over 80 years of age; and they were constantly afraid of him dropping off when they would not have any stimulants to give him. Defendant said he hold the police it was for his brother in Belfast. That was not true. None of the local people would sell him (defendant) a bottle of whiskey. Some of the whiskey had been in the house since Christmas- He collected it from time to time and brought it over with him. Mr. Cooper-—-Were you going over the Border on different days and bringing it back—accumulating it?—-No. His Worship—There’s no proof he was dealing in it on a very large scale. I think £15 would meet it.

LORRY DRIVER FINED AT IRVINESTOWN. “The lorry came round Flack’s corner 40 at m.p.h. without slackening speed.” “My lorry is governed down to 25 m.p.h.” These two conflicting statements of evidence, the first one by a constable and the second by the driver of the lorry were given at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday when District Inspector P. Walshe summoned Charles McQuaid, of Drogan, for driving a motor lorry in Irvinestown on 7th Sept. without due care and attention and without reasonable consideration for other users of the highway. Constable McKimm proved the summons and was corroborated by Constable Bradley, neither of whom heard a horn sounded. Defendant said he sounded the horn and only accelerated when he got round the corner. His lorry was governed down to 25 m.p.h. Major Dickie, R.M., said the two constable were definite that defendant came round without due care and he imposed a fine of 10s and costs.

TWICE TORPEDOED MERCHANT NAVY MAN FINED £5. A wireless operator in the Merchant Navy, who, according to his solicitor, had been twice torpedoed and had also been in a tussle with the ‘Deutschland’ appeared at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., on a charge of being concerned in a fraudulent attempt at evasion of payment of Customs’ duty on two bottles of spirits, at Kesh, on 28th July, imported from “Eire” into Northern Ireland.

Defendant was Vincent Mahon, of Mill St., Irvinestown, and Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, said a Customs officer found defendant sitting reading a book in a third class carriage of the train. He asked defendant if he had any articles to declare and he did not reply. He then asked defendant, what he had in his pockets: and defendant produced. two camera films and said that was all he had got.

The Customs officer, proceeded Mr, Cooper, was very suspicious of defendant as this pockets seemed bulky and ordered him to stand up till he searched him, and found a bottle of whiskey in each of his trousers pockets. When asked why he did not declare the spirits defendant told the officer to “go to hell you and the spirits;” When asked to furnish proof he admitted he had not paid any duty and absolutely decline to recognise the Customs authorities in any way.  His Worship—In what way? Mr. Cooper-He said he did not recognise them. His Worship — A very unfortunate position, with two bottles of whiskey in his pockets.

Mr. E. C. Ferguson, LL.B., M.P., defending, said they admitted having the two bottles of whiskey. The circumstances were these Defendant was a wireless operator employed by the Marconi Company with the Merchant Navy. Since the outbreak of war he had been torpedoed twice and on one occasion had been in a tussle with the ‘Deutschland.’ As a result of these sea activities he had been invalided home at the end of July by the Company. He (Mr. Ferguson) was instructed by defendant that he had wanted these two bottles of whiskey to send to a friend of his. Defendant was a decent fellow who was now fit and ready to return to duty and was awaiting a call to his ship. Mr. Cooper said if defendant .had adopted a different attitude he would have been fined there and then. The duty on the spirits was £l 15s 5d. Mr. Ferguson said in the circumstances perhaps it was excusable. “I am asked,” he said, “to apologise for anything, that he did wrong. His Worship said defendant knew quite well he should not have done this. However, in view of his record he imposed a fine of £5.

SUNDAY CARTING DISAPPROVED. A meeting, under the auspices of the Six-Co. Farmers’ Union was held in the Townhall, Enniskillen on Saturday afternoon, when representatives from all over County Fermanagh attended. Addresses on the policy of the Union were given by Mr. H. Jamison, General Secretary ; Mr, J. H. Barbour, Organiser; Mr. Hughes. Farmers’ Union Insurance Company, and Rev. R. J. M‘Ilmoyle, Dervock. Resolutions were passed, viewing with apprehension the milk marketing scheme so far as payments were concerned and a unanimous expression of opinion was voiced against the carting of milk on Sundays. The main purpose of the meeting was the formation of new branches and progress in this direction was made.

FELLOW INTERNEE’S TRIBUTE TO CAHIR HEALY, M.P. By Frederick Bowman, Internee, Brixton Prison, London and 5, Bradley Place, Eastbank St., Southport; Lancashire, England.

TILL IRELAND UNITE IN PEACE

The years, untried, in prison passed,

Have made impressions sure to last,

Many are grim, but, I’ve a few

For which my gratitude are due.

One patriot I’m proud I’ve met

While tangled in the prison net,

Is CAHIR HEALY—always kind,

Whose noble heart and cultured mind

Inspires respect and strengthen all

Whose courage might incline to fall.

His fine example—smiles of cheer

Make prison walls less gloomy here

His shrewd remarks and sound advice:

Confer a boon beyond all price

On those whose prison .life he shades,

Smoothing their madness, easing cares.

His land and loved ones far away,

Are in his gentle thoughts all day.

But helping others makes him try

To keep suppressing any sigh.

A man of wit and worth and charm.

Sincere and steadfast, firm and calm;

To death for Ireland he would go—

This man whom I’m so proud to know.

Peace for the world is what I claim

And Healy’s object is the same.

His work for Ireland will not cease.

Till Ireland can unite in peace.

SIX-COUNTY VACANT SEATS. STORMONT REJECTS LABOUR MOTION. A motion by Mr. H. Midgley (Labour, Willowfield) at Stormont on Tuesday which asked that writs for vacant Parliamentary seats be issued not later than three months from date of vacancy was defeated by 24 votes to one. The  motion was described by the Minister of Agriculture as the most reactionary that had ever been brought.

 

1942. Fermanagh Herald.

19-9-1942. HILL-TOP MONUMENT TO COONIAN’S FAITH. NEW ST. JOSEPH’S CHURCH DEDICATED AND OPENED. CEREMONY BY THE RIGHT REV. MONSIGNOR KEOWN. Raising its beautiful Irish Romanesque outlines on the crest of a hill overlooking a valley wherein between two hills is hidden a poor rude structure of the Penal days, which it succeeds, the new St. Joseph’s Church, Coonian, Brookeborough, solemnly dedicated and opened on Sunday by Right Rev. Monsignor Dean Keown, P.P., Carrickmacross, Vicar Capitular of Clogher Diocese, will be a landmark in South Fermanagh. It will serve 180 families of that mountainous portion of Aughavea parish whose ancestors were driven to those hills from the rich plains below by the invader.

Possessed of little but a strong faith and perseverance, the people have survived and flourished. Nearly a thousand of them on Sunday stood proudly by the new St. Joseph’s looking down the vista of years to the beginnings of the little edifice whose walls are tottering with the weight of age in the Valley. .It was with them through their trials and the trials of their fathers, and though for the past half century its damp, sodden walls and unheated interior held little of comfort, it must be with not a little tinge of regret that they part company from that rude home of their faith which has been hallowed by the prayerful gatherings and worship of their ancestors.

DAWNING OF HAPPIER DAY. But the faith has conquered, through many trials and bitter persecution, in this district, and with the dawn of a happier day in which worship .may be public and in which, through hard work, the people have attained to a reasonable standard pf comfort and prosperity, it was only right that the ancient and true faith should once more have its centre in a worthy home on some crowning mount. In July, 1959, the great work was undertaken. In August of the following year the foundation stone was laid, and on Sunday the people saw more than three years of strenuous and self-sacrificing effort brought to a happy consummation.

THE NEW CHURCH. St. Joseph’s will accommodate over 500 people. It is designed in the Irish Romanesque style, with, a deep semi-circular apse and an imposing tower rising almost fifty feet on the Gospel side of the building. The magnificent site overlooks the wide sweep of valley between Coonian and Colebrooke. The building was designed, by Messrs. J. Donnelly and Sons, architects, Enniskillen, and was erected under their supervision by Father Patrick McQuaid, P.P. A very considerable amount of the labour required was given voluntarily by the parishioners, and the site was given free of all charge by Mr. Dillon, a parishioner who lives close by. The cost totalled about £7,000 of which most has already been paid. Owing to the restrictions caused by the war, it was not possible to provide altars, communion rails, seats and other furnishings or to complete the grounds about the church. These must await the end of the war.

AUGHAVEA PARISH IMPROVEMENTS. Since Father McQuaid’s appointment to the parish over nine years ago, he has completely reconstructed Brookeborough parish church and erected new schools there. These buildings are convenient to one another and surrounded by Church property. He has also been responsible for the provision of a new cemetery at Brookeborough and of a new cemetery adjoining the present Coonian Church. This cemetery was solemnly consecrated on Monday by Dean Keown. Father McQuaid’s other works include the reconstruction of the parish priest’s residence and also the curate’s residence at Coonian.

THE OFFICIATING CLERGY. Sunday’s ceremony commenced at. 11 a.m. Assisting the Vicar Capitular at the dedication and opening ceremony were Very Rev. E. O’Hart, P.P., Tempo, as deacon; and Very, Rev. F. J. Donnelly, P.P., Lisnaskea, as sub-deacon, with Rev; T. J. Meegan, C.C., Enniskillen, as master of ceremonies. Dean Keown performed the ceremony of opening the church, with a key presented to him by Mr. Donnelly. Solemn High Mass, at which Dean Keown presided, was celebrated by Rev. P. McGloin, chaplain, Monaghan County Hospital, formerly curate at Coonian, with Father O’Hart as deacon, Father Donnelly sub-deacon and Father Meegan master of ceremonies. Also present were Father McQuaid and Rev. J. McMahon, C.C., Coonian. .

STATIONS OF THE CROSS ERECTED. After Mass, the Stations of the Cross were blessed and erected by Dean Keown, assisted by Father Meegan, and the ceremonies, which lasted almost three hours concluded with Solemn Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament imparted, by the Vicar Capitular. The music of the Mass, the Stabat Mater and the hymns, for Benediction were provided by the combined choirs of Coonian and Clogher, under Sisters Collette and Ephraim, of Clogher Convent.

PASTOR’S TRIBUTE. Addressing the people after Mass, Father McQuaid said, it was providential that a very great friend of Dr. Owens, a Bishop of Clogher who first saw the light in Coonian, should in the person of Dean Keown perform that solemn ceremony. The Church was very beautiful, but to his mind nothing was too good for the people of Brookeborough, who had been magnificent in their support. He had not paid one penny interest on money since he began the building. On one Monday morning he had not a penny piece, and he was wondering if he would, have to borrow money out of the bank, but by Saturday he had almost enough to pay the workmen. All work was done by direct labour. It was a privilege to have Monsignor Keown with them to perform the ceremony. Monsignor Keown knew some amongst the congregation, whom he had also known long ago in the spring-time of life when he was a curate in Coonian. Father McQuaid thanked all who had assisted in the erection of the Church, particularly Mr, Donnelly, the architect, who had designed that very beautiful church. It was well heated and would be comfortable for the people.

MONSIGNOR KEOWN. Monsignor Keown said he regarded it as a great privilege and a very solemn duty to assist in the dedication of this beautiful building to the honour and glory of God. It was just 54 years since he celebrated Mass in Coonian. It was his first curacy, .His was a very short stay, there, but it was long enough to learn to love and admire the people. Many, changes had taken place since, but there was no change in the strong faith of Coonian. Fifty years ago the old church was not suitable for its purpose, but circumstances were against the people. Theirs was a struggle for a bare existence, and church buildings and schools had to be put aside. A happier day had come and they had now a church that was a joy and delight to the district, the parish and, indeed, the whole diocese. Their late Bishop looked forward with great joy and happiness to performing that ceremony in Coonian. God had ordained otherwise, but he was sure Dr. McKenna was amongst those looking down on their ceremony and uniting with them in their day of joy. Dr. Owens, too, he was sure, was united with them in their happiness. He had been associated with the late Dr. Owens for many years and knew of his very deep interest iii the people of his native Coonian.

Their Church would be a rallying-place for the people for all time. It had been opened and the lamp had been lit before the adorable Sacrament on the Altar. It was how a centre for worship in the district, and he was sure, the people would take an interest and delight in going there and thanking God for the graces and blessings bestowed on them. The church was God’s own house. He loved it. “He loved the beauty of His house and the place where His glory dwelleth.” He loved this Church, which was a new proof of the love of the people of Coonian for God, and He would abide there and bless them and their children and their children’s children for the great work they had done. The Monsignor very warmly congratulated the people, and hoped the people would always remain the good and faithful Catholics they had in the past always shown themselves to be.

19-9-1942. JAIL FOR CYCLE THEFT. CASE AT CLONES COURT. At Clones District Court, on Wednesday of last week, before District Justice Lavery, Thomas Clarke, labourer, Muff, Cootehill, Co. Cavan, was charged with the larceny of a bicycle, value £12, the property, of Thomas, McFadden, Cornasuaus, Co. Cavan on September 14. Defendant was remanded in custody from a special court, and admitted the offence. Supt. B. O’Boyle, Bailieboro’ gave evidence. Accused was sentenced to three months imprisonment.

19-9-1942. BUTTER FOR EXPORT. George Scott, Crivelea, Clones, was fined £7 4s for bringing to a place for export a quantity of whiskey and 21b. of butter at Clones on July 20. Defendant pleaded guilty. Mr. J. B. Murphy (solicitor for defendant) said his client was not normal, and his clergyman had written to the Revenue Commissioners about him. When he came in to see him (Mr. Murphy) he burst into tears. Defendant was unfit to work. He could not pay the fine sought for and was not fit to go to jail. The Justice imposed the fine as stated, which was the penalty sought fo.

19-9-1942. CHEMIST’S ASSISTANT SUMMONED. UNINSURED MOTOR BICYCLE. . A young chemist’s assistant, John Douglas Irwin, of 42, Belmore St., Enniskillen, was charged at Enniskillen petty Sessions on Monday with using a, motor cycle on 13th August last, without being insured. Constable Walker said that defendant produced a certificate of insurance which had expired on 31st July. Defendant stated that he knew it was out of date but he had only gone for a short run to test the bicycle. Mr. J, Hanna, for defendant, said that defendant had not been using the bicycle for some time, and he intended to sell it and forgot to take out, the insurance. Major Dickie, R.M., imposed a fine of £4 and 2s costs, with automatic suspension of defendant’s licence for 12 months.

26-9-1942. JOTTINGS. Boho Sports.—Boho Sports Committee passed a resolution thanking the following who sent cash and prizes to the sports Mrs. McKinstry, Tullyholvin P.E.S.; Mrs. Rose A. Magee, Cornerk P.E.S.; Mr. J. J. Maguire, Derrygonnelly.

Monea Sports.—Postponed because of unfavourable conditions, Monea sports will be held this Sunday at Tullynargy. There has been a good entry, it is under-stood for the North Fermanagh Donkey Derby, an innovation which should prove a most attractive item. There is a big supporting programme, including a football, challenge match.

COMING EVENTS. Sunday, 27th Sept. Ceilidhe, Killyrover Hall, Monea Sports at Tullymargy. Dance, Foresters’ Hall, Enniskillen. Dance, A.O.H. Hall, Arney. Sunday, 4th Oct.—Dance, Tullyholvin School.

26-9-1942. CO. FERMANAGH CIVIL DEFENCE SERVICES. A Civil Defence Mobile Reinforcement Column, paid a visit to Ballinamallard on Monday evening, consisting of Wardens, Ambulance, First Aid Party, Rescue Party and a section of the; National Fire Service. The column was under the command of Mr. J. Lusted, County Training Officer, and the air raid incidents were under the control of Mr. Cecil Taylor, Chief Warden and Controller, Enniskillen. The practice, which consisted of reporting of incidents, treatment and removal of casualties, firefighting by the N.F.S. and rescue from a three storey house of supposedly trapped casualties, was carried out under, extremely difficult conditions.

The practice was under the general supervision of Capt. W. R. Shutt, M.C., County Civil Defence Officer, and his deputy, Major J. A. Henderson. After the exercise all the C.D. services proceeded to the Archdale Memorial Hall where they, were addressed by the County Civil Defence Officer, who paid tribute to the keenness of the Ballinamallard Volunteers and to their Chief Warden.

10-10-1942. FROM MOUNTJOY TO CRUMLIN. BICYCLE THIEF SENTENCED AT ENNISKILLEN. “I may say that in every case of larceny of a bicycle I intend to impose imprisonment,” said Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. He was dealing with a charge of the larceny of a bicycle by Thomas McGovern, of no fixed address, the machine being the property of Desmond Leonard, Garvary. Sergt. Kerr, Letter, gave evidence that on the 25th Sept. defendant was brought to the barracks by an R.U.C. patrol and witness asked him where he got the bicycle he had in his possession. After caution defendant stated he left Enniskillen at 11 p.m. on the previous day to go to James Chambers’ house in the Tempo district. When he got to Garvary he went to the house of Cahil Leonard, and without being given authority took away a bicycle the subject of the present charge. He then proceeded to Chambers’ house and was admitted by Edward Chambers, who said the ball bearings of his (defendant’s) bicycle he had given Annie Chambers, his sister, were broken. Defendant added that he intended to take up a job at Pettigo and used Leonard’s bicycle to get there, intending to leave it back. Desmond Leonard said that on the 23rd Sept. he left his bicycle at home and missed it two days later. He gave nobody authority to take it away. He had known defendant through seeing him at dances. Defendant, on being asked if he wished to give evidence, refused to go into the witness box but said his own bicycle was still at Chambers’ house.

In reply to the R.M., Head-Constable Poots, who prosecuted for D.I. Walshe, said that on the 25rd Sept. defendant was coming out of Mountjoy Jail after doing six months for the larceny of cattle. He had another conviction for the larceny of a horse in the 26 Counties. The R.M.—You have had two previous convictions, You had no right to take this man’s bicycle and I can only regard it as ordinary larceny. Six months’ imprisonment: His Worship then made the remark quoted at the outset.

10-10-1942. £10 FINE ON FARMER. EXCESSIVE CLAIM FOR POTATO SUBSIDY. What he described as a moderate penalty of £10, with five guineas costs, was imposed by Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday in a case in which George Johnston, a young farmer, of Derrykeeghan, Enniskillen, was summoned by the Ministry of Agriculture for making an alleged false claim in respect of subsidy on his potato crop.

Mr. James Cooper Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, said defendant claimed for eight acres, whereas he only had 4 acres 3 roods under potatoes. The amount involved was £32 10s. Samuel Johnston, Government Inspector, produced a statement alleged to have been given him by defendant on 30th June in which he (defendant) said the claim was completed and signed by him on the 13th June, and posted to the Ministry of Agriculture. It was witnessed by Constable McCreevy. The alleged statement went on: “I must have been wrong in my evidence of the measurements. I own a field which is about five acres, but there was an acre or more in turnips. The remainder is planted with potatoes, except for a few drills of cabbage. The other field belongs to my mother, in which have potatoes planted. I reckoned it contained three acres I had a notion of putting in potatoes in the whole field belonging to myself, but the last amount of potatoes did not grow. I had to plant turnips.” Witness added that in consequence of very exaggerated claims the Ministry had found it necessary to institute proceedings.

In reply to Mr. Ferguson, defending, witness said most of the claims sent in were approximate, but it was unusual to find such discrepancies in this instance. He did not think it was unusual for farmers to measure their potato plots before sending in their claims. It was true to say there had been a severe drought in the months of May and June, and there had in consequence, been misses in the potato crop, but he had not heard of wholesale failures in fields. Mr. Corr, Ministry’s Inspector, gave evidence of measuring the plot in Derrykeeghan field (defendant’s property), and he arrived at 2a. 3r. There was a slight doubt, the benefit of which was given by his superior officer (Mr. Gillespie) to defendant, and it was altered to three acres. In the Ballydoolagh field the potato acreage was estimated at la. 3r. Mr. Gillespie corroborated. To Mr. Ferguson, he admitted there were slight discrepancies in most cases. Last year in addition to the police inspection report, there was a ten per cent check by the Ministry on subsidy claims. His Worship-You complain this was grossly exaggerated?

Witness—Yes. Defendant, in evidence said he owned the farm in Derrykeeghan, and he cultivated his mother’s land in Ballydoolagh. He understood that the Ordnance Survey map gave the area of the Derrykeeghan field as 5½ acres. In the Ballydoolagh field, which was 4½acress in extent, he estimated there were three acres of potatoes, which was the acreage, allowed by Mr. Ritchie, Agricultural Officer for the county when he inspected the corn crop. Part of the potato crop in Derrykeeghan failed, and he pulled out the tubers, knowing there would be no result, and sowed turnips. Questioned by Mr. Cooper, witness said he did not consider he was overpaid, subsidy on last year’s corn crop. The claim was accurate as far as he knew, or he would not have submitted it. Richard Crozier, surveyor, estimated that the total acreage under potatoes in the Derrykeeghan field was 2a 3r. l5p, and in the one at Ballydoolagh la. 3r. 19p a total of 4a. 2r.34p. The Derrykeeghan field was very deceptive, as the Ordnance Survey measurement were larger than the field now actually was. Mr. Ferguson submitted defendant did not know the claim was false, and that he had no intention of defrauding the Ministry. The Ministry’s inspectors, unable to measure every field they inspected, had to take their measurements from the Ordnance Survey.

His Worship said that apparently defendant had guessed the area of the two fields, but guessed in his own favour. It was quite clear he did not inform the Ministry about the potatoes not growing, and putting in the turnips as a substitute. Mr. Ferguson—I do not know that he would be entitled to inform them. The (the Ministry) give the subsidy whether the potatoes grow or not. One of the inspectors was rising to speak when his Worship remarked that some farmers who did not even bother to take out their potatoes, were paid £10 per acre by a generous Government. He did not say defendant, whom he believed was a good farmer, did that. He did not think defendant really realised what he was doing. He must, however, have known that he was making a claim he could not possibly substantiate. It was not a bad case, and the penalty he had in mind was not substantial. His Worship ruled as already stated.

10-10-1942. AMERICAN SOLDIER’S DEATH. LORRY AND “ PEEP ” COLLIDE. COURT SEQUEL. There was a sequel to a fatal accident at Silverhill, near Enniskillen, at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, when, arising out of an accident in which an American soldier lost his life, John J. Bannon, of Mountdrum, Lisbellaw, was charged with having driven a lorry without due care and attention.

Bannon had been driving a lorry laden with about four tons of stones from Blaney quarry on 8th August when he came into collision with a Peep (an American Army vehicle). As a result of injuries received in the collision one of the passengers in the Peep—an American soldier—died next day. The only evidence tendered for the Crown was given by Sergeant Henderson, inspector of public vehicles, and Constable. A. Corry; and Head-Constable Poots said that the accident had been reported to the American authorities with a view to having the other driver brought before their Court. Bannon said that as he came to the bend on the road his lorry was in second gear, travelling at a speed of between seven and ten miles per hour, and about I5 feet from the grass verge on his own side. He saw the Peep corning along and the accident happened suddenly. He thought the other vehicle had plenty of room to pass. Dismissing the charges on the merits, Major Dickie, P.M., said he was extremely sorry that the death of a member of the American forces occurred as a result of the accident, and he was sure, they all tendered their sympathy to his relatives. Mr. Isaac Copeland, K.C. (defending), said that Bannon felt it very much. His Worship—I am quite sure he docs. Head-Constable Poots also tendered sympathy on behalf of the police force.

10-10-1942. BROOKEBOROUGH COURT CASES “Most Inveterate Smuggler.” Owen Beggan, clothes dealer, of Mullinavale described by Mr. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, as a most inveterate smuggler on both sides of the Border, was, at Brookeboro’ Petty Sessions on Tuesday, fined £20 for harbouring with intent to evade Customs duties, prohibited goods, including two men’s serge suits, 9 pairs’ men’s woollen underpants, 9 pairs men’s braces, 1 shirt, 1 aluminium kettle, and 5 dozen razor blades. Defendant admitted purchasing the clothing in “Eire.”

10-10-1942. ASSAULT CHARGE. When James Maguire, labourer, Corrylongford, charged Charles Boyd, farmer, of Tattymickle, with assault, Boyd alleged Maguire was continually denouncing the English, and that, declared the I.R.A. had not shot enough policemen. He also alleged that Maguire refused to recognise a British court. He (Boyd) admitted striking him in self-defence, and his Worship ordered him to pay £1 compensation to Maguire. Maguire denied the allegations made by Boyd.

10-10-1942. ALL NIGHT VIGIL AT PUBLIC HOUSE. ENNNISKILLEN LICENSING CHARGE. An all-night vigil by police outside a public house in Enniskillen was described at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday, when Richard Johnston, publican, Market St., Enniskillen, was charged under the usual five counts with breaches of the licensing laws, and with failing to admit the police. Evidence was given by Sergt. Sherrard that at 12.45 a.m. on 26th Sept. when passing defendant’s licensed premises he heard the sound of voices speaking in a very low tone. He saw a light around the edge of the window blind at the bar and heard the sound of some liquid running. He knocked loudly on the door and shouted in through the letter box ‘‘Police on public house duty. Open up,” and heard the sound as if someone was walking on tiptoe. After that all was silent. Witness described how the police then kept the premises under observation all night and the demand for admittance to the premises was repeated at intervals. At 8.30 a.m. when he went into a house next door to the licensed premises he found a man in the kitchen and as a result of what the man told him he went to the rear yard and on examining the wall dividing the yard from the licensed premises he found fresh scrapes on the bricks on top of the wall, where there was a green slime.

At 8.45 a.m. when he returned to defendant’s licensed premises, defendant’s wife admitted him and he found defendant in bed. When asked to account for the long delay in admitting witness, defendant said he did not know he was out there it all. When told about seeing the light in the bar at 12.45 a.m. defendant said “That is a lie.” Witness brought the other man to the premises and read his statement. The man said he admitted being on the premises, and when asked if he had anything to say, defendant replied: “I know nothing about him-nothing.

Mr. E. C: Ferguson, LL.B., M.P. (for defendant)—More people than you are knocking at public house doors these times?—I can quite believe that. Witness said he did not think the marks on the wall had been made by a cat. Constables Walker and Williams also gave evidence. The man found in the adjoining house said that he met defendant on the night in question and went to his house to have a yarn with him. He was in defendant’s house about five minutes when he heard a knock and he went out the back and over the wall. His Worship—That’s Mr. Ferguson’s cat. (Laughter). Witness said that he stopped in the yard all night. Defendant denied that the man found by the police had been on his premise that night and he did not hear anyone shouting through the letter box or door. Asked about the knocking, he said they were fed up with knocking. His Worship fined defendant 20s and costs for failing to admit the police, and dismissed the other five charges.

10-10-1942. POLICE SERGEANT ASSAULTED. ENNISKILLEN INCIDENT. LISNASKEA MAN FINED. An assault on a police sergeant at a dance in the Townhall, Enniskillen was described at Enniskillen Petty Sessions an Monday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when Patrick Maguire, of Aghadrenan, Lisnaskea, was charged with disorderly behaviour, on 25th September and with assaulting Sergeant R. Torrance, R.U.C. An application was also made to have defendant bound to the peace.

Sergeant Torrance gave evidence that when on duty at the Diamond at 10.40 p.m. on 25th Sept. a complaint was made by a boy that he had been beaten by a stranger in the Townhall lavatory. He went with the boy into the Townhall, where there was a dance in progress and the boy pointed out defendant who was accompanied by six or seven American soldiers. He was adopting a fighting attitude and was very aggressive and when asked him his name he said it was Maguire. On request defendant produced his National Registration card and when witness took out his notebook to take particulars he was struck four heavy blows on the face and head, his cap being knocked off and his notebook knocked out of his hands. Witness got hold of defendant by the coat and an American soldier snatched defendant’s identity card out of witness’s hand. When witness saw the attitude of the American soldiers he could not do very much at the time.  Some civilians wanted him to take Maguire from the American soldiers and seemed to resent the interference of the Americans.

The soldiers took Maguire out and they got into a lorry. Other police arrived and they took Maguire out of the lorry. He lay down in the lorry and held on to the American soldiers, and was taken out of the lorry forcibly. When being brought to the barracks he resisted very violently. Defendant was not drunk but had drink taken. ‘I came off lucky, I must say,” added witness. “I think Maguire meant to hurt me.” To Mr. J. B. Murphy for the defence, witness said that defendant was kept in the barracks all night and when handed the summonses next morning said he apologised, that he had no intention of hitting a policeman. His Worship—Were you in uniform? — I was. Mr. Murphy—Defendant instructs me to express, his most sincere apologies to you here today.

Sergeant Sherrard said that defendant resisted arrest violently and succeeded in tripping him. He said he did not mind if he did 20 years penal servitude. Mr. Murphy said this was a most regrettable occurrence and one which defendant felt very deeply to-day. Explaining the circumstances, he said that defendant was engaged in war service and was attached to the American Army, and along with a number of American soldiers he came into the town on this particular night, had several drinks, and then went to the pictures where they only remained ten minutes. They went out and had more drink and went to the dance. The three of them went into the lavatory where this boy was. They did not assault him, they said, but the boy went out and complained he had been assaulted. Maguire, who was hopelessly drunk at the time, was asked for his identity card and apparently lost his temper owing to the fact that he felt he was being charged with assault. He realised the seriousness of the offence he had committed when he sobered up next morning.

Defendant, in evidence, bore out his solicitor’s statement. Next morning, when told what happened he apologised. Mr. Murphy — On your oath were you drunk or sober?—I was drunk. Head-Constable Poots—Do you not think this was a most unprovoked assault on the sergeant? Defendant—I do. His Worship said he thought it was a drunken spree and defendant had adopted a very wise course. Defendant at the earliest possible moment had apologised, to Sergt. Torrance for assaulting the sergeant he imposed a fine of 40s and costs and. bound over defendant for 12 months, himself in £10 and one surety of £5. His Worship added: ‘I would like to make it quite clear, in these cases I shall not have the slightest hesitation, in sending the people to jail, especially in cases where U.S. forces are involved. It may possibly drag them into a very unpleasant incident.”’

10-10-1942. ROWDY BEHAVIOUR AND VANDALISM. SCENES DESCRIBED AT COUNCIL MEETING. MINOR HALL DANCE BOOKINGS SUSPENDED. Serious complaints regarding misconduct, rowdy behaviour, drunkenness and vandalism in the Town Hall led to Enniskillen Urban Council on Monday, by the casting vote of the Chairman (Senator Whaley), suspending for three months the bookings of the Minor Hall for dances when present bookings expire. There were revelations regarding the consumption of intoxicants by women, who have been seen badly under the influence of drink in the Town Hall and on the streets. It was stated that “it is as much as the caretaker’s life is worth to talk to some of these rough and rowdy characters in the hall. When the Surveyor (Mr, J. reported that painting work had carried out in the Minor Hall, Mr. J. Logan said the Minor Hall that morning was mud from top to bottom. Criminal proceedings should be taken against someone, and there should somebody in the hall to protect it on the occasion of dances.

Chairman—You mean dirt on the floor? Mr. Logan—Oh the walls–it is mud right up to the top. There are all sorts of filth, not on one wall, but on all. The Surveyor r. Donnelly) said the hall was cleaned on Friday. .He had seen the dirt on Sunday. There had been a dance on Saturday night. Mr. Monaghan—When was that damage likely to have been done? Mr. W. Johnston—Saturday night. Mr. Monaghan—Is there any undertaking demanded by the Council, from the organisers of these dances that they will be responsible for their good conduct? Chairman— There is no supervision. Drink was not sold in the Town Hall. People brought in drink in their pockets, and no one could be expected to search, them to see that they had none. The first place they made for was the lavatory, where the drink was taken. How was that going to be stopped?

10-10-1942. EXCHANGE OF PLAQUES. Fermanagh County Council received from the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty a letter stating that as a result of the successful warship week Fermanagh reached its financial objective, thus enabling that area to adopt the destroyer Sir Lancelot. The commanding officer and ship’s company of the ship were being informed, so that a lasting association might be established between the ship and Fermanagh people. Instructions had been given to prepare a commemorative plaque for presentation to the area. If the Council had in mind to present in return a commemorative plaque to the ship, the Admiralty should be informed so that an occasion for the exchange might be arranged. The Secretary (Mr. Moffitt) said he had brought the matter before the Finance committee who had approved of the presentation of the plaque. The matter was left in the hands of the Chairman and Secretary.

10-10-1942. RELIGIOUS RECEPTION IN MONAGHAN. The reception took place at St. Louis Convent, Monaghan, of Miss Anna Foley (Sister M. Carmel Teresa) of Ballin Valley, Coolaney, Co. Sligo. The ceremony was performed by Right Rev. Mgr. Dean Keown, Vicar Capitular, P.P., V.G., Carrickmacross, assisted by Very Rev. J. J. McCaughey, Adm., V.F., and Rev. E. McGahan, C.C., Monaghan. Sister Mary St. Luke, OFM. (Finnegan), daughter of Mr. and Mrs T. Finnegan, Dernaglagh, Magheracloone Co., Monaghan who was professed in the Franciscan Convent, Holme Hall, Yorkshire, won distinction in the nursing profession before joining the community and was educated at St. Louis Convents, Monaghan and Carrickmacross. .

10-10-1942. LATE MR LEO HYNES. The death is reported from Port Arthur, Ontario, Canada, of Mr. George Hynes, second son of the late James and Frances Hynes, of 5, Orchard Terrace, Enniskillen. Deceased belonged to a family which will be well remembered in the district for its widespread popularity and the reputation gained by Mr. James Hynes and his sons in the building trade. As reliable and efficient building contractors, the Hynes firm was well known over a wide area. Many years ago, the deceased, left this country for Canada, where he established for himself a circle of sincere friends who will deeply mourn his passing.

10-10-1942. EXCELLENT RATES COLLECTION. Mr. H. J. Moffitt, secretary, told Fermanagh County Council on Friday that of the total warrant for the year of £18,784 13s 11d, a sum of £9,892 18s 5d , or 53 per cent, of the total, had been lodged by the collectors for the half-year up to 30th Sept., 1942. This was a very satisfactory return. All the collectors had closed the first half of the warrant.

10-10-1942. WELL-KNOWN WATER DIVINER’S DEATH. Early on Tuesday morning, well- known well-sinker and water diviner, ‘‘Bill’ Williamson, was taken suddenly ill at his home at Drummurry, Ballinamallard. An urgent message was sent for a doctor but before his arrival Mr. Williamson was dead. He had been living in the district for about six years prior to which he resided at Conerich, Enniskillen. He was a native of Tipperary and aged about 60. He is survived by his wife and family.

10-10-1942. RETIRED AND DIED IN SAME QUARTERS. COINCIDENCE OF RATE COLLECTORS’ PASSING. At Fermanagh County Council on Friday, Hon. C. L. Corry presiding, Mr. H. J. D. Moffitt, secretary, reported the deaths of Mr. John Patterson and Mr. John, Crozier, two superannuated rate collectors. He pointed out that Mr. Patterson had been appointed in 1906, and Mr. Crozier in 1907. Both retired in the same quarter in 1938, and now both had died in the same quarter of 1942. It was a peculiar coincidence he added.  Mr. George Elliott moved a vote of sympathy with the relatives of the deceased, who, he said, had given the Council very faithful service in their time. Lord Enniskillen seconded, and the proposal was passed in silence, the members standing.

10-10-1942. DEATH OF DR. KIDD. WELL-KNOWN ENNISKILLEN SURGEON. Dr. Leonard Kidd, D.L., one of the best-known medical practitioners in Northern Ireland and for many years medical superintendent of the Fermanagh County Hospital died on Friday of last week at his residence, Green Gates, Enniskillen, in his 80th year. He represented the medical profession of all Ireland on the Council of the British Medical Association in London for some time, and was a keen .advocate of the establishment of a Ministry of Health for Northern Ireland. During his long tenure of office at the Fermanagh Hospital he transformed that institution from a small poorly-equipped building into one of the most modern and best equipped in every respect to be found in the Irish Provinces. In recent years’ a new maternity and children’s wing has been added. Dr. Kidd had been in failing health for a considerable time, and had been confined to bed for many months prior to his death. He is survived by two daughters, Miss Edith Kidd, Co. Librarian, Armagh, and Miss Rita Kidd, secretary to the Fermanagh County Hospital.

10-10-1942. WAR WORK PERMIT REFUSED. In reply to Mr, H. Midgley, Labour) at Stormont on Tuesday, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry, of Home Affairs said that in the case of a Mr. J. Smyth, Mary Street, Enniskillen, a permit necessary to enable him ,to take up war work was refused by the Services Security Officer. The onus of deciding whether or not a person was suitable for employment in a military camp rested entirely with the appropriate military authority, and while he (the Parliamentary Secretary) could accept no .responsibility on this point, he was satisfied that the action taken was the proper one in the interests of public security.

10-10-1942. BORDER SEIZURE. A smugglers’ rendezvous utilized by black marketeers from both “Eire” and Northern Ireland, was discovered on Tuesday near the Border in a cemetery building adjoining Connon’s Church, Clones, Co. Monaghan. The “capture” included cases packed with, hundreds of bottles of brandy, gin and wines, bearing a Dublin mark, and bales of binder twine and chests of tea from Northern Ireland. Binder twine, which is extensively used in harvesting, is unobtainable in “Eire.”

10-10-1942. OLD PERMANENT WAY OF CLOCHER RAILWAY. Replying to Mr. Jacob Tavener, at Fermanagh County Council on Friday, Mr. H. J. D. Moffitt said it was the intention of the Council to remove the foundation of the now defunct Clogher Valley permanent way and utilise this ground for widening the roadway where it ran alongside the line. The cost of this work would be recouped to the Council by the liquidator. Answering Lord Belmore, Mr. Moffitt said the Council were not acquiring those portions of the line site which lay inside private property.

10-10-1942. LEAN TIMES FOR BOOKMAKERS. The decline, due to wartime restrictions,  in the betting business was referred to by Mr. P. J. Flanagan, LL.B., solicitor, when defending a number of bookmakers, summoned at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. He said that having regard to the small number of bets in these cases, he did not think, from the police point, of view, the business could be said to be a nuisance. He knew it was not right for him to speak of profits arising from an illegal business, but the racing programme at present was very limited. Certain wayside pulpits proclaimed that the “bookmakers always win.” In this particular case he thought it was correct to say that the bookmakers always lose. (laughter) Major Dickie, R.M. — But they remain in business. Head Const. Poots, (prosecuting) We are only attempting to make them disgorge some of their winnings. (Laughter) His Worship—I am afraid this is becoming a sort of annual tax. The principals in the case, John Jones, 24 Church Street; Lawrence McKeown, Belmore. Street and Patrick McCall. Market street, were each fined 40/- and costs, and each of the frequenters 3/- and costs. The complainants were Sergt. Codd and, McNally and Constable Kane.

10-10-1942. RAILINGS FOR WAR EFFORT. Fermanagh County Council on Friday decided to cooperate with the Ministry of Finance in the scheme to obtain railings for the war effort. When .the secretary read a letter from the Ministry on the matter, he said that representatives of the Ministry had had a conference with the County Surveyor and himself, and he (the secretary) consulted the chairman, and in the meantime the assistant surveyors were scheduling all the railings in the county. In reply to a member, the secretary said that, according to an advertisement which had appeared, objection could be lodged by owners against the removal of railings, but there was only a small chance of any objection being upheld. He thought that the only exemptions were in the case of gates on farms, and artistic and valuable railings.

10-10-1942. LATE CONSTABLE BOB SCOTT. The sudden death on Monday in Belfast of Constable Bob Scott caused deep regret in the Enniskillen district in which he had been stationed for nearly 12 years until his transfer to Belfast in the early months of this year. Shortly before his transfer he married Miss Doreen Bleakley, of High Street, and it is stated he was taken suddenly ill and died in his wife’s arms in their Belfast home. He was a popular and efficient police officer who knew the line of demarcation between efficiency and officiousness. A tall, well-built policeman, his death was wholly unexpected.

 

 

Davy Elliott, Pettigo Blacksmith. David Elliott – Village Blacksmith keeps up a rich Tradition. Impartial Reporter 11th September 1980. (Report by Brian Donaldson) (Photo Raymond Humphreys)

After more than half a century as a blacksmith, working a couple of miles on the Donegal side of Pettigo village, David has preserved an ancient craft that is fast disappearing from the rural scene. The emergence of the tractor on the agricultural scene in post-war years, replacing the farm horse, has been blamed for the decline in forges but David maintains there could still be a future in the trade for a dedicated young man willing to learn.

“It is a dying trade to a certain extent but there is a future for any young man who was willing to serve his apprenticeship to become a blacksmith. There would be a livelihood yet, what with the growth in the number of riding horses,” he said, puffing a mild cigar in the confines of his forge.

RED ROSES. Many people would be glad to escape the urban pressures for the simple, carefree life that David and his wife Marion, enjoy at their quaint little cottage adjoining the forge a few miles into Co. Donegal. A profusion of scented red roses growing in black-painted pots adorn the front wall of the whitewashed house which has been preserved from the days of David’s predecessors. The half-door remains a relic of the past and inside of the kitchen- cum-living room with its flagstone floor remains unchanged. The rich odour of burning turf on the hearth fire wafts in the air and tingles the nostrils. The loft, which was once used for sleeping, overhangs from the pitched ceiling. Above the hearth, a gleaming brass overmantel holds various ornaments and antiques and two large circular patterned plates are displayed. It’s like living in another world. A T.V. set serves as the only reminder that it’s a modem era.

FARRIERS’ COMPETITION. In a prominent position on a wall hangs a framed certificate which certifies David’s prowess as a blacksmith. It confirms his membership of The Worshipful Company of Blacksmiths. David sat the examination while competition at Balmoral Show in 1969 when he was runner-up. The success of the examination made David a registered shoeing smith. But he has a sentimental feeling for the certificate. He became a registered blacksmith exactly 100 years after his grandfather, James Elliott, began his indenture into the trade. He still keeps the original contract. David explained how his grandfather founded the first forge at Drumawark, outside Pettigo. “He served his time with a blacksmith named Robert Johnston in Pettigo village and left to go across to Scotland to work. But when he was there a while he took bad with a fever and was laid up in hospital in Glasgow. It was there that he met his wife, who was a nurse.

SCOTTISH WIFE. “She had come from Argyllshire in the western highlands and was a fluent Scottish-Gaelic speaker. “My grandfather married her and brought her back here where he set up this forge and they reared six of a family. The forge has been here since.”

He went on: “My father married and settled here and when I left school at 14, I joined my grandfather and father in the business. The three of us worked together for a number of years.

David has maintained the links with his grandmother’s homeland. He returned a couple of weeks ago to watch the Scottish National sheepdog trials at Dumfries and he spent a few extra days visiting some of his many friends he has made there. “1 met an old shepherd who was running a dog in the National,” David told me. “He won an international in Wales one year and at 76 years of age, he’s still going strong.”

FEW “WEE DRAMS” “It was a most enjoyable three days, we met afterwards in the beer tent and every trial was re-run as we drank a few wee drams. “I have great respect for the Scottish on account of my granny and I’ve made some very good friends.” It was not his first time there. He spent some time in Caithness with a veterinary surgeon he knows and

Modem society has done little to change the lifestyle of country blacksmith David Elliott. He continues to practise this skilled craft which he learnt from his forebears in the little whitewashed forge adjoining the cottage where he was born. David, now 67, takes great pride in his work and enjoys country life to the full. Sheepdog trials and shooting are among his most treasured pastimes and he has been at the Royal Highland show watching the farriers at work. David’s interest in sheepdog trials began a good many years ago and it prompted him to found the Pettigo Sheepdog Society about 18 years ago which is still flourishing. Trials are held every lune. “We have as good a trial as anywhere in Northern Ireland,” he proclaimed proudly.

IDEAL. The countryside around Pettigo is ideal for this country pursuit although the flocks of sheep kept locally have declined considerably in recent years. The countryside also breeds good game, ideal for shooting and as a member of Pettigo Gun Club, he helps to maintain the supply of game birds, especially pheasants in the area. The club receives a grant from the Eire Government to help rear the birds which are released. The only birds saved from shooting are the hens. “Shooting is not what it used to be,” he recalled. “Birds tend to scatter around a bigger area now than in the days when cereal crops kept them in a confined area.”

Fishing was another sport he took part in mainly in the nearby Termon river and mountain lakes which yielded sturdy brown trout.

HARD WORK. As David would profess, though, hard work was the order of the day when he took up the smithing trade, and there was not much time for sport. “There was a time when you had to work hard and you didn’t get a lot for it,” David said, as another whiff of cigar smoke drifted out of the forge door. “We used to work to ten or eleven o’clock at night on plough irons but it was busiest during wartime. “We did a lot of shoeing and jobbing work then and we often took on journeymen smiths who were on the road during the last war. Then when we were busy in the springtime working on ploughs, we’d keep them for six or eight weeks and we learnt a lot from them for they were very experienced men-

A LIVING. “There was a lot of shoeing farm horses too, because of the compulsory tillage but that’s all gone now and there’s just the odd riding horse to shoe now. “Usually there were always two working in the forge but when wages went up, you struggled to get a living for yourself and very often you could not charge more than what a farmer was willing to pay you. “In those days, a set of shoes for a donkey cost two shillings, and five shillings and sixpence for a horse but your raw materials, iron, coal and nails were very cheap then. A box of nails were only about sixpence a pound, now they might be up to £2 a pound!”

Another modern aid which threatened the trade was the supply of electricity by the ESB to the area. This gave rise to electric welders which took over much of the repair work on farm implements. During the war years, David had to set up a forge on the northern side of Pettigo village for his Northern Ireland customers because of the restrictions on materials. Now, the dark interior of the small forge serves as a reminder of the heyday of blacksmithing in the area. It’s a craft that has dwindled because, there is no-one to carry it on and because of the decline in the blacksmith’s work. In an area stretching westwards from Fermanagh across through Donegal, there are now only three blacksmiths still working, one of them Willie Foster of Lisbellaw. The third operates south of Donegal Town.

AWARDS. Anyone willing to take it up would have to operate a portable forge to serve a wider area, David believes. David takes life easier now. “When you come to between 60 and 70 years of age you’re not as good a man as you were and I don’t need to work as hard to earn a living any more,” he said, stoking up the fire. David spends some of his spare time making shepherd’s crooks from hazel-wood found in nearby woods. The artistry of his work won him an award at Ballyshannon craft show. As I left the blacksmith in his forge on the side of the road that used to be the main route from Pettigo to Castlederg but now down-graded to just another narrow country road, 1 could only admire him for preserving this rural scene for posterity.

September 1942. Fermanagh Herald.

19-9-1942. 72 PACKS OF FLOUR. CUSTOMS CAPTURE AT NEWTOWNBUTLER. An Unusual Case. R.M, HOLDS GOODS LIABLE TO FORFEITURE. A most unusual Customs ease was heard at Newtownbutler Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major T. W. Dickie, R..M., when William P, Lucas, 15 Fade St., Dublin, and Matthew D. Rooney, 44 Temple Bar, Dublin, were charged in connection with 4 tons 4 cwts. 3 qrs. and 14 lbs. of flour, being goods of which, the export was prohibited, and which were found in the possession of the G.N.R, at Newtownbutler on April 14th, 1942 and in respect of which an order for forfeiture was sought. Mr. James Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted; Mr. J. Hanna, solicitor, appeared for the two defendants; Mr. M. E. Knight, solicitor, held a watching brief on behalf, of the G.N.R

Mr. Cooper said it was rather all unusual type of case. On April 3rd there arrived at Newtownbutler station 4 tons 4 cwts. 3 qrs. 14 lbs of white flour. This flour had been consigned by the Co. Derry Railway from ‘‘Eire” and was consigned to Dublin. The bags of flour were examined by Mr. Chapman, Officer of Customs. One bag was marked Belfast, another Australia, while the others were differently marked and appeared to have been taken out of the original, bags. The flour was put in a sealed waggon. Proceeding, Mr. Cooper said the Customs authorities, required the station master at Newtownbutler to furnish proof under Sec, 3 of the Customs Defence Act, 1939, as amended by the new regulation. Following the demand of proof from the stationmaster, word was received from the railway companies that this flour had been originally handed in at Stranorlar and that it was consigned from Stranorlar by a man named McFadden. The railway company also stated that Mr. McFadden had never sent any other flour by that route and appeared to be a small country shopkeeper who lived at Breena, about 20 miles from Letterkenny. The freight in sending it from Strabane to Stranorlar would be £1 16s per ton and to send it by Ballyshannon would he £2 Is per ton.

It was re-consigned from Ballyshannon by a man named J. McDonald. Nobody knew who McDonald was. The Customs authorities directed the flour to be seized. It was seized, and notice of the seizure was served on Rooney Bros., Dublin. Mr. Fitzpatrick, solicitor, gave formal .notice that Mr. Lucas claimed ownership, and also wrote on behalf of Rooney, who claimed two tons of the flour. The railway company then informed them part of this flour was first sent from Buncrana to Letterkenny by a man called W. Porter. A man named Bradley then came in and made a claim against the railway company for £228 for loss in respect of the flour. This flour was unobtainable at the time in the Free State and they suggested it was smuggled through the Customs somewhere about Strabane, because it would have to be unloaded and put on the train to have it sent down to Ballyshannon. In any case, it had no business to be exported from Northern Ireland at all.

19-9-1942. IRVINESTOWN PETTY SESSIONS. CYCLE LARCENY CHARGE. BICYCLE THEFT PRISON FOR SOLDIER. At Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., District-Inspector Walshe charged Private Kerrigan, Pioneer Corps, formerly of Boho, Co. Fermanagh with the larceny of a bicycle value £10, the property of Curry Beatty, Ballinamallard. Henry Armstrong, Coolisk, was charged with receiving the bicycle. Kerrigan stated that he was returning to England from leave, when he bought the bicycle from a man named O’Donnell, of Sligo, for £1 15s. He then sold the bicycle to Armstrong for £2 10s. A sentence of six months’ imprisonment was ordered. For Armstrong it was said that he was under the influence of drink when he bought the bicycle and the case was dismissed on the merits.

19-9-1942. £120 IN FINES CALEDON MAN MULCTED. At Dungannon Petty Sessions, Thomas A. Clark, Ballagh, Caledon, was prosecuted for dealing in the following prohibited goods—85 loaves of wheat flour bread, five -0-st. bags wheat flour 420 lb. candles, 446 packets and 14 lb. of soap flakes and soap powders, 3¾ cwt. soap, 24 lb. custard powder, one quarter and 2½ lb. cocoa, and 1 qr. 22 lb. coffee. On a second count he was prosecuted for having the following uncustomed goods—large iron kettle, one aluminium teapot, one enamel teapot, two enamel dishes, one enamel saucepan, and 38 dozen eggs. Mr. Long, R.M., said the Clarke family seemed to be engaged in the wholesale distribution of these prohibited articles Owing to defendant’s age and ill-health he would not send him to prison. In the first case he would be fined £115 12s 3d. For harbouring the uncustomed goods he was fined £5.

19-9-1942. REFUSED TO GIVE NAMES TO B SPECIALS. Five Men Before Trillick Court. At Trillick Petty Sessions on Monday, before Major Dickie, R.M., Francis Donnelly, Derrymacanna; Francis Woods, Moorfield, Trillick; John P. McGrade, Shanmullagh; Philip McGrade, Tallymacanna; and Frank McColgan, Stralongford were charged with disorderly conduct and refusing to give their names to members of a “B” patrol. S. D. Commandant Beattie, gave evidence that early on Monday morning, Aug.,

19-9-1942. £30 FINE ON IRVINESTOWN MOTORIST FAILURE TO TAX CAR. Daniel McCrossan, Main Street, Irvinestown, appeared at the local Petty Sessions last Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., to answer a summons brought against him for using a motor vehicle on the public road on 7th April last without a licence. The summons was brought by Fermanagh County Council per Herbert J. D. Moffitt, taxation officer.

Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuting, said that Constable Cander found defendant’s car on the public street on 7th April, 1942 without being licensed. The matter came before the County Council, and they decided to allow defendant off with a mitigated penalty of £1. Mr. Moffitt wrote to defendant on the 6th May informing him that proceedings would be stayed if he paid £1. No answer was received, and Mr. Moffitt again wrote, but no answer was received from defendant. Constable Cander gave evidence of finding a public service vehicle, the property of defendant, on the street on 7th April. It was not licensed. Defendant said “It was just an overlook at the time.” John Moffitt, who is employed in the taxation office, said the car was licensed at the present time. The annual duty was £10 a year. He sent a notice to defendant that the County Council had considered the matter, and that if he paid £1 proceedings would not be taken—if he took out a licence. There was no reply. Witness sent a further note on 7th July. Mr. Cooper—In this case the penalty is £20, or three times the amount of duty payable, whichever is the greater. The County Council I understand, have power to review it when it goes back to them. The greater penalty is £30. Defendant said that the car was out of order at the time, and he was looking for parts for it. His Worship — Why did you not answer the letter? I did not think the offence was very serious. Defendant added that if he did not tax the car he would get no petrol. His Worship imposed a penalty of £30, and £1 ls 9d costs, with a stay till next Court. Mr. Cooper — We want to get the penalty your Worship, to show these people they must pay attention to these things.

19-9-1942. TO STAND FOR STORMONT SEAT MR. EAMONN DONNELLY, Ex-T.D. Mr. Eamonn Donnelly, secretary of the Green Cross Fund, and formerly T.D. for Leix-Offaly, is to be a candidate for the Northern Ireland Parliamentary by-election for the. Falls Division, Belfast. He was also M.P. for South, Armagh from 1925 to 1929. Mr. Donnelly told a Press man that he had been asked by a number of representative men to stand for the Division in the interests of unity. His chief aims would be to try to bring together all sections of the minority. “I know,” he said, “there are many who will support the candidature of one espousing the principles that I would like to see established. We have been wandering more or less in a morass for the last, number of years, at sixes and sevens, with no definite guidance as to the ultimate realisation of the objective, that everyone cherishes dearly, namely, the unification of our country.

“I have always held, and still hold, that it is possible to re-unite our country by constitutional means. I believe the Irish people as a whole, given an opportunity, will stand for the bringing together again of the old Constituent Assembly, the first Dail under the aegis of which the advances were made which Southern Ireland today enjoys, but which do not apply to us.” “I assured the delegation,” he said, “ that my aim, if elected, would be to concentrate on the release of political internees. “There can be no peace while internment without trial exists. It is contrary to every principle of justice and citizenship, and certainly contrary to what the Allied. Powers profess to be fighting for. I have never compromised and never will on the unity of Ireland. I believe the unity of the country is more necessary to-day than ever, more particularly as its defence as a unit in the present world conflict should be the first consideration of every Irishman. I have no doubt as to the result in West Belfast. It often gave a lead before to Ireland, and God knows we want leadership now more than ever.”

19-9-1942. CHARM ING DERRY WEDDING. OMAGH POSTAL OFFICIAL WED. HYNES —YANNARELLI. A charming wedding took place on Thursday morning in St. Eugene’s Cathedral, Derry, with Nuptial Mass and Papal Blessing, when two well-known Derry and Tyrone families were united. The contracting parties were Mr. Patrick Hynes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hynes, of Campsie, Omagh, Co. Tyrone, and Miss Isabella Yannarelli, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Yannarelli, Strand Road, Derry City. Both bride and bridegroom, are well known and highly esteemed, the bridegroom being a very popular member of the clerical staff of Omagh Post Office, while the bride is prominent in local social circles. The ceremony was performed by Rev. T. Devine, C.C.. Castlefin, Donegal.

19-9-1942. ASSAULT CASE. DEFENDANT FINED AND REMOVED FROM COURT. IRVINESTOWN STORY. Summonses against father and son were heard at Irvinestown Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when Thomas McLaughlin, Coolback, brought a summons against James Hamilton Martin (father), Cabragh, for defendant’s neglect to pay for trespass of his cattle on complainant’s land at Doogary on 3rd inst.; and also a summons against Ernest Martin (son), Cabragh, for assault. Mr. A. Herbert appeared for complainant, who gave evidence that he had taken part of a farm, the other, part being taken by the senior defendant; Plaintiff alleged that on the 3rd inst. Martin senior put, seven head of cattle on to the land he (plaintiff) had taken. Later, when plaintiff met defendant and his four sons defendant asked him did he drive the cattle off, and plaintiff replied in the affirmative. Plaintiff then described what followed, and said that Ernest Martin struck him on the mouth, which bled.

Francis McMulkin, owner of the farm gave evidence as to the letting. When he had finished his evidence there ensued an argument between the senior defendant and witness.       Sergeant M, Kelly said that when plaintiff called with him on 3rd inst. there was blood trickling from the side of his mouth, and his lip was slightly swollen. Defendant said that plaintiff made all shapes to stick, him with a pitchfork. One of his sons caught, the pitchfork, and whatever injury plaintiff got was in the wrangling over the pitchfork.

This man, declared defendant, “is a bad man—a dangerous man. Would you not know the look of him? Ernest Martin denied striking plaintiff. Plaintiff and his brother were wrestling for the pitch fork on one side of the road, and witness was standing on the other side of the road. Kenneth Martin said plaintiff followed them with a pitch fork and attempted to stab his father with it. Witness caught the pitch fork, and during the tussle plaintiff got a crack on the face.His Worship—How many of you were there? — We were going to our work, and there were five of us. Henry Emery also gave evidence.

His Warship held that Martin, Sen., was guilty of trespass, and that his son was guilty of an unprovoked assault. He fined the son 40/- and 4/- costs, and made an order for the trespass by scale, with £2 2s 0d costs. Addressing Martin, Senr., his Worship said that from his behaviour in Court, if he had any more trouble with him he would bind him over in heavy sureties to keep the peace. Defendant—I will appeal the case. His Worship then directed the police to remove defendant from Court.

19-9-1942. ROSSINVER PARISH COUNCIL. FARMERS’ GRIEVANCE. THE TEA SUPPLY. A meeting of Rossinver Parish. Council was held in St. Aiden’s Hall on Sunday, Rev. Father McPhillips, P. P. (chairman) presiding. Other members present included: Messrs. Michael Sheerin, V.C., John Gilligan, P.C.; Joseph Fox, James Connolly, Sean Eames, N.T. (secretary), and Padraic J. O’Rourke.

DRAINAGE. A deputation appeared before the meeting on behalf of farmers residing in the townlands of Corraleskin, Gortnaderry, Gubmanus, Lattoon and Cornagowna, whose lands have been flooded by the Kilcoo River. Mr. Patrick Meehan, Latloon, who acted as spokesman said that many farmers along the border from Kiltyclogher to Garrison had suffered great losses in hay crops and pasture for the past two months. The damage done had been unprecedented. Nine floods, coming in quick succession had effected the complete ruin of a huge amount of hay and oats. The floods had been the worst in living memory. A lake in the Six Counties had been drained a few years ago, and the extra water from this area was now coming into the border river, making the flooding much worse than it used to be. Rev. P. McPhillips- The people have been trying for the past 50 years to get the border river drained, and the removal of a narrow bed of rock from the river bed near Garrison would solve the whole difficulty at a very small cost. A. few sticks of gelignite would; do the whole thing.

Mr. O’Rourke—Farmers on both sides of the border are affected, and our Government were prepared to have the river drained four years ago provided the Six-County Government would co-operate. The required co-operation was not forthcoming, and so the scheme fell through.

Mr. Denis Keaney (a member of the deputation) stated that as all the good grazing lands, lay along the river the cattle had failed in milking since they were put on the hard hills, and farmers had lost from £5 to £10 in their creamery Cheques for the two months, and the flooded hay was likely to kill the cattle during the winter.

The following resolution, proposed by Mr. P. J. O’Rourke, seconded by Mr. M. Sheerin, was passed unanimously (copies to be forwarded to the Minister for Local Government and local T.D.s): “That we, the members of Rossinver Parish Council, request the Minister for Local Government to take into, consideration the serious losses in hay crops and pasture suffered by farmers living along the border river, particularly in the townlands of Corraleskin, Gortnaderry, Lattoon, Gubmanus and Cornagowna, and to grant them a rebate in the rates, for the coming year. Wo also consider it very necessary that immediate action be taken by the Government to have the rock at Cornagowna, which is the prime cause of the whole flooding, removed.” Mr. Sheerin—We want the T.D.s to back us up in this matter.

19-9-1942. BELLEEK SESSIONS. At Belleek Petty Sessions on Tuesday, Before Major Dickie, R.M., Eric Carson, Knocknashangan, Garrison, was fined 10s for failing to produce his identity card when asked to do so by an authorised person. Michael O’Shea, Drumanillar, Belleek, was summoned for leading two horses on the public highway during the hours of darkness without having a light in front of the animals. The case was dismissed.

19-9-1942. WAR DEPARTMENT PETROL. Thomas Gallagher, Aghoo, Garrison, was charged with having in his possession on 23rd July a quantity of petrol—5 gallons— the property of the War Department. (N.I.), which, he bought or received from a soldier or person, acting on his behalf. He was also charged with not being a servant of the Government acting in the course of his duty as such, or a person acting in accordance with the authority of a Government Department had in his possession a quantity of Government petroleum spirit contrary to the Emergency Powers Order. Constable McMullin, examined by D.I. Walshe who prosecuted, said that on 23rd July he stopped Gallagher, and subsequently went to inspect defendant’s garage, and found the petrol in a tins there. In a statement Gallagher said he got two gallons of petrol from a soldier on the road a few weeks previously. Sergt. Bailey gave evidence of testing the petrol, which he found reacted to the test for Army petrol and Cpl. Geelan said he dispatched a sample of the petrol to the public analyst at Belfast. D.I. Walshe said that owing to the enormous expense entailed they had not brought the analyst from Belfast, but had obtained his certificate. Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solr., Enniskillen, pleading guilty on behalf of his client, said that this was the type of offence any person, being human, would fall into. The defendant had acted with extrema foolishness, and he asked the Resident Magistrate to deal leniently with the matter. The R.M. said he could not treat the matter lightly, and imposed a fine of £93 on the second summons, the penalty to rule both charges. He allowed two months to pay.

CASE DISMISSED, George Connor, Aghoo, Garrison, was also charged with having army petrol in his possession. D.I. Walshe prosecuted, and Mr, P. J. Flanagan defended.

19-9-1942. SIX COUNTY POTATO PRICES. MORE MONEY FOR GROWERS. (Ed. “Ware Potatoes” is a term mostly used within the potato industry. Sometimes, it is used in a generic sense for any potatoes destined for human consumption in potato form, as opposed to seed potatoes or potatoes that are primarily valued for the amount of starch that can be extracted from them for industrial processing.)

Growers’ prices for ware and seed potatoes of the 1942 crop as from 1st October have now been announced. The districts will be District 1—Counties Antrim., Down, Armagh (Newry No. 2 Rural District only), Tyrone (Strabane Rural District only) and Londonderry, and District 3—-Counties Fermanagh, Tyrone (except Strabane Rural District), Londonderry and Armagh (except Newry No. 2 Rural District).

In District I. the price of ware potatoes during October will be 90/- per ton tor the varieties Golden Wonder, King Edward, Red King and Gladstone; 75/- per ton for Kerr’s Pink, Redskin, Up-to-Date, Dunbar Standard, Arran Peak, Arran Victory and any other variety grown on red soil, and 70/- per ton for any other variety not grown on red soil. In District II. the price will be 5/- per ton less in each case. These are fixed prices for delivery f.o.r. grower’s railway station, or on buyer’s lorry at the farm.

Growers’ prices per ton for Class I. certified seed will be until further notice: Arran Crest, Catriona, Di Vernon, Doon Early, Immune Ash leaf, May Queen, Ninetyfold, Witchhill,  Ulster Chieftain, 205/-; Arran Pilot, Ballydoon, Duke of York. Ulster Monarch, Arran Scout, Sharpe’s Express, 155/-; Doon Pearl, Dunbar, Robar, Eclipse, Dargill Early, Suttin’s Abundance, Arran Signet, 140/ -; Ally, Alness, Arran Comrade, Arran Peak, Ben Lomond, British Queen, Dunbar Standard. Edzell Blue, Gladstone, Golden Wonder, King Edward VII, Red King, Beauty of Hebron, Herald, Bintze, (Muizen) – 120/-: Arran Banner, Arran Cairn, Arran Chief, Arran Consul, Arran Victory, Bishop, Champion, Doon Star, Dunbar Archer, Dunbar Cavalier, Field Marshall, Great Scot, Irish Queen, Kerr’s Pink, King George V., Majestic, President, Redskin, Rhoderick Dhu, Royal Kidney {Queen Mary), Tinwald Perfection. Up-to-Date, Baron, Arran Luxury, 110/-.

The price for Northern Ireland Report Certificate Seed will be 20/- per ton less in each case. A top riddle of and a bottom riddle of 1¼ will apply to all varieties of seed of the above classifications.

CONSUMER TO PAY LESS. A reduction in the maximum wholesale and retail prices for ware potatoes has been announced. To offset this reduction a subsidy will be paid to licensed “first buyers’ and in certain circumstances licensed grower-salesmen. The maximum wholesale price in District I. from 24th to 50th September will be 4/- per cwt. for Grade A and 3/6 per cwt. for Grade B. In District II the price will be 3d per cwt. less in each case. From 28th September to 3rd October the maximum retail price in both districts, will be 5d per half-stone for Grade A and 4½d per half-stone for Grade B.

19-9-1942. Department and Monaghan Appointment. At a meeting of the Co., Monaghan Vocational Education Committee, a letter was read from the Department intimating that the Ministry was not prepared to approve of the appointment of Miss M. Duffy, as commercial teacher in Monaghan Technical School. By 14 votes to 4, a resolution was carried requesting the Minister to sanction the appointment temporarily pending Miss Duffy securing certificate for instruction in typewriting.

19-9-1942. NOTICE TO FARMERS.  We wish to inform our customers and the general public that we have received a large consignment of Men’s, Women’s and Boys’ Kip Nailed Boots for the winter season. These are exceptionally good, reliable Boots, and up to pre-war standard. We would advise the early purchase of same, as we may not be able to repeat the superior quality of these lines. FLANAGAN’S, Enniskillen.

19-9-1942. DESERTED FROM TWO ARMIES. A stranger stopped by a policeman in Enniskillen was found to be a deserter from the Irish Army. It later transpired that the man had deserted from the British Army. The man, Michael D’Arcy, of the A.M.P.C., was charged with being a deserter at a special court before Mr. W. F. Dewane, J.P., and was ordered to be handed over to the military authorities.

19-9-1942. LISNASKEA ASSAULT CASE. When Mary Jane Melanophy, of Lisnaskea, summoned Margaret Burns, Erne Terrace. Lisnaskea, for assault, at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, plaintiff alleged that defendant threw two stones at her, one of them striking her on the ankle. Defendant, said she threw a stone at plaintiff, but she did not believe it hit her. She threw the stone in self-defence when plaintiff raised a broom over her head. Major Dickie, R.M., said he did not believe there was anything to choose between them from what he heard in Court. He imposed on Mrs. Burns a nominal penalty of 2/6, with £1 Is 0d costs, and advised the parties to try to live in peace.

26-9-1942. CONSTABLE SUMMONED AT LETTERBREEN. RECKLESS DRIVING CHARGE DISMISSED. Constable James Mulqueeny, formerly of Kinawley, Co. Fermanagh, and now of Bessbrook, Co. Armagh, appeared at Letterbreen Petty Sessions on 16th inst., before Major Dickie. R.M., on the usual three counts; the reckless driving of a motor car on 2nd May last at the cross roads at Florencecourt Creamery. Mr. P J. Flanagan, LL.B., defended. Two constables who had been with defendant in the car on the occasion gave evidence that on the way out from Enniskillen defendant mentioned about the steering of the car being stiff. About 50 yards from the creamery cross they passed another car. Defendant was driving on the left-hand side of the road at a speed of from 25-30 miles per hour, and in the words of one of the witnesses “all of a sudden the car just gave a ‘double’ on the road and struck the far ditch.” Keith Farlow, aged 13 who witnessed the accident, said he saw the car come round the cross and skid on the gravel. The car had been travelling at a medium speed.

Sergeants Ryan and Henderson also gave evidence, the latter, who is inspector of public service vehicles, describing the condition of the car following the accident, and said the right front wheel was buckled and the tyre burst. Defendant said that at the time of the accident was stationed at Kinawley, and was the driver of the Customs car.. The car in which he had the accident was his own, and his brother had been using it in the city. When it came back he noticed there was something wrong with the steering. Describing the accident, defendant said the steering seemed to lock. He put pressure on it, but could not get it straightened again. The steering did not answer at all, and he struck the bank. His Worship-—There are so many, theories one could advance of how this accident happened. I don’t know which to accept. I don’t think it is a case in which I ought to convict. He dismissed the case.

19-9-1942. WRONGFUL USE OF PETROL. LISNASKEA CASE. The first case of its kind in the district was heard at Lisnaskea Petty Sessions on Thursday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when Imelda Evelyn Beggan, of Tattycam, Newtownbutler, was charged, with having used motor fuel on 3rd August at Kilygullion for a purpose other than that specified. Constable Kelly gave evidence of stopping a Ford motor car driven by defendant on 3rd August, and in reply to questions she said she was getting three gallons of petrol per month for going to Mass on Sundays, and bringing eggs to Lisnaskea market every Saturday and that she had been leaving her sister to the 5.30 p.m. train for Belfast. Mr. J. B. Murphy, defending, said that defendant lived six miles from a railway station and in one of the forms she stated that there was no public transport. He suggested that defendant was entitled to use the car to bring her sister, who worked, in a Government office, to the railway station in order to get back to work. His Worship—She is given this for certain purposes in strict law. He added that one thing that was wrong was the statement that there was no public transport.

Mr. Murphy—It is three miles away. He said that it was the first case of its kind, and he would ask his Worship to apply the Probation of Offenders Act. When applying for a renewal of the three gallons defendant could mention this journey. District Inspector Smyth said it was the first case in the district. They were going to delve into this business very carefully, and the prosecution had been brought to air activity in the matter. His Worship—I understand that if a person is convicted for improper use of petrol automatically the petroleum officer: will not give them any further supplies. District Inspector—They refer it to the police first and ask their opinion. Dealing with defendant under the Probation of Offenders Act on payment of costs of Court, his Worship said that did not mean that the next person would get the benefit of the Probation Act.

26-9-1942. FALSE REPRESENTATIONS CHARGE AT KESH. Thomas Duncan, Water Lane, Letterkeen, was charged at Kesh Petty Sessions an Tuesday with having on the 1st Jan., 1942, at Kesh, for the purpose of obtaining for himself a supplementary pension under the Unemployment Assistance Act, knowingly made a false representation that during the seven days up to and including, 1st January he had not earned more than 5s, whereas, during this period he was employed by Messrs. H. and J. Martin, Ltd., 163, Ormeau Road, Belfast, and in the week ended 31st December, 1941, earned 76/3d,: this sum being paid to him on 3rd Jan., 1942. There was a second charge against defendant of making a false representation, for the same purpose, for the week ending 8th January, the amount he was alleged to have earned  being 67/9d. Alan McCullagh, an official of the Assistance Board, gave evidence of receiving defendant’s application on 16th October last. Major Dickie, R.M. “(to defendant) — Have you any explanation to give? Defendant—I have not indeed. I know nothing about it. His Worship-—You knew enough to draw £3 16s.

James Weir, another official, gave evidence of filling up the application for defendant on 14th Oct. He read over the application to defendant and explained it to him and witnessed defendant’s mark. Another official, William Henry, Howe, told of interviewing defendant on 4th. Feb., and following caution, defendant said he had done “only an odd hour’s work inside, the last three years.” He denied having been fully employed. John L. Duffy, of the firm of Messrs. Martin, said that for the four weeks from 16th Dec.—10th January, defendant was paid 15s 6d, 75s, 76/3, and 67/9. Miss Mildred Thompson, postmistress, Kesh, said when defendant brought these paying, orders to her, she read them over to defendant and explained them to him. Sergt. Horgan said defendant was a labouring man of good character. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown solicitor, prosecuting—These cases are giving a lot of trouble. These men are drawing large sums of money and are getting this money at the same time. His Worship—I am afraid it is not a case in which there could be any possibility of a mistake. He would not send defendant to jail but imposed on the first charge a fine of £5 and 40s costs, and on the second charge 40s and 20s costs. In default, in the first case two months’ imprisonment and in the second case one month, to run consecutively. Addressing defendant, his Worship said —“That is a fairly substantial penalty, but I am afraid you deserve it.”

19-9-1942. ANTRIM MAN KILLED. TWO U.S. SOLDIERS IN CUSTODY. Soldierstown, Aghalee, South Antrim, has been the scene of a horrible crime which has resulted in the death of Edward Clenaghan, aged 46, who was found lying unconscious on the roadside about midnight on Monday and who died on Tuesday in Lurgan District Hospital. Two American soldiers; 20-year-old Embra H. Farley, from Arkansas, and 26-year-old Herbert Jacobs, from Kentucky, are being held by the U.S. military police in connection with the affair. At an inquest a verdict was returned that Clenaghan died from injuries caused by some person or persons. The dead man was an A.R.P. warden and was unmarried. He lived with his mother at Soldierstown and helped her to manage a public-house, he was a kinsman of the famous artist, Sir John Lavery under whom, he studied art for a time, and was a cousin of the late, Rt. Rev. Mgr. Canon Clenaghan, P.P., V.G., St. Malachy’s Church, Belfast, and of Rev, George Clenaghan, P. P., Armoy.

At the inquest, Dr. James O’Connell, R.M.O., Lurgan Hospital, said that deceased was admitted at 1.50 on Tuesday morning. He was unconscious on admission, and remained so until his death, about 7 o’clock that morning. He had a lacerated wound over the left eye, a lacerated wound on the left side of the chin, and bruising on the right side of the head. The cause of death was cerebral laceration following a fracture of the skull. James Joseph Clenaghan, farmer, a brother of the dead man, said that on Monday evening he was in the bar of his mother’s licensed premises. There were a number of U.S. soldiers there, and he particularly noticed two of them, who seemed to be in or about all afternoon.

All the soldiers left except the two. The soldier in command seemed to be more or less scared of these two but he eventually got them out. All the others left and witness got the bar closed.  About 9.20 p.m., he heard the sound of breaking glass and went out to the hall door and found that a pane of glass in the bar window was broken. He heard footsteps running and overtook two American soldiers. He tried to reason with them, but they started using filthy language and waving two beer bottles and insisted on having more drink. Witness refused, advising them to go on up the road and they might get another drink elsewhere. They still kept walking about on the road some twenty yards or so from the house. He went back home, and his brother, Edward, said he would go up and see the commanding officer of the camp.: He left on his bicycle about 9.30 or 9.45 p.m. About 12.15 a.m. in consequence of a message, he went along the road towards Aghalee, and about a quarter of a mile from home found his brother lying on the grass on the left-hand side of the road going towards Aghalee. He seemed to be in terrible pain and was unconscious. Witness obtained a motorcar and accompanied him to Lurgan Hospital.

26-9-1942. FEEDING STUFFS RATIONING Laggards Should Lodge Ration Books At Once. Livestock owners and farmers have now had their ration books for the fifth period under the feeding stuffs rationing scheme in their possession for three weeks, but, strange to say, many have not yet lodged the books with their chosen suppliers. The Ministry of Agriculture has issued to those who have not done so a timely warning that feeding stuffs cannot be allocated to them until their, suppliers have received their buying permits, and, of course, no supplier can obtain a buying permit until he has forwarded his customers’ nomination forms to the Ministry. If, therefore, you do not receive feeding stuffs because of your failure to lodge your ration book, do not blame your supplier, or the Ministry. Blame yourself because you will be the only person worthy of blame.

26-9-1942. UNSCUTCHED FLAX. MINISTER AND THE 1941 CROP. The proportion of the 1941 flax crop as yet unscutched is 472 acres, and everything possible is being done to assist in having these crops processed. This was stated by Lord Glentoran (Minister of Agriculture) in reply to Mr. Brown (South Down) at Stormont on Tuesday. Lord Glentoran said a survey of scutch mills had shown that in two areas facilities for handling the crop were inadequate. He was satisfied there would be adequate facilities for 1942 crop, and steps were being taken to ensure that any increase in the 1943 crop would dealt with.

26-9-1942. BREAD PRICES INCREASED ON BOTH SIDES OF BORDER. Britain’s bread is to be dearer, but potatoes cheaper, under a new order, which also affects the Six Counties. From Sunday, the 4lb. loaf went up from 8d to 9d, with the 21b. loaf up by a halfpenny. Potato prices will from September 28 be reduced to an average of 1d a lb. The price charges are part of the campaign to reduce bread and increase potato consumption in Britain. The British Food Ministry has kept the price of bread almost stable since the outbreak of war by subsidies costing some £80 000 a year. Increased bread prices came into effect in the Twenty-Six Counties on and from Monday last.

26-9-1942. TEACHERS’ DEMAND FOR WAR BONUS. QUESTION AT STORMONT. At Stormont on Tuesday, the Minister of Finance told Mr. J. Beattie (Lab., Pottinger) that a demand for a war bonus of £1 a week for all teachers had been received by the Ministry of Education. He was informed that in Britain the Burnham Committee has recommended that war bonuses for teachers should be increased as from the 1st July, 1942, the new rates being £45 per annum for men and £36 per annum, for women on the lower scales of salary, and £35 and £28 for men and women respectively on higher scales. Certain matters were at present under investigation by the Ministry of Education with a view to the application of these rates of bonus to teachers’ salaries in Northern Ireland, and, of course, as the member was aware the policy of their Government had been to give to Northern Ireland teachers the same war bonuses— and no more—as had been granted to their colleagues in Britain.

26-9-1942. MISUSE OF PETROL LISNASKEA MAN’S OFFENCE. Charles Magee, hackney car owner, of Lisnaskea, was, at Caledon Petty Sessions on Monday, fined 10/- for using petrol in his car for purposes other than intended. It was stated by the police that defendant was intercepted on a recent Sunday driving his wife and family to Newry to see friends. Mr. J. J. Rea, solicitor (for defendant) admitted defendant used the car to drive his family to Newry to see his mother-in-law, who was ill, and his client did not know it was an offence to use the car in this way.

26-9-1942. TRACTOR WITHOUT LICENCE KE$H COURT FlNE. When William J. Hamilton, Kilmore, was prosecuted at Kesh Petty Sessions on Tuesday for permitting a young boy to drive a tractor without a policy of insurance, Sergeant Bradley stated that the boy gave his age as 13 years and had no licence to drive. Hamilton said that the young lad had been pressing him to learn to drive and he yielded to the boy’s request. Hamilton was fined £3 and costs and a case against the boy was withdrawn. No order was made as to suspension.

26-9-1942. UNPRODUCED IDENTITY CARD. When Dorothy Grimsley, Feddans, Kesh, was charged with failing to produce her identity card to a police constable in uniform, it was stated that defendant elected to produce the card at Kesh but had not done so within the prescribed period. Defendant said she was sorry about the whole thing. Major Dickie, R.M. – You have given everybody a lot of trouble. I am afraid you will have to pay for it. Fined 5s.

26-9-1942. GAELIC SPEAKING PRIESTS. As a result of a motion by Riobard A. Bramharm (An Ard Craobh), adopted by the Dublin Executive of the Gaelic League, the Annual Congress is to be called on to request his Eminence Cardinal MacRory to ensure that at least one Gaelic-speaking priest be appointed to each church in Ireland, to attend to the spiritual needs of Gaels..

26-9-1942. FISHERY CASE AT KESH. Hamilton Shaw, jun., Ardshankill, Boa Island, was charged before Major Dickie, R; M., at Kesh Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, with having had an otter in his possession at Mullans, Boa Island, on 1st June last. Mr. J. Hanna appeared, for Enniskillen Fishery Board, and Mr. Murnaghan defended. William Irvine, water bailiff, gave evidence that when on the shore of Mullans Bay he observed two men fishing on the side of Lusty Beg. Later the boat headed for the Boa Island shore where the men got out. Witness took cover and saw a man—whom he failed to identify—walking from the boat. The other man (defendant) walked out of the boat with something under his arm and hid it in a whin bush. Defendant walked back to the boat, picked up some sticks, and headed off. Witness approached him then and asked him where he had got the fish and he did not give any definite answer. Witness searched the whin bush and found an otter and a line of flies in a wet condition. He followed defendant and took the fish from him. Defendant denied having had the otter. His Worship said he was afraid there was not much doubt about it and imposed a fine of 20s and £2 10s costs, with an order for the forfeiture of the otter and line.

26-9-1942. DISTRESSING FIVEMILETOWN AFFAIR CHILD LOSES LEGS. A distressing accident occurred during harvesting operations on Wednesday evening of last week, when a child aged two years, daughter of Bernard McMahon, Breakley, Fivemiletown, had both legs severed.  It appears the child crept into the corn and became entangled in the reaper. The child was immediately removed to Fermanagh County Hospital, where its condition is still regarded as rather critical.

26-9-1942. INFANTILE PARALYSIS OUTBREAK. Nine deaths from infantile paralysis have been reported since July 1, the Dublin Department of Local Government announced on Tuesday. Apart from the five cases in Dublin city during the week ended September 19, there were 26 cases in the rest of the country for that week. Every possible precaution against the spread of the disease is being taken, the Department adds.

26-9-1942. TWO £10 FINES AT KESH. James Brimstone, Pruckliss, was fined £10 at Kesh Petty Sessions on Tuesday, for knowingly harbouring one head of cattle. A similar charge against John Brimstone, Bannagh, Kesh, was dismissed. Wm. John Mulholland, Derrylougher was fined £l0 for importing or bringing one head of cattle into the United Kingdom.

26-9-1942. £275 AMBULANCE PRESENTED TO A.R.P. SERVICE. The new £275 ambulance provided by Enniskillen subscriptions was presented to the County Fermanagh Civil Defence authorities, on Monday evening by Mr. W. Maxwell, organiser of the committee (consisting of Messrs. J. Ryan Taylor, J. Lusted and D. Devine), who collected the subscriptions. Mr. Maxwell said the committee was formed about 12 months ago, and aimed to collect £250. They exceeded the total by £100. The ambulance cost approximately £275, which left a balance that the committee had decided to keep for running expenses. After the war it was intended to present the ambulance to the Co. Hospital. The Civil Defence authorities would have the use of it for the duration of the war. He thanked all who had assisted in making the project a success. They had a lady driver and lady attendant for the .ambulance—Miss Scott and Mrs. Clarke; and he would like other ladies to join the Civil Defence organisation. Senator G. Whaley, chairman of. Enniskillen U.D.C., receiving the vehicle on behalf of the Civil Defence authorities, said he hoped the ambulance would never. be required in the district for war casualties. There was a very small attendance at the ceremony on the Jail Square. Those present included Capt. Shutt, county organiser of Civil Defence, and Major Henderson; Enniskillen’s A.R.P. chief. The ambulance has accommodation for four stancher cases and is extremely well fitted.      ‘

26-9-1940. FATALITY NEAR BELLEEK. OCTOGENARIAN’S FATAL INJURIES.A fatal motor cycling accident at Brollagh Hill, Belleek on Tuesday of last week was investigated by Mr. G. Warren, coroner and a jury at an inquest on Wednesday. The deceased was Andrew Roohan, aged 86 of Brollagh, who died eight hours knocked down by a motor-cycle at Brollagh Hill at three o’clock approximately. Andrew Roohan, son gave evidence of identification and of seeing his father lying injured on the side of the road. To Mr. P. J. Flanagan, solicitor, for Peter Francis McGovern, Garrison, who was riding the motor cycle. Witness said his father could hear when the voice was raised a little.

Dr. George Kelly, Belleek, stated that he examined deceased on the roadside after the accident. Witness described deceased’s many wounds and gave his opinion that death was due to haemorrhage following injuries together with senility. Witness had treated deceased in the last six months for deafness. Mrs. Teresa Keown, Tullymore, gave evidence that when walking along the road with her daughter and with a baby in her arms, deceased overtook. They walked up the hill and her daughter warned them that a motor-cycle coming behind. Deceased, who was on the outside, looked round partly to his right and the next thing she saw was deceased lying on the road ten yards ahead. The motor-cycle was ridden by McGovern and he had a passenger on behind. To Mr. Flanagan, witness said her opinion was that the motor cyclist had plenty of room to pass on the right without hitting deceased.

Corpl. Francis Hugh Green, R.A.F., who was in the vicinity, stated he heard the sound of brakes being applied. Constable George S. Acheson, R.U.C. deposed to finding deceased lying on the side of the road. The road at the point of impact was eighteen feet wide with an 18-inch grass verge on either side. The motor cyclist (McGovern) pointed a spot five and a half feet from the right-hand side of the road as the point of impact. Witness put in a statement alleged to have been made by McGovern, who stated a pillion passenger and he were coming from Belleek. At Brollagh he saw the man, woman and child on the road in front. As he was about to pass them deceased, he alleged rushed straight to his right. He pulled the machine to the right in an effort to avoid deceased, but the front wheel struck him and deceased and the two men on the machine fell. The reason he did not sound a warning of approach was because he had no bell or horn on the motor cycle. He had two years’ experience of motor cycling. Hr could not have pulled to the left as it would thereby have endangered the lives of the woman and child. McGovern told the jury he had nothing to add to the statement. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony and the Coroner, Head-Constable Briggs and the foreman of the jury expressed sympathy with the relatives of the deceased.

1942 Fermanagh Herald. Belleek Attack.

8-8-1942. SMUGGLER ESCAPES BY RIVER SWIM. LARGE LOAVES SEIZURE BY NEWTOWNBUTLER POLICE. A seven a.m. chase of smugglers on the Monaghan-Fermanagh border last week led to the capture by Sergt. Blevins and Constable Freeman, Newtownbutler, of a large quantity of loaves. Sergt. Blevins, newly transferred to Newtownbutler from Belleek, where his customs work had gained him a wide reputation, surprised two men on the banks of the River Finn, which at this point is the border between the two States. The men were conveying loaves to a ‘’cot,” which is a large unwieldy float for carrying cattle across lakes and rivers in Fermanagh. On the arrival of the police, the cot, drawn up at the Six-County side of the river, already held a large consignment of loaves. As the police rushed to the “cot’’ one man made off across fields in the direction of the border. The other man, divesting himself of his clothes, put his pants around his neck and plunged into the icy-cold water and swam the thirty yards of river to Twenty- Six County territory. Both men made good their escape. The police seized all the loaves and the “cot’ which was later conveyed to Enniskillen. They also found and seized the jacket, waistcoat, boots and other clothing, excepting the trousers of the swimmer.

8-8-1942. TYRES SEIZED AT ENNISKILLEN. Seeing a man dragging two large bags along a railway line at Enniskillen, Sergt. McNally and Constable Walker investigated and found in the bags several doz. bicycle tyres which they seized.

8-8-1942. CUSTOM ACTIVITIES INTENSIFIED. Customs officers along the entire stretch of the Border (on both sides) from Pettigo to Clones are redoubling their efforts to prevent smuggling and the quantity of goods finding their way across from either side must have fallen to such an extent as to be a very small proportion of the former quantities. Trains and buses are gone through almost “with a fine comb” and many cross-border time schedules have been completely upset by the customs delay for months past, but more particularly of late. The intensified efforts, while naturally showing fair returns in seizures, are not producing nearly the same proportion of captures as in former times, the reason probably being that those with an inclination to smuggling are being ‘‘headed off” by the knowledge of what awaits them on arrival at the Customs post. This, of course, refers to ordinary travellers, and does not affect the professional smugglers who presumably have other means of getting across their consignments of prohibited goods. But even these find the more intensive police watch on both sides distinctly more discouraging.

5-9-1942. GLENFARNE NEIGHBOURS’ DISPUTE. AN ASSAULT CASE. “ Jealousy Over Land ” CASE AT KILTYCLOGHER COURT. At Kiltyclogher District Court on Tuesday, before Mr., Flattery, District Justice, Patrick McDermott, a minor, through his father, Peter McDermott, Lougnross, summoned Peter Clancy, of the same place, for alleged assault.

Mr. Alfred McMorrow, B.A., L.L.B., appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. P. O’Flynn, solicitor, Manorhamilton, appeared for defendant. Patrick McDermott, in evidence, stated that a few evenings before the alleged assault had taken place, Mrs. Clancy was milking a cow on the road and the cow had .its head across a gate leading into his (plaintiffs) father’s field. There had been some words between defendant’s wife and himself on that occasion about trespass, and a few days later, when he (plaintiff), was riding down the road on a donkey, Peter Clancy had come down the road meeting him and had knocked him off the donkey with a blow of a spade shaft and had got on top of him, pounding him with his knees. He had to take through another man’s land to escape as he could, not pass Clancy’s house.

Mr. O’Flynn—-Were you not prosecuted some time ago in this Court for stealing Clancy’s fowl?

Witness—It was my brother took the fowl; I only accompanied him.

Mr. O’Flynn—You were along with your brother, and for that reason you have spite in for Clancy. Do you know anything of a well between Clancy’s land and the land of a man named Flynn?—There is water in a shough; it is not a well.

Mr. O’Flynn — Why did you put bushes around that well from which the Clancy’s get water ?—I did it to stop trespass of cattle.

Mr. O’Flynn—On the evening of this terrible assault was Clancy thatching? — He was not.

Mr. O’Flynn—I put it to you that Clancy was thatching, and when you came down the road he came down the ladder and asked you what filthy language you had used to his wife. – He was not thatching.

Did you call Clancy a grabber?—-No.

You didn’t go home to tell your father about this terrible assault? A slap was all you got.

Peter McDermott, father of plaintiff, in evidence, stated that he suffered a lot with Clancy, all owing to jealousy over a bit of land he got. Clancy’s cattle were always on his land.

Mr. McMorrow-—You were going to town on the day of the assault? — I was going to the town, and I went to Clancy’s house and asked for a drink of water. Clancy came round the house with a knife in his hand, and said to me “When I get up to that son of yours it won’t be good for him.”

Mr, .O’Flynn — You went to the house of your greatest enemy and you asked for water. Did you get milk? — I did.

Mr. O’Flynn — You got more than you asked for. Was Clancy thatching?—I don’t know.

Mr. O’Flynn — You say he had a knife in his hand? Of course that knife was for cutting the scallops. Did he complain about the language your son used to his wife, and did you tell him to correct your son every time he heard him because he uses language like that at home?—I don’t remember.

5-9-1942. Clones Call for Reprieve—At the meeting of Clones Urban Council on the motion of Mr. McCabe, seconded by Mr. O’Connor, it was decided to send the following telegram to  the Duke of Abercorn:—“The newly elected Urban District Council of Clones composed of all shades of religion and politics, begs your Grace to use your prerogative of mercy for the reprieve of the six young men under sentence of death. By doing so you will ensure goodwill and friendship amongst the people on both sides of the border.”

 

5-9-1942. BELFAST YOUTH EXECUTED. WILLIAMS BORE UP WELL TO THE END. EARLY MORNING SCENES. POUCE PRECAUTIONS IN VICINITY OF PRISON. Thomas Joseph Williams, aged 19 was executed at Belfast Prison on Wednesday morning at 8 o’clock, all efforts to secure his reprieve having failed. At 8.15 a.m. a notice intimating that the death sentence had been carried out in their presence was posted on the prison gate and signed Robert Henderson, Sheriff for Belfast, George Stewart, Justice of the Peace, Thomas Moore Stuart, Governor of the prison, and Rev. T. McAllister, Chaplain.

Young Williams bore up well to the end. He had been visited by relatives a short time prior to the execution and his spiritual comforts were attended to by priests in attendance. Precautions against a demonstration were taken by the police and crowds who gathered at various points at the approaches to the jail and knelt in prayer.

No people were allowed into Crumlin Road for a distance of about 200 yards in front of the prison. A police car patrolled the area around the prison and a strong cordon of police was also drawn around the district.      .

As eight o’clock was striking there was an opposition demonstration in Old Park Road when about 100 women and girls gathered and sung ‘’God Save the King” and British songs and engaged in cheering. They were forced into side streets by the police.

Williams, with five others was convicted and sentenced at the Assize Commission in August on the charge of causing the death of Constable Murphy, R.U.C., by shooting in April. An appeal to the Court of Criminal Appeal over a week ago was dismissed. A Nationwide appeal for the reprieve of the youths was without result in the case of Williams. On Sunday last Lord Abercorn’s statement announcing the reprieve of five of the youths was issued but it stated that the law must take its course in the case of Williams.

LORD ABERCORN’S STATEMENT. The statement issued at Stormont Castle said that the Six-County Governor had considered the cases of Thomas J. Williams, William J. Perry, Henry Cordner, John T. Oliver, Joseph Cahill and Patrick Simpson, ‘’prisoners lying under sentence of death in His Majesty’s Prison Belfast,” and decided that in the case of Williams the law must take its course, that the sentences in the cases of Perry, Cordner, Oliver and Cahill be commuted to penal servitude for life, and that Simpson’s sentence, be commuted to15 years’ penal servitude. The Governor’s decision was conveyed to the parents of the five reprieved men by Mr. D. F. Marrinan, their solicitor.

 

5-9-1942. …. and that such consecration as may be desired by the Church of England or the Catholic Church should be carried out on the individual grave. It was found that this principle met the wishes of the fighting Services better than the use of denominational plots and that it corresponded to a very deep conviction that the graves of men of very different faiths, who died, however, in a single cause, should be side by side. “If the local conditions make it necessary for a Separate Catholic plot to be formed, will you please arrange this through our District Inspector.’’ The Chairman—I suppose the Council would have no objection to that. Mr. William-Kelly—It is all the same, I think. The Council decided to grant Archdeacon Gannon’s request.

5-9-1942. £100 FOR ENNISKILLEN GRAVEYARD CARETAKER. The caretaker of Enniskillen new Cemetery—Mr. Jas. H. Kerr—applied to Enniskillen Rural Council for an increase of salary. The application, made last May, was adjourned till Tuesday, when the members had received the report of the Committee relative to the acquisition by the Catholic people of their hitherto unused plot. Mr. Kerr, who has £50 a year with free house, coal and light, plus £7 10s 0d a year war bonus, said he was afraid of the extension throwing so much additional work on him that, with the scarcity of  labour, he would find it difficult to cope with it. On the proposal of Mr. J. J. Bowler, seconded by Mr. A. Wilson, the Council unanimously agreed to increase Mr. Kerr’s salary to £100 a-year and to make him wholly responsible for the carrying out of all work at the Cemetery. -The Clerk pointed out that on many occasions the Registrar was not given sufficiently early notice of burials.

Old Graveyards—Caretakers’ Replies. Recently complaints were made as to the state of the old graveyards in Enniskillen rural area under the care of the Rural Council, and the Clerk was directed to write to the caretakers drawing their attention, to the complaints. Here are three replies received by the Council from caretakers :— From the caretaker of the old graveyard in Kinawley—‘‘I have mowed it twice this summer—the last time less than a month ago—and am now going to mow it a third time. It is quite possible that the person or persons who complained to you about the appearance of the graveyard, made a mistake about .the identity of .the plot. You can enquire off  some local person around the village about the  appearance of the old graveyard.’’ Devenish graveyard caretaker stated  that he never had failed to mow the graveyard, while the caretaker of. Pubble cemetery, Tempo, said: ‘‘I mow it once every year, and at the same time I remove the weeds, and trim the hedge.”

5-9-1942. GARVARY PENSIONER’S ESCAPE. An old-age pensioner named Mary McQuillan, of Shankhill, Garvary, had a remarkable escape when she was knocked down by a military lorry. Found lying in a pool of blood, she was rushed to hospital where it was found that her injuries were superficial. When knocked down she was going for a jug of milk, and on reaching hospital she was still clutching the jug.

5-9-1942. CAVAN FARMER FOR TRIAL. At Cavan District Court, before District Justice Lavery, Patrick Greene (24) farmer, Enniskeen, Kingscourt, was charged with maliciously burning a quantity of hay, value £100 the property of Patrick Tinnelly, Enniskeen, and maliciously burning a cart and harness and other property, value £50. Accused was returned for trial.

5-9-1942. Rossinver Convent.—The Franciscan Sisters of the Atonement of the Mother Lurana Mary Francis House, Rossinver, County Leitrim, have pleasure in announcing that permission has been given by the Holy See to make the Mother Lurana Mary Francis House a Temporary Novitiate for the duration of the war. The time of receptions will be announced later.

5-9-1942. £2 5s for Graveyard Caretaker.—At Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Mr. J. Murphy enquired if the salary of the caretaker of Cleenish Old Graveyard had been increased recently. The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) said originally the salary was 30/-. Then about two years ago the salaries of all graveyard caretakers were increased by 50 per cent.

5-9-1942. Catholic Burials — Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry, J.P., presiding, instructed its engineer, Mr. James Donnelly, to prepare a specification for carrying out certain works at the New Cemetery, where the local Catholic community are utilizing their plot in future owing to lack of space at the Catholic Cemetery.

5-9-1942. NOTICE TO OUR CUSTOMERS. THE DERBY CAFÉ,ENNISKILLEN, WILL BE CLOSED ALL DAY THURSDAY,10TH SEPT. RE-OPENING FRIDAY MORNING.

5-9-1942. BUNDORAN LADY DIES IN COUNTY FERMANAGH. The death occurred of Mrs. F. Maguire, late of’ Ocean View, Bundoran. Since the death of her husband she had resided with her son and daughter-in-law at Lattoon, Belcoo, Co. Fermanagh. At the funeral last week the chief mourners were—James Hackett, Clogher (brother); Mrs. P. Carty (daughter); John and Freddie Maguire (sons); Peter Carty (son-in-law); Mrs. J. Maguire and Mrs. F. Maguire (daughters-in-law); Miss M. Maguire (sister-in-law); Nano, Packie and John Maguire, Jose, Jack, Frankie, Paddy, Peter and Michael Carty (grandchildren).

5-9-1942. AMERICAN SOLDIER SENTENCED. SEQUEL TO FATAL STABBING. Found guilty by secret ballot of the manslaughter of a member of the British Pioneer Corps, an American soldier, Pte. William Davis (23), of Texas, was sentenced to eight years’ imprisonment by a United States Army courtmartial in the Six Counties on Tuesday.He was also ordered to be dishonourably discharged from the American Army. Davis, who was found not guilty on the original charge of murdering the Pioneer Private, Owen McLoughlin, of Motherwell, will be sent back to America to serve the sentence in a penitentiary. McLaughlin was fatally stabbed on August 1st during a row at a dance in Randalstown Orange Hall.

5-9-1942. THREE TYRONE SISTERS ENTER RELIGIOUS LIFE. Miss Agnes Murray (Sister Mary Laurence) was finally professed, and her sister Winnie (Sister Bernard Therese) made her first profession at La Sainty Union Convent, Bath, on 15th August. Another sister Miss May Murray, H. Dip., has entered the Loreto order in Llandudno, North Wales. She was educated at St. Louis Convent, Carrickmacross, and University College. Dublin. Miss Winnie Murray was educated at Loreto Convent, Omagh, and the Convent High School, Southampton. They are daughters of Mr. .and Mrs. Patrick Murray, Rathfragan, Fintona.

5-9-1942. TO FIGHT TUBERCULOSIS IN BRITAIN. A number of sets of miniature radiography apparatus-the new weapon to combat tuberculosis—has been ordered and may be ready about the end of the year, Mr. Ernest Brown, British Minister of Health, disclosed on Monday opening a sanatorium at Nottingham. We have many difficult problems to solve in finding how the best use can be made of this new weapon, he said. Ideally everyone ought to undergo a regular examination and look upon it as a normal health measure. The fight against tuberculosis—that scourge happiness and destroyer of manpower has a definite, and by no means unimportant, place in the nation’s war effort.

5-9-1942. TRANSACTIONS IN BRANDY. TWO MEN FINED AT BELFAST.

CASE AGAINST ENNISKILLEN MAN. Fines totalling £125 or in default three months imprisonment were imposed by Major Dickie, R.M., in Belfast Summons Court on Desmond McGratty, Ormond Road, Dublin, in Customs prosecutions arising out of transactions in brandy. Samuel Moore, Down St., Enniskillen, was fined in sums aggregating £101 and ordered 12 months’ imprisonment without hard labour. Immediate warrants were issued against both defendants. The summons against McGratty was for being concerned in dealing in 59 bottles of brandy and a bottle of wine, with dealing wholesale in .spirits without a licence, and for causing to be harboured 446 bottles of brandy. Moore was summoned for dealing in 59 bottles of brandy, delivering spirits without a permit, dealing wholesale in spirits without a licence, and causing spirits to be harboured.

Fines of £10 were imposed on R. M. McLane and John Watters, publicans, Belfast, for failing to make an entry in their stock books and other cases against them were dismissed. The former was summoned for being concerned in dealing with 59 bottles of brandy and a bottle of wine, with receiving spirits without a permit and failing to make the necessary stock book entries, and the latter for being concerned in harbouring 446 bottles of brandy, for receiving spirits without a licence, and for failing to make the necessary stock book entries.

Mr. T. J. Campbell, K.C., M.P. (instructed by Messrs. J. Donnelly & Co.) for the defence, said if there was any offence at all it was a Customs offence, and he submitted that his clients were innocent even of the Customs charge. Mr. R. F. Sheldon (Crown Solicitor), for the Commissioners of Customs and Excise, gave notice of appeal in the Excise Cases against these two defendants.

5-9-1942. POLICE RAIDS IN BELFAST. 200 PERSONS DETAINED. Belfast police raided various districts in the city early this week and as a result 200 men have been detained. The raids began at five o’clock on Tuesday morning and the district covered include Falls Road, Ardoyne, North Queen Street, the Dock area, the Markets area, and portions of Ballymacarret and Short Strand. A very large force of police was engaged and the swoop was made simultaneously in each district. The majority of the suspects were taken from their beds, and the men, having been allowed to dress, were removed in cage cars and taken under strong escort to the cells at Chichester Street. There was intense police activity in the Falls Road area of Belfast all during Tuesday night and into the early hours of Wednesday morning.

A number of houses were raided. One man is known to have been detained. In Lisburn district there were also extensive police raids and a number of persons taken to the local barracks were questioned and afterwards released. There were many raids on Thursday night and early on Friday morning. After a night of patrol activity by armoured cars, police in tenders and on foot carried out concentrated raids at dawn. It is understood that the people detained are mostly youths, but a number of girls are also under detention.    In one case a father and his five sons were taken, leaving the mother the only remaining member of the family. . Police waited outside factories and mills and questioned young men as they left at lunch hour. Some on arriving home were detained.

In one street in the Falls, police with drawn revolvers followed a number of youths and later another chase developed when a young man jumped out the back door of a house when the police entered, and ran across the Bog Meadows. The men detained comprised dockers, factory, mill and munition workers and some A.R.P. wardens and fire watchers were taken to the barracks.

12-9-1942. BELLEEK BARRACKS ATTACKED. BOMBS FAILED TO EXPLODE, SHOTS FIRED. ENNISKILLEN HOUSE SEARCHES. At 4 o’clock on Friday morning the R.U.C. Barracks at Belleek, a short distance from the .Border, was attacked. A homemade time bomb or bombs placed near the building failed to explode. Shots were fired at the barracks and to these the police replied. The telephone wires to Enniskillen were cut but the police got a message through to Kesh from which a police party under Head-Constable  Conlin rushed to the assistance of their Belleek colleagues. After less than half an hour, however, the firing ceased and the only damage caused was a few windows broken in the barracks. About fifty shots in all were fired. Considerable police activity followed, several men in the Belleek district being questioned. Police from County Head-quarters at Enniskillen, under County Inspector Gorman for several hours investigated and received reports on the occurrence.

ENNISKILLEN SEARCHES. In Enniskillen district during Friday six houses were visited by a party of armed police and detectives. Nothing was found it is believed. One mart, Mr. Bertie Love, of Mill St., Enniskillen, was painting on the roof of a hut several miles from the town when he was taken into custody. He was later released. In the interval, he was lengthily and closely questioned by several police officers. His house was one of those searched. Other houses raided included that of Mr. Sean Nethercott, Paget Square, well known Fermanagh Nationalist, and Mr. W. J. Monaghan, U.D.C., P.L.G. Several hours were spent in each search.

OFFICIAL STATEMENT. On Friday night R.U.C. headquarters issued this statement:—“At 4 a.m. to-day Belleek barracks, Co. Fermanagh was attacked by fire and bombs. About fifty shots were fired. Police returned the fire. After calling on the police to surrender, the assailants disappeared.

RANDALSTOWN AFFAIR. The explosion at Randalstown barracks, caused by a bomb placed on the sill, blew in one window and the surrounding brickwork, cut the heavy steel bars over the window, badly damaged adjacent houses and broke windows for a hundred yards on either side of the barracks. One of the injured policemen, Sergeant McCammond was flung across the day room and through a door opposite the window. He had been doing clerical work at the time. Constable Bunting, the other injured man, who was standing in the centre of the room was blown against another door and knocked semi-conscious. The sergeant was found to have a fracture of the left arm and severe abrasions to the left leg when he was removed to the Royal Victoria Hospital, where he was stated last night to be comfortable. The constable was not .seriously hurt. The day room is only 9ft. by 12ft. The floor was littered with bricks and other debris, while the walls were pitted with holes.

12-9-1942. ROSLEA COURT BORDER MERCHANT FINED. At Rosslea Petty Sessions before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., John Maguire, merchant, Lackey, Roslea (near Clones), was charged on three counts with being in possession of the following goods with intent to evade export prohibition— 8 cwts. rice, 5 cwts. barley, 2½ cwts. S/R flour, 3 cwts. currants, 2 stones sultanas, 96 tins salmon and 42 lbs. soap powder. Mr. J. Cooper, Crown Solicitor, prosecuted, and Mr, Herbert, solicitor defended. Martin Shaw McMullen, of McKay and Leetham, Belfast, deposed to selling the goods to defendant on September 23rd, 1941. He had never seen defendant before. Cross-examined by Mr. Herbert, witness said there were no restrictions on the goods at that time.

Sergeant Moffatt deposed to visiting defendant’s premises, which were about 20 yards from the border, on Oct. 29th. Defendant had a very small stock and the goods which were seized were found in defendant’s dwelling-house. At that time witness could find no trace of baking soda or lentils which defendant had purchased in Belfast. In a statement defendant said half the goods were for a Mr. Somerville who owned a shop about 1½ miles away. Defendant refused to sign the statement.

Defendant, in evidence, stated he was an ex-serviceman and had served in the British army in France and in the East during the last war. He had been in business for himself since 1934 and was on friendly terms with Mr. Somerville, Clones with whom he had previously been employed. His purchases from January, 1941 to August, 1942, were £910. Witness had never any intention of smuggling these goods across the border. Convicting, defendant of being in possession of the goods for export, the R.M, imposed a fine of £60, with time to pay. He dismissed the other two charges. He ordered the forfeiture of 2 cwts. of barley and 2 cwts. of currants.

12-9-1942. MISCONDUCT AT WEEKLY DANCES. AMERICAN OFFICERS’ COMPLAINT.  A letter was read from the officer in charge of U.S.A. military police, regarding dances held in the Minor Townhall—particularly those held on Saturday nights, under the auspices of the football club. It stated: “The door keepers have no limit in admission; the result being that the atmosphere is appalling. There is no room to dance and when evilly disposed. There is no room to dance and when evilly disposed persons start a “brawl’ the hall is so crowded it is impossible to pick out the participants. We suggest that the number of persons admitted be limited to 150 at the outside. We are agreeable to place joint police patrols at the door, who will be responsible for seeing that the service men do not gain admittance after the correct number had been reached, and also our patrols will enter the hall if there is any disorder among the service personnel at the request of the door keeper or a member of the dance committee. We take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation to all classes in Enniskillen for the hospitality and cooperation we have invariably received.” In a subsequent letter it was stated: “We can no longer provide police patrols for duty at the above mentioned dances as we are not getting the cooperation of the organisers.’’

The Chairman (Mr. Johnston) said the difficulty was 200 to 300 people go to this dance and the place gets choked up. One dance last week had to be stopped on account of the conduct. There was only one thing they could do and it would be a drastic remedy—close the hall altogether to these dances. The Council made an order that the number of persons to be admitted to a dance in the Minor Hall be limited to 150.

12-9-1942. LEITRIM COUNCIL SYMPATHY. THE BALLINAMORE TRAGEDY. Mr. Mooney proposed a vote of sympathy with the relatives of the victims of the Ballinamore drowning tragedy. He happened to be in Ballinamore the previous Tuesday, and he witnessed a scene of sorrow there which he hoped never to see again. It was a consolation to know that the children who lost their lives were daily attenders at Mass and communicants. Therefore they were well prepared to meet their Creator, and their parents had the whole-hearted sympathy of the Council in their bereavement. Mr, P. J. Reynolds, in seconding said it was his intention as a member of the Council for Ballinamore area to propose a vote of sympathy as he thought according to procedure the agenda had to be finished first before taking up consideration of such a resolution. The parents had the wholehearted sympathy of the Leitrim County Council in the great loss which they had sustained. The Chairman said the sad occurrence had cast a gloom not alone over the Ballinamore area but it caused a painful shock throughout “Eire.” They sympathised deeply with the relatives of those children.

12-9-1942. DEARER 26-CO. BREAD. The price of the 41b. batch loaf is to be raised in the 26 Counties from ls to ls 1d, delivered, as from September 21. The price will be Is when sold at bakers’ shops. The price of flour (including wheaten meal) will be increased South of the Border from 52s 6d a sack of 280 lbs. to 60s free on rail at port mills, as from September 14th. The flour price increase is attributed to the new guaranteed price of 50s a barrel for Irish wheat,

12-9-1942. GLANGEVLIN TRAGEDY. MAN FOUND HANGED. A distressing tragedy was discovered in Glengevlin on Friday afternoon when Peter McGovern, Bealballie, Glangevlin was found dead, suspended from a rope, in his home. A niece of deceased, who had acted as housekeeper for him, had left on the previous evening to visit her sister’s house, some miles away. On her return on Friday afternoon she found the door bolted and. was unable to gain admittance. Securing assistance the door was forced .and the grim discovery made. THE INQUEST. At an inquest held on Saturday a verdict of suicide while of unsound mind was returned. It was stated that deceased had not been in good health since a recent illness. Sympathy was extended to his relatives. The funeral, which took place to Glangevlin, was largely attended.

12-9-1942. BALLYSHANNON COURT. JAIL SENTENCES FOR ASSAULT. At Ballyshannon District Court, before Mr. J. O’Hanrahan, D.J., Patrick and John Rooney, Single Street, Bundoran, were each sentenced to two months’ imprisonment with hard labour for assaulting Charles Gorman, who said he was cut in several places, Lieut. James Mahony, National Army, said one of the Rooneys held Gorman as the other beat him. Witness interfered and took the man away. John Rooney said Gorman started the row.

12-9-1942. KESH MAN GETS DECREE. A decree for £25 was given in a civil bill brought by Francis Maguire, Derrynieve, Kesh, against Lena Gallagher, Tourist House, Bundoran, for that amount due for. cash lent and advanced by plaintiff to defendant on the 20tk October, 1938.

12-9-1942. 60 DOZEN EGGS SEIZED. Imposing a penalty of £100 with a recommendation that it be reduced to £5 in a case in which James McGonigle, Corlea, was convicted of attempting to smuggle 60 dozen eggs across the Border, the Justice said he hoped it would serve as a warning to people on this side of the Border not to be catspaws for those outside the jurisdiction of the State. Garda McGarvey said when questioned McGonigle, who was carrying three boxes of eggs, in a donkey cart in the direction of Corlea, said he was conveying them for a day’s pay from a shop in Cashelard to a man who lived in the Belleek district. The eggs were seized.

12-9-1942. DRUMKEERAN DISTRICT COURT LICENCE APPLICATIONS. Mr. M, J. C. Keane, District Justice, presided at this Court on Wednesday. DANCE LICENCE. Mr. H. Murray, solicitor (Mr. C. L. Flynn), Carrick-on-Shannon, applied on behalf of Mrs. Celia Crowne, Drumkeeran, for an annual dance licence in respect of Crowne’s Hall, Drumkeeran.

Superintendent McNamara, Carrick-on-Shannon, said there was no objection to the licence and the Justice granted the application as asked by Mr. Murray— twenty dances in the year from 8 p.m. to 12 midnight. Mr. Thomas Dowd, Gluckawn, was granted a licence to hold a dance at Gluckawn National School, the guards having no objection.

ANNUAL LICENCES. The publicans in Drumkeeran and district had their annual applications listed for the renewal of their licence and as there was no objection the applications were granted, as also exemptions for early opening on fair mornings.

Mr. Patrick Dolan, .Drumkeeran, applied for the renewal of his spirit grocery wholesale and retail licence, and the Justice inquired if there was any proof of valuation with regard to the wholesale licence. Mr. Early, court clerk, said the applicant was within the limitation and had been granted a licence on a previous occasion. The renewal of the licence was accordingly granted.

12-9-1942. D.J. SUGGESTS TRANSPORT FACILITIES TO COURT. MINERS’ ABSENCE HOLDS UP CASE. Fifteen miners, summoned to give evidence at Ballyfarnon in a series of cases under the Holidays (Employees) Act, 1939, against Michael Leydon, managing director Arigna Collieries, Ltd., failed to appear, and Mr. Keane, D.J., adjourned the summonses for a month for their attendance. It was alleged that Mr. Leydon had failed to give workers annual leave and public holidays, and had failed to pay, assessor pay when they quitted his employment.

Mr. M. Lavin, Inspector of Mines and Factories, said Mr. Leydon had told him that he thought the Act did not apply to his mines. Mr. Leydon, after the issue of the summonses, sent a letter to the Department enclosing receipts from the persons concerned stating that they had got payment in respect of assessor pay, annual leave and holidays. Mr. C. E. Callan, defending, said the inspector had prevented Mr. Leydon increasing the men’s wages. The men could not be present at court owing to transport difficulties. Mr. Keane thought that some effort to transport them to court might he made.

12-9-1942. SMALL FINES PROTEST. CROWN SOLICITOR AND R.M. When at Tynan Petty Sessions on Saturday, Mr. Austin, R.M., fined Patk. Carbery, Balteagh, Middletown, £15 for having been concerned in carrying 35 bottles whisky, uncustomed goods, Mr, J. P. Best (Crown Solicitor) said it was no use the Commissioners getting small penalties like that.He again protested when Fras. Hughes, Lislanley, was fined £3 in respect of two cycle tyres.

If these penalties were to continue he suggested to the Commissioners that they make the minimum fine £100. Mr. Austin — If you want to fill the prisons well and good. Mr. Best—Small penalties encourage smuggling. Mr. Austin—I don’t believe in imprisonment unless it is absolutely necessary. Mr. Best — You don’t seem to think there is a war on.

SUING FOR £1,000 FINE. When Patrick Hamill, John St., Portadown, was charged in respect of 2 lbs. tea. Mr. Best said that under a new Order the authorities were suing for a. £1,000 fine. The R.M.—Very well, I will fine him £1,000. Then he goes to jail. Defendant—I’ll go to prison rather than pay £1,000. Mr. Best, (to the R.M.)—If you want to make yourself ridiculous you can impose the fine. A fine of £3 was imposed.

12-9-1942. BLACK-OUT WARNING. “I would like people clearly to understand that penalties will be very heavy in the coming winter if they don’t blackout, said Major Dickie, R.M:, at Enniskillen Petty Sessions on Monday. Addressing District Inspector Peacocke, his  Worship said: “At the same time, Mr. Peacock, I might suggest, that it would be well to draw, the attention of the military authorities to the practice of military cars and lorries not only passing through Enniskillen, but parking in Enniskillen, with unscreened headlights full on. I counted six of them at midnight with blazing headlights. . The whole town of Enniskillen must have been blazing with lights visible from the air for miles away,” he said. D. I. Peacocke—That matter has been given attention already. Of course you understand we must approach the authorities. In, the black-out cases before the Court, his Worship imposed fines of 5/- and costs in the majority and in one a fine of 20/- and costs was ordered.

COCOA SALE: £31 FINE. Thomas Coogan, merchant, Ballybay, was fined £20 and his brother, Patrick Coogan, £5 when summoned at Ballybay for charging 3/9 for a lb. of cocoa. They were also fined £2 each for selling the  cocoa to a non-customer For refusing to give a. receipt a further fine of £2 was imposed on Patrick Coogan.

12-9-1942. ROSLEA DROWNING TRAGEDY. FATHER’S STORY AT INQUEST. How a horrified father watched his son drown in a lake a short distance from the shore was described at an inquest held in Rosslea on Wednesday of last week into the circumstances of the death of a boy named Frank Morton (18) son of Constable Francis Morton, R.U.C., Rosslea, who: was drowned in Drumacritten Lake on the previous evening. The inquest was held by Mr. James Mulligan, Coroner, sitting without a jury. District Inspector Smyth, Lisnaskea, conducted the proceedings for the Crown. The death of young Morton, who was a general favourite with everyone, caused a pall of gloom in the district. A lad of fine physique, measuring six feet in height, the deceased was about to be accepted in the police force, and his untimely death has evoked widespread sympathy. A native of Co. Armagh, his father was transferred from Derrylin about five months ago, Deceased was his second eldest child, fond, of all kind of sport and a remarkably strong swimmer.

At the inquest, Constable Horton, who was obviously overcome with grief, stated that on the evening of the tragedy witness left his home about 6.30 to have a shot with his gun. His sons, Frank (dead) and George, asked him where he was going, and witness told them so that they would know where to get him. Later witness shot two wild ducks rising off  Drumacritten Lake. Witness tried to get his setter dog to go out for the ducks, but the dog would not go, as it had not seen the ducks on the water. Witness gave up trying to get the ducks and was going away when his two sons arrived. Frank said he would go in for the ducks, and started to take off his clothes. Deceased was a strong swimmer. His son entered the water, and when he was about halfway turned to come back, shouting for help. Witness ran up to a .field to get assistance, but when, he returned he could only see bubbles where his son had disappeared. A verdict of accidental death was returned and sympathy expressed with the bereaved family and relatives.

12-9-1942. SYMPATHY WITH POLICEMAN. When Constable Frank Morton, R.U.C., was giving evidence in a black-out case, Major Dickie said he would like to mention how much they all sympathised with Constable Morton on the occasion of his recent sad bereavement. They were all extremely sorry. Mr. Cooper also, associated himself with the expression of sympathy and Constable Morton, returned thanks. Constable Morton’s 18-year-old son had been drowned in a lake hear Roslea a couple, of days previously. Fines were imposed in a number of cases against householders for not having their premises effectively blacked-out, and Major Dickie said the .penalties would be much heavier this winter if there were any complaints from the R.A.F.

1942. August.

 

1-8-1942.ENNISKILLEN MAN SENTENCED. EXPORT OF LORRIES. John O’Connor, a 26-year-old motor trader, of Enniskillen, was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment when he pleaded guilty before a Special Criminal Court in Dublin to four charges arising out of the purchase and exportation of motor-lorries from the 26 county area to a six county border area. Mr. Trant McCarthy, solicitor, for O’Connor, pleaded for a fine instead of imprisonment and said that O’Connor had been followed by tragedy from his early days. He was suffering from tuberculosis from 1935 to 1937 spent two years in hospital and was, compelled to use crutches after his discharge. He was about to undergo, a serious operation in a few days. The Court said that they could not vary the sentence.

1-8-1942. GAELIC PILCRIMS TO LOUGH DERG. One hundred and. thirty Gaelic speaking pilgrims left Dublin on Saturday on a Pilgrimage to Lough Derg sponsored by Croabh na h-Aiseirghe. It has for its object “Siochain an Domhain agus Saoirse na h-Eireann. They were joined by a party of Gaelic speakers from Tyrone and other parts of the Six Counties. The spiritual directors were An t-Athair Raghnall MacGiolla Gunna, O.F.M., and An t-Athair Leonardo Mattimoe, O.F.M. The Dublin pilgrims arrived back in the city on Monday.

1-8-1942.SEIZURES NEAR KESH.CATTLE AND SHEEP. Head-Constable Conlin, R.U.C., Kesh, Co. Fermanagh seized 200 sheep at Drumarn, Lisnarick, on suspicion of being imported from the 26 counties. He also seized 7 head of large cattle at Coalisland, Tyrone, on suspicion of being imported at the Fermanagh border.

1-8-1942.FERMANAGH YOUTH KILLED. EVIDENCE AT INQUEST. Charles Johnston, aged 20 years, a shop assisting at Gola, Lisbellaw, was killed in a motoring accident at Gola on Sunday. At about 6.45 p.m. he was travelling on a motor-cycle from Lisbellaw direction and at the cross roads he collided with a motor car being driven from Lisnaskea by Mr. B. L. Winslow, solicitor, Enniskillen. Death was instantaneous. At the inquest on Monday evening evidence was given that deceased emerged from the side road at Gola creamery and dashed into the side of Mr, Winslow’s car, which was on its proper side of the road. Deceased struck his forehead against the hinge of the door on the right hand side of the car, and went on for 19 or 20 yards when lie fell off the bicycle. A verdict was returned that death was due to haemorrhage and severe laceration of the brain and no blame was attached to Mr. Winslow. Sympathy was tendered to the relatives of deceased. Deceased resided with his uncle, Mr. George Clingan, Belleisle. Formerly he lived at Ballycassidy, when his mother, the late Mrs. Johnston, taught at Shanmullagh School.

1-8-1942.21,000 BOOKS GIVEN. ENNISKILLEN PAPER DRIVE. The people of Enniskillen and district responded on Saturday to the appeal for 5,000 books to help to swell the total in the waste paper competition. The town hopes to get a £1,000 prize. A temporary receiving stall was erected at The Diamond, and during the day this became the Mecca for hundreds of people who deposited their cast novels, magazines, etc. The local hon. organiser for salvage, Mr. D. Devine, had the assistance of several ladies, the Enniskillen Boy Scouts, Wolf Cubs and Girl Guides, as well as the Urban, Council employees. During the entire morning a U.S. Army band rendered selections. Shortly after 2.0 o’clock it was announced that 15,000 books had been received, and at 6.0 p.m. the total was in the region of 21,000.

1-8-1942. MILITARY EXERCISES IN TYRONE AND FERMANAGH. Large scale and realistic combined exercises in which Home Guards, military and auxiliary services in the Counties of Tyrone and Fermanagh took place during last week. The opposition was provided by the United States Forces whose tanks units, police, and A.P.R. services were in action.The tests were carried out in regard to communications between Tyrone and Fermanagh and in the matter of general administration and efficiency. (Ed. Who won?)

1-8-1942. Gaelic Festival at Ederney. PRIEST’S APPEAL FOR THE LANGUAGE, MUSIC, SONG AND DANCE. AN INTERESTING PROGRAMME. The greatest concourse of people ever seen in St. Joseph’s Park; Ederney, assembled on Sunday last to witness and partake in a real feast of Gaelic song, dance and sport while the close association between Gaelic culture and religion was indicated by the inclusion in the programme for the day of competition in Plain Chant. Rev. P. McCarney, P.P., in opening the proceedings, first expressed his regret and the regret of the people in general at the enforced absence of Mr. Cahir Healy, and hoped that we would soon have him amongst us once more as, no doubt he was present that day in spirit. In the unavoidable absence, he said, of prominent Gaels better qualified than he to deliver the opening oration he would enumerate a few points of interest in connection with such events as he was called on to declare open. The work of the Gaelic League is too well known to require any explanation. One can easily see evidence of preservation of Gaelic culture in language, arts and sports. Such events as these serve to remind the people, that as Irishmen and women they have a heritage to be cherished and handed on intact to future generations. When the most of Europe was uncivilised Ireland was the seat of culture and learning —a culture dating right back to prehistoric times and the Gaels were one of the most civilised and cultured races that ever inhabited any part of Europe. When aggression and other misfortunes fell to the lot of the Irish people and they had a series of bitter trials to endure this culture was in grave danger of destruction. The national language was prohibited and a foreign one substituted; education was denied to Irish children and later teachers who knew no Irish were appointed to teach children, who knew no English. In spite of these misfortunes the language still lives to-day, thanks to the patriotism and devotion of our forefathers and, in later years, to the founders and members of the Gaelic League. Recent misfortunes, continued Father Mc Carney, taught the people of France to cherish the ideals of their country and aid in bringing about a revival of patriotism and realisation of the duty they owed to past generations, but it is to be hoped that we in Ireland may awake, without the bursting of shells or crashing of bombs, to a fuller realisation of the beauties and greatness of our country, its language, music and sport. (Applause).

MUSICAL SELECTIONS. Appropriate musical selections were rendered by Tummery Pipers under the direction of their able bandmaster, Mr. James Irvine, and their rousing music and colourful native costumes added much to the brilliance and enjoyment of the proceedings. In this connection too St. Dympna’s Ceilidhe Band, Dromore, provided first class entertainment. Priests and people from all the surrounding parishes were present and helped to make the event the success that it was.

COMPETITION RESULTS.

Plain Chant 1.  Sacred Heart Choir, Irvinestown; 2, St. Joseph’s Choir, Ederney.

Songs in Gaelic—1, Ederney School Choir; 2 Irvinestown Boys’ Choir.

Anglo-Irish songs—1, Irvinestown Boys’ Choir; 2, Ederney School Choir.

Lilting—1, Michael McCann, Dromore; 2, Patrick Maguire, Sydare.

Traditional violin—1, P. Maguire, Sydare; 2, P. McNabb, Tummery.

Melodeon—1, Jack McCann, Dromore; 2, Sean McVeigh, do.

Three-hand reel. — 1, Knocknagor Troupe; 2, Kilskeery Troupe.

Hornpipe (senr.)- l, Mairead Bennett, Dublin.

Jig and hornpipe (junr.) —1, Knocknagor Troupe; 2, Kilskeery Troupe.

Ceilidhe Band—St. Dympna’s, Dromore.

Father Burns, C.C., Devenish, contributed humorous recitations which were greatly appreciated.

FOOTBALL COMPETITION.

First round—Irvinestown (8 pts.) v. Edemey (7 pts.). Dromore(12 pts.) v Pettigo (6 pts.) Final—Dromore (15 pts.) v. Irvinestown (1 pt.)

Valuable prizes were presented to successful competitors. The organisation committee was in charge of Fr. M. Donnelly, C.C., Ederney.

To complete the festivities a very successful Rinnce Mor was held in St. Josephs Hall, under the direction of Rev. E. O’Flanagan, C.C.

Gifts were presented to Mr. James McDonnell, Cahore, Ederney, and Mr. Monaghan, Derrybrick, Kesh, and Mr. P. Rooney, Ardmoney, Brookeborough.

1-8-1942.FAILED TO PLOUGH. FARMER FINED AT DERRYCONNELLY. “I cannot see any excuse whatever,” said Major Dickie, R.M., at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions, on Friday, when he fined Robert Acheson, of Drumskimbly, £40, with £3/14/0 costs, on a summons brought by the Ministry of Agriculture, for failing in part to comply with a direction to plough.

Mr. J. Cooper, D.L., Grown Solicitor, prosecuting, said that defendant was served with a direction on 2nd January, 1942, requiring him to plough ten acres of his holdings in Drumskimbly, Cosbystown, Glenwinny, Kilgarrow, and Sandhill by the 30th. January, 1942, and a further 15½ acres by 11th April, 1942. Mr. Jordan, Ministry’s Inspector, visited the holding on 4th July, 1941, and reported that the area was 186 acres, of which an area of 51 acres was arable. On the 17th June, 1942, when the holding was visited, it was found that the total area cultivated was 12 acres leaving a default of 13½ acres. Mr. E. C. Ferguson, LL.B., M.P., defending, said that defendant was over 80 years of age; and had a nephew living with him. They managed to plough, and crop 12 acres. In that area, as his Worship knows, owing to work of national importance, labour was very scarce, and in fact if they had not a tractor well on in January they were likely to be left without one. The only defence was that defendant could not get sufficient labour and the area of his lands was scattered all over. Defendant said if he could have got the labour he would have been willing to crop as much as wanted. His Worship—Other farmers are in exactly, the same position and they managed to do it. Mr. Cooper said there was a previous conviction, defendant having been fined £10 last year. Mr. Ferguson—I think he did his best in the circumstances. His Worship—I cannot see any excuse whatever. Every other farmer in the county is doing his best. They seem to make no effort. .Defendant was fined as stated above.

1-8-1942. MANORHAMILTON NEWS. County Council Elections. Very little interest is being shown in the forthcoming elections. Probably the old members will again come forward. Not for years has Manorhamilton had a representative on the County Council and it is rumoured that the town will put up a candidate.

Clerical Appointment—Rev. M. Gilbride, recently ordained, has been appointed assistant to Rev. T. F. Brady, C.C., pending the appointment of a successor to the late Rt. Rev. Monsignor Soden, P.P., V.G., P.A.

Recent Deaths—The death of Mr. Jas. McLoughlin, Ross, which took place at an advanced age is deeply regretted. All his sons were prominent in the old I.R.A. movement. The funeral was large and representative. Another regretted death is that of Mrs. Feely, Castlemile, which took place last week. There was a large attendance at the funeral.

 

1-8-1942. TRACTOR OFFENCES. BALLINAMALLARD MEN SUMMONED. At Clogher Petty Sessions on Thursday Henry W. West, of Mullaghmeen, Ballinamallard, was fined Is for failing to show the maximum speed and laden weight on a tractor at Killclay, Augher, on 9th July, l5s for failure to have a reflecting mirror on the vehicle and for having no silencer attached he was dealt with under the probation Act. Terence McCann, of Beagh, Coa, Ballinamallard, the driver, for using the vehicle without having speed and weight displayed, was fined 1s, for having no bell or horn Is, for failing to have a reflecting mirror 5s, and a summons for having no silencer on the machine was dealt with under the Probation Act.

1-8-1942. ENNISKILLEN COLLEGIATE SCHOOL FEES. The students should not be enrolled on the register of the Enniskillen Collegiate School for Girls until their fees had been paid was the suggestion of Mr. J. Coffey at the meeting of the Co. Fermanagh Education Committee in Enniskillen on Friday. He advocated that a number of defaulting parents should be sent their accounts through legal channels. Rev. J. B. Jennings said it was a far more satisfactory method to pay the fees through the bank.

1-8-1942. DEATH OF POPULAR YOUNG KILTYCLOGHER LADY MISS ANNIE McGOWAN. A gloom has been cast over a wide area by the death of Miss Annie McGowan, of the Mental Hospital nursing staff, Sligo, which occurred in the Surgical Hospital, Sligo on Thursday week, following a brief illness. The deceased lady, who was only 22, was the second daughter of Mr. Patrick McGowan, Co. C., and Mrs. McGowan, Kiltyclogher. She was a nurse in Sligo Mental Hospital for a period of years, and during that time her gentle disposition and great charm of manner won for her the esteem and affection of all with whom, she came in contact. On Friday, amid scenes of deep mourning the remains were carried from the Surgical Hospital to the borough boundary by doctors and members of the Mental Hospital staff. A guard of honour was formed along the roadside as the hearse moved into Leitrim. On approaching Kiltyclogher, the cortege was met by relatives and a large body of people, who accompanied the remains to St. Patrick’s Church, where they were received by Rev. Father Brady, C.C. The funeral which took place to Rossinver on Saturday, was the largest seen in the district for years.

1-8-1942. ROAD WORKERS’ WAGES IN LEITRIM. COUNTY COUNCIL MAKE A RECOMMENDATION. At Leitrim County Council special meeting on Saturday, Mr. S. Flynn, T.D., chairman, presiding, Mr. Hoey moved that all men employed by the Council be paid the same rate of wages as those working in the bogs. Mr. J. Flynn seconded. Mr. Hoey said that the reason he moved his motion was that the road workers in the county were treated unfairly. He said that those employed on minor relief schemes and those employed by the Land Commission were paid a higher rate. Road workers should be paid at the same rate as those employed on the turf scheme, 6/6 per day. He proposed that the road workers be given, an increase of 8d per day in order to bring their wages to 5/6 per day. Mr. Callaghan, a representative of the road workers, said that all they asked was that the matter be put up to the Department and place the matter on the right shoulders. They, had asked Mr. Hoey to bring the resolution, forward as he argued they gave as good work as any of the others who had been granted an increase. The County Surveyor said that the matter was discussed at a conference he attended in Dublin and they had no power to grant an increase to road workers. At the conference this was a burning question. The only thing to do was to make a recommendation, as this question hampered them, when work was going on. They were allowed to pay 5/6 to workers on roads off the main roads and those on main roads were only allowed 4/10. There was a differentiation between what they could pay on grant works and improvement works. He would be glad if this was settled, as the men were not inclined to come out and work on the roads. Finally it was agreed to recommend to the Department that the road workers’  wages be increased to the same basis as the bog workers, not to take effect until after the 31st March, next.

 

1-8-1942. SEQUEL TO DELIVERY AT DERRYCONNELLY. ALLEGED ATTEMPT TO EXPORT. COURT CASE ADJOURNED. The seizure of 250 lbs. of tea had a sequel at Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions on Friday, before Major Dickie, R.M., when John James Maguire and Mary Maguire, of Derrygonnelly, were charged with having in the month of November, 1941, knowingly, harboured 250 lbs of tea with intent to evade the export prohibition applicable thereto. Teresa Rooney, who is employed as a book-keeper in Lavery’s Bar, 80 Chichester Street, Belfast, said that in August last a gentleman named Maguire ordered tea to be sent to his sister, Mrs. Charles Maguire, in Derrygonnelly. In consequence of that she got in touch with a Mr. Lyons, of Donaghadee, gave him the address of Mrs. Charles Maguire, and told him to send the invoice to her. An envelope which was left in the bar was handed over to Mr. Lyons. Mr. R. A. Herbert, DL.B. (defending), called defendant, John James Maguire, to come forward, and asked witness: “Did you ever see that man before?” Witness—No; that definitely is not the gentleman gave me the order.

 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 8th 1942. THOSE BUTTER PARADES. It seems that there are some people who can be fooled all the time. The Ulster Scot having got all he wanted, having cut himself off from the rest of Ireland and sat in embittered loneliness behind an embattlement of tariffs designed to keep Irish goods out of the “ Paradise’ having for years denounced the Irish State as being just no good and a monstrosity whose existence should not be permitted, is now finding out that war’s lean and hungry grip in so far as his own bailiwick is concerned has imparted quite another hue to the land of Republican Green and that profitable and useful excursions can be made there with little or no hindrance. Thus, in hordes, are the Scots dwellers of the Six Counties pouring across the Border in search of that which cannot be had for love or money in their own quarters, and that is saying quite a lot. Anything that is rationed and everything that isn’t is fair game for these loyal sons of the Six Counties who have so suddenly discovered the catering and other amenities of the hated “Free State.”

One would think that the rigorous action only all-too rarely enforced by the Irish Customs authorities would have the approval and support of all the citizens of the State, but it appears not. Certain well-meaning people are getting up in the National assembly and suggesting that the Border seizures are creating a feeling that will lead only to the perpetuation of Partition! Was greater nonsense ever talked! The argument is that the Orange excursionists, whom the merchant and business houses of the Irish State would never see were it not for the circumstances of the times, are being won over to the national side by the courtesy and generosity of the “Southerners” with whom they are temporarily trading and that any official action taken to discourage this dealing will inevitably react against the national interests. Such is far from the truth. Scenery (and especially the scenery and panorama of well- stocked shop fronts) is the Orangeman’s sole interest in the Irish State to-day.

8-8-1942. JOTTINGS. Died While Bathing. – Private McAndrews, Belmullet, died while bathing at Rossnowlagh, near Ballyshannon.

Fatal Injuries.—Patrick Kelly (65), Drummond, Magheracloone, Carrickmacross, was fatally injured when his bicycle collided with a motor van.

Shop Entered—The confectionery shop of Mr. W. H. Creighton, Church Street, Enniskillen, was broken and entered and a quantity of sweets stolen. Police are investigating.

An Appointment.—At a special meeting of Monaghan Vocational Education Committee, Miss Maureen Duffy, a native of Co., Monaghan was appointed a commercial teacher to succeed Miss Forde, resigned.

Irvinestown Lady’s Success- Miss M. T. Dolan, S.R.N., C.M.B. has been appointed Ward Sister in the Belfast Union Hospital. She is daughter of Mrs. Dolan and the late Mr. John Dolan, Drumschool, Irvinestown.

Special Court—At a special court in Enniskillen on Monday before Major T. W. Dickie, R.M., Wm. Hynes, Nugent’s Entry, Enniskillen, was charged with a serious offence and was remanded, on £10 bail to next Enniskillen Petty Sessions on 17th inst.

New Head Constable. — Sergt. John F. Traynor, R.U.C., who, until a few years ago, was stationed, (for twelve years) in Enniskillen, has been promoted Head Constable and transferred from Mayobridge, Co. Down, to Clogher, Co. Tyrone.

Professed.—Sister St. Macarten, professed at Convent of Bon Secours, Cork, is the daughter of Mr, and Mrs. Patrick O’Daly, Lisnashannagh, Carrickmacross, and , sister of Rev. B. O’Daly, C.C, Tydavnet, and Rev. J. O‘Daly, C.C.. Los Angeles,

Band performances — In a letter to the Enniskillen Rural Council, on Tuesday the Six-County Tourist Development. Association, Ltd., stated it was felt every encouragement should be given to military and other bands to give performance at towns throughout Northern Ireland. Such performances would help to entertain the large number of people spending their holidays at home.

Alleged Desertion— At a special court in Enniskillen Benjamin Cyril Rees a serving soldier, charged with being an absentee from his unit, was remanded in custody to await a military escort. J. Freeman gave evidence of finding Rees in Newtownbutler sub-district wearing civilian attire. As a result of enquiries made and assistance given by Rees, witness located his uniform.

Council Workers’ Wage Increases. Enniskillen Urban Council, on Tuesday evening, adopted recommendations from the Finance and Lighting Committee that Henry Sadlier, for carting work granted an increase in remuneration of 5/- weekly, and that Frederick Walker while acting as roller-driver, be granted 3/- weekly increase. The application of Mr. Bracken, contractor for scavenging, for an increase was pending the supplying by him of further details.

SIX MEN SENTENCED TO DEATH RESULT OF BELFAST TRIAL. PRISONERS PLEAD “NO PREMEDITATION.” Six young Belfast men were sentenced to death at the Courthouse, Crumlin Rd., Belfast, on Thursday week, after a trial lasting three days. They were charged with the murder of Constable Patrick Murphy of 53, Cawnpore Street on Easter Sunday. The men who pleaded not guilty, were —Thomas J. Williams (19), house repairer, 46, Bombay Street, Belfast; Henry Cordner (19), fitter; 35, Malcolmson St.; William James Perry (21) labourer, 264, Cupar Street; John Terence Oliver (21) painter, 167 Springfield Road; Patrick Simpson (18), sheet-metal worker, 86, Cawnpore Street; and Joseph Cahill (21), joiner, 60, Divis Street.

The jury returned a verdict of guilty after an absence of 2 hours 5 minutes. The executions were fixed for Tuesday, August 18. In the case of Simpson the jury recommended mercy on account of his youth.

PRISONERS’ STATEMENTS. Asked if they had anything to say before sentence was passed, the prisoners, made the following statements CORDONER—“ I am not guilty. There was no premeditation to murder. I would like to thank my counsel, Mr. Lavery, Mr. Agnew and Mr. Marrinan for their splendid defence on my behalf.”

PERRY—“1.am not guilty of murder. There was no premeditation to murder. I also wish to thank Mr. Lavery and the other counsel for the manner in which they conducted the case.”

OLIVER—“Not guilty of murder. I had no premeditation to murder.” He also thanked his counsel.

SIMPSON—“I am not guilty of murder. I had no premeditation to murder, and I state that the operation at Kashmir Road was the only one to be performed. I also wish through the medium of the Press, on behalf of my comrades, to thank everyone who enabled us to have such a splendid defence in the case’

CAHILL—“I am not guilty of murder. There was no premeditation or intention to take life.”

WILLIAMS—“I am not guilty of murder. I am not afraid to die. There was no premeditation to murder. I want to thank my counsel for the splendid defence they put up on our behalf.’’

Before passing sentence, Lord Justice Murphy said: “I do not intend to say anything to you young men that would add to the horror of the position in which you find yourselves.”

He then passed the death sentence. The men remained standing at attention and calm during the proceedings. When warders and police were removing them from the dock to the underground passage the prisoners waved to friends in the Court. Several women sobbed and screamed. One made a rush to the dock crying “God help you, Tom.” Some of the prisoners shouted “Don’t be worrying.” Others, cried “God save Ireland.’ A number of British officers and other men in uniform were in the Court, which was heavily guarded by troops. Afterwards six women relatives were seen going across to the jail.

RECORDED SENTENCE ON GIRL. A further case arising out of the shooting of Constable P. Murphy was heard in Belfast on Friday, when a recorded sentence of one year was passed on Margaret Nolan (aged 17), 32 Bombay St., Belfast at the City Commission, when she pleaded guilty to being an accessory after the fact in the incident concerned.

Mr; J. Agnew, who defended, said that the police had spoken highly of the respectability of Miss Nolan’s family. He honestly thought that the girl did not realise the terrible consequence of the acts in which she had played a part, and he asked his lordship to consider that she would have a memory all her life of what happened on that Easter Sunday which would be more poignant than any punishment that could be inflicted.

Mr. J. C. McDermott said that the prisoner had been put forward on this charge because the Crown regarded the part which she had played on that Sunday as being a minor one.

Lord Justice Murphy said that he had recognised before he heard the evidence given on her behalf, that she had been led into that affair by older people.

PETITION FOR REPRIEVE SIGNED BY THOUSANDS. Forma of petition to the Six-County Governor asking for a reprieve of the six youths in Belfast Jail under sentence of death for the shooting of Constable Murphy are being extensively signed in Belfast, and arrangements are complete to secure signatures all over the Six-County area.

A representative committee of the Irish Unemployed Workers’ Association, which is taking part in the organisation of the petition, are seeking the co-operation of other sympathetic organisations, both in the Six Counties and in Great Britain, and has issued also an appeal to people in the Twenty-Six Counties to help.

Telegrams have been despatched to President Roosevelt, to the British Premier, to Mr. Herbert Morrison, British Home Secretary, and to the Clan na Gael, New York, asking them to use their influence in order to prevent the executions taking place.

Already arrangements have been; made by the reprieve organisations to have forms available in provincial centres next Sunday. Influential people on both sides of the Border, including Church leaders, and of every shade of political opinion, are to be approached to add their names to the list. Copies of the petition are to be sent to Cardinal MacRory and the Catholic Bishops, as well as the Protestant Primate and the heads of other Protestant Churches.

The Irish Unemployed Workers’ Organisation will, it is understood, ask the Belfast Trades Council to use their influence in the trade Union section of the community. At Masses in Belfast city churches the

TWO APPOINTMENTS DECIDED BY PARTY VOTES. Caretaker of Cemetery and Tenant of Cottage. DISCUSSION AT ENNISKILLEN RURAL COUNCIL. An appointment as a graveyard caretaker and the choice of a tenant for a labourer’s cottage were decided by party vote at the meeting of Enniskillen Rural Council on Tuesday, Hon. C. L. Corry (chairman) presiding. Proposing Mr. James Bartley, Cleenish Island, for appointment as caretaker of the island cemetery, Mr. James Murphy (N.) said the graveyard had been, neglected and was covered with weeds and nettles. It was a disgrace and he knew that in Mr. Bartley they would have a man who would look after the graveyard properly. Mr.W. Kelly (N.) seconded.

Mr. W. A. Thornton. (U.) proposed Mr. John Balfour, Cleenish, and Mr. J. Beatty (U.) seconded. Mr. Kelly—Should not this be advertised? Mr. Thornton — Sure it is only 30/- a year. Mr. Murphy. — The previous man got £2 a year. Mr. Beatty—It isn’t a big thing, not worth advertising. Mr. Murphy —The graveyard was neglected and we were throwing away £2 of the ratepayers’ money. Mr. Thornton—Nearly all are neglected. By 10 Unionist votes to 4 Nationalist, Balfour was appointed. Mr. E. Callaghan asked who supervised the cleaning of these graveyards. Mr. Murphy—No one at all-they get their money for doing nothing.

Mr. Callaghan said there were ricks of hay on Pobal (Pubble?) cemetery, which was a disgrace in any civilised community. Mr. Beatty- I saw it .as well as you and there was nothing wrong with it. There was only a handshaking of hay on it. Mr. Murphy- But it is hay, Mr. Beatty. Mr. Beatty—He told me he would take it away next day. The Clerk (Mr. J. Brown) said he would write to caretakers saying they must clean up the graveyards at once.

This was agreed to. Mr. Callaghan — A graveyard is no place for winning hay. Mr. Cathcart – Isn’t the hay won on any graveyard.

CINEMA PRICES-NO INCREASE. ENNISKILLEN URBAN COUNCIL DECISION. In the absence through indisposition of Mr. W. J. Monaghan, the following motion standing in his name, was proposed by Mr. T. Smyth at the meeting of Enniskillen Urban Council on Tuesday evening. “That the absolution of 1st June, 1942, refusing consent to the Regal Cinema Co. to raise the price of admission to balcony seats on Sundays by one penny to meet increased taxation be rescinded and that the application of the Company be granted.”

Mr. C. Patterson seconded Mr. T. Algeo moved the rejection of the motion, stating that if the cinema shows on Sunday the proprietors had the remedy in their own hands. The cinema, he said, should never have been allowed to open the cinemas on Sunday during the summer and he would propose later on that this be not allowed.

Mr. P. Kelly seconding, said he was opposed to the motion on the ground that he thought that there should not be particular seats for officers in the rear while the private soldier was as well entitled to sit in the balcony as anyone else. He thought the Regal Cinema should write to the Taxation Authorities on the matter instead of the Council.

Mr. W. E. Johnston (chairman), said he did not think there was any particular place in the Regal Cinema for officers. Mr. Kelly asserted that the balcony was being reserved for people with an inferiority complex. The Chairman replied that any soldier could go to whatever part of the cinema he liked. Mr. W. H. Creighton supporting Mr. Algeo’s amendment, said that when the Regal was granted permission, to open on Sundays the Council was informed the opening was purely to provide entertainment for the troops and that they did not want to make money out of it. He knew the proprietors were not running the shows at a loss. “If they were patriotic enough,’’ he added, ‘‘they would let them have the entertainment free, but instead of this they are trying to  make money out of it on Sundays.”

Mr. J. Logan said in wartime all businessmen had to contend with extra Expenses, such as extra wages. He understood that not one hundred officers would be frequenting this cinema so that the total amount involved would be 8/4. It was a very poor war effort. They should not charge anything on Sunday if it was for the benefit of the troops. He was afraid it was for  their own benefit. Mr. Patterson said he was given an explanation for. the suggested change—the  scarcity of coppers. Instead of the 8d seat as at present the 9d seat would exclude the use of coppers in payment, 6d and 3d pieces.

Mr. Algeo — They have their own remedy to close down. Mr. Creighton – That is right. The voting resulted- For the motion- Messrs. Fitzsimmons, Patterson, Smyth and the Chairman—4. Against—Messrs. Lee, Elliott, Logan, Creighton, Algeo, Kelly, Fox and McKeown—8. Mr. Weir did not vote. The Chairman declared the motion lost.

WIFE’S MAINTENANCE CLAIM AT BROOKEBORO’ HUSBAND SUED. Mrs. Mary Little, of Coolnakeklly, sued her husband, George Little, farm labourer, of Latnafree for maintenance, at Brookeboro’ Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before Major Dickie, R.M. Mr. Ferguson, M.P., solicitor, was for the wife, and Mr. Patterson for the husband.

Mrs. Little, who said she and her husband were over 30 years married, gave evidence of her husband having left her for no reason whatever that she knew of last May, and had not since returned. She lived with her grown up son and daughter, aged 16 and 13½ years. Defendant took his ration book with him and he paid nothing towards the upkeep of the family. All she had to live on with the family was 10/- a week brought in by her son. Answering Mr. Patterson, witness said her husband left her 18 years ago and again two years ago, but he came back afterwards. He was in the habit of walking away and leaving her for what reason she did not know. Defendant at present lived with his mother, and last March she and her family raised £15 to pay a fine imposed on him at Irvinestown Petty Sessions for the larceny of tools. James Little, a son, gave evidence of his parents not having got on well together for years back.

For the defence the husband alleged unfaithfulness on the part of his wife for 18 years back and said it was time for him to leave the house when the door was closed against him and his clothes thrown out on the street. He was earning 33/6 a week with board as a farm labourer. His Worship said it was perfectly clear a case of desertion was established and the defendant was entitled to maintain his wife and family. The question was one of the amount of contribution and he (his worship) thought a weekly allowance of 17/6 would be reasonable and he would make an order to that effect. Mr. Ferguson agreed the amount was reasonable as they did not want to take all defendant’s money from him. Defendant was ordered to pay in addition 28/- costs.

8-8-1942. MINISTRY WANTS IRON-ENNISKILLEN HAS IT. The Ministry wrote to Enniskillen Urban Council on Tuesday evening that it was requisitioning all available iron and steel railings in the Six Counties for the war effort, and it asked for the co-operation of local authorities. M. T. Algeo — There is 50 tons of cast iron railing lying outside the town for the last three years: why don’t they commandeer it? Chairman, (Mr. W. E. Johnston)—Mr. Donnelly (the surveyor) will assist the Ministry as far as possible. Mr. Donnelly said Mr. Ritchie and himself pointed out the iron, referred to by Mr. Algeo twelve months ago, and it was still there. Chairman—They will come now to take more stuff and may take it.

8-8-1942. Smuggling Charges—Terence McKeown, High St., Monaghan, was .fined £10 at  Aughnacloy for smuggling two cycle tyres, six cycle repair outfits, and three cycle wheel catches on July 20 at Mullaghtinney. Patrick McGlone, Belgium. Park, Monaghan, who was with the last defendant and who was charged with smuggling the same number of articles, did not appear. Both defendants had been out on hail, sureties being fixed at £10 each. The recognances in the case of McGlone were certified by Mr. J. O. H. Long, R.M., with a view to proceedings against the surety.

Clones Man Killed in Air Raid.—Mrs. J. McDonald, Roslea Tec., Clones, has been  informed that her husband, Mr. John McDonald, was killed in an air raid on Birmingham last week. He had been working there for the past year. He leaves a widow and two young children.

8-8-1942. R.A.F. MAN DROWNED. Aircraftsman A. Ernest Taylor, R.A.F., Killadeas, a native of Stoke-on-Trent, was drowned while bathing in Lough Erne during the week-end. At an inquest on Saturday, held by Mr. G. E. Warren, Coroner a verdict of accidental drowning was returned. It was stated that, with a companion, Tyler, went to bathe at Killadeas and the companion asked him could he swim. He said he could swim a little. The companion entered the water first and had only gone a short distance when he looked back and saw Tyler in difficulties. He went to help him, but Tyler caught him by the neck and was pulling him down, so that he had to let him go. He went out and shouted for help, which arrived, but Tyler had disappeared and could not be found. It was two and a half hours later when the body was recovered from a fifteen feet hole.

8-8-1942. CHURCHILL WILL NOT INTERVENE. CONDEMNED BELFAST YOUTHS REPRIEVE PETITION EXTENSIVELY SIGNED. Mr. Winston Churchill, British Premier, through his secretary, has replied to the recent telegram sent from, a conference of Nationalist Senators and Members of the Six-Co., Parliament in connection with the petition for the reprieve of the six young men under sentence of death in Belfast prison to the effect that “it is not a matter in which it is possible for him to intervene.” APPEAL. No date has yet been fixed for the hearing by the Court of Criminal Appeal of the appeal of the six young men. It is unlikely that it will come before the Court early next week.

THE PETITION. Satisfactory reports of the signing of the reprieve petition have been received at the Reprieve Committee’s headquarters in Belfast by Mr. Eamon Donnelly, Approximately 200,000 have signed the petition up to date and the campaign is still in progress. Thousands of signatures are being received daily at the Reprieve Committee’s office. The Duke of Abercorn, acknowledging the telegraphic, appeal, by the Lord Mayor of Cork (Ald. J. Allen) on behalf of the six men states, (through his private secretary, Mrs. S. Lewis Haslett) that it will have his careful consideration.

THE CONDEMNED YOUTHS. The six young men are attending Mass and receiving Holy Communion, each morning in a cell specially furnished for the purpose. They are visited daily by Rev. P. McAllister, Catholic chaplain to the prison Father Oliver, C P., and Father Alexis C.P., of Holy Cross Monastery, Ardoyne.

8-8-1942. Bundoran is having a record year. For the past month the resort has been crowded fully to capacity and hundreds failed to travel because of information that accommodation was not available. Nearly all visitors are from the Six Counties and County Fermanagh, especially Enniskillen, supplied a large proportion of cross-border holiday makers. The August weekend was the most crowded Bundoran has had in many years. Enniskillen sent hundreds of the visitors by train and bus while at least a dozen made the journey (32 miles) by bicycle.